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Archive of posts published in the tag: 上海夜网论坛

1,750 Tickets reserved for Fans of BiH in Athens

first_imgAccording to the agreement of the Football Association of BiH and the Football Association of Greece, a total of 1,750 tickets is reserved for fans of BiH, and the price of one ticket is 10 EUR.Interested individuals and organized groups can apply for the appropriate number of tickets, no later than by the 1st of November 2016 until 00:00 am, via e-mail address [email protected] individual can apply for a maximum of five tickets, with the submission of a photocopy of their identity document (passport) and address of residence, as well as the list of fans / passengers with their dates of birth, passport number and address of residence.Organized groups can apply for more than five tickets, what submitted photocopy of an identification document (passport) of the representatives of the group, with address of residence, and a list of all the fans / passengers with dates of birth, passport number and place of residence, as well as information on the way of travel and possible accommodation in Greece.The competent service of the Football Association of BiH will consider all applications until the 4th of November 2016, when sale of tickets will begin. Individuals and groups whose application is accepted will be informed.Match Greece – BiH will be played in Athens on the 13th of November at 8:45 pm in the context of the fourth round of the qualifiers for the World Cup 2018.(Source: klix.ba)last_img read more

England Golf plans new County Rules Schools

first_img England Golf will run two County Rules Schools in early 2015, in Cumbria and on the Channel Island of Guernsey. Further rules schools will take place in other regions later in the year. Since 2011, England Golf has run 14 rules schools across the country, all proving very popular and attracting a total of over 400 people. Successful delegates qualify as county referees and can assist at county tournaments. The Guernsey school will be the first of these courses to take place off the mainland and is being run at the request of the Jersey and Guernsey Golf Unions. Successful delegates will be qualified to officiate at the 2015 Island Games, which are being held in Jersey from 27 June to 3 July and will attract competitors from 24 islands. The Cumbria school is also being held at the request of county officials and Toby Thorne, England Golf Championship Manager, said: “We are delighted by the interest in our rules schools and the invitations we receive from across the country. We are very pleased to provide opportunities for people to attend a school on their doorstep.” The County Rules Schools are open to all members of golf clubs affiliated to England Golf and delegates should have at least a basic understanding of the Rules of Golf before attending. The format of the school is a mix of outdoor practical demonstrations, refereeing role-play scenarios and some indoor tutorials. There is an exam on the second day of the course. The details for the events are as follows: St Pierre Park Hotel and Golf Resort, Guernsey Day 1: Saturday 11th April, 2015 Day 2 (inc exam): Sunday 12th April, 2015 Entry deadline: Friday 20th February, 2015 Penrith Golf Club, Cumbria Day 1:    Wednesday 1st April, 2015 Day 2 (inc exam): Wednesday 13th May, 2015 Entry deadline: Friday 27th February, 2015 The fee for attending an England Golf County Rules School is £50, which includes tuition, lunch, teas and coffees.  Priority will be given to applicants from the host counties but delegates from other counties are welcome to apply and will be accommodated where possible. For more information regarding the England Golf County Rules Schools and how to register your interest, please click here Image © Leaderboard Photography -ENDS- 15 Dec 2014 England Golf plans new County Rules Schools last_img read more

Column: Sit or play? Davis and Williamson cases differ

first_imgThe New Orleans Pelicans beat LeBron James and the Los Angeles Lakers over the weekend even with Anthony Davis riding the bench, ostensibly to get some rest after the All-Star break. When they met again Wednesday night at Staples Center, Davis was watching courtside for most of the second half after being pulled for Cheick Diallo. Still, the Lakers struggled to put away the Pelicans even with their star on the bench.That says something about the Lakers, who suddenly find themselves in a race for irrelevancy in the West. Bookies in Las Vegas now believe they won’t even make the playoffs, and even James seems to be having second thoughts about the guys playing on the court with him.Barring some miracle, the Pelicans won’t make the playoffs either. And there surely won’t be a miracle with Davis benched for some games and an afterthought in others.The Pelicans, of course, are giving Davis limited minutes because he wants to play elsewhere. No sense risking his trade value when there are plenty of teams that will come courting for the star after the end of the season.“Obviously, he’d like to be playing,” New Orleans coach Alvin Gentry said. “But I think we’ve got to look and see what we feel like is best for us at this particular time and move forward.”Duke’s Zion Williamson (1) falls to the floor with an injury while chasing the ball with North Carolina’s Luke Maye (32) during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game in Durham, N.C., Wednesday, Feb. 20, 2019. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)The situation is a little different at Duke, where star freshman Zion Williamson is out because of a bizarre equipment malfunction that sent shock waves through Nike headquarters. The Blue Devils were the No. 1 team in the nation before Williamson sprained a knee in a shoe blowout, but have now lost two of their last three games with him out of the lineup.The injury has led to speculation that Williamson might not play the rest of the season, even if he’s judged healthy. Some believe there’s too much money at stake in the NBA, where Williamson is widely expected to be the No. 1 pick in the next draft, to risk injury even though Duke would be favored to win a national title with Williamson on the court.Sit or play. Two different situations, with two possibly very different outcomes.Does New Orleans owe it to its fans to play Davis even if it might jeopardize a future trade? Does Williamson owe it to himself and his family to protect his financial future by sitting the rest of the season even if it costs Duke a possible national title?Surprisingly enough, the answer to both questions just might be yes.There’s really no good reason for New Orleans to sit Davis some games and not play him in the fourth quarter in others. And there’s a lot of reasons — most of them financial — for Williamson to protect himself for what will surely be the biggest score of his life.Sure, the Pelicans might be taking a bit of a risk by playing Davis when they are realistically out of contention for a playoff spot in the West. There’s always the chance — however slight — that he could injure himself so badly that the Pelicans don’t get the biggest pot of gold available when he is officially offered up for trade at the end of the season.But there are still fans paying good money expecting that New Orleans puts the best starting five it can on the court every night. There are sponsors and broadcast partners who have every reason to expect Davis would be out earning the $25 million he is being paid this season instead of riding the bench.No, this is not a situation the Pelicans created. Blame that on Davis for declaring last month through his agent that he wanted to be traded.Still, in a star-driven league, it’s hard to rationalize not playing one of the biggest stars around for the last part of the season.Williamson, on the other hand, owes Duke little. He was recruited to play just one season to begin with, so it’s not as if he’s going to miss out on finishing his degree by sitting out the rest of the season.This is Williamson’s one shot to cash in, and jeopardizing that would be a mistake, even if it means Duke might not win its sixth national title under coach Mike Krzyzewski.The billion-dollar NCAA Tournament might just have to take place without him.___Tim Dahlberg is a national sports columnist for The Associated Press. Write to him at [email protected] or http://twitter.com/timdahlberg New Orleans Pelicans’ Anthony Davis, left, shoots over Los Angeles Lakers’ LeBron James (23) during the first half of an NBA basketball game Wednesday, Feb. 27, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)last_img read more

SAN MARCOS STAKES QUOTES – SATURDAY, FEB. 4, 2017

first_imgJOCKEY QUOTES AUSTIN TRITES, ASSISTANT TO TRAINER GEORGER WEAVER, ISOTHERM, WINNER: “Well at the end of the day, George Weaver entrusted me here with one horse. It’s just us and we’ve had a great time. The horse has done nothing but improve.“I think it was just the time from his soft turf try at Belmont transitioning to his time here. He’s had more time to adjust. He’s had 24 days since the Mathis Brothers Mile to settle and to relax. He was ready to post those two big works, for sure.“Most of his trips wind up with us wanting to pull our hair out so this was amazing. Flavien Prat has a nose for the pocket and managed to get a perfect trip today.” FLAVIEN PRAT, ISOTHERM, WINNER: “I was hoping he would break well, and he did, so I kinda used that to my advantage. We didn’t go that fast so I was sitting just behind the pace and thought he’d have a good shot. It worked out well.“Today, I knew I had some good shots. Everything worked out really well and I’m pretty lucky.”center_img TRAINER QUOTESlast_img read more

VINTAGE SANTA ANITA STARTING GATE TO ADORN PADDOCK GARDENS THIS SATURDAY, SANTA ANITA HANDICAP DAY; LEGENDARY SEABISUIT BROKE FROM STALL 13 EN ROUTE TO WINNING 1940 BIG ‘CAP

first_imgARCADIA, Calif. (March 9, 2017)–Santa Anita’s first-ever electronic starting gate, which housed the legendary Seabiscuit prior to his career-capping victory in the 1940 Santa Anita Handicap, has been completely refurbished and will be on display for fans to admire in the track’s East Paddock Gardens this Saturday, Santa Anita Handicap Day, at Santa Anita.De-commissioned for decades, the 15 ton gate had been relegated to Santa Anita’s own “battleship row,” according to assistant starter John Lopez, who headed the renovation project.“I had been looking at that gate since I was a little kid and I just decided this was something that needed to be done,” said Lopez, 59, who began working as an assistant starter in 1977.  “It was just wasting away and I said, ‘You know what, I can do this.’  It’s like putting a model airplane or car back together.”With Lopez heading the project that began this past May, he was assisted by Santa Anita’s Carpenter and Paint Shops, as well as the track’s Director of Graphics, Candice Coder Chew.“The carpenters built the sign, the painters stripped everything down and brought it back to life and Candie was able to provide the numbers on top of the gate,” said Lopez.  “I just put everything back together…It’s nice to see the ‘Old Lady’ come back to life again.”The vintage starting gate, which was originally manufactured on-site prior to the 1939/40 meeting, provides a link to a legendary past that can be revisited by all on Santa Anita Handicap Day, this Saturday, at The Great Race Place.First post time on Big ‘Cap Day, this Saturday, is at 12 noon.  Admission gates open at 10 a.m.last_img read more

Experts seek ways to mitigate environmental impacts of infrastructure boom in Asia Pacific

first_imgMore than 22 million kilometers of new roads are projected to be built in highly biodiverse tropical and developing countries by 2050.Direct habitat loss, illegal logging, increased poaching and encroachment and animal road kill are some of the environmental risks associated with road development.Last week, a conference of experts, officials and activists from the Asia-Pacific region discussed ways to maximize the socio-economic benefits of infrastructure development while mitigating the environmental risks. KUALA LUMPUR — “We are currently living in the most explosive era of infrastructure expansion in human history,” said biologist and conservation advocate William Laurance in a speech kicking off a forum on infrastructure development in the Asia-Pacific region.Academics, activists and officials from countries in the region last week gathered in Malaysia’s capital to explore ways to boost the socio-economic advantages of road projects without severely impacting the environment.The conference, “Infrastructure in the Asia-Pacific: Promoting Benefits & Limiting Environmental Risks,” was hosted by the Centre for Tropical Environmental and Sustainability Science of Australia’s James Cook University. In focus was infrastructure development in Indonesia, Malaysia and Papua New Guinea.Laurance cited an estimate from the International Energy Agency that an additional 25 million kilometers (15.5 million miles) of paved roads would be built across the world by 2050, nine-tenths of them in developing nations and tropical regions.Whether built as turnkey developments or as supporting infrastructure, roads are crucial in providing access to health care, education and jobs, he said.However, these countries “sustain some of Earth’s most environmentally critical ecosystems and highest biodiversity,” Laurance noted.Direct habitat loss, increased poaching and encroachment, animal road kill and stolen revenues from illegal logging are some of the risks associated with road development, Laurance said.William Laurance gives the keynote speech. Photo courtesy of Centre for Tropical Environmental and Sustainability Science.Through interactive presentations and discussions, the two-day symposium of experts, government officials and activists sought ways to reduce the environmental impacts of road construction.Noviar Andayani, country director of the Indonesia program at the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), described infrastructure development as a “strategic necessity” in Southeast Asia’s largest economy.Indonesia, however, currently has multiple road projects in the pipeline that threaten national parks in Sumatra, which is home to one of the last and largest remnants of tropical rainforest in Asia.“Infrastructure opens up forests and wildlife to loggers and poachers,” Andayani said.She highlighted the importance of beefing up security in protected areas by increasing funding to deploy more park rangers and through improving efficiency in budget use.“Road development is a matter of priorities,” said Sean Sloan, a researcher at James Cook University, who currently leads an analysis of spatial planning reform in Indonesia’s Aceh and North Sumatra provinces.Poor planning of road projects gives rise to conflicts between development and environmental protection, Sloan noted.“Roads are both necessary but also problematic for tropical rainforests’ future,” he said.Sloan called for improving spatial planning – which measures the environmental values and development effectiveness of an area targeted for an infrastructure project – and improving the enforcement of spatial planning laws to “dramatically reduce conflicts between development and environmental protection.”Planners should also be transparent with civil society in order to mitigate controversies over infrastructure projects, said Nathan Whitmore, a zoologist with WCS in Papua New Guinea.“Roading issues are symptomatic of wider planning issues in Papua New Guinea,” Whitmore said.Group discussions between experts, government officials and activists on efforts to mitigate the environmental risks of road development. Photo courtesy of Centre for Tropical Environmental and Sustainability Science.Other experts argued that ongoing or completed road projects that cut through zones with high biodiversity must take measures to reduce fatal accidents involving wildlife, such as introducing additional traffic regulations and improving habitat management.Malaysia, where plans are afoot for road expansion in wildlife habitats, recently reported two accidents, in June and August, in which a baby elephant and a 10-year-old elephant were killed along the same highway.“[There should be] no road expansion, because if we make roads bigger, then traffic follows, so it increases risks for animal loss,” said Ahimsa Campos-Arceiz, an elephant expert with the University of Nottingham’s Malaysia campus.“We must [enforce] strict speed limits as people drive too fast on these kinds of roads,” he added.Experts at the conference also stressed that the financial backers of infrastructure projects should be a key driving force when it comes to supporting the future of sustainable development.The demand for infrastructure across Asia and the Pacific far exceeds the current supply, according to a recent Asian Development Bank (ADB) report. It said that from 2016-2030, more than $26 trillion – or $1.17 trillion a year – would be required to deliver infrastructure that both supports robust growth and is resilient to climate change. The figure is double the amount spent annually at present.“We have to engage with and talk to them,” Laurance said of backers like the ADB. “They really want to know how to avoid disasters because they don’t want to lose their money.”Laurance said financiers must consider a list of risks – environmental, social, financial and reputational – when agreeing to fund a proposal for an infrastructure project.“If you’re investing in bad projects, then we need to tell them that. These kinds of risks must be on … the table during the talks,” he said. Article published by Isabel Esterman Activism, Biodiversity, Conservation, Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Politics, Forests, Fragmentation, Governance, Infrastructure, Rainforests, Roads Banner image: a mining road cuts through the forests of West Kalimantan in Indonesian Borneo. Photo by Rhett Butler/Mongabay.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Editors note: William Laurance is a member of Mongabay’s advisory board. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Culture keeps cattle ranching going in the Brazilian Amazon

first_imgA recent study finds that financial incentives to move people away from cattle ranching don’t address cultural and logistical hurdles to changing course.Even though ranchers could earn four times as much per hectare farming soy or up to 12 times as much from fruit and vegetable farming, many stick with cattle as a result of cultural values.Ranchers, along with small-scale farmers, could benefit from targeted infrastructure investments to provide them with easier access to markets, according to the study.The researchers argue that their findings point to the need for policies that take these obstacles into account. Cattle ranching can be a scourge to forests, requiring vast tracts of cleared land to produce relatively small amounts of food. It is also the primary cause of deforestation in Brazil. In an effort to protect Brazil’s remaining forests in the Amazon, leaders have come up with programs to tempt ranchers into other lines of work, such as giving them a break on interest rates charged for loans to invest in more sustainable livelihoods. But these initiatives haven’t made much headway in reducing ranching, puzzling many researchers.A recent study, published in the most recent issue of the journal Ecology and Society, provides some clues to why many of these attempts might not be successful. The team behind the research, led by environmental scientist Rachael Garrett of Boston University, has found that Brazilian ranchers have more than money on their minds and face challenges in spite of these programs. Their conclusions shake up the calculus required to help them transition to more lucrative, less environmentally destructive livelihoods.“Throwing money at farmers in the Amazon is not going to solve all of our problems because there are major, long-standing, cultural traps that prevent farmers from wanting to move out of what they’re doing,” Garrett said in an interview. “That’s particularly strong with respect to ranching because that’s such a deeply embedded practice.”Cattle graze on deforested land in Brazil. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.Garrett and her colleagues noticed that, despite the fact cattle ranching isn’t very profitable for many of its practitioners in Brazil, many seemed reluctant to move into higher-paying sectors, such as growing soybean or farming fruit or vegetables. They calculated that soybean farmers earn about $1,000 per hectare, four times what cattle ranchers earn on average. Fruits and vegetables are even more profitable commodities.That led Garrett to wonder, “If they’re not doing these things because of income, why are they doing it?”At the same time, the team had “rich data on subjective well-being” from interviews with farmers and ranchers in 2010 and 2011 living in two regions in the Amazonian state of Pará. When she analyzed the data, Garrett arrived at a startling conclusion.“I was just totally shocked that there was no relationship between any of the income metrics that we had and any of the happiness metrics,” she said.From their responses, cattle ranchers, in particular, seemed to favor a quiet life in the countryside to more intensive farming or to moving into areas closer to cities, even though those changes might have meant a bigger paycheck.Clearing land for cattle ranching is the largest driver of deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.But while part of the explanation came from a culture that values the “tranquility” of a life of cattle ranching, Garrett said that wasn’t the whole story.“Instead of finding a lot of positive reasons why they [continued ranching], I found a lot of barriers as to why they might not be doing [better-paying forms of work],” she said.Among them was the difficulty in getting farmed goods into the hands of buyers. That’s especially important for farmers trying to get vegetables or fruits to market before they spoil. And the data revealed that it isn’t just ranchers who cling to less-than-optimal food production methods, Garrett said.“You’ll see small farmers doing all of the things that the large farmers do, in terms of really low-income cattle ranching, using fire, eking out a really measly income,” she said.This new information points to the need for “a national-scale policy” that takes into account the needs of these farmers and ranchers.The researchers found that culture, along with infrastructure hurdles, kept people in cattle ranching, despite potentially more efficient and profitable uses of their land. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.“They really need to be investing in infrastructure, and I don’t mean roads,” Garrett said. “Roads are highly controversial.”She said that processing facilities — those that might turn fruit into easier-to-ship purees, for example — as well as assistance with refrigerated transport for their goods, could help “small and unmechanized farmers” diversify beyond “the major export commodities like beef and soy.”With that help, farmers and ranchers could move into production processes that yield more food from smaller areas of land, while at the same time boosting their bottom lines.New policies need to be aimed at tackling “this persistent problem of low-income, environmentally degrading land uses in the Amazon,” Garrett said. “It’s about getting the best bang for your buck in terms of sustainability if you are going to invest in development and infrastructure.”CITATIONSGarrett, R. D., Gardner, T. A., Morello, T. F., Marchand, S., Barlow, J., Ezzine de Blas, D., … & Parry, L. (2017). Explaining the persistence of low income and environmentally degrading land uses in the Brazilian Amazon. Ecology and Society, 22(3).Henders, S., Persson, U. M., & Kastner, T. (2015). Trading forests: land-use change and carbon emissions embodied in production and exports of forest-risk commodities. Environmental Research Letters, 10(12), 125012.Banner image of cattle in Colombia by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Follow John Cannon on Twitter: @johnccannon Article published by John Cannon Agriculture, Amazon, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Amazon People, Amazon Soy, Cattle, Cattle Ranching, Conservation, Deforestation, Development, Drivers Of Deforestation, Ecology, Environment, Fires, Forests, Rainforest Agriculture, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest People, Rainforests, Ranching, Research, Saving Rainforests, Saving The Amazon, Soy, Sustainability, Sustainable Development, Threats To The Amazon, Tropical Forests center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Papua New Guinea gets its largest-ever conservation area

first_imgBanner image courtesy of Rainforest Foundation NorwayFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. On November 29, government officials declared the establishment of the Managalas Conservation Area. It is Papua New Guinea’s largest conservation area, encompassing 3,600 square kilometers of rainforest.Local communities, with the support of governments and non-profit organizations, have been working towards its incorporation as a protected area for 32 years.Managalas Conservation Area will be protected from large-scale agricultural and logging operations while allowing the communities that live there to use forest resources and grow crops in a sustainable manner.But stakeholders say mining is not officially excluded from the Conservation Arena’s management plan, and are worried about future encroachment by mining companies. Papua New Guinea has been granted its largest-ever conservation area, a 3,600-square kilometer (1,390-square mile) protected area of rainforest in the country’s southeast that stretches from near the ocean up into the mountains. Called Managalas Conservation Area, the move is being celebrated by conservation organizations and local communities that have been working for 32 years to establish more protections for the region.Managalas Conservation Area was officially declared on November 29 by Minister for Environment and Climate John Pundari and Northern Governor Gary Juffa at Itokama village.“Without environment, and without you and I, we will never enjoy the blessings of life,” said Pundari, as reported by PNG’s Post-Courier. “If we lose [the environment], we lose ourselves and that is also a global message.”Local communities held a party following the announcement to celebrate the declaration, the culmination of their decades of work towards protection of their forests.Minister for Environment and Climate John Pundari and Beate Gabrielsen from the Norwegian Embassy pose for photos at the declaration ceremony. Photo courtesy of Rainforest Foundation NorwayResidents of Itokama celebrate the declaration of Managalas Conservation Area. Photo courtesy of Rainforest Foundation NorwayThe region, called the Managalas Plateau, still has expansive tracts of primary forest. But it has been increasingly eyed by extractive industries like logging and mining, according to Rainforest Foundation Norway (RFN), which is supporting conservation activities in the region. Industrial agriculture is also a big threat, with several areas of the plateau suitable for oil palm plantations.The Managalas Conservation Area will protect the plateau from most large-scale encroachment, RFN says, while safeguarding sustainable use of forest resources by the 21,000 people that call it home. These uses are described in the project’s long-term management plan, which was drawn up by the communities residing in the Conservation Area, and include both subsistence and livelihood activities like coffee cultivation.According to RFN, the development of the Conservation Area has already aided preservation of the region by deflecting mining and logging operations. RFN says that when it became known that mining exploration licenses were being issued, conservation organizations and local communities sent letters of protest to authorities arguing that mining should not be allowed in an area earmarked for conservation.“As a result, the boundaries for the licenses were amended, and the mining company withdrew,” RFN representatives told Mongabay. “And with the establishment of the Conservation Area, the areas marked for logging was also eradicated.”Thick rainforest covers much of the newly declared Managalas Conservation Area. Photo courtesy of Rainforest Foundation NorwayManagalas Conservation Area encompasses 3,600 square kilometers and particularly large, connected tracts of primary forest called Intact Forest Landscapes (IFLs). Satellite data from the University of Maryland show tree cover loss and degradation in IFLs in the region; conservationists hope official protections granted to the area will help reduce deforestation and safeguard the area’s remaining forest cover. Data source: Hansen/UMD/Google/USGS/NASA, accessed through Global Forest WatchHowever, some stakeholders are still concerned about mining, which is not specifically excluded from Managalas Conservation Area’s management plan.“The decision from the National Executive Council on the Conservation Area states that activities like logging and large scale agriculture is to be excluded from the conservation area. However, it does not mention mining, so that is a concern to us … and the people of Managalas,” said Kenn Mondial of Partners with Melanesians (PwM), a non-profit that has been supporting establishment of Managalas Conservation Area.While declaration of Papua New Guinea’s newest and biggest conservation area represents a huge step forward in the protection of the region’s forests, much still needs to be done to get Managalas up and running. Next steps include government endorsement of the management committee, which is comprised of tribal leaders, community-based organizations, churches and local governments, and supported by outside organizations like RFN and PwM. After this is done, the committee will finalize the management plan for the area and rangers will be deployed to monitor its implementation in the Conservation Area’s different zones.Managalas Conservation Area is home to around 21,000 people who will be able to sustainably use forest resources in accordance with the Conservation Area’s management plan, which was drawn up by local communities. Photo courtesy of Rainforest Foundation NorwayStakeholders would also like to see improvement of the region’s roads so that crops grown by local communities, such as coffee, can reach outlying markets.“The condition of the roads here is not good. And the bridges are sometimes washed away in heavy rainfalls. So market access for the local produce is a big challenge,” Mondial said. “We need support from the government to improve this. We are also looking for any partner interested in promoting fair trade and organic coffee.”But for now, local residents and international supporters are focusing on celebrating their pivotal victory in protecting Papua New Guinea’s rainforests.“For me personally, after working on this project for 14 years, I am satisfied,” Mondial said, “and would like to thank the 21,000 people of Managalas, RFN and the people and government of Norway.” Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davis Agriculture, Community-based Conservation, Environment, Forests, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Indigenous Communities, Indigenous Rights, Industrial Agriculture, Logging, Mining, Oil Palm, Palm Oil, Plantations, Protected Areas, Rainforests, Sustainability, Sustainable Development, Sustainable Forest Management, Tropical Forests Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Forests: A key piece of the land and climate puzzle (commentary)

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Scientists contributing to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) have published a new report examining the interactions between climate change and land use. Agriculture, forestry, and other land uses are responsible for nearly a quarter of all man-made greenhouse gas emissions. But forests are also one of our planet’s biggest carbon sinks and can contribute to carbon removal, thus constituting a key piece of the land and climate puzzle.The report provides a comprehensive look at the forest-related solutions we have, among other land-based responses, that could help us mitigate and adapt to climate change and the possible synergies and trade-offs with other critical land-related issues, including land degradation and desertification and food security.We now need the political will and action from governments, the private sector, and consumers to change the way society values forests, to stimulate forest protection, and to embrace sustainable forest management and forest restoration while reversing the pressure on forests. And we need to do so without displacing that pressure to other ecosystems.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. The vital contribution of forests in protecting biodiversity, regulating the climate, and enhancing human well-being is being recognized as never before.Forest-related responses to tackling the climate crisis are increasingly being seen as a cost-effective option among nature-based solutions. By protecting existing forests and halting deforestation, we can maintain some of our most important carbon sinks, and by restoring forests we can remove significant quantities of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.There is, however, a vast gap between these solutions and reality. Climate change is placing additional stress on forests, and climate change impacts, compounded by trends such as consumption growth, infrastructure expansion, and increased food production, will put additional pressures on land. We are seeing this unfold at this moment in Russia, where record levels of forest fires have sparked fears about an ecological disaster. Or in Guatemala, where rapid deforestation has led to floods and water shortages.On August 8, scientists contributing to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) published a new report examining the interactions between climate change and land use. Agriculture, forestry, and other land uses are responsible for nearly a quarter of all man-made greenhouse gas emissions. But forests are also one of our planet’s biggest carbon sinks and can contribute to carbon removal, thus constituting a key piece of the land and climate puzzle.Cane fires burning, Mount Inkerman, Queensland, Australia. The sugar industry has made many improvements to look after the environment including reducing burning of the crops before harvesting. Burning takes the organizing matter out of the system. Photo Credit: © WWF / James Morgan.The IPCC Special Report on Climate Change and Land synthesizes and provides the science we need to advance our understanding of what the pressures on land are and the potential and limitations of the response options. The report provides a comprehensive look at the forest-related solutions we have, among other land-based responses, that could help us mitigate and adapt to climate change and the possible synergies and trade-offs with other critical land-related issues, including land degradation and desertification and food security.We now need the political will and action from governments, the private sector, and consumers to change the way society values forests, to stimulate forest protection, and to embrace sustainable forest management and forest restoration while reversing the pressure on forests. And we need to do so without displacing that pressure to other ecosystems.Our call to action is challenging, but not impossible. Forest-related solutions are cost effective precisely because we can harness the power of nature to address climate change. But it also requires a fundamental shift in behaviors — in the way we use land for agriculture and in the way people consume and eat.The Special Report arrives shortly before the UN General Assembly and the Climate Summit in September, and the UN climate talks in December. It is a critical moment to reflect on responses related to forests and assess how they can be incorporated into national agendas and climate action plans of both developing and industrialized countries.Tractors for conversion of grasslands into crops, north of Pierre, South Dakota. Photo Credit: © Day’s Edge / WWF-US.Focus on forestsMost of the pressures on forests come from outside forests and the forestry sector — whether that’s demand for land to grow food, or because of policies and financial systems that don’t take account of the full value of forests. Effective forest protection, then, needs to originate outside forests, too — through improving land management, transforming food systems, and advancing more responsible finance and investment. And it needs to adapt to specific contexts to ensure the most cost-effective options for mitigation and adaptation to climate change, while ensuring synergies with land restoration and food security.Forests play a key role in the integrated response options that contribute to pathways limiting global warming to 1.5o degrees Celsius. Some of the forest-related solutions have clear win-wins, in the context of a broad range of land-based options. These include forest conservation, sustainable forest management, reducing deforestation and forest degradation, and agroforestry, given their co-benefits for mitigation, adaptation, reversing land degradation and food security.Expanding tree cover through reforestation and afforestation is expected to have positive benefits for mitigation and adaption and reversing land degradation, but there needs to be a concerted to avoid negative impacts on food security when deployed at a large-scale, as well as social and environmental impacts. Small-scale deployment with the use of best practices in managed landscapes under strong governance could bring some greater co-benefits. And these risks and benefits will require careful assessment depending on the context.Amoron’i Onilahy is a Protected Area managed by local communities who work to protect their natural wealth through ecotourism and the promotion of biodiversity. WWF is an important partner in that area. Photo Credit: © Martina Lippuner / WWF-Africa.In addition, the potential of forest and ecosystems restoration, while not fully analyzed in the report, has taken center stage recently. For example, a recent study, based on different type of assumptions, has shown the technical potential for tree restoration to be as high as 900 million hectares (about 2.2 billion acres), though it is important to note that there is a large gap between the technical potential and the actual feasibility, and several barriers will have to be overcome. Another recent study found that the world’s largest carbon sinks are located in young forests regrown on former agricultural or deforested areas.The IPCC Special Report synthesizes our scientific knowledge about the potential of different forest-related responses in the context of integrated response options. But as critical as it is to take stock of our current knowledge, it is just as important to translate this knowledge into action, and actions to protect and restore forests will depend on collaboration between many actors — governments, donors, local communities, farmers, and the private sector.These actions have the potential to deliver significant benefits under approaches to manage whole landscapes or jurisdictions in a sustainable way. And these approaches require meaningful partnerships between governments, investors, and private companies with the close involvement of local farmers and communities.It is now time to scale this up and put science into action.Deforestation for future agriculture plantation in Tahuamanu Province, heading to Centro Poblado de Alerta, Madre de Dios Region, Peru. Photo Credit: © Nicolas Villaume / WWF-USCITATIONS• Bastin, J. F., Finegold, Y., Garcia, C., Mollicone, D., Rezende, M., Routh, D., … & Crowther, T. W. (2019). The global tree restoration potential. Science, 365(6448), 76-79. doi:10.1126/science.aax0848• Blanco G., R. Gerlagh, S. Suh, J. Barrett, H.C. de Coninck, C.F. Diaz Morejon, R. Mathur, N. Nakicenovic, A. Ofosu Ahenkora, J. Pan, H. Pathak, J. Rice, R. Richels, S.J. Smith, D.I. Stern, F.L. Toth, and P. Zhou. (2014). Drivers, Trends and Mitigation. In: Climate Change 2014: Mitigation of Climate Change. Contribution of Working Group III to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [Edenhofer, O., R. Pichs-Madruga, Y. Sokona, E. Farahani, S. Kadner, K. Seyboth, A. Adler, I. Baum, S. Brunner, P. Eickemeier, B. Kriemann, J. Savolainen, S. Schlömer, C. von Stechow, T. Zwickel, & J.C. Minx (eds.)]. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York, NY, USA.• Pugh, T. A., Lindeskog, M., Smith, B., Poulter, B., Arneth, A., Haverd, V., & Calle, L. (2019). Role of forest regrowth in global carbon sink dynamics. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 116(10), 4382-4387. doi:10.1073/pnas.1810512116Pablo Pacheco is Global Forest Lead Scientist for WWF.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Mike Gaworeckicenter_img Climate Change, Climate Change And Forests, Climate Change Policy, Commentary, Editorials, Environment, Food, Forests, Global Warming, Land Use Change, Research, Researcher Perspective Series, Restoration last_img read more

Gritters prepare for freezing conditions tonight

first_imgDonegal County Council has announced that its gritters are to be out in force tonight, as temperatures are set to drop to -2C.The local authority says all of its primary routes will be gritted from 9pm.Met Eireann is forecasting a cold and dry night with lowest temperatures of -2C. A widespread ground frost will develop and there is a risk of some icy patches inland, which is expected to clear later in the day on Monday. The following routes will be gritted by the council tonight: 01: National Primary North02: National Primary Central03: National Primary South04: Inishowen South05: Inishowen East06: Inishowen West07: Milford South08: Milford North09: Cill Ulta East12: Binswilly13: Stranorlar North14: Stranorlar East15: Stranorlar West16: Donegal West17: Donegal North18: Donegal South19: Donegal National SecondaryLT: Letterkenny Town Priority 1BT: Buncrana Town Council Priority 1  Gritters prepare for freezing conditions tonight was last modified: October 27th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more