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Archive of posts published in the tag: 宁波泛太平洋酒店爽记

2016 was even deadlier for environmental and indigenous activists than 2015

first_imgArticle published by Mike Gaworecki Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Activism, Agriculture, Dams, Endangered Environmentalists, Environment, Illegal Logging, Indigenous Communities, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Industrial Agriculture, Law Enforcement, Logging, Mining, Poaching, Rainforest Logging center_img According to a new report released today by Global Witness, at least 200 people were killed in 24 countries last year in retaliation for standing up to environmentally destructive industrial projects. That’s up from 185 murders in 16 countries in 2015.With at least 33 murders linked to the sector, mining appears to be the most deadly industry to oppose. But killings connected to logging companies are on the rise, with 23 in 2016, compared to 15 the year before. Another 23 deaths were associated with agribusiness projects, 18 with poachers, and seven with hydroelectric dam projects.More than half of all killings of environmental activist last year occurred in Latin America. Brazil was once again the deadliest country in the world to be an activist, with 49 murders, many of them committed by loggers and landowners in the Amazon. Last year, London-based NGO Global Witness published a report that showed 2015 was the deadliest year for defenders of the environment since the group started tracking killings of activists in 2002. But that record didn’t last long, as the number of environmental and indigenous activists murdered in 2016 was not only higher, but even more widespread across the globe.According to a new report released today by Global Witness, at least 200 people were killed in 24 countries last year in retaliation for standing up to environmentally destructive industrial projects. That’s up from 185 murders in 16 countries in 2015.That means that four defenders of the land, wildlife, or the environment were murdered every week in 2016, and the authors of the Global Witness report note that these numbers may actually be far from complete: “With many killings unreported, and even less investigated, it is likely that the true number is actually far higher.”Some 33 murders were linked to the mining sector, making it the most deadly industry to oppose. But killings connected to logging companies are on the rise, with 23 in 2016, compared to 15 the year before. Another 23 deaths were associated with agribusiness projects, 18 with poachers, and seven with hydroelectric dam projects.Private security forces and hitmen hired by industrial actors were responsible for 52 of the killings, Global Witness found.Some 40 percent of the victims of lethal anti-environmental violence were indigenous people. When an industrial project is forced on an indigenous community — often without their free, prior, and informed consent — protest is typically the only recourse available to the people that have, in many cases, occupied their land for generations. Far from protecting indigenous peoples’ right to protest, however, government forces frequently act in complicity with industry: Police and soldiers are believed to have been the perpetrators in at least 43 of the murders recorded last year, the report states.Park rangers are facing increasing threats, as well, with 20 killed in the line of duty in 2016 — nine of those in the Democratic Republic of Congo alone.“Brave activists are being murdered, attacked and criminalised by the very people who are supposed to protect them,” Ben Leather, a campaigner with Global Witness, said in a statement. “Governments, companies and investors have a duty to guarantee that communities are consulted about the projects that affect them, that activists are protected from violence, and that perpetrators are brought to justice.”More than half of all killings of environmental activist last year occurred in Latin America. Brazil was once again the deadliest country in the world to be an activist, with 49 murders, many of them committed by loggers and landowners in the Amazon. Meanwhile, Colombia saw a spike in the number of killings, which reached 37 last year, an all-time high for the country and the second most recorded by Global Witness for a single country — mostly due to conflicts sparked as Colombians return to areas previously held under guerrilla control only to find extractive companies and paramilitaries aggressively disputing their claims to the land.Nicaragua, where 11 activists were killed, had the highest per-capita death rate for activists last year, but Honduras still has the most murders per capita over the past decade, with 127 activists having been killed since 2007 — including indigenous rights activist Berta Cáceres, who was assassinated in her home in Honduras in March of last year, sparking an international outcry.On the other side of the globe, killings in India tripled to 16, most of them linked to mining projects, heavy-handed policing, and the repression of peaceful protests. The mining industry is also seen as having driven the 28 murders of activists in the Philippines last year.As activists face an increasingly deadly threat from the very industries they oppose, however, they are all-too frequently criminalized for their activities. This trend is evident even in the United States, which didn’t record a murder of an environmental activist last year but did see a number of other violent tactics used to suppress and criminalize protests against an oil pipeline being built near the near the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota.“It is increasingly clear that, globally, governments and companies are failing in their duty to protect activists at risk,” the report authors write. “They are permitting a level of impunity that allows the vast majority of perpetrators to walk free, emboldening would-be assassins. Incredibly, it is the activists themselves who are painted as criminals, facing trumped-up criminal charges and aggressive civil cases brought by governments and companies seeking to silence them.”A collaborative project between Global Witness and the Guardian that aims to track every environmental activist killed in 2017 found that 98 had already been murdered as of May 31, putting this year on path to set yet another record.While federal governments have a duty to protect activists under international law, private businesses must also help tackle the root causes of the problem, the authors of the report add, by “guaranteeing communities can make free and informed choices about whether and how their land and resources are used.” Investors and development banks must also take a look at their portfolios and stop funding projects that are harmful to the environment and human rights, the authors write.“The battle to protect the planet is rapidly intensifying and the cost can be counted in human lives,” Global Witness’s Ben Leather said. “More people in more countries are being left with no option but to take a stand against the theft of their land or the trashing of their environment. Too often they are brutally silenced by political and business elites, while the investors that bankroll them do nothing.”Private security guarding the Agua Zarca dam project. The ex-head of private security for the dam is one of seven people arrested for the killing of Berta Cáceres, who had been campaigning for years against the construction of the Agua Zarca hydroelectric dam on her community’s land and the sacred Gualcarque River. As head of an indigenous rights organisation, she was subject to frequent threats and harassment for her opposition to the project. She was assassinated in her home in March 2016. Photo by Giles Clarke.last_img read more

Indonesian conservation bill stirs debate over geothermal rigs, private guards

first_imgA proposed revision of Indonesia’s 1990 Conservation Law provides a mechanism for companies to obtain a waiver for geothermal drilling in forest areas zoned for conservation, currently off-limits to the industry.Lawmakers are considering a proposal from companies that their security guards be allowed to arrest trespassers in their plantation and mining concessions.The law would include heavier penalties for wildlife traffickers. JAKARTA – It was supposed to be about cracking down on the illegal wildlife trade, as traffickers move online.But a conservation bill now making its way through Indonesia’s parliament is drawing fire for stipulations that would open new forest areas for geothermal drilling and empower plantation-company security guards to make arrests.Indonesia, a heavily forested archipelago country, is home to incredible biodiversity. But poor governance has allowed the trade in rare animals to flourish, especially as the Internet provides new tools with which to connect with buyers.In 2015, news of the arrest of a smuggler who had stuffed 24 rare cockatoos in plastic water bottles prompted many Indonesians to turn over their illegal pets to the government. Not long after that, President Joko Widodo’s administration announced plans to revise the 1990 Conservation Law, which lays out penalties for traffickers, in order to fight criminal traders.But some have criticized a recent draft of the bill from the House of Representatives that provides a mechanism for companies to obtain a waiver for geothermal drilling in forest areas zoned for conservation, currently off-limits to the industry.“This conservation law should have been the last standing fort,” said Nur Hidayati, executive director of the Indonesian Forum for the Environment (Walhi), the country’s largest environmental pressure group. “Instead there are loopholes that would allow extractive industries to exploit more protected areas.”The debate over the drilling stipulation comes as President Jokowi, as he is popularly known, aims to increase Indonesia’s electricity generating capacity, with demand in the country of 260 million people expected to double by 2020 over 2012 levels.At the same time, Jokowi plans to cut Indonesia’s reliance on petroleum in favor of renewable energy sources like geothermal, which releases fewer greenhouse gas emissions.The rub: a huge portion of Indonesia’s geothermal reserves – the largest in the world – lie in conservation forests. For some time, the industry has been trying to open these areas for geothermal drilling, arguing that keyhole drilling operations have a minimal environmental footprint. Critics, however, say supporting infrastructure required by drilling rigs, especially road networks built to service them, fragments the forest in a way that can hasten its destruction.Not all NGOs believe geothermal rigs should be kept out of conservation forests. Indra Sari Wardhani, climate and energy manager of WWF-Indonesia, said it would be better to allow this kind of drilling than for Indonesia to increase its dependence on coal. She believes the conservation law should regulate geothermal drilling in away that ensures it is done sustainably.“Geothermal is an important energy source for Indonesia to shift from fossil fuels to renewable energies,” she said.Power plants, she added, should be kept out of conservation forests. Walhi’s Hidayati argued geothermal should be excluded from the conservation bill, since the industry is already regulated in a 2014 law. “This bill should no longer regulate things that already has its own law,” she said. Farmers work a potato farm near a geothermal plant on the Dieng Plateau, on the Indonesian island of Java. Photo by Raditya Mahendra Yasa/Flickr.Another subject of debate is a proposal from companies that their security guards be allowed arrest encroachers in their concessions, an idea opposed by critics who say it would deepen conflicts with surrounding communities.Corporate representatives aired the idea at a recent parliamentary hearing, according to Walhi’s Hidayati. The existence of the proposal was confirmed by House member Viva Yoga Mauladi, head of the parliamentary committee overseeing the bill. “There’s an idea to give limited authority [to private security guards] to make arrests whenever there’s a violation [of the law],” he said. “Violators would be handed over to state officials to be processed according to the law.”Encroachment is widespread in company concessions, many of which cover huge areas the size of small cities. The same is true in many national parks and other forest reserves, with the government devoting few resources to securing these areas. A massive nature reserve in Borneo has just three forest rangers assigned to patrol it, according to a scientist working there.Hidayati opposes the idea of empowering company guards. “This is going wild wild west,” she said. Satrio Adi Wicaksono, forests and landscape restoration manager at the World Resources Institute, a U.S.-based thinktank with an office in Jakarta, said it would be better to encourage partnerships with indigenous and other rural communities to patrol conservation areas rather than rely on private forces. He also suggested remote sensing and other technololgy could aid law enforcers. “High-resolution satellite images could be used to monitor deforestation in conservation areas in almost real time,” he said. “It would be great if there was infrastructure that could alert [forest rangers] about deforestation.” Article published by mongabayauthor Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Banner image: A geothermal power plant in the Ulubelu field in Indonesia’s Lampung province, on the island of Sumatra. Photo by Aldio Dwi Perkasa/Flickr.last_img read more