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Archive of posts published in the tag: 苏州楼凤

Best stocks to buy now during one of the worst earnings seasons

first_img Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares Anna Sokolidou has no position in any of the companies mentioned in this article. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Tesco. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. Image source: Getty Images. I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. Enter Your Email Address I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Anna Sokolidou | Wednesday, 8th July, 2020 | More on: BA TSCO Many analysts think July has marked the worst earnings season since the 2008–09 global financial crisis.Finding best stocks to buy now might seem like a tough task.Stock indexes around the world have rallied since the end of March. At the same time, corporate earnings declined in the first quarter of 2020. Many experts argue that the second quarter was even worse for the companies’ profits. And there are plenty of macroeconomic and political risks to boot. In fact, some of my Foolish colleagues and I think that there will even be another stock market crash pretty soon.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…But that doesn’t mean investors should panic. You might even want to think of another market crash and the earnings season as opportunities to buy more shares. Choosing ‘good’ companies can really help you achieve your financial goals. Here are some of my favourite stocks to buy now. Best retail stocks to buyThe best retail stock to buy now must be Tesco (LSE:TSCO). It is the industry’s clear leader. On 26 June, it reported a wonderful sales rise, which totalled about 8% for the group. This was mainly due to an increase in online shopping. Tesco’s customers bought plenty of groceries and other essentials. Unfortunately, they also cut spending on non-essentials such as clothing items. The results clearly show Tesco’s ability to adapt to challenging situations and rising competition from online supermarkets. At the same time, the sales boost comes at significant costs. That’s simply because Tesco had to employ some temporary staff to meet the high demand and implement social distancing measures.But management expects Tesco to report roughly the same profit as it did in 2019. This means the growth rate will not be brilliant this year. But remember that Tesco will be one of the few companies to actually avoid a significant profit drop in 2020.It all comes at a dividend yield of about 4%. Finally, don’t forget that Tesco is a stable business. In fact, some traders say: “No-one ever went bust buying Tesco“. The publishing of good results didn’t lead to any share price boost. In fact, Tesco’s stock is near its 52-week lows.  BAE Systems during this earnings seasonThe best or safest stocks to buy, in my opinion, are issued by defence companies. Why is that? Well, governments tend to be these companies’ main customers and rarely go bankrupt. And the demand for defence equipment doesn’t tend to be very cyclical. That is, it doesn’t depend on economic growth. So, even now BAE Systems (LSE:BA) has many things to do.The company will announce its earnings results on 30 July. Of course, no one expects a significant profit rise and some people think the company might not pay a dividend this year. But the share price fully reflects this.Some time ago, BAE announced acquisitions of two companies – the Collins Aerospace Military Global Positioning System and Raytheon’s Airborne Tactical Radios businesses. This came at some leverage but Moody’s expects the company to reduce its debt level in 12 to 18 months time. So, it looks like the worst is almost behind for BAE.My stock picks are defensive. They will let you build a recession-proof portfolio but don’t just limit yourself to these two. FTSE 100 offers many other great companies that will help you survive the 2020 recession.center_img Best stocks to buy now during one of the worst earnings seasons Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. See all posts by Anna Sokolidou Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee.last_img read more

A family’s commitment: 30 years of the Goldman Environmental Prize (commentary)

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored On Earth Day in 1990, the Goldman Environmental Prize was launched to honor grassroots environmental activists from each of the world’s six inhabited continents, celebrating sustained leadership, persistence, courage, and success in protecting our natural world. The grassroots nature of the work was critical to the concept and its uniqueness.Some recipients have used the visibility of the Prize to launch political careers. Many more have leveraged the Prize as a springboard to continue and double down on their environmental work. One Prize winner even won the Nobel Peace Prize.Today, as the Prize enters its fourth decade, the Goldman family is acutely aware that its ability to continue to make a meaningful impact may require some creative and hard thinking about its role in a world that is changing at a rapid pace. That includes evaluating how the Prize addresses major environmental issues head-on, especially when it comes to climate change.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. One morning in the late 1980s, San Francisco businessman and philanthropist Richard Goldman was reading a newspaper article about the latest Nobel Prize winners. At the time, Goldman, an avid outdoorsman and environmentalist, was becoming increasingly concerned about the degradation of the environment and was pondering how he could use his financial resources, large social network, and problem-solving skills to help protect our precious natural resources.“As my father was reading this article, he wondered whether an equivalent prize for environmental achievement existed,” recalls Susie Gelman, the daughter of Richard and Rhoda Goldman and president of the board of directors of the Goldman Environmental Foundation. Finding no Nobel-equivalent for environmentalism, Richard Goldman launched a process to examine how such an award might be implemented.While Richard’s staff was researching the possibility of an environmental prize, two events that shook the world sealed the deal.“What really validated my father’s interest in launching the Prize was the murder of Chico Mendes in Brazil,” Richard’s son John says. Mendes was a rubber tapper and trade union leader fighting to preserve the Amazon rainforest who was killed by a rancher in 1988. “Soon after the murder of Mendes came the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Alaska. These two events led my dad to say, ‘We have to do something.’”Richard was a visionary who thought big and long-term. “He wanted to protect the environment for his kids and his grandkids,” says Lorrae Rominger, deputy director of the Foundation, who began working for the Goldmans in 2002. “He was not afraid to take risks if he thought it was the right thing to do.”Goldman Environmental Prize founders Richard and Rhoda Goldman. Photo Credit: Goldman Environmental Prize.On Earth Day in 1990 (coincidentally Richard’s 70th birthday), after considerable due diligence and lively debate among the family and staff of the Richard and Rhoda Goldman Fund (the Goldmans’ charitable foundation, which closed in 2012 after 60 years and $700 million in grants awarded), the Goldman Environmental Prize was launched. They established criteria — still in place today — to honor grassroots environmental activists from each of the world’s six inhabited continents, celebrating sustained leadership, persistence, courage, and success in protecting our natural world. The grassroots nature of the work was critical to the concept and its uniqueness.The 194 recipients over the last 30 years have all been “ordinary people taking extraordinary action,” says Michael Sutton, executive director of the Foundation.Some recipients have used the visibility of the Prize to launch political careers—for example, just this spring, Zuzana Čaputová, the 2016 Prize winner from Slovakia, was elected president of her country. Many more have leveraged the Prize as a springboard to continue and double down on their environmental work, such as Azzam Alwash, 2013 Prize winner from Iraq, who has furthered his work to bring back the freshwater marshes between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers in southern Iraq. One Prize winner even won the Nobel Peace Prize: Wangari Maathai, 1991 Prize winner from Kenya, was recognized for her work to reverse the devastation wrought by deforestation in her country, leading the charge to plant more than 20 million trees. She was recognized in 2004 by the Nobel Prize Committee.Two familiesThe recipients are honored every year with an award ceremony attended by thousands in San Francisco, followed by a visit to Washington, D.C., which includes a smaller ceremony and meetings with NGOs, agencies, and elected officials on Capitol Hill. The monetary award and international press coverage that accompany the Prize are critical for empowering Prize winners to continue and amplify their work. But there is another, unexpected, element of the Prize that has become powerful: Over the years, Prize winners have become members of two families: the Goldman family and the family of Prize winners.Richard’s children John, Susie, and Doug (their eldest brother, Richard, passed away in 1989) have continued their parents’ tradition of embracing the Prize winners as part of their extended family, inviting them into their homes and spending significant time with each new cohort in San Francisco and Washington, D.C. Increasingly, the Prize has offered recipients opportunities to network with each other and deepen their work as a community. Indeed, one of the Foundation’s initiatives is a networking program that sends Prize winners to conferences, workshops, and professional meetings with their colleagues around the world.“The recipients become members of the Prize family and, as a result, feel connected to each other and to something that is bigger than themselves,” says Susie. “I don’t think we could have anticipated this at the inception of the Prize. But we’ve learned over the years that they form a strong bond with each other.”“The synergy that develops when they are able to collaborate has made their work more effective and impactful,” says John. “This means the Prize isn’t just recognition for their achievements to date but also allows them to continue what they’re already doing and even elevate their work and the public’s awareness of their issue. In this way, our Prize recipients have an even greater impact on our environment and on our world.”2019 Goldman Environmental Prize winners at the awards ceremony in San Francisco. Photo Credit: Goldman Environmental Prize.That impact has been profound. The Goldman Environmental Prize, oftentimes referred to as the “Green Nobel,” garners global press coverage, elevates the stature of Prize winners, and brings their issues to the attention of leaders in their home countries. It has inspired countless people to become activists themselves, including youth. While they’re in San Francisco, Prize winners meet with dozens of young environmentalists and provide inspiration and insights about their journeys. And the award ceremony in San Francisco has become a focal point for leaders of the global environmental movement, giving them an annual opportunity to network, renew their inspiration, brainstorm, and collaborate on ways to create a more sustainable planet.Global warming and the future of the PrizeToday, as the Prize enters its fourth decade, the Goldman family is acutely aware that its ability to continue to make a meaningful impact may require some creative and hard thinking about its role in a world that is changing at a rapid pace. That includes evaluating how the Prize addresses major environmental issues head-on, especially when it comes to climate change.“We are continually discussing how can we best address this issue,” says Susie. “Climate change cuts across many of the issue areas we recognize through awarding the Prize. But there is only so much one individual can do to impact this huge issue, so it may well be an issue that is best addressed on a much broader level. We need to think about how we can make a difference here.”John agrees. “Climate change is the transcendent issue of our day, intrinsic to everything people in the environmental movement are working on,” he says. “It is imperative that we figure out how we can meaningfully and significantly affect global warming; otherwise, our very existence is at risk.”However the Prize evolves, it will continue to use its resources, passionate staff and board, and international platform to protect our planet. It will also continue to honor the vision and legacy of Richard and Rhoda Goldman.“As I reflect upon the past 30 years, I cannot help but reminisce about my parents and their nurturing of the Goldman Environmental Prize,” says Doug. “This Prize exists as a major component of their legacy. Indeed, it speaks to who they were as people. My parents truly wanted to make this world a better place for generations to come. They were particularly fond of the Margaret Mead maxim that has often been used to describe the Prize winners: ‘Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.’ That quote equally applies to Mom and Dad.”2019 Goldman Environmental Prize winners at the awards ceremony in San Francisco. Photo Credit: Goldman Environmental Prize.Jackie Krentzman is a freelance writer and editor based in Berkeley, California. She has actively written about philanthropy, healthcare, Jewish community issues, sports—and everything in between.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Activism, Climate Activism, Commentary, Editorials, Environment, Environmental Activism center_img Article published by Mike Gaworeckilast_img read more

Sri Lanka scales up its domestic campaign to protect sharks with a global push

first_imgWith the killing of sharks and rays on the rise, Sri Lanka played a lead role in pushing three proposals to extend global protection to 18 species at the recently concluded CITES wildlife trade summit in Geneva.Sixty-three sharks and 42 ray species are found in Sri Lankan waters, and are threatened by overexploitation driven by an ever-increasing demand for sharks fins, meat, and liver oil.While five species of sharks currently enjoy legal protection against the species trade in Sri Lanka, conservationists see an urgent need to extend protection to all reef sharks and other endangered shark and ray species. Decades ago along the beaches of Sri Lanka, fish sellers used bicycles to transport their catch, including sharks. It was said the sharks were often so big that, when tied down to the bicycle frame, their snouts and tail fins would touch the ground at either end.“But not anymore,” says Hiran Jayawardene, the founder and former chairman of the National Aquatic Resources Research and Development Agency (NARA). He says this decline is evident at shark landing sites around the country, where fishermen are no longer pulling in the large sharks they did before.Sri Lanka’s waters are home to 63 shark and 42 ray species, but many are threatened by overexploitation to feed the growing demand for shark fins, meat, and liver oil.The result of the voting at the CITES summit in Geneva in favor of the uplisting of mako sharks to Appendix II. Image courtesy of IISD Reporting Service.But the country is looking to change that, rolling out a raft of regulations in the past two decades to protect various shark species domestically, and, more recently, spearheading a push for the global protection of highly exploited and endangered mako sharks.Among the many proposals it supported at last month’s global summit of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), Sri Lanka called for the inclusion of the two species of mako sharks, shortfin (Isurus oxyrinchus) and longfin (I. paucus), in CITES Appendix II, which would subject their trade to strict rules. It also called for similar protections for six species of giant guitarfishes and 10 species of wedgefishes.The IUCN Red List includes both species of mako sharks as endangered, all six species of giant guitarfishes as critically endangered, and nine of the 10 species of wedgefishes as critically endangered.“All these species have seen very steep declines in their populations in recent decades and this is mostly due to overfishing, habitat destruction and degradation,” Rima Jabado, the IUCN Shark Specialist Group’s regional vice-chair for the Indian Ocean, told Mongabay.Kim Friedman, senior fisheries resources officer at the U.N.’s Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), said a mere listing would not protect the species. “It matters to change the management framework of fisheries to get implemented at ground level.”More than 100 million sharks are killed every year, mainly for their fins. Image by Malaka Rodrigo.Protecting the ocean’s predatorsIn Sri Lanka, five species of sharks enjoy legal protection: the pelagic thresher shark (Alopias pelagicus), bigeye thresher (A. superciliosus), common thresher (A. vulpinus), oceanic whitetip shark (Carcharhinus longimanus), and whale shark (Rhincodon typus). Since 2001, local fishing regulations have required that any of these sharks that are caught must be brought to shore with their fins attached. The rule was enforced to curb shark finning, the practice of catching a shark, cutting off its fins mid-ocean, then dumping the live shark back into the water, where, unable to swim, it dies.In 2013, Sri Lanka went further and introduced a five-year National Plan of Action for the Conservation and Management of Sharks (NPOA), specifying measures for adoption and implementation of new shark conservation and management mechanisms.Sisira Haputhantri, an ocean fisheries expert at NARA, told Mongabay that the shark action plan, since extended for another five years, should help monitor the implementation of the conservation initiatives.Over the past 10 years, the country has official exported 59 metric tons of shark fins annually. But there’s evidence that greater volumes of shark fins are being smuggled out of the island.There are recorded and unrecorded instances of fins being exported as dried fish, said Sevvandi Jayakody, Sri Lanka’s coordinator for the recent CITES summit.By listing mako sharks in Appendix II, scientists can gather accurate figures of sharks killed as part of the international trade, which would help determine whether catches are reaching what’s known as the maximum sustainable yield (MSY), Jayakody said.“We do not want to stop shark fishery but we do want sustainable fishery. CITES should help educate regulators and fisherfolk alike, on the new developments,” she said.Both species of mako are oceanic, roam the high seas, and undertake long-distance migrations, making local protection mechanisms of somewhat limited value, according to Rex I. de Silva, author of Sharks of Sri Lanka. The CITES listing is therefore vital to protect the species in international seas.A shark is finned at the Negombo shark landing site in western Sri Lanka. Image by Malaka Rodrigo.John E. Scanlon, former secretary-general of CITES, told Mongabay that the convention had been used effectively since 2013 to regulate the international trade in commercially harvested sharks and rays. These include hammerheads (family Sphyrnidae), porbeagles (Lamna nasus) and oceanic whitetip sharks and manta rays, as well as silky (Carcharhinus falciformis) and thresher sharks together with devil rays (genus Mobula) since 2016. Mako sharks are the latest to join the list.“Following the 2003 listing of sharks, there had been great progress in the conservation of white sharks, basking sharks and whale sharks,” Jabado said. “The other listings are much more recent, and it is unlikely we will see a difference in the population size of these species just yet.”Conservation management What countries need is better fisheries management to curb overexploitation, Jabado said.“Many species in the Indian Ocean are considered migratory but many are endemic to this region,” she said. “This means, we need higher levels of species protection. To ensure protection of the migratory species, the best strategy is collaboration with other countries in the region, both on research and conservation.”Daniel Fernando of Blue Resources Trust initiated a nine-day survey of fish markets and landing sites at 11 localities in Sri Lanka that led to the identification of 34 shark species. Five of them are sharks new to science. “If a short survey of nine days could help discover new species, it shows the need for greater research on Sri Lanka’s sharks,” Fernando told Mongabay.Following the listing of sharks and rays to Appendix II during the 2013 CITES summit in Bangkok, Sri Lanka’s Department of Fisheries Resources and the FAO conducted a joint survey to identify the successes and challenges experienced in the implementation of CITES provisions.The survey showed poor awareness about the CITES process among stakeholders. However, they had a satisfactory level of knowledge of other measures, with more than 69 percent of respondents having awareness of management measures.Sharks caught for their fins. Finning often takes place at sea, with the live shark thrown back into the water, where it’s unable to swim and quickly dies. Image by Malaka Rodrigo.“Shark conservation in Sri Lanka appears to be at the starting point: It has a long way to go in order to reach conservation efforts undertaken by neighbours such as the Maldives,” said  Howard Martenstyn, a marine biologist with the Centre of Research for Indian Ocean Marine Mammals (CRIOMM).Promotion of ecotourism of sharks and manta rays as an alternative to fishing can offer a different revenue model for the local economy, Martenstyn said. Article published by dilrukshi Banner image of a stuffed shark toy at the Sri Lankan delegation’s seat at last month’s CITES summit in Geneva. Sri Lanka played a leading role in pushing for greater protection for sharks and rays at the summit. Image courtesy of IISD Reporting Service. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Cites, Conservation, Environment, Marine Biodiversity, Oceans, Overfishing, Sharks last_img read more

Greta and Mesoamerica’s five great forests (commentary)

first_imgArticle published by Mike Gaworecki Cattle, Cattle Ranching, Climate Change, Climate Change And Forests, Commentary, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Editorials, Environment, Forest Fires, Forests, Global Warming, Indigenous Peoples, Ranching, Researcher Perspective Series In New York’s Battery Park last Friday night, Greta Thunberg rightly said, “This is an emergency. Our house is on fire.” She continued, “This Monday, world leaders are going to be gathered here in New York City for the U.N. Climate Action Summit. The eyes of the world will be on them. They have a chance to take leadership, to prove they actually hear us.”In Mesoamerica, leaders are listening and acting. During the Climate Summit, Mesoamerica’s leaders announced their commitment to protect the “Five Great Forests of Mesoamerica” and shared some of their governments’ lessons learned to date to reduce forest fires and tackle deforestation.We are supporting them by promoting an initiative in which governments, Indigenous Peoples, and civil society are coming together to protect 10 million hectares and restore 500,000 hectares in these critical forest areas, thereby helping safeguard the world’s climate.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. This week’s Climate Strike mobilized and inspired millions of people around the world, including us.On Friday, we stood with young protesters in New York’s Battery Park, listening to Greta Thunberg’s speech. Her courageous words, her grit, her honesty, her powerful presence, the overwhelming gravity and urgency of her message coming from such an unlikely leader… Greta brought us to tears.We both belong to conservation organizations and have dedicated our lives and careers to protecting forests and wildlife. In other words, we are already believers in Greta’s message. We know that the world’s intact forests, along with the ocean, sequester half of humankind’s carbon emissions every year, and that protecting them and working to restore ecosystems around the planet are the most efficient ways to mitigate climate change.We have seen firsthand the magic and majesty of Mesoamerica’s last five great, intact forests. Spanning from Mexico to Colombia, this “Amazon” of Mesoamerica covers an area three times the size of Switzerland and is home to more than 7.5 percent of the planet’s biodiversity, such as the jaguar and endangered Baird’s tapir. The five forests hold nearly 50 percent of the region’s forest carbon stocks and provide important ecosystem services to 5 million people, including clean water, clean air, food security, and climate stability.The jaguar’s range currently extends from Mexico through Central America to South America. The species is listed as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List and the population is declining. Photo Credit: Julie Larsen Maher.Yet we have also seen the devastation. Since 2000, an insatiable global demand for beef has driven reduction of three of Mesoamerica’s five great forests by more than 23 percent. Ninety percent of deforestation in the five forests results from illegal cattle ranching — sometimes used as a front for organized crime and drug trafficking and sometimes connected to international markets.To make matters worse, climate change-induced drought has sparked widespread forest fires, with smoke eclipsing the sun and choking both humans and wildlife. At times, it feels apocalyptic.Greta rightly said, “This is an emergency. Our house is on fire.” She continued, “This Monday, world leaders are going to be gathered here in New York City for the U.N. Climate Action Summit. The eyes of the world will be on them. They have a chance to take leadership, to prove they actually hear us.”In Mesoamerica, leaders are listening and acting.During the Climate Summit, Mesoamerica’s leaders announced their commitment to protect the “Five Great Forests of Mesoamerica” and shared some of their governments’ lessons learned to date to reduce forest fires and tackle deforestation. We are supporting them by promoting an initiative in which governments, Indigenous Peoples, and civil society are coming together to protect 10 million hectares and restore 500,000 hectares in these critical forest areas, thereby helping safeguard the world’s climate.The Five Forest Initiative follows four key principles that give us hope for its success.A movement, not a projectThe Five Forests Initiative will convene and support a “Five Forests Alliance,” including the region’s governments, civil society, universities, and local and indigenous communities, collectively working along a single, coherent strategy. Through mass mobilization of resources channeled to an alliance of the most effective partners in each of the forests, the initiative will effect broad and lasting impact.Addressing the primary threatGreater than 90 percent of the deforestation within the Five Forests is caused by illegal cattle ranching that has been allowed to invade protected areas and indigenous territories. The Five Forests Initiative will work to address illegal ranching while providing economic alternatives for local people that result in more trees and fewer cows and that are compatible with local and indigenous cultures.Local solutionsNearly half of the Five Forests of Mesoamerica are governed by Indigenous Peoples who have lived and worked sustainably in them for centuries. They have time-tested solutions for how to live and work in these landscapes in ways that promote biodiversity conservation and limit forest degradation and deforestation. The Five Forests Alliance is committed to integrating local and indigenous voices as leaders to understand, promote, and scale community-based solutions.Trust in local capacityThe Five Forests Initiative endeavors to empower the conservationists of Mesoamerica to create the conditions in which they can implement their own innovative ideas and generate the change needed to save the region’s forests, including consistent and well-paid employment.Mesoamerica’s people, culture, biodiversity, economic health, resilience to climate change—the very essence of Mesoamerica—all depend on these five great forests. To survive as a planet and stave off the worst effects of climate change, we all depend on the success of movements like Mesoamerica’s Five Great Forests Initiative.As Greta famously said, “I want you to act. I want you to act as if our house is on fire.”Mesoamerica’s forests are literally on fire. The region’s governments, Indigenous Peoples, civil society, and the broader conservation community now commit to protect them.La Mosquitia is a region of rainforest in the easternmost part of Honduras. Photo Credit: John Polisar, WCS.CITATION• Baccini, A. G. S. J., Goetz, S. J., Walker, W. S., Laporte, N. T., Sun, M., Sulla-Menashe, D., … & Samanta, S. (2012). Estimated carbon dioxide emissions from tropical deforestation improved by carbon-density maps. Nature climate change, 2(3), 182. doi:10.1038/nclimate1354Dr. Jeremy Radachowsky is Regional Director of Mesoamerica and the Caribbean for WCS and has worked for more than two decades to conserve Mesoamerica’s forests.Dr. Chris Jordan is the Central America and Tropical Andes Coordinator for Global Wildlife Conservation (GWC).FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

$750,000 prize seeks solutions to challenges from small-scale mining

first_imgWhile the devices we carry around in our pockets everyday provide us with unprecedented convenience and levels of access to information, the materials they contain are often linked to the destruction of some of the planet’s richest ecosystems.Yet small-scale mining is an important source of income more than 40 million people worldwide, generating livelihoods and, in some cases, creating paths to escape poverty.For these reasons, last week a broad coalition launched a $750,000 global competition to identify ways to make small-scale and artisanal mining less damaging to communities and the environment.The Artisanal Mining Grand Challenge is hosted by Conservation X Labs, a Washington, DC- and Seattle-based non-profit that has organized other prize-based competitions around difficult environmental problems. While the devices we carry around in our pockets everyday provide us with unprecedented convenience and levels of access to information, the materials they contain are often linked to the destruction of some of the planet’s richest ecosystems. Extracting metals and minerals like gold from the Amazon, coltan from the Congo, and nickel from Indonesia can take a heavy on local peoples, wildlife, rivers, and forests. Gold mining is a major threat to the forests and biodiversity of the Peruvian Amazon, including protected areas. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.One of the most complicated aspects of addressing the issue is the disparate nature of small-scale and artisanal mining, which accounts for a significant share of production of some of the most critical materials that go into mobile phones, tablets, and laptops as well as jewelry: 15-20 percent of diamonds, 15-20 percent of gold, 20 percent of cobalt, and 70-80 percent of colored gemstones. Much of this mining is informal, unregulated, or even illegal, putting it beyond the reach of authorities. And some of the companies that sell products to consumers may have very little knowledge of what raw materials ultimately end up in their supply chains.Yet small-scale mining is an important source of income more than 40 million people worldwide, generating livelihoods and, in some cases, creating paths to escape poverty. So outright crackdowns on the activity can have a downside.Gold mining in the Peruvian Amazon. The launch event for the Artisanal Mining Grand Challenge featured a talk by Dr. Luis E. Fernandez of Wake Forest University Center for Amazonian Scientific Innovation (CINCIA), who discussed the impacts of artisanal mining in Madre de Dios in the Peruvian Amazon. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.For these reasons, last week a broad coalition launched a $750,000 global competition to identify ways to make small-scale and artisanal mining less damaging to communities and the environment. The Artisanal Mining Grand Challenge is hosted by Conservation X Labs, a Washington, DC- and Seattle-based non-profit that has organized other prize-based competitions around difficult environmental problems.“This is a wicked problem,” said Alex Dehgan, Co-founder and CEO of Conservation X Labs. “All of the partners involved are doing this because we like to run to hard problems, rather than run away from them.”“Our problems are scaling exponentially and our solutions have been linear. We seek to work as part of a coalition because none of us can solve it alone,” Dehgan continued. “Our only competitor should be extinction.”A view of the Soarano wetland, cleared of forest by illegal gold miners, near Ranomafana, Madagascar. Image by Daniel Burgas.The Artisanal Mining Grand Challenge is structured into three categories: preventing and remediating damage at mine sites; addressing social and environmental costs in mining supply chains beyond mine sites; and developing information solutions that measure the environmental and social impacts of mining. On top of those categories, Microsoft’s AI for Earth Initiative is awarding $100,000 “for solutions that utilize or deploy artificial intelligence (AI), including machine learning,” to the issue.The challenge is open to anyone offering solutions. Paul Bunje, Co-founder and CSO/COO of Conservation X Labs, expects a wide range of entities — from NGOs to companies to entrepreneurs — to get involved.“We can now use a crowd-based innovation competition, not just to incentivize new solutions and accelerate innovation – which is critical – but also use this as an opportunity to capture huge value,” Bunje said. “It’s the opportunity for all of us to be a part of something huge.”Forest cleared for gold mining in Indonesian Borneo. Photo by Rhett A. ButlerThe Artisanal Mining Grand ChallengeCorrection October 9, 2019: Conservation X Labs is based in both Washington, DC and Seattle, not only Virginia as originally stated in this post.Disclosure: Mongabay is participating in The Artisanal Mining Grand Challenge through a special reporting project on small-scale and artisanal mining worldwide. The Artisanal Mining Grand Challenge does not have any editorial influence on the stories Mongabay produces. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Gold Mining, Green, Mining, Prizes, Water Pollution center_img Article published by Rhett Butlerlast_img read more

Deadly conditions for Indonesian migrant crews tied to illegal fishing

first_imgA recent report by the environmental group Greenpeace highlights harrowing testimonies from Indonesian migrant workers about dire conditions on board foreign distant-water fishing vessels.The workers told of being overworked, having their wages withheld, being forced into debt bondage, and experiencing physical and sexual violence.Experts say slavery on board fishing vessels is strongly linked to illegal fishing activities.Greepeace has called on governments and boat operators to resolve human rights issues at sea as part of efforts to achieve sustainable fisheries. KUTA, Indonesia — D, 28-year-old Indonesian man, was witness to a deadly assault on a fellow boat crew member by the captain when they worked aboard the Taiwanese fishing vessel Da Wang a few years ago. The captain hit his friend in the head, then forced them to continue working.“In the morning when we woke up for breakfast, we found him dead in his room. The captain wrapped up my dead friend’s body with a blanket and then stored him in the freezer,” D said in an interview in July 2019.D is one of 34 Indonesian sailors featured in an investigative report by the environmental group Greenpeace and the Indonesian Migrant Workers’ Union (SBMI) published on Dec. 9. The organizations looked into their complaints of forced labor during their employment on 13 fishing vessels registered in China, Taiwan, Fiji and Vanuatu.The crews’ statements described conditions in which they experienced overwork, withholding of wages, debt bondage, and physical and sexual violence. These conditions eventually forced them to cut short their working contracts, which typically run about two years, and forfeit the deposits they were typically required to pay to get the jobs.Indonesian migrants on board foreign fishing boats describe conditions in which they experience overwork, withholding of wages, debt bondage, and physical and sexual violence. Image courtesy of Greenpeace.“There’s a strong interrelation between illegal fishing and forced labor of crews aboard fishing boats — it’s two sides of the same coin,” Arifsyah Nasution, oceans campaigner at Greenpeace Southeast Asia, told Mongabay.With coastal fisheries being depleted due to overfishing, vessels are heading farther out into open waters and high seas, in turn racking up higher operating costs. Companies look for cheap labor to reduce costs and stay profitable — and much of that cheap labor comes from Southeast Asia.“The way for [companies] to survive is by doing illegal activities: unreported catch, shark finning, transshipment so they can stay out in the seas longer, and sacrificing standards for salary and life on board,” Arifsyah said.Citing the Taiwan Fisheries Agency, the report says 21,994 Indonesian fishers were working on Taiwanese coastal and distant-water fishing vessels as of June 2019. Migrant boat crews from Indonesia and the Philippines make up a large component of Taiwan’s distant-water fleets, one of the top five in the world and responsible for an industry valued at $2 billion a year, according to Greenpeace.While the abuse mostly occurs once the crews are aboard the vessel, exploitative working arrangements begin with recruitment by fly-by-night hiring agents, the report says.Many Indonesian migrant fishers are reportedly given false seafarers’ papers by the hiring agencies, which in most cases aren’t even licensed to send workers overseas; only two of 124 registered manning agencies had permission from the Indonesian Transportation Ministry to recruit and place migrant fishers aboard foreign vessels, according to government records cited in the report.The migrant fishers also have to agree to a payment scheme in which their salaries are deducted to pay “guarantee deposits” and processing fees for the first six to eight months of their employment, forcing them to work long hours for little or no pay, the report says. And when a crew member fails to complete their contract, they will lose the deposit, it adds.“The clauses in the contract are already unfair,” Arifsyah said. “There’s an indication that [working conditions] are designed to be inconvenient [for the boat crews], and it’s being used to benefit the local recruiters and agencies abroad.”A flyer advertising factory and fishing jobs in South Korea by LPK Nakdong, a migrant worker placement agency that also provides Korean language training in the city of Tegal, Central Java. Image courtesy of Greenpeace.Despite the onerous conditions, many Indonesians still seize on the opportunity to break free from poverty, the report says. Some even consider it a “prestigious” first work experience because of the overseas placement, Arifsyah said.According to Arifsyah, most of the migrant fishers come from Indonesia’s most populous island, Java, with hiring agencies concentrated in the province of Central Java and the cities of Jakarta and Bekasi. There’s also been an increase in the number of candidates coming from eastern Indonesia and the Sumatran provinces of Lampung, North Sumatra and Aceh, Arifsyah said.“It’s likely that [recruiters] are looking for new pockets to source the boat crews,” he said. “It seems that there’s a network that consolidates them all so that people from outside Java can register to the agencies in Java.”Greenpeace and SBMI, the migrant workers’ union, reached out to the companies and individuals operating the respective fishing vessels. All of them denied accusations of withholding or deducting salaries paid through the recruitment agencies. Some of the boat operators also promised to investigate the allegations and to improve efforts in upholding the human rights of their migrant boat crews.Arifsyah said some key aspects of the trade still needed to be exposed, such as finding out where the fish caught by these vessels end up, and also identifying the middlemen involved in the recruitment process.“But that should be a concern of the law enforcers as this is a cross-country issue and involves multi stakeholders. Law enforcers should up their game, for instance, by involving Interpol,” Arifsyah said.In response to the report, the Indonesian fisheries ministry said it would compile a comprehensive database of Indonesian migrant fishers and hiring agencies in the country. It also vowed to improve coordination with other government institutions — including the ministries of labor, transportation and foreign affairs, and the national agency for migrant worker protection — to set up clear jurisdictional authority for resolving these issues.“Protecting our boat crews is an absolute [necessity] — not only for our fishermen or businesses, but also boat crews,” Zulficar Mochtar, the ministry’s head of capture fisheries, told Mongabay on the sidelines of a recent event in Kuta, Bali.Greenpeace is calling on governments across Southeast Asia to resolve slavery at sea as part of efforts to achieve sustainability for fisheries and marine protection. This includes ratifying and implementing the International Labour Organization’s Work in Fishing Convention to protect their citizens from human rights abuses on fishing vessels, Greenpeace said.“We can’t continue to ignore both environmental and social issues [in global fisheries], and only resolve one of them,” Arifsyah said. “It has to be both.”Many Indonesian migrants experience life-threatening challenges when they work on foreign vessels fishing in distant waters. Image courtesy of Greenpeace.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Environment, Environmental Crime, Environmental Law, Fish, Fishing, Forced labor, Governance, Human Rights, Illegal Fishing, Law Enforcement, Oceans center_img Article published by Basten Gokkonlast_img read more

SA’s Baker stars at Big Wave Awards

first_img5 May 2014 South African surfer Grant “Twiggy” Baker picked up two awards at the Billabong XXL Global Big Wave Awards in Southern California on Friday evening, cementing his position as one of the world’s great big wave riders. Baker received the award for winning the 2013/14 ASP Big Wave World Tour and also claimed the Surfline Best Overall Performance.‘Travel and surf’ “All I ever wanted to do is travel and surf and that’s what this world title means to me,” Baker said at the Awards. “I’m feeling more competitive than ever. I’d love to have a heat with Kelly Slater in 25-foot-plus waves. He’d probably still beat me, but at least I’d have a chance.”‘Fantastic’ The Billabong XXL Ride of the Year went the way of Greg Long. “To win Ride of the Year is fantastic, but riding those waves is what I’m here to do,” he commented. “The fear is an underlying motivator and turning the fear into something positive is what big wave surfing does for me. When you’re riding a big wave you’re so focused and it’s like time goes into slow motion.” ‘It’s like winning the Oscars’ The Billabong Women’s Best Overall Performance was awarded to Hawaii’s Keala Kennelly. “It’s like winning the Oscars, especially in front of all the other big wave guys,” she said. “Last year I won this award, cashed the check and three days later I was in Teahupoo for a big swell. It was the first time I’d been back since my face injury there. To come back and overcome my fear and get the best wave was a huge personal triumph for me.”Biggest wave Frenchman Gautier Garanx picked up the Billabong XXL Biggest Wave Award for a 62- footer he rode in Belharra, Spain. “To be here is a dream,” said Gautier Garanx. “All my idols are here, the superstars, and tonight I’m with them. That wave was easily the biggest of my life.”AWARD WINNERSASP Big Wave World Tour Champion: Grant “Twiggy” BakerTube of the Year: Koa RothmanBillabong Women’s Best Overall Performance: Keala KennellyBillabong XXL Wipeout: Koa RothmanBiggest Paddle: Mark HealeySurfline Best Overall Performance: Grant “Twiggy” BakerBillabong XXL Biggest Wave: Gautier GaranxBillabong XXL Ride of the Year: Greg Long2014/15 ASP Big Wave World Tour Southern Hemisphere (15 April 2014 through 31 August 2014)Punta de Lobos, ChilePico Alto, PeruDungeons, South Africa Northern Hemisphere (1 October 2014 to 28 February 2015)Todos Santos, MexicoPunta Galea, Basque Country SpainPe’ahi (Jaws), Maui, Hawaiilast_img read more

2019 Junior Dairy results

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Cole Heger, Preble Co., shows his Red and White in the Dry Cow Class. Aubree Topp, 13, Shelby Co., shows a Milking Shorthorn. Milkinging Shorthorn class Casey Weiss, Darke Co., shows her Milking Shorthorn that was the Senior Champion of Junior Show. Alyson Phillips, Henry Co., shows her Red and White in the Sr. 2-year-old class. Wyatt Schlauch, from Holmes Co., shows his Red and White in the Jr. 2-year-old class. Madelyn Topp from Auglaize Co. showing her holstein in a dry cow class. Kayla Cring from Huron Co. with her Grand Champion Holstein Female. Grand Champion Holstein Female Kayla Cring from Huron Co and Reserve Grand Champion Holstein Female Zachary Steinke from Auglaize Co. Cole Pond from Champaign Co. showing in the Holstein Senior Showmanship. Tim Gunkelman from Wayne Co. showing his Holstein in the Senior Showmanship class. Grace Gunkelman from Wayne Co. showing her Holstein. Grace Gunkelman from Wayne Co. showing in the Holstein Intermediate Showmanship class. Photos by Zach ParrottHere are results from the 2019 Ohio State Fair Jr. Dairy Show. Further results will be made available as the shows progress.HolsteinTotal animals shown: 116Exhibitors: 56 YRP Grand ChampionExhibitor: Kayla CringAnimal: Stunning Coruette Google-ESire: Sonnek GC Coruette-ET YRP Reserve Grand ChampionExhibitor: Zachary SteinkeAnimal: Maple Tree Mogul DelaniSire: Mountfield SSI DCY Mogul-E YRP Junior ChampionExhibitor: Logan ToppAnimal: Toppglen Jacoby Wooka-ESire: Cycle Doorman Jacoby-ET YRP Reserve Junior ChampionExhibitor: Taylor KolpfensteinAnimal: Etgen-Way Doc HoneymooSire: Woodcrest King Doc YRP Senior ChampionExhibitor: Kayla CringAnimal: Stunning Coruette Google-ESire: Sonnek GC Coruette-ET YRP Reserve Senior ChampionExhibitor: Madelyn ToppAnimal: Topp-View Attitude RaceSire: Attitude Senior Showmanship (15 and over)Marissa ToppTim GunkelmanCole PondMariah TroutwineLogan Schlauch Intermediate Showmanship (12-14)Logan ToppAubree ToppOlivia FinkePeyton HenryGrace Gunkelman Junior Showmanship (11 and under)Colton ThomasMadicyn RuppRuth BaumbauerJustin LandesKennley Siegrist Red and White YRP Grand ChampionExhibitor: Alyson Philips YRP Reserve Grand ChampionExhibitor: Wyatt Schlauch YRP Intermediate ChampionExhibitor: Alysan Philips YRP Reserve Intermediate ChampionExhibitor: Wyatt Schlauch YRP Senior ChampionExhibitor: Mariah Troutwine YRP Reserve Senior ChampionExhibitor: Cole Heger Senior Showmanship (15 and over)Madelyn ToppMariah TroutwineSydney GoodAlly CuppsLindsay Lamoreaux Intermediate Showmanship (12-14)Lily ElsassCarissa PittmanLillian FinkeWyatt SchluachKaleb Pond Junior Showmanship (11 and under)Lydia KavermanNoah SprengNora BudnyGage Workman Ayshire YRP Grand ChampionExhibitor: Marissa ToppAnimal: Toppglen Wishful Thinking YRP Reserve Grand ChampionExhibitor: Lane GreiweAnimal: Mill Valley Gunner Gumbell YRP Junior ChampionExhibitor: Kinley ToppAnimal: On Top Wiggle Wiggle YRP Reserve Junior ChampionExhibitor: Ashley HowvermaleAnimal: Hawver- Crest Showstopper YRP Senior ChampionExhibitor: Marissa ToppAnimal: Toppglen Wishful Thinking YRP Reserve Senior ChampionExhibitor: Lane GreiweAnimal: Mill Valley Gunner Gumbell Senior Showmanship (15 and over)Ashley HowvermaleLane GreiweMarissa ToppKinley ToppAaron Berg Intermediate Showmanship (12-14)Kelly HowvermaleLogan ToppAdam WolfJulianne HeadingsSylvia Headings Junior Showmanship (11 and under)Ava LahmersKale HamkerNoah SprengAnna HeadingsStephanie Headings Milking Shorthorn YRP Grand ChampionExhibitor: Aubree Topp YRP Reserve Grand ChampionExhibitor: Emmy Days YRP Junior Grand ChampionExhibitor: Henry WeissAnimal: Weissway Ocean OatmealSire: Cherrywood Weissway Ocean YRP Junior Reserve ChampionExhibitor: Emmy DaysAnimal: Reidien Acres Snowwhite PSire: Lucky Strike Senior Showmanship (15 and over)Carrie RhoadesEmmy DaysTess KikoRachel ShermanHenry Specht Intermediate Showmanship (12-14)Madelyn BakerLillian SpechtKatie Weiss Junior Showmanship (11 and under)Henry WeissJerseyTotal animals shown: 87Total exhibitors: 36 YRP Grand ChampionExhibitor: Blake GreiweAnimal: DKG Motin Jolly YRP Reserve Grand ChampionExhibitor: Colton ThomasAnimal: Miss Premier MangoritaSire: Hawarden Impuls Premier YRP Junior ChampionExhibitor: Lillian FinkeAnimal: Big Guns Andreas ViennaSire: Sunset Canyon Andreas YRP Reserve Junior ChampionExhibitor: Jade LauxAnimal: Impression StormySire: Rock Ella Impression Senior Showmanship (15 and over)Lane GrieweMadelyn ToppBlake GrieweKinley ToppGarrett Hageman Intermediate Showmanship (12-14)Grace GunkelmanJacoby GilbertMeredith HagemanGwen SchindelLillian FinkeJunior Showmanship (11 and under)Allison FrancisLydia KavermanLane FrancisEmma HershbergerElla Hershberger GuernseyTotal animals shown: 62Total exhibitors: 27 YRP Grand ChampionExhibitor: Aubree ToppAnimal: Lavon Farms Norak RattleSire: Lang Haven Grumpy Novak YRP Reserve Grand ChampionExhibitor: Case AltAnimal: Marodore Ernie FelizSire: Lonestar-ET YRP Junior Guernsey ChampionExhibitor: Samantha PlocherAnimal: Dix-Lee Method DarwynSire: Mar Ral Method-TW YRP Reserve Junior Guernsey ChampionExhibitor: Hannah HurstAnimal: Guernsey Grove HP MaverickSire: Springhill J Lonestar Senior Showmanship (15 and over)Jessica LangenkampSamantha PlocherTyler DehanAlex RichardsonDerek Burns Intermediate Showmanship (12-14) Logan DehanKyle PolkNatasha DavidsonAbigayle DickeCase Alt Junior Showmanship (11 and under)Adam LangenkampTiffany LangenkampDrew LangenkampClaire GoekeSilas Kohler Brown SwissTotal animals shown: 54Total exhibitors: 28 YRP Grand ChampionExhibitor: Madelyn ToppAnimal: Kulp-Gen Supreme DawnSire: Supreme YRP Reserve Grand ChampionExhibitor: Kinley ToppAnimal: Cutting Edge T Taylor ET YRP Junior ChampionExhibitor: Molly MoffettAnimal: New View C BravoSire: Voelkers TD Carter YRP Reserve Junior ChampionExhibitor: Carissa PittmanAnimal: Brook Hollow Whiskey KokitaSire: Manis Glenn Whiskey ET Senior Showmanship (15 & over)Molly MoffettKinley ToppMadelyn ToppZachary LoganRussell Alden Intermediate Showmanship (12-14)Carissa PittmanAmy HughesRiley ShockeyTyler KressDrake Yoder Junior Showmanship (11 and under)Reagan ShockeyJacob HowmanMadicyn RuppDelilah TuronAnna Headingslast_img read more

Americans Are Saving Energy by Staying at Home

first_imgNo place like homeSince there are only 24 hours in a day, any increase in time spent on one activity has to be counterbalanced by an equal decrease in other activities. Thus, extra time at home has to come from decreased time elsewhere. We found that Americans spent 1.2 fewer days traveling and 6.6 fewer days in nonhome buildings in 2012 compared to 2003. Empty movie theaters and malls across the United States anecdotally confirm this trend.What did people do with all this extra time at home? Some activities were directly linked to digital technologies: working, watching video, and using computers. Some were not: Time spent sleeping and preparing and eating meals at home also increased. It is possible that people used the time saved by reduced traveling and shopping to catch up on sleep. We have not, however, disentangled how various factors such as shifts in the labor market and demographics could also shift activities.The trends we found differed by age group. Americans aged 18 to 24 spent two more weeks at home in 2012 compared to 2003, a change that was 70% higher than the general population. This could be due to differences in their job situations, texting friends instead of going out, or other factors.In contrast, people over age 65 spent less time at home compared to 10 years ago. Presumably this is due to increases in the Social Security retirement age over time and the fact that older Americans are working longer, which results in comparatively more older people in the workplace. By ASHOK SEKAR and ERIC WILLIAMSInformation and communication technologies are radically transforming modern lifestyles. They are redefining our concept of “space” by turning homes and coffee shops into workspaces. (This article was written in a coffee shop.) Instead of going to the theater, many people sit in the comfort of their homes and stream movies. Online purchasing of food, groceries, and consumer products has transformed shopping. Personal interactions, from the casual to the intimate, are increasingly virtual instead of face to face.How can we measure the impacts of these changes? Time diaries are one tool for quantifying lifestyles and trends. A time diary is a survey in which people list what they do and for how long, from waking up in the morning to going to bed at night.Along with our colleague Roger Chen, we analyzed data from 2003-2012 from the American Time Use Survey, which is conducted annually by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, to gain insights into our digital lifestyle and its effect on national energy use.Our recently published findings are surprising. Americans spent nearly eight more days at home in 2012 compared to 2003, and even when we allow for displaced energy consumption — such as the electricity required to run server farms — they consumed less energy. This is good news, but it also raises important concerns about making home energy use more efficient. Staying home saves energyWe did this research partly to understand lifestyle changes, but we also wanted to know how these changes affected energy use. Analysts use mathematical methods that attribute changes in energy use to different explanatory factors, such as population, changes in building floor space, efficiency improvements, and now, time use. Applying these methods, we found that Americans are saving energy by staying at home.Nationally, reduction in time spent traveling led to a decrease in energy of 1,200 trillion British thermal units, or Btu, a measure of the heat content of fuel. Reduced time spent in non-home buildings lowered energy consumption by 1,000 trillion Btu. Energy use did increase at home, but to a comparatively smaller degree — about 480 trillion Btu.Combining these three shifts, we found a net reduction of –1,700 trillion Btu, or 1.8% of national energy demand. A gallon of gasoline contains about 120,000 Btu. So the lower energy consumption translates into 14 billion gallons of gasoline.While the time reduction in traveling (1.2 days) is much less than the increase in home time (8 days), one minute of car travel is 20 times more energy intensive than time at home, so any reduction saves a lot of energy.Our analysis did not include some factors. For example, when internet use increases, we know that servers and IT infrastructure consume more energy. While we could not completely account for this, we did find that the increase in energy consumption by all servers in the United States during the period we studied was only about one-seventh of the total savings of 1,700 trillion Btu — not enough to counteract the overall trend.We also did not include energy consumption from trucks delivering e-commerce orders to homes. However past work has shown that the energy reduction from shoppers making fewer trips to stores was much larger than energy consumption by e-commerce delivery trucks. Ashok Sekar is a postdoctoral fellow in the Energy Systems Transformation Research Group at the University of Texas at Austin. Eric Williams is an associate professor of sustainability at the Rochester Institute of Technology. This post originally appeared at The Conversation. A new priority for home energy efficiencyThere are many efforts at the state and federal level to reduce energy demand. The Environmental Protection Agency’s Energy Star program certifies energy-efficient appliances. The Department of Energy, with input from Congress, develops energy efficiency standards for appliances and equipment. State-run utility commissions typically require utilities to run programs to encourage efficiency, which often provide rebates to consumers who purchase efficient appliances.The trends we identified suggest that people are going to spend more time at home. This provides motivation for policymakers to increase focus on efficiency programs for homes. Policies such as the Trump administration’s proposed budget cuts to EPA’s Energy Star program would be moving in the wrong direction when home energy use is becoming more important nationwide.Time use data could also inform public policy by helping households develop personalized plans for energy efficiency. Currently home energy audits account for factors such as the level of insulation and type of furnace, but usually do not consider how residents’ lifestyle choices affect energy use. We have shown in prior work that at least for televisions, differences in how much people watch leads to huge differences in energy consumption. Awareness of time use can help residents figure out what efficiency actions will save the most energy and money.Technology will continue to affect our lifestyle choices in ways we cannot imagine. Luckily, time use provides a method to measure these changes and identify opportunities for energy savings. All About Embodied EnergyGreen Basics: Lighting and Phantom LoadsOccupant Behavior Makes a DifferenceTV Set-Top Boxes Will Be More EfficientCalifornia Gets New Light Bulb Efficiency StandardChoosing an Energy-Efficient Refrigerator RELATED ARTICLES last_img read more

MTT Aussie Tour Diary Day 1 and 2

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