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Archive of posts published in the tag: 爱上海419

My Morning Jacket Guitarist Carl Broemel Announces Short Solo Tour This Fall

first_imgTickets for all five performances go on sale tomorrow, Wednesday, 9/19. For more information and tickets to each of the performances, follow the links below:Care Broemel Fall 2017 Solo Tour Dates:11/13 Decatur, GA * (hyperurl.co/CBDe)11/14 Nashville, TN* (hyperurl.co/CBNash)11/15 Louisville, KY* (hyperurl.co/CBLville)11/16 Chicago, IL (hyperurl.co/CBChi)11/18 Indianapolis, IN* (http://hyperurl.co/CBInd)For more information on Carl Broemel’s various projects, head to his website.[Cover photo via Rockstars and Babies/Jessica Daschner] My Morning Jacket guitarist Carl Broemel has announced a five-night run of shows this November. The mini-tour will feature Nashville instrumental duo Steelism as nightly support at all but one of the run’s stops, in Chicago on November 16th. The brief run will begin in the Atlanta, GA area with a November 13th performance at Eddie’s Attic, followed by shows at Nashville, TN’s Basement East on November 14th and Louisville, KY’s Zanzabar on November 15th. Finally, after the Chicago date without Steelism (11/5), Broemel will finish out his tour at HiFi in Indianapolis, IN on November 18th.Just over a year ago, Broemel released a new solo album, 4th Of July. The deluxe edition of the album is available now.  Earlier this summer, the MMJ guitarist played a set at Broemel released a solo album, 4th Of July, on his label Stocks In Asia and Thirty Tigers in August of last year. Earlier this year Broemel performed a set with Steelism backing him at the annual Newport Folk Festival in Rhode Island.last_img read more

EDM artist Jack Dugan embraces mindfulness

first_imgHarboring an ear for music and discipline for personal development, EDM artist and producer Jack Dugan practices a trifecta of mindfulness, music production and Brazillian jiu jitsu to propel his professional career and tackle adversity.  In addition to holding private music production lessons via Zoom, Dugan is currently constructing a new artist project called Quinn Alexander — the name originally given to him by his birth mother.  “The Quinn Alexander project reminds me of Porter Robinson not because the music sounds similar, but because it feels equally as emotionally driven [rather than] sales driven,” close friend and fellow artist Leah Silberman said.  He showcased his talent as a DJ at tailgates and frat parties at the University of Miami, where he attended before transferring to USC. At the time, Dugan also released a variety of electronic remixes and reboots. His most notable release came in 2016 when he won the Wavo remix competition for Steve James’ “Renaissance.” The remix was soon signed to Ultra Music, according to Dugan’s Spotify.   Following his yearning for peace of mind, Dugan channels physical energy into activities that promote mindfulness. As an avid practitioner of Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, he describes the martial art as “a great way to develop humility and detachment.” He plans to experiment with new orchestral sounds that contrast his previous work. The switch in music style highlights how Quinn Alexander would have held a completely different identity from Jack Dugan.  For Dugan, music has consistently served as a source of consolation, especially as he grew to question his place in the world and come to terms with his adoption. While he always held a sincere and loving relationship with his adoptive family, constantly contemplating the story behind his adoption led him to an anxious state.  Jack Dugan, a recent graduate from the Thornton School of Music, finds solace in DJing and producing EDM. (Photo courtesy of Jack Dugan) Because he gravitated the most toward instrumental production, Dugan became hooked on creating EDM in high school. “I felt lonely and frustrated about not knowing anything at all about my past,” Dugan said. “So I felt, more than anything, that I couldn’t fit in anywhere.” Dugan said that “people create their sense of self through filtering their past experiences and telling themselves stories about what they’ve been through.” He compares this tendency to “view life through a lens” to a “filter” that is used in music production to warp sound.     Through Quinn Alexander, Dugan strives to capture an authentic story of his adoption. He emphasized that while Quinn Alexander would have been a completely different person — with different experiences, fears and aspirations from Jack Dugan — the two would have shared the same mind and consciousness.  “It’s pretty difficult to find time to recharge when you’re on a bus. And it’s really important to recharge because you give so much to the crowd every single night,” Dugan said.  For Dugan, the experience of adoption once shaped his perception of life through a single filter of angst and uncertainty. However, cultivating mindfulness through meditation and journaling has led him to interpret his adoption through new filters of motivation and appreciation.  Just as a voice or instrument’s sound may be warped by a musical filter, he said the way we view the world may be contorted by the emotional filters created by our personal experiences. And just as the removal of a musical filter reveals raw sound, eliminating our emotional filters unveils our most authentic selves, allowing us to live up to our greatest individual potential.  Since musicians naturally gravitate toward sound, anchoring their awareness in the noises of their surroundings allows them to better connect with the world and achieve a deeper meditative state. center_img Dugan also read “The Artist’s Way” by Julia Cameron, which motivated him to keep a daily journal — another tactic used to develop mindfulness and an activity Dugan encourages everyone to try.  “As I get better at understanding my emotions through journaling and meditation, I am better able to objectify my thoughts,” Dugan said. He argues that learning to perceive thoughts as objects has allowed him to separate himself from the emotions that once controlled him and prevented him from obtaining peace of mind.  “[Meditation] has given me a much greater sense of appreciation and allowed me to connect deeper with the world through my already developed sonic skills,” Dugan said.  “[Through music], people were able to understand a part of me that I didn’t know how to express through words,” Dugan said, explaining his once shy, reserved personality.  Yet, his mindset drastically shifted when he discovered the practice of mindfulness at the age of 19. Dugan was inspired by successful music business entrepreneurs who recommended practicing introspection and cultivating mindfulness as mechanisms to make better business decisions. So he downloaded HeadSpace, an app designed to facilitate mindfulness through meditation.  Through practicing mindfulness, Jack Dugan hopes to better understand himself and his past experiences. (Photo courtesy of Jack Dugan) As an artist, he said he believes that mindfulness practice may serve particularly beneficial while on tour. Dugan’s mindfulness practice was drastically amplified by adjunct professor of music industry Richard Wolf’s “Music and Mindfulness” course at USC. He confesses that Wolf’s class showed him how improving his meditation practice could make him a “better musician, more creative and happier.” He has grown to effectively articulate “an immense amount of gratitude” toward his adoptive family, as they have given him various opportunities he otherwise would not have had. He admits that this shift in perspective has motivated him to make the most of small things. The project intends to show that “there is something much more to the self than simply the experiences and stories we tell ourselves about our past,” Dugan said.  He further argues that practicing mindfulness to achieve peace of mind is key to disassociating from negative thoughts that prohibit people from achieving their true potential, or their most authentic “selves.”   Highlighting Dugan’s commitment to introspection in his meditative practice, Dugan’s longtime best friend Kyle Sonlin said that being mindful has allowed Dugan to “access a lot of the emotional drive it takes to be so creative.” Conquering the piano and guitar at age seven, the 2020 Thornton School of Music graduate has always been musically inclined. While collaborating with his middle school rock band in his hometown of Bethesda, Md., he identified music as his method of communication and channel for self expression.  The final product of the Quinn Alexander project, which he expects to release in 2021, will represent the most authentic, raw form of Jack Dugan. Producing Quinn Alexander will allow him to get in touch with a higher, purer form of his consciousness by expressing that the “self” is greater than the experiences that people so often assume shape it, he said.last_img read more

Oceanic Bridge To Close for 3 Weeks Following Memorial Day

first_imgRUMSON – The 70-year old Oceanic Bridge, which engineers say is in advanced disrepair, is going to need an estimated $653,650 in additional work and will be closed for three weeks immediately after the Memorial Day weekend.After undergoing repair work and having been closed overnights since earlier this month, the bridge will be closed to all vehicular and pedestrian traffic—but not marine traffic—from Tuesday, May 26 through Tuesday, June 12, according to Laura Kirkpatrick, Monmouth County spokeswoman.Officials decided to wait until after the Memorial Day weekend before proceeding with the three-week project.In addition, preparation work will require the bridge’s closing from 10:30 p.m. to 6:30 a.m. from Wednesday, May 13 through Friday, May 15 and Monday, May 18 through Thursday, May 21, according to the county.The overall cost of the bridge repair is an estimated $2.7 million.The work that was being done involved repairing concrete and steel structures on the aging and badly deteriorating drawbridge that spans the Navesink River, connecting Rumson to the Locust section of Middletown. The workers were cleaning and removing structural plates and steel angles when they uncovered two of the bridge’s four main bearings were damaged, which wouldn’t have been discovered otherwise, according to Ettore.The issue with these bearings, the engineer said, is that it supports the bridge’s bascule span and flanking span on the bridge approaches. These bearings “support all of the weight from the main girders,” for the spans, he said. “They carry a tremendous amount of load for these two spans and carry that load down to the foundation,” Ettore said.This most recent needed work is essential given the bridge’s condition, Ettore stressed, when he addressed the Board of Chosen Freeholders at the board’s workshop, April 22. “In my opinion it is in an advanced stage of disrepair,” the engineer told the freeholders.Ettore explained the strategy is to do sufficient work to the structure so it will be able to last for another five to seven years, as county officials work with federal transportation representatives to formulate a plan for a future bridge replacement project.Steve Bidgood is the managing partner of the Salt Creek Grille, a Bingham Avenue restaurant that literally backs up to the Oceanic Bridge. “It’s never an opportune time for them to close it obviously,” Bidgood said, with a nod to the protracted closure that occurred in fall 2011-spring 2012 for extensive repair work that caused considerable anxiety for business owners in both sides of the Navesink River as well as drivers who were detoured through either Red Bank or Sea Bright. “But it’s not the full swing of summer yet,” and the busy warm weather, Bidgood observed. “And it’s better to be closed for a few weeks now than it be down for a lot longer if something breaks or if anybody gets hurt.”The Oceanic Bridge, officially Monmouth County Bridge S31, at 2,752-feet-long is the county’s largest drawbridge.— By John Burtonlast_img read more

Leafs taking slow road up Murdoch standings ladder, split weekend home series

first_imgThe Leafs march back to the upper echelon in the Kootenay International Junior Hockey League is taking longer than expected after Nelson suffered its second loss during a 10-game home stand thought to be the team’s chance to make a run up the standings as the season winds down.Thomas Cankovic scored with 44 seconds remaining in overtime to give the visiting Creston Valley Thunder Cats a 4-3 KIJHL victory over the Leafs Saturday night at the NDCC Arena.last_img

STABLE NOTES BY ED GOLDEN – MONDAY JULY 4, 2016

first_imgChad Lindsay651071215%45%$223,630 Rafael Bejarano17442352924%61%$2,322,050 James Cassidy4474616%39%$427,500 JockeyMts1st2nd3rdWin%ITM%Money Won SANTA ANITA STATISTICS Mike Puype53117521%43%$348,850 Peter Eurton4285519%43%$481,515 Joseph Talamo13425171919%46%$1,474,098 Bob Baffert521511629%62%$813,203 (Current Through Sunday, July 3) Santiago Gonzalez17422243113%44%$1,095,800 Tyler Baze18529393316%55%$1,488,202 Martin Garcia771261316%40%$646,734 Philip D’Amato922319825%54%$1,516,358 Richard Mandella3995723%54%$723,822 Mario Gutierrez71715410%37%$583,775 Doug O’Neill95921199%52%$698,786 Tiago Pereira103916169%40%$456,722 Stewart Elliott9398710%26%$391,875center_img Mike Smith40138133%55%$926,437 Martin Pedroza791291215%42%$387,650 Edwin Maldonado14426221518%44%$987,556 TrainerSts1st2nd3rdWin%ITM%Money Won NYQUIST BREEZES A HALF-MILE IN 48.60ESPINOZA STOPS TO SMELL THE ROSESHEAVYWEIGHT DORTMUND ‘CHROME’ Flavien Prat14037222026%56%$1,791,030 Jerry Hollendorfer721471419%49%$973,463 TEAM O’NEILL HAPPY WITH NYQUIST WORKKentucky Derby king Nyquist worked four furlongs at Santa Anita Monday morning in 48.60 as he prepares for his first race since finishing third in the Preakness Stakes on May 21.Under exercise rider Jonny Garcia, the son of Uncle Mo trained by Doug O’Neill for owners Paul and Zillah Reddam worked in company with Malware (50.20) and came back well after his 7 a.m. drill.“He worked great, 48 and change and (galloped out) a two-minute lick from the wire to the half in under two minutes,” O’Neill said. “He went really well. We’re really happy with him. He’s cooling out great so we’re all smiling right now.“It just felt right to have Jonny work him this morning. Mario (regular rider Mario Gutierrez) is here, but Jonny knows him really well, as does Mario.”As to where and when Nyquist returns to the races, O’Neill is playing it close to the vest.“I’m going to meet with Paul on Wednesday, so we should know more Thursday. You can circle a race like the (Kentucky) Derby when you’re heading that way, but that’s not the case now. You’re at a point where you’re going to run him when he’s right.“When you say a specific race and it doesn’t work out, there is a lot of second-guessing, so I don’t know if my stress level can handle being painted in a corner. We’ll let the horse tell us and hopefully it will be soon.” A YEAR LATER, VICTOR GETS THE SPOILSWhat a difference a year makes.At this time in 2015, Victor Espinoza was basking in the glow of piloting American Pharoah to the first Triple Crown victory in 37 years. Everybody wanted a piece of him.Today, although he looks forward to his role as the regular rider of champions California Chrome and Stellar Wind, it’s relatively business as usual for the affable 44-year-old jockey.Victor, who by a vote of his peers, won this year’s Santa Anita George Woolf Memorial Jockey Award, is taking time to smell the roses, and not at Churchill Downs.“Things have settled down for me now,” Espinoza said. “I have more time for myself. I’m doing things I’ve wanted to do that I couldn’t do before. The last two years were intense, and now I have more free time for myself.“Besides working out and spending time with my favorite charity, City of Hope, the weather’s been good so I’ve relaxed at the beach and spent three days in Kentucky where I saw American Pharoah (at Coolmore America Ashford Stud, where he stands for $200,000).“I also visited Old Friends Farm and saw Silver Charm and other Kentucky Derby champions. I spent pretty much the whole day there.“American Pharoah looks great, amazing.”Asked if the 2015 Horse of the Year recognized him, Espinoza laughed and said, “I have no idea. I have no clue. But it was fun.” Now it’s back to business.“We had a lot of obligations outside of racing that took some business away,” noted Espinoza’s agent, Brian Beach. “We’ve slowed some of that down a little, but not completely. During the past two years, Victor has been a good ambassador for racing, but now it’s time to be a little selfish and get things back to normal.“Victor went to New York last night but he’ll be at Del Mar a week before the meet starts to work horses. We’ll concentrate on the second half of the year.”Continued Espinoza: “The trip to Kentucky was something I wanted to do and it was good to hang out with all the old-time horses, especially at Old Friends Farm. It’s amazing to see how they look now compared to their prime when they won the Kentucky Derby.”Old Friends Farm in Lexington recently was named the official charity beneficiary of the 2016 Breeders’ Cup World Championships, in collaboration with Maker’s Mark“I’m happy to be back now and getting ready for Del Mar,” Espinoza said. “I’m working hard for that meet. I’m always lucky there. I’m planning to win a lot of races.”HALL OF FAME JOCKEYS TO SIGN ONE-OF-A-KIND POSTER NEXT SUNDAYOn closing day next Sunday, July 10, Hall of Fame jockeys Gary Stevens and Mike Smith will be available from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. to sign one-of-a-kind posters featuring three-time champion mare Beholder and the undefeated filly Songbird.Signings will take place in the shaded saddling enclosure. Families are invited to bring the kids, as Santa Anita mascots, Winnie and Lucky, will be on-hand to greet fans and offer Beholder peppermints, her favorite treat. John Sadler63971314%46%$742,733 Richard Baltas55991216%55%$401,650 Fernando Perez941111812%32%$436,128 Peter Miller571014718%54%$479,520 Mark Glatt6812151118%56%$457,026 Kent Desormeaux56118420%41%$453,685 FINISH LINES: Whether 2015 Santa Anita Derby winner Dortmund is better than ever remains to be seen, but at a Clydesdale-esque 1,400 pounds, he assuredly is bigger than ever. “I weighed him the other day and he was 1,400,” said Bob Baffert, who trains the son of 2008 Kentucky Derby winner Big Brown for Kaleem Shah. “Once I get him down to 1,380, he’ll be good to go.” Seriously, Baffert plans to run Dortmund in the San Diego Handicap on July 23, the same race 2014 Horse of the Year California Chrome and 2015 Kentucky Derby runner-up Firing Line are being pointed to . . . Triple Bend Stakes winner Lord Nelson worked three furlongs for Baffert Monday in 36.40 . . . Her Emmynency, Grade I Queen Elizabeth II winner at Keeneland last October, worked six furlongs in 1:15 for Kristin Mulhall . . . With four days left in the Spring Meet, Rafael Bejarano holds a 42-37 lead over runner-up Flavien Prat in the jockey standings, while Phil D’Amato is pretty much down to his “magic number” en route to his second straight Santa Anita training title with a 23-15 lead over late-charging Baffert . . . Hector Palma and a band of merry well-wishers celebrated the trainer’s 79th birthday this morning at Clockers’ Corner with cake, coffee and good cheer. Palma has been training since 1971 and was the groom for the great Native Diver trained by Buster Millerick . . . Santa Anita’s Spring Meet closes with a three-day week next Friday, Saturday and Sunday, July 10. Simulcast wagering will be offered on Thursday, when there is free Grandstand Admission and free grandstand parking that day and on Friday, July 8. Patrick Gallagher2972224%38%$266,100last_img read more

Is anyone going to save the Sumatran rhino?

first_imgAs the Sumatran rhino’s population dwindled, conservationists were locked in a debate about whether resources should be directed toward captive breeding or protecting wild populations.With captive breeding efforts showing success, and wild populations becoming non-viable, the pendulum has swung in favor of captive breeding.Experts agree that action is needed now more than ever, but any steps rely on support from the Indonesian government. This is the third article in our our four-part series “Is Anyone Going to Save the Sumatran Rhino?” Part One, looked at how many rhinos remain in the wild and Part Two focused on Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park and the Rhino Protection Units.WAY KAMBAS NATIONAL PARK, Indonesia — Five-year-old Andatu pushes his head between the iron bars and whistles at me, a sound like a dolphin greeting. He pulls back and snorts, expelling a puff of rhino breath. He’s telling me he’s impatient; he’s hungry. Behind me, keepers are preparing a meal of fruit and plants for him. The head veterinarian at the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary (SRS), Zulfi Arsan, tells me that Andatu is smelling me — here I am, a new human, a new bipedal smelly-being, in his territory.Andatu is the hope for the future of this species. He was born in 2012, the first baby rhino at this sanctuary — and the first Sumatran rhino (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) ever born in captivity in Indonesia. But the hope that Andatu and his younger sister, Delilah, represent is currently outweighed by the dire state of their species as a whole.Andatu has a breakfast of watermelon after being checked by keepers. Officials are discussing how to best utilize him to aid the dwindling population. Photo by Jeremy Hance for Mongabay.Official numbers put the number of Sumatran rhinos left in the wild at around 100, clumped in four locations across Sumatra and Indonesian Borneo. But nearly every expert I talked to said that was no longer the case. No one knows for sure how many are left, but the best-case scenario for the wild population would be around 90 and the worst-case 30.  And the population continues to decline.If the Sumatran rhino goes extinct — an increasingly likely proposition despite decades of desperate conservation efforts — it would not just be the loss of a species, but an entire genus. The Sumatran rhino is the only surviving species in the Dicerorhinini group that evolved 15 million to 20 million years ago. It is a living relic, an echo of a past family of rhinos that once roamed the entirety of Eurasia, and the only living relative of the woolly rhino, which humans hunted to extinction 10,000 years ago.And Sumatran rhinos, at least in my view, are the most easily lovable of the world’s rhinos: they are small (for a rhino), weirdly hairy, and the most vocal of all rhino species, making numerous cetacean-like sounds that have been little studied. It’s impossible to meet a Sumatran rhino and not feel a tug toward this shy forest wanderer.last_img read more

When it comes to captive breeding, not all Sumatran rhinos are equal

first_imgArticle published by Isabel Esterman Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Archive, Biodiversity, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Ex-situ Conservation, Governance, Mammals, Protected Areas, Rhinos, Saving Species From Extinction, Sumatran Rhino, Wildlife center_img A new partnership called Sumatran Rhino Rescue aims to capture critically endangered Sumatran rhinoceroses to reinvigorate a captive-breeding program.Most experts agree that captive breeding is necessary to prevent extinction; with wild populations small and fragmented, too few baby rhinos are being born to keep the species alive.The current plan approved by the Indonesian government focuses on capturing “doomed” or “isolated” animals in populations too small to survive in the long term.However, female Sumatran rhinos living in isolation are particularly susceptible to reproductive problems, leading some experts to argue that it makes more sense to focus on capturing rhinos from healthier populations where rhinos are known to be breeding successfully — perhaps at the risk of harming the survival prospects of those populations. In November 2018, a small female Sumatran rhino plunged into a pit trap in Kalimantan, the Indonesian part of the island of Borneo. Pahu, as she came to be called, was the first of what is hoped to be a number of captive animals for a new partnership called Sumatran Rhino Rescue. The partnership’s plan is to capture enough wild Sumatran rhinos (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) to build a sustainable captive-breeding program, one that could finally ensure the species’ survival. But the question now is, where to start? With four distinct populations, some almost totally obliterated, the question of which rhinos to catch takes on a terrible weight.Currently, the plan, with approval from the Indonesian government, is to first target the so-called isolated or doomed animals. These are animals like Pahu, stuck in small fragments of forests in groups too small to survive in the near term, let alone the long term.“We are currently focusing on finding and capturing the small, isolated populations,” says Barney Long, the senior director of species conservation at Global Wildlife Conservation, one of the partners of Sumatran Rhino Rescue. But he adds that capturing isolated animals “has never been stated as the only thing the alliance and project will focus on.”He points to the expert advisory board that will counsel the Indonesian government on where to target rhinos for capture. The board is part of Sumatran Rhino Rescue and made up of 13 voting experts from around the world. A board meeting is currently scheduled for July 29 to Aug. 1 in Jakarta.“The project will adapt based on the recommendations made by this group,” Long notes.Nan Schaffer, the founder of SOS Rhino and a veterinary expert on Sumatran rhinos, says that going after animals simply because they’re isolated is the wrong course of action. Instead of focusing on doomed animals, she says there should be one goal in mind: capturing animals that are proven breeders. The current course of action would largely focus captures in Indonesian Borneo and in southwestern Sumatra’s Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park, if there are any rhinos left there. Captures may also begin in some areas of Aceh in northern Sumatra if rhinos there are found to be separated from the main population. But Schaffer, who is also a member of the expert advisory board, says she believes the first course of action should be capturing females from Way Kambas National Park, in southeastern Sumatra, and Aceh, both areas where camera traps actually have footage of baby rhinos.The priority, according to Schaffer, is to “produce as many babies as fast as possible.”Officially there are fewer than 100 wild Sumatran rhinos left on the planet; the actual number probably ranges anywhere from 30 to 80 animals, though no one really knows for certain. There are nine Sumatran rhinos currently in captivity, but only one pair of proven breeders. Six of the captive rhinos are female, but only one has borne children (Ratu); three appear incapable of breeding (Iman, Rosa, and Bina); one has yet to be tried (Pahu); while the last is still too young (Delilah).“This is an emergency,” Schaffer says, adding, “we have to be efficient and effective.”Female Sumatran rhino with calf at the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary in Indonesia’s Way Kambas National Parl. Following two successful rhino births, the facility is home to seven rhinos. Image by Rhett A. Butler for Mongabay.com.A plague of infertile femalesSchaffer’s argument for catching proven breeders rests on history.In 1984, conservationists began catching Sumatran rhinos in the wild for captive breeding. The program, for decades, was a disaster. While the project at first suffered from a lack of knowledge about the species, the biggest hurdle was that many of the females already had or quickly developed severe reproductive pathologies, including tumors, cysts, cystic endometrial hyperplasia (abnormally thick lining of the uterus), and a propensity to lose fetuses even when able to get pregnant. It took the program 17 years and dozens of rhinos to finally produce a baby, in 2001.While there is still some debate as to the exact causes of these fertility problems, experts generally believe that if a female rhino doesn’t get pregnant and bear young frequently, she will eventually lose the ability to do so.“We think that the repeated exposure to fluctuating hormone concentrations that occur in females who cycle regularly but never get pregnant cause or exacerbate the development of [a reproductive] pathology,” says Terri Roth, the head of CREW, a research facility at Cincinnati Zoo and the scientist who finally figured out how to breed Sumatran rhinos in captivity. “In a healthy wild population, the female would rarely cycle because she would always be pregnant or lactating.”Upon reaching maturity, a steady exposure to hormones such as estrogen may turn females nearly infertile within a few years.Schaffer, who was the first to ultrasound a female rhino, discovered the various pathologies in 1991, and has been studying them ever since. In a still-unpublished paper, Schaffer describes how most of the females captured over the last 35 years developed reproductive problems.“What I discovered over subsequent years was that almost all the females had the same pathology in their uterus,” Schaffer says.And this isn’t an issue that only develops in captivity: it’s happening in the wild too. The first Indonesian female caught in 1986 had tumors in her uterus, according to Schaffer, and necropsies on rhinos killed by poachers have shown them to suffer from similar reproductive problems.In many ways, these reproductive problems explain why wild populations have collapsed over the last four decades: when a population falls to a certain size, or becomes too disconnected, females simply don’t have enough children to stave off major fertility problems. Eventually they become incapable of breeding, and the number of deaths in the rhino population begins to eclipse births.“After ten years and survey after survey the only information we had about the Malaysian Borneo population was that the population had not rebounded, the estimates just continued to decline,” Schaffer says. “The remnant population was not viable and we needed to bring them into captivity. Just a few years later, this ghost population was gone. The same thing is happening across each of the remaining populations in Indonesia.”Schaffer says the problem isn’t limited to older females, but can even show up in young rhinos.“Rosa had tumors five years after she reached maturity,” she says of one of the females residing at the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary in Way Kambas National Park, in southern Sumatra. “The quick progression of fertility loss makes immediate action critical.“Doomed [or isolated] animals are likely infertile,” Schaffer adds. “This policy [of catching doomed rhinos] has set the program back since the 80s.  We focused capture efforts on areas that contained [reproductively] compromised rhinos, but didn’t know it. At this point we should know better.”For Schaffer, rhinos stuck in isolated, or doomed, forests should be put on the backburner to make way for animals that she says will be much more likely to successfully produce offspring.In addition, Indonesia’s hesitance so far to attempt advanced breeding technologies, which can come with their own challenges and dangers, has meant that infertile rhinos are not utilized. For example, Schaffer says Rosa could still be useful to the larger population if here eggs were collected.Schaffer’s views are supported by a number of other experts.John Payne, the head of the Borneo Rhino Alliance, says the focus on catching isolated animals “failed spectacularly” because isolated animals tended to be older, less healthy, and came into captivity with pre-existing reproductive issues.Payne has been desperately trying to breed females with reproductive problems for decades, with no success to date. Now, the last known male rhino in Borneo, Tam, has died.“After 35 years we should know not to keep on doing the same thing and expecting a different result,” he says. “The focus must now be on locating those rhinos that are most likely to be fertile.”Two of the remaining Sumatran rhino habitats, Way Kambas and Bukit Barisan National Parks, lie on opposite coasts at the south of Sumatra Island.Location, location, locationFor those who support Schaffer’s views, the first targets for capture should be the rhinos of Way Kambas National Park and Aceh, not Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park. (Capture efforts could still go ahead in Kalimantan given the rhinos there, if any indeed survive, are a distinct subspecies.)Payne says it should be “easy” to get five reproductively healthy female rhinos out of Way Kambas, given the flat terrain and the fact that experts believe the park is home to 20 to 30 animals. But he also warns the population will be “severely inbred” — a reality at this point potentially for all surviving animals, except perhaps in Aceh.Petra Kretzschmar, an expert on rhinos and advanced reproductive techniques with the Berlin-based Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research, believes Aceh to hold the only “healthy population” left and therefore the best place to begin captures.Officials are currently considering building a new captive breeding facility in Aceh.The challenge with Aceh is that the mountainous and remote terrain may make captures difficult, according to Payne.“And in some locations practically almost impossible,” he adds.The focus should also be on younger rhinos, even juveniles. Payne also advocates targeting mothers and babies using a surface trap designed in Malaysian Borneo to catch rhinos without relying on them falling into a pit.Still, some point out that there is a downside to catching very young rhinos: they would have to spend years in captivity before mating could be attempted.Some rhino experts, however, don’t view the issue as quite so black-and-white.Both Roth of Cincinnati Zoo and Margaret Kinnaird, global wildlife leader with WWF International, say that while the best way to find breeding females is to go into areas where babies are known to be present, there is still value in capturing isolated animals.“The isolated animals are probably doomed if we do not do anything, so it seems worthwhile to at least capture them and see what they look like,” Roth says.Kinnaird agrees, noting that some of these animals have only become isolated “recently,” meaning they still could be reproductively healthy.Removing animals from Way Kambas and Aceh also comes with risks. Not only could animals be injured or killed during capture, as happened with Najaq a female in Borneo, but the efforts could harm the chances for survival of the two wild populations.“That is a hard decision to make,” Roth says. “If populations are reproducing well in the forest, the tendency is to leave them there and protect them.  After all, that is ultimately what we are striving for with this species.”Of course, the question then becomes, are any of these populations actually viable in the long term? Do births actually outnumber deaths anywhere? And are rhinos, even in remote Aceh, actually protected from the threats of poaching and snaring? Rhinos in captivity are safer from those threats, yet that only assumes they can be successfully and safely captured, which isn’t guaranteed.“Many feel that giving this option of [catching isolated rhinos] is worth the risk of leaving the two known breeding populations in the wild for a couple more years until we have captured some isolated rhinos and assessed their reproductive potential,” says Long, who declines to take a side on the issue.This debate isn’t new. It’s been going on for decades, but since Indonesia has now agreed to new captures for the first time since the 1990s, it has gone from a hypothetical to the need to make tough decisions.“I don’t think there is a clear right or wrong here, but opinions behind each option are strong,” Long says.The challenges of the decision are highlighted by the most recent animal caught, Pahu.Ratu with her firstborn, Andatu, four days after his birth in June 2012. Ratu is currently the only female Sumatran rhino in captivity known to be capable of bearing live calves. Image courtesy of the International Rhino FoundationThe Pahu puzzlePahu was an isolated rhino and is believed to be quite old, around 25 years. But experts say they’ve found no obvious reproductive problems or tumors with Pahu. So far, Pahu may have bucked the trend and arguably provides support for the idea that catching isolated rhinos may bear some fruit.“If we had abandoned Pahu, she would have very likely died in a snare. There was no chance of her remaining in her forest fragment, which was rapidly being encroached by logging, mining and other activities,” Kinnaird says. “Although other females captured in Bornean Malaysia have shown reproductive problems, Pahu does not at this point.”But there are other problems with mating Pahu. She’s small — very small: she weighs around 360 kilograms (790 pounds), and while this may sound large, the average weight of a Sumatran rhino is more than double that. Schaffer says she may even be suffering from dwarfism. And some fear that attempting to mate her with a male could lead to injury or even death; Sumatran rhino mating is a violent, raucous affair. Others fear that, given her size, she would be unable to safely birth a regular-sized baby. Breeding success with her remains untested and unknown.Currently, Pahu sits in a facility in Kalimantan while experts decide the next course of action.But the rhinos of Kalimantan provide another last-ditch opportunity. They are distinct representatives of a nearly extinct subspecies. Tam, who recently died, may have been the last male Bornean rhino. Capturing more animals in Kalimantan, assuming any are there, could maintain at least some of the subspecies’ distinct genetics, even if it means mating them with the Sumatran line.For her part, Kinnaird says a strategy of catching both isolated animals and some from core populations is the best way forward.She notes that isolated animals include males, which don’t suffer from the same reproductive pathologies. New males are needed almost as desperately today as females, given that all three males currently in captivity are directly related.A rhino calf, photographed in 2016 at the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary in Way Kambas. The park that hosts the sanctuary is also home to a population of wild rhinos. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.No easy way forwardAlthough there’s finally a plan to capture wild rhinos, it doesn’t mean the way forward is clear or easy.“Each of the last seven animals that have come into captivity have had fertility problems — abortions, cysts and tumors.  How many more will it take before we shift our focus?” Schaffer says.But there are other considerations here. Long says that Sumatran Rhino Rescue has only secured political will from Indonesia to catch isolated rhinos, but not yet rhinos from the core populations.“This does not mean this support can’t be secured or that we would not try to secure it,” he adds, but notes that getting the support of the government would require “more work.”It took years to convince Indonesia to move forward with captures at all.Time, space, resources and money are running out. Catching infertile females will mean spending limited resources on animals that will very likely not carry the population forward. Already there are three females in captivity that are unlikely to contribute to future generations, unless Indonesia finally agrees to go ahead with utilizing advanced technologies and success is swift. These females all require funding, space, and employee time.“If we have limited time, limited capture teams, limited resources and limited space in our sanctuary, we have to take the most efficient route toward the goal of increasing birthrates,” Schaffer says. “Given that the emergency is the need for production of babies as soon as possible, the rescue of isolated animals is secondary.“We are at the final crossroad,” she adds: “It truly is now or never.”A Sumatran rhino at the Way Kambas sanctuary. Image by Tiffany Roufs for Mongabay.Correction: this article has been updated to correct the name of one of the female rhinos, Iman, that is likely to be infertile.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Africa’s largest reserve may lose half its area to oil development

first_imgArticle published by terna gyuse Animals, Biodiversity, Birds, Conflict, Conservation, Critically Endangered Species, Deserts, Development, Ecology, Elephants, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Human Migration, Hunting, Mammals, Oil, Over-hunting, Poaching, Research, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img The Termit and Tin Touma National Nature Reserve in Niger was Africa’s largest when it was established in 2012.Just seven years on, however, the government is considering redrawing its boundaries and slashing its size by nearly half.The move comes in response to a push by the China National Petroleum Corporation (CNPC), which has exploration rights in a small section of the reserve, to expand its operations significantly.Conservation groups, including the NGO that manages the reserve, say the move would impact areas of high biodiversity, threatening species such as the critically endangered addax and dama gazelle. Created in 2012, Niger’s Termit and Tin Toumma National Nature Reserve is the last region of the Sahara relatively undisturbed by human activity. But expanding oil exploration threatens this sanctuary for 130 bird and 17 mammal species, including the critically endangered addax (Addax nasomaculatus).The Termit and Tin Toumma National Nature Reserve (Réserve Naturelle Nationale de Termit et Tin-Toumma) covers nearly 100,000 square kilometers (38,600 square miles) of desert and low mountains in the southern Sahara, an area three times the size of Belgium and as large as the U.S. State of Maine. A UNESCO World Heritage Site, it is internationally recognized for the biodiversity it hosts within a landscape ranging from mountains and valleys to grassy plains, open desert and sand seas.But on June 26 this year, seven years after the reserve was established, the Council of Ministers of Niger announced that its boundaries would be modified, removing nearly 45,000 square kilometers (17,300 square miles) from the protected area.“We were shocked to learn this,” said Sébastien Pinchon, parks manager at the French NGO Noé that manages the reserve on behalf of the government. The final agreement entrusting management of the reserve to Noé was signed just a few months ago, on Nov. 5, 2018.“We are just getting started, constructing buildings, buying vehicles and hiring people to properly manage the area,” Pinchon told Mongabay. The size and remoteness of the area mean it will take one or two years for the reserve to be fully operational, he said.China National Petroleum Corporation (CNPC), one of the world’s largest oil companies, has exploration rights in a small region inside the reserve, but suddenly pushed for a major expansion, Pinchon said. Ten years ago, Niger announced that in exchange for a $5 billion investment, the Chinese government-owned CNPC would build a number of wells, a 20,000-barrel-per-day refinery, and a pipeline out of the nation for exports.The 45,000 square kilometers the government wants to remove from the reserve also happens to be where most of the wildlife is found, including the addax–  of which fewer than 100 individuals remain in the wild – and another critically endangered species, the dama gazelle (Nanger dama). “The government proposes to add a similar amount of land to reserve on its western boundary, but it has little ecological value,” Pinchon said.It took decades of surveys, wildlife monitoring, education, and meetings to mobilize support at all levels from the local people living in the area to the president of Niger so the reserve could be created in the first place, said John Newby, senior adviser at the Sahara Conservation Fund, a conservation NGO.“The reserve is unique in the entire Sahara-Sahel Region because its rich wildlife community is still intact,” said Newby, who has worked in the region for more than 30 years.However, since CNPC oil operations began in 2010, the addax population has crashed, he told Mongabay. “It’s not the drilling, but poaching by Niger’s military units protecting the CNPC camps that has brought the addax to the verge of extinction.”Armed conflict across the Sahara and Sahel region is devastating the region’s wildlife. Photo: University of Granada.The poaching appears to be for meat. Bloodied military clothing has been found buried with addax remains. “I’ve run into these military patrols. No one is going to stop them out in the desert,” Newby said.Government and military officials have done little about this despite pleas from conservationists. The Chinese could stop it but they are uninterested in even talking about it, Newby said. “They don’t seem to care what’s happening.”Noé has made many attempts over the years to meet with CNPC officials, without any success, Pinchon said. This disinterest is in sharp contrast to China’s expressed interest in becoming a global leader in biodiversity, he said. The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), under Chinese presidency, is organizing the World Congress for Nature in France next year. China will also host what’s expected to be a landmark meeting of the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity in November 2020.“Oil and wildlife can co-exist, if it’s done to international standards or how it is done in China,” Pinchon said. Instead, observers and locals report poisoned livestock near leaking pipelines, dead birds in oil drilling waste ponds, waste dumping in the desert, cutting of trees, and collection of special tubers that are the addax’s main source of water, he said.Oil extraction doesn’t have to have a big impact if it’s designed well, said Fabien Quétier of Biotope, an ecological science consulting group based in France.Oil extraction in Gabon by Shell Oil, working with conservation partners including the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, has benefited wildlife and reduced poaching in and around Loango National Park on the country’s Atlantic coast, he said.If China wants to do business in other countries with important ecological areas, it could show that it’s capable of operating without any negative impacts in Niger, Quétier told Mongabay.Map courtesy Noé“Niger is rightly proud of the amount of protected areas they have. They’re one of the world leaders,” Newby said. However, it’s also one of the poorest countries in the world. That’s why Noé is managing the reserve, bringing technical knowledge, training, and millions in funding from the European Union, he said.Nature reserve management by nonprofit organizations on behalf of governments is becoming common in Africa and elsewhere Newby noted. Funding for the reserve will have to continue since the security situation is too risky to generate any revenue from tourism. Niger has been involved in the regional fight to counter Boko Haram, and is also a waypoint for the human trafficking of migrants trying to get to Libya and on to Europe.Niger needs the oil revenue, and oil extraction can be done without destroying the environment or removing lands from the Reserve, Newby said.“The proposed land swap isn’t the solution.”Banner image: Fewer than 100 addax remain in the wild: Photo: Thomas Rabeil/Sahara Conservation FundFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Indonesian officials charged in $1.6m bribes-for-permits scheme

first_imgTwo land agency officials have been charged with taking $1.6 million in bribes in exchange for granting oil palm plantation concessions spanning an area of 200 hectares (500 acres) in Indonesian Borneo.Investigators from the KPK, Indonesia’s anti-graft commission, are also investigating the businesspeople allegedly involved in the deal.KPK deputy chairman Laode Muhammad Syarif says the case highlights the dangers of the government’s continued refusal to allow greater transparency in the permit-issuance process.A watchdog group warns that corruption in the palm oil industry could get worse if the KPK is weakened under the purview of a controversial new law. JAKARTA — Anti-corruption investigators in Indonesia have charged two government officials for allegedly taking $1.6 million in bribes to grant permits for oil palm plantations spanning just over half the size of New York’s Central Park.The Corruption Eradication Commission (KPK) announced the charges on Nov. 29 against Gusmin Tuarita, an official at the National Land Agency (BPN), and Siswidodo, from the West Kalimantan provincial land agency.The pair stand accused of taking 22.23 billion rupiah in bribes in exchange for granting plantation concessions spanning an area of 200 hectares (500 acres) in West Kalimantan, Indonesian Borneo.The KPK did not identify the parties that allegedly paid the bribes, but spokesman Febri Diansyah told local media that a number of individuals were being investigated. “There are some businesspeople in the palm oil industry whom we have questioned,” he said as quoted by Beritasatu.The case marks the latest anti-graft bust by the KPK, which has recently focused more of its attention to corruption in Indonesia’s natural resources sector. In 2016, a KPK audit found that the country lacked a credible and accountable system to prevent violations and corruption in the palm oil industry. The commission identified the permit-issuance process for plantations as being particularly rife with corruption.KPK deputy chairman Laode Muhammad Syarif said this was because of the lack of transparency in the process, which often results in permits being issued that overlap with existing land claims or onto forest areas that are off-limits to plantations.The BPN has insisted on keeping the plantation permit data, which include maps and boundaries, out of the public’s reach, in defiance of a 2017 order by the Supreme Court for the agency to make the data publicly available.Sofyan Djalil, the head of the BPN, has refused to follow the order, arguing that the documents are the property of private companies, and that publishing them could reveal confidential financial information.The government has doubled down on that stance, instructing member companies of the country’s powerful palm oil lobby to not share their plantation data with other parties, including external consultants, NGOs, and multilateral and foreign agencies.Some palm oil companies have publicly said they have no problem with publishing their concession maps, though others in the industry have expressed the view that local thugs could use the maps to extort them.The country’s palm oil lobby, known by its Indonesian acronym GAPKI, meanwhile, has repeatedly said that opening up the HGU data would hurt the palm oil industry as the data could be scrutinized by the public, rocking the boat.NGOs say that’s exactly why they need the maps, to monitor companies’ activities and hold them accountable.University students heading towards the Indonesian parliament’s building in Jakarta to protest against several controversial bills, including the recently passed KPK law. Image by Hans Nicholas Jong/Mongabay.‘Naughty’ agenciesThe move away from transparency and toward greater opacity has drawn intense criticism, not only from civil society groups but also from other government agencies.Both the country’s ombudsman and the KPK have recommended the BPN make the plantation permit data available to the public. The agency’s refusal to do so in the interests of preventing corruption prompted Laode to label the BPN one of four “naughty” government agencies. The other three are also involved in regulating the natural resources sector: the Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources, the Ministry of Agriculture, and the Ministry of Environment and Forestry.“To be honest, we’re complaining,” Laode told lawmakers during a parliamentary hearing on Nov. 27. “These four agencies have lots of budget but they have the worst management because they’re always closed off to the KPK.”He cited the West Kalimantan bribery case as an example of the urgency for making the licensing process more transparent.“Specifically for the BPN, we are hoping that the [plantation permit] data is made transparent, [as] the Supreme Court has already ruled that it should be,” Laode said. “Why is there a need to make it transparent? So that there’s no overlapping [permits]. There are even plantations inside forest areas.”Khalisah Khalid, the head of politics at the Indonesian Forum for the Environment (Walhi), the country’s biggest green NGO, said making the permit data publicly available would compel the government to be more stringent about regulating the palm oil industry.“It’s important because the public can scrutinize the data, which will make the government more accountable,” she told Mongabay.A worker takes a chainsaw to an oil palm on an illegal plantation in Tenggulun. Image by Junaidi Hanafiah for Mongabay.Weakening the watchdogKhalisah also stressed the importance of allowing the KPK to retain its far-reaching investigative powers, given the reticence of other government agencies to go after corruption in the natural resources sector.“That’s why we’re worried about the efforts to weaken the KPK,” she said. “Because other than the mining and coal sectors, the KPK also targets the forestry and plantation sectors.”Parliament passed a hugely controversial bill in September that severely curtails the KPK’s ability to carry out investigations. Under the bill, which is being challenged at the country’s Constitutional Court, the KPK is no longer an independent state institution. Instead, it becomes a government agency, staffed by the very civil servants it was originally tasked with monitoring, and overseen by a council handpicked by the president and parliament — a body of legislators who have often been the target of anti-corruption investigations.It has also been stripped of its authority to carry out independent wiretaps of suspects — one of the key weapons in its war on graft that has helped it achieve a near 100 percent conviction rate.The passage of the bill prompted massive protests by university students in Jakarta and other cities across Indonesia, who called on President Joko Widodo to issue an executive order that would quash the new law. But despite having built his career on a reformist image and making the fight against corruption one of his priority agendas during his campaign, Widodo has made it clear that he will not issue the executive order.Laode said these developments contradicted the president’s promise to strengthen the KPK.“We’re still hoping for the president to issue the executive order,” he said. “We’re still very much hoping for that.”Khalisah warned of corruption thriving in the plantation industry if the KPK was weakened.“As an institution committed [to fighting corruption], the KPK mustn’t be weakened,” she said. “A strong KPK is needed to monitor the industry.” Corruption, Environment, Environmental Law, Forests, Law, Law Enforcement, Oil Palm, Palm Oil, Plantations, Rainforests, Transparency Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Banner image: Oil palm plantation in Rawa Singking Wildlife Reserve. Image by Junaidi Hanafiah/Mongabay-Indonesia.center_img Article published by Hans Nicholas Jong FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

LNOC, Youth & Sports Must Rescue Basketball

first_imgIt comes a time in the life of a people or an organization that compels someone to act for the common good of all. If that opinion is correct, which I have no doubt about, then I need someone at the Liberia National Olympic Committee and the Ministry of Youth & Sports to act.The headline to this commentary suggests that Liberian basketball deserves an urgent rescue, and followers of the game can agree that since the partial end of the Ebola virus disease that has encouraged other sporting organizations, including the LFA to restart their programs, Liberian Basketball Federation seemed to have no way forward.True, for at least four occasions, a congress and its attendant scheduled elections could not be held due to disagreements on administrative issues.LNOC President Phillibert Brown and Deputy Minister for Sports, Hon. Henry Yonton paid considerable attention to burning issues raised by several club presidents but ended in failure.At one point, LNOC’s Brown was compelled to remark openly that Rufus Anderson’s administration failed to do those little things that could have earned the confidence of those who were calling for his head, and therefore because Anderson did not do them, he lost the authority to lead the organization.As painful as those remarks were, Mr. Brown, who held the leadership of the Liberia Basketball Federation for many years, could not be wrong. Then of course, he is the president of the Liberia National Olympic Committee.The LNOC has been one of the major sponsors of basketball and therefore if Brown does not see an individual as capable to lead an association that he has to provide financial and logistical support to, then of course there could be a problem in the future.But it is important to accept the fact that Mr. Rufus Anderson deserves some credit. This is because he loves basketball and he has served as president for the last four years. Sadly, while he could not boast of major achievements, that he supervised the successful hosting of an FIBA Zone 11 Tournament in Liberia demands a great amount of respect.But at the same time, not everyone will appreciate your contribution and it is therefore important to understand that there are times one must let things go and move on.Admittedly, those who have been at logger heads with Anderson’s administration are stakeholders who spend their resources to develop basketball and as a result their opinion must not be overlooked.This is where the Ministry of Youth & Sports comes in. Interestingly, Minister Eugene Nagbe recently resolved a long standing conflict among members of the Federation of Liberian Youths, and therefore I request his intervention to resolve the impasse in basketball.There must be compromises and give and take offers. Someone must be able to look at the future of basketball and take some decisions and the Ministry of Youth & Sports, in collaboration with the Liberia National Olympic Committee must agree to take a concerted but rescue decision to end the frustration of those who love the game and cannot stomach its degradation.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more