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LoGiurato: For past, present, future, SU’s win signifies return to rich history

first_img Comments PISCATAWAY, N.J. — Doug Marrone wasn’t going to tear up again. Not this time. Not while walking across the field after Syracuse’s 13-10 win over Rutgers that clinched bowl eligibility. Not while his players cried tears of joy and simulated bowling their helmets in celebration. Not at the podium, while the room waited for him to give the kind emotional reaction that came from a game, a season and a tenure full of emotion. But even if it wasn’t the overly dramatic press conference, Marrone knew how much this win meant to the Syracuse football program. Standing behind the podium, he symbolized the past, present and future of the program. ‘Just like Coach Mac used to tell me and our football team when I was a player,’ Marrone said. ‘(He) would always tell us, ‘Don’t ever mistake, part of the college experience is winning.’ We haven’t done that, and I always felt that it was my job to make sure we got over this hump.’ ‘This hump’ had been built for six long years without a bowl. And so the win Saturday meant something for the past. The glory days of Syracuse football. The team as it was under the direction of Dick MacPherson, who Marrone affectionately refers to as ‘Coach Mac.’AdvertisementThis is placeholder text MacPherson and Marrone were together in Rutgers back in 1985 when Syracuse won its seventh game of that season. Syracuse went to the Cherry Bowl that year, its first bowl in — you guessed it — six years. Today MacPherson attends all of SU’s home games to provide radio commentary, but he rarely travels to a road game because he attends each of his grandson’s usual Friday night games at Christian Brothers Academy. But CBA’s season ended last weekend. And for this potentially special occasion, MacPherson made the trip. And he watched one of his former players lead the new rebirth of a program that hadn’t been to a bowl game in six years. There they were, 25 years later. MacPherson recognized the similarities. How much significance Saturday’s win had for the past of such a rich program. ‘This program was at a very high level at one time, two times,’ MacPherson said in a telephone interview Sunday. ‘As two years have gone by, I think the selection committee and the fans have started to realize that Syracuse football is in very good hands.’ ‘This hump’ was the culmination, for some SU players, of four long seasons of trials and tribulations that finally ended in triumph. Nine wins in the previous three seasons, compared with seven already this year. And so the win Saturday meant something for the present. When it became apparent that SU would come away with the victory, senior defensive tackle Anthony Perkins kneeled down in front of the Syracuse bench and pointed to the sky. Senior Da’Mon Merkerson and juniors Chandler Jones and Torrey Ball posed for the camera near them. This was their moment. Soon after, Perkins joined his teammates in the festivities, the highlight of which was when he and others simulated bowling their helmets in celebration of going bowling. Perkins wasn’t one to hide emotion. Pointing to the sky, the tears of joy came with, finally, something to be proud of. ‘For me, I couldn’t hold it in,’ Perkins said. ‘After the struggles that have taken place before I got here and in my early years, to finally get a bowl game on my side. ‘It’s just … euphoria.’ ‘This hump’ was finally conquered. And so this win means something for the future. As Perkins said, the win means the end of bowl talk. Even this season, with two games remaining and still a chance to win the Big East, the goals have changed. On to bigger and better things. Max Suter was asked how this win will be remembered 10 years from now. To Suter, it was all too simple. ‘It’s definitely going to be a big thing,’ Suter said. ‘This year, you know, we changed this program around. It hasn’t been like this in a long time, and finally we’re back to this bowl game.’ With all of the meaning for past, present and future, Marrone couldn’t help but show emotion. Even if it was only to his former head coach getting on the team bus. ‘The only person happier than him,’ MacPherson said, ‘was his wife.’ Brett LoGiurato is an assistant sports editor at The Daily Orange, where his column appears occasionally. He can be reached at [email protected] Facebook Twitter Google+center_img Published on November 14, 2010 at 12:00 pmlast_img read more

Communities struggle to save Sabah’s shrinking mangroves

first_imgFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Agriculture, Aquaculture, Community Development, Deforestation, Development, Ecosystem Services, Featured, Forests, Habitat Degradation, Habitat Loss, Industrial Agriculture, Land Rights, Mangroves, Poverty, Poverty Alleviation, Rainforests, Trees, Wildlife A truck laden with Acacia logs is transported along a trail in Pitas district, Sabah, East Malaysia. Photo by Rod Harbinson for Mongabay.According to AFI literature, HASB is: “a Sabah based company the ultimate shareholders of which are two international timber funds. Tropical Asia Forest Fund (TAFF) is the majority shareholder managed by New Forests.”Requests for comment sent to AFI were unanswered by press time. However, in a subsequent statement, a representative from New Forests said, “AFI has undertaken an extensive participatory mapping program with the support of local NGO PACOS in order to support the Pitas/Bengkoka communities in defining customary land rights and securing formal land rights as well as to clarify operating boundaries and planted areas of the company’s plantation estate.” Read New Forests’ full statement here.Rumindon explained that his people, the Rungus indigenous people, were originally nomadic. He and his neighbors agreed to settle on the land offered to them by the government. He said the state offered 15 acres of land per family if they agreed to give up their nomadic tradition, settle there and clear the forest to cultivate crops.“There was a survey conducted and stones put in the ground in 1974,” Rumindon explained, thumbing through a thick folder of correspondence with government officials.According to Rumindon, in the late 1970s the community agreed to requests from the original acacia company, Hijuan Planters, to rent the land, because the company said it would clear it. Mongabay visited AFI’s loading dock where cranes load vast piles of acacia logs onto barges destined for pulp and paper mills.“SAFODA says we are encroachers” said Rumindon, who despite his age is still struggling for a just outcome and says it was SAFODA that leased it to the company. Rumindon says the land was never returned. AFI, which took over operations more recently, retains occupation of the plantation area still under operation, and their claim appears to be supported by SAFODA.“It took seven years to get hold of the [paper] plan,” Rumindon explained, unrolling a large detailed plan of community land from the land department. It appears to conflict with an earlier plan that clearly shows the plots allocated to community families.“SAFODA began designing reforestation and settlement projects in Bengkoka in early 1979,” reads a translated version of SAFODA’s website. “Acacia mangium cultivation was started in 1981. This project is the only large-scale institutional farm dedicated to commercial purposes.” The site does not mention an earlier land agreement, and requests for comment sent by Mongabay to several senior SAFODA staff went unanswered.Mastupang Bin Somoi inspects the operations of the AFI company that operates acacia plantations on land claimed by the neighboring communities. Photo by Rod Harbinson for Mongabay.Mastupang Bin Somoi stands amongst the threatened mangroves he is campaigning to get recognized under community native customary rights and thereby prevent their conversion to shrimp farms. Photo by Rod Harbinson for Mongabay.In its charter, translated from Malay to English, SAFODA says it is committed to: “Restoring and maintaining an environmentally friendly balance including flora and fauna through forestry activities.”Rapid clearance of natural eco-systems for development projects in Sabah is an ongoing issue of concern to conservationists, and the situation in Pitas is no exception. As forest is razed for development, already-threatened species may be placed at greater risk. Meanwhile, local communities may face the loss of the many valuable ecosystem services mangrove forests provide, such as fishing, foraging and water catchment.So far, local indigenous groups say their appeals for official recognition of their rights over these lands have largely been ignored. Critics say government development plans remain firmly in favor of supporting big businesses, despite damaging environmental consequences.Rumindon explained that his people, the Rungus indigenous people, were originally nomadic. He and his neighbors agreed to settle on the land offered to them by the government. He said the state offered 15 acres of land per family if they agreed to give up their nomadic tradition, settle there and clear the forest to cultivate crops.Clarifications and corrections:This story was amended with clarifying information from Lanash Thanda. (9/21/17)A statement from New Forests on behalf of AFI was added. (9/21/17)A previous version of this article incorrectly stated Rumindon said the government offered 18 acres of land per family. That number has been corrected to 15 acres. (9/22/17)center_img A development plan establishing shrimp farms and timber plantations begun purportedly to reduce poverty in northern Sabah, Malaysia, has attracted criticism from local communities and NGOs, which say the project is ignoring communities’ land rights.Satellite imagery shows the clearing of large tracts of mangrove forest for shrimp farms. Critics of the development say this is depriving forest-dependent local communities of their livelihoods as well as threatening mangrove wildlife.Several communities have banded together and are together petitioning the government to officially recognize their rights to the remaining mangroves and prevent further clearing for development. TELAGA, Malaysia — The district of Pitas in the Malaysian state of Sabah is situated on the 40-kilometer Bengkoka peninsula on the island of Borneo, stretching east into the South China sea.This forested, hilly area slopes down to the coast along the Telaga River, through ancient mangrove forest. But since the 1980s, it has been increasingly opened up by government-sanctioned development projects; more recently, in 2013, mangrove clearance has resumed for the commercial farming of shrimp (also referred to as prawns). This resurgence has brought the company Sunlight Inno Seafood Company Sdn Bhd, which is supported by the government, into conflict with local communities that depend on the mangroves for their livelihoods.Satellite data from the University of Maryland show heavy tree cover loss in the district of Pitas in northern Sabah between 2001 and 2015, which reflects both deforestation and the harvesting of tree plantations. Blotches of dark pink in mangrove areas indicate the clearance of mangrove forest. The data indicate the Telaga area has been one of the most heavily affected. Data source: Hansen/UMD/Google/USGS/NASA, accessed through Global Forest Watch.Satellite images from Planet Labs show shrimp farms have supplanted much of the mangrove forest around Telaga over the last several years.In response to mangrove clearance, six indigenous Orang Asli communities in the district have come together to form the “Group of Six” (G6) collective Pitas action committee. It aims to save around 1,000 acres of the remaining mangroves and get this area legally designated under their Native Customary Rights (NCR).Farmer and fisherman Mastupang Bin Somoi, 52, from Kampung Sungai Eloi, is founder and Chairman of the G6 collective. In his gardens he grows vegetables, rice and a few rubber and oil palm trees. He shows me a handful of large shellfish he has gathered from the muddy riverbed at the nearby boat landing. He says the villagers in the area depend on a mix of farming, fishing and collecting non-timber forest products from the mangrove forest for their livelihoods.Mastupang Bin Somoi, 52, from Kampung Sungai Eloi paddles his boat through ancient mangrove forests on which his community depends. Much of the forest has already been cleared and the community is keen to maintain an area to sustain their livelihoods. Photo by Rod Harbinson for Mongabay.Mastupang Bin Somoi, from Kampung Sungai Eloi in Pitas holds a handful of shellfish that he has collected from a stream in the mangrove forest. Photo by Rod Harbinson for Mongabay.“They used to be quite friendly, they were not scared of humans, but now after their habitat’s been destroyed they’ll keep their distance,” Somoi says as he watches two proboscis monkeys (Nasalis larvatus) bound through the trees. As the boat he’s on proceeds along a channel through the mangroves, a two-meter (6.5-foot) estuarine crocodile (Crocodylus porosus) slides from the bank into the water. These mangrove forests are home to a wide diversity of vulnerable species, some of them listed under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES).“This sign says, ‘no encroachment’,” says Somoi, pointing to a sign tied to a tree. The signs have been placed by the communities to demarcate the perimeter of the mangrove forest claimed under their NCR. Around 2,300 acres have already been cleared under the project and this is set to expand next into an additional 1,000 acres, pending the outcome of an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) started in 2015.Further along, Somoi points out a burial site he says is sacred to the communities. Soon the dense mangrove forest opens into a clearing of stark devastation with dead mangrove roots bleached silver by the tropical sun and the dark peat earth beneath torn into grooves by heavy equipment. Most of the forest has already been cleared and the communities are desperate to retain the remainder on which they depend for resources, as well as the other ecosystem services it provides.The shrimp farms cut out of the mangrove forests are secured with two-meter-high solid metal fences backed with coils of razor wire to keep people out. One plot visited by Mongabay was an area about 400 meters (1,300 feet) across containing artificial ponds in which water was being circulated with turbine pumps; a handful of workers was on-site.A fenced-off area of shrimp farm established in an area cleared from the surrounding mangrove forest. Photo by Rod Harbinson for Mongabay.Lanash Thanda, president of the NGO Sabah Environmental Protection Association (SEPA), described how the project was originally initiated by the Sabah Forest Development Authority (SAFODA) as part of the 2010 Malaysian Economic Transformation Programme to bring economic development to the poverty stricken area.“There is no [clean] water connection so people save rainwater from their roofs and when that is gone have to pay for deliveries,” Thanda said. She explained that levels of poverty in Pitas are high compared with most of Sabah.However, according to Thanda, the project has floundered due to mismanagement and a lack of processing, storage and transportation infrastructure.“Look at their office – it’s new. That’s the prawn farm company. When I came in November it wasn’t there,” said Thanda, explaining how the project is proceeding despite initial deficiencies.“The Sunlight company was supposed to open a plant in Pitas to process prawns and provide 3,000 jobs, but nothing is happening,” Thanda told Mongabay. She said local people are dismayed that foreign workers have been brought in, and that few of the jobs originally promised have materialized. Sunlight Inno Seafood Company Sdn Bhd did not respond to requests for comment. (Thanda later clarified that there has been no more evidence of them since 2016.)The boat stops at a large stand of dead mangrove trees. The communities suspect they were poisoned because at the same time the trees died, “all the fish died” in the area, Thanda said. This area of mangroves was frequently used by local communities, and its destruction galvanized members from the G6 collective into action. In June 2015 they confronted workers clearing the area with heavy equipment.Mastupang Bin Somoi, 52, from Kampung Sungai Eloi stands in front of an area of mangrove forest that has died through unknown means. The authority for clearing the area is contested because at the time the company responsible had not conducted an environmental impact assessment. Photo by Rod Harbinson for Mongabay.“We spoke to the other G6 communities. Thirty-seven members came down. We posted a notice and painted the hitachis [digging equipment],” Somoi said. “In the notice we explained that we are giving you [the equipment operators] 24 hours notice to vacate this area, because this is our NCR [Native Customary Rights] area. If you do not leave after this we will not be responsible for actions taken against you from the communities. Then we left.”The equipment was subsequently removed and the Environmental Protection Department responded that an EIA would now be conducted on the area to assess whether clearance should proceed. But despite beginning in 2015, the EIA is still pending. The G6 collective has since been active in denouncing the conduct of the EIA process and the project in general. Meanwhile, according to SEPA, in December 2015 the State Cabinet approved clearance of a further 3,000 acres of mangrove forest in the region.Two indigenous Orang Asli fishers row through an area of mangroves that has been cleared. Photo by Rod Harbinson for Mongabay.On April 27, 2017, a delegation from the G6 collective travelled to the state capital Kota Kinabalu to deliver a letter to Chief Minister Datuk Seri Musa Aman, requesting that he intervene to stop the mangrove clearance. The Borneo Post reported that the letter requested the First Minister “to intervene and protect the land in their villages from alleged encroachment by the owners of a prawn farming project there.” The Chief Minister has yet to respond to their request.Clearance of the forest is nothing new to the communities. Bihahon Rumindon, 67, from Kampong Boluuh village (which is a member of the G6 collective), has been fighting for recognition of his land title for years. He says that while he was awarded the land by the Sabah government in 1971, the state did not follow though on the allocation commitment and instead used it for a local acacia plantation project now managed by Acacia Forest Industries Sdn Bhd (AFI). The company is currently structured as a 50:50 joint venture between the Sabah Forestry Development Authority (SAFODA) and the Hijauan Bengkoka Plantations Sdn Bhd (HASB) company and supported by SAFODA. Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davislast_img read more

Southeast Asian countries pledge to tackle marine plastic waste crisis

first_imgMember states of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), including some of the biggest producers of the plastic waste in the oceans, have declared their commitment to addressing the trash crisis.Together with China, the ASEAN members Indonesia, the Philippines, Vietnam and Thailand account for half of the 8 million tons of plastic waste that ends up in the oceans each year.Any meaningful action to tackle the problem should focus on reducing the production of plastic to begin with, rather than dealing with the waste after the fact, an environmental activist says.A growing refusal by Southeast Asian countries to take in plastic waste from developed countries for processing could provide the impetus for action by the global community to cut back on plastic production. Some of the countries most responsible for the plastic waste that ends up in the oceans have pledged to tackle the problem together, but activists say they’re focusing on the wrong end of the production chain.The 10-member Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) adopted a declaration at the close of its twice-yearly summit on June 24 to “prevent and significantly reduce marine debris, particularly from land-based activities.” The commitment, the first of its kind in the region, is expected to complement policies and actions already being taken by individual member states to manage their plastic waste.More than half of the 8 million tons of plastic waste that ends up in the oceans every year comes from five Asian countries. Four of them are ASEAN members — Indonesia, the Philippines, Vietnam and Thailand — according to a 2017 report by the nonprofit NGO Ocean Conservancy. China, not an ASEAN member, tops the list as the largest polluter.At the regional summit in Bangkok over the weekend, ASEAN also published a framework of actions to address the problem, including policy planning, conducting research, raising public awareness and engaging the private sector.“Marine debris is a transboundary issue which requires integrated regional cooperation,” the bloc said in a statement. “Without immediate action, marine debris pollution may negatively impact marine biodiversity, environment, health, society and economy.”Leaders of ASEAN member states gathered in Bangkok for the bloc’s biannual meeting to address a range of issues affecting the region. Image courtesy of ASEAN.But environmental activists in Southeast Asia say the declaration and accompanying framework of actions fall short of addressing the plastic crisis. They say the suggested efforts have a misplaced focus on managing waste, when they should instead go further up the production chain and focus on reducing the production of plastics, particularly single-use packaging.“Plastics is a pollution problem, not a litter problem, and must be addressed throughout its life cycle, from production to end of life,” Tara Buakamsri, the country director for Greenpeace Thailand, said in a statement.“The issue is not how to manage plastic waste so they don’t end up as marine debris, but how all nations must focus upstream, and drastically reduce plastic production,” he added.Buakamsari also noted that ASEAN had failed to set any target or timeline for the actions, or to address the problem of waste imports.In the past two years, imports of plastic waste into Southeast Asia from developed countries, including Canada and the U.S., increased by 171 percent. This has far outpaced the countries’ capacity to handle the waste, much of which has wound up in unlicensed dumps and incinerators in places like Malaysia, resulting in environmental problems and a growing public outcry.The ongoing crisis is largely due to a 2018 ban on waste imports by China, which had previously taken in the most foreign waste. While many Southeast Asian countries also imported waste prior to the ban, they did so at a much smaller scale. With the trickle of waste turning into a torrent, the affected countries have begun to restrict imports, culminating in May and June this year with announcements by the Philippines, Malaysia and Indonesia that they would start sending waste shipments back where they came from.“The framework doesn’t mention [a] ban on single-use plastic simply because it is up to circumstances (and political will) of each member state,” Buakamsri told Mongabay in an email. “It doesn’t include plastic waste imports because of [the] issue around trade.”Single-use consumer product packaging comprised the bulk of the waste collected during a garbage audit at Freedom Island in Metro Manila last year. Image courtesy of Greenpeace.Though ASEAN’s framework to deal with plastic waste is well-intentioned, Buakamsri said, a harder-line approach that builds on the growing refusal to take in other countries’ waste may be the more effective path.“In fact, by stopping waste imports and implementing strong plastic reduction policies, the ASEAN region is in an ideal position to help spur a transformation of the global economy, forcing the West to rethink their waste generation and end all waste exports,” Buakamsri.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Basten Gokkon Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Conservation, Environment, Environmental Policy, Government, Marine Conservation, Ocean Crisis, Oceans, Plastic, Pollution, Sustainability, Waste, Water Pollution last_img read more

$750,000 prize seeks solutions to challenges from small-scale mining

first_imgWhile the devices we carry around in our pockets everyday provide us with unprecedented convenience and levels of access to information, the materials they contain are often linked to the destruction of some of the planet’s richest ecosystems.Yet small-scale mining is an important source of income more than 40 million people worldwide, generating livelihoods and, in some cases, creating paths to escape poverty.For these reasons, last week a broad coalition launched a $750,000 global competition to identify ways to make small-scale and artisanal mining less damaging to communities and the environment.The Artisanal Mining Grand Challenge is hosted by Conservation X Labs, a Washington, DC- and Seattle-based non-profit that has organized other prize-based competitions around difficult environmental problems. While the devices we carry around in our pockets everyday provide us with unprecedented convenience and levels of access to information, the materials they contain are often linked to the destruction of some of the planet’s richest ecosystems. Extracting metals and minerals like gold from the Amazon, coltan from the Congo, and nickel from Indonesia can take a heavy on local peoples, wildlife, rivers, and forests. Gold mining is a major threat to the forests and biodiversity of the Peruvian Amazon, including protected areas. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.One of the most complicated aspects of addressing the issue is the disparate nature of small-scale and artisanal mining, which accounts for a significant share of production of some of the most critical materials that go into mobile phones, tablets, and laptops as well as jewelry: 15-20 percent of diamonds, 15-20 percent of gold, 20 percent of cobalt, and 70-80 percent of colored gemstones. Much of this mining is informal, unregulated, or even illegal, putting it beyond the reach of authorities. And some of the companies that sell products to consumers may have very little knowledge of what raw materials ultimately end up in their supply chains.Yet small-scale mining is an important source of income more than 40 million people worldwide, generating livelihoods and, in some cases, creating paths to escape poverty. So outright crackdowns on the activity can have a downside.Gold mining in the Peruvian Amazon. The launch event for the Artisanal Mining Grand Challenge featured a talk by Dr. Luis E. Fernandez of Wake Forest University Center for Amazonian Scientific Innovation (CINCIA), who discussed the impacts of artisanal mining in Madre de Dios in the Peruvian Amazon. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.For these reasons, last week a broad coalition launched a $750,000 global competition to identify ways to make small-scale and artisanal mining less damaging to communities and the environment. The Artisanal Mining Grand Challenge is hosted by Conservation X Labs, a Washington, DC- and Seattle-based non-profit that has organized other prize-based competitions around difficult environmental problems.“This is a wicked problem,” said Alex Dehgan, Co-founder and CEO of Conservation X Labs. “All of the partners involved are doing this because we like to run to hard problems, rather than run away from them.”“Our problems are scaling exponentially and our solutions have been linear. We seek to work as part of a coalition because none of us can solve it alone,” Dehgan continued. “Our only competitor should be extinction.”A view of the Soarano wetland, cleared of forest by illegal gold miners, near Ranomafana, Madagascar. Image by Daniel Burgas.The Artisanal Mining Grand Challenge is structured into three categories: preventing and remediating damage at mine sites; addressing social and environmental costs in mining supply chains beyond mine sites; and developing information solutions that measure the environmental and social impacts of mining. On top of those categories, Microsoft’s AI for Earth Initiative is awarding $100,000 “for solutions that utilize or deploy artificial intelligence (AI), including machine learning,” to the issue.The challenge is open to anyone offering solutions. Paul Bunje, Co-founder and CSO/COO of Conservation X Labs, expects a wide range of entities — from NGOs to companies to entrepreneurs — to get involved.“We can now use a crowd-based innovation competition, not just to incentivize new solutions and accelerate innovation – which is critical – but also use this as an opportunity to capture huge value,” Bunje said. “It’s the opportunity for all of us to be a part of something huge.”Forest cleared for gold mining in Indonesian Borneo. Photo by Rhett A. ButlerThe Artisanal Mining Grand ChallengeCorrection October 9, 2019: Conservation X Labs is based in both Washington, DC and Seattle, not only Virginia as originally stated in this post.Disclosure: Mongabay is participating in The Artisanal Mining Grand Challenge through a special reporting project on small-scale and artisanal mining worldwide. The Artisanal Mining Grand Challenge does not have any editorial influence on the stories Mongabay produces. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Gold Mining, Green, Mining, Prizes, Water Pollution center_img Article published by Rhett Butlerlast_img read more

British armed forces supplied by Brazilian meat firm linked to Amazon deforestation, corruption: Report

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Agriculture, Beef, Conservation, Deforestation, Environment, Forests, Logging, Rainforest Deforestation, Threats To Rainforests, Tropical Forests Article published by danielcenter_img The British military sourced beef for ration packs from Brazilian meatpacker JBS despite its history of corruption, poor environmental record and links to human rights abuses.Ration packs supplied to the UK armed forces between 2009 and 2016 were found to be manufactured by JBS and supplied by Vestey Foods.The sources of JBS beef imported by Vestey into the UK could not be confirmed and may not have come from illegally deforested lands or suspect supply chains.Cattle ranching is the largest single driver of deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon and a significant contributor to tropical carbon emissions. A recent wave of forest fires in the region prompted a global outcry and calls for tougher action to curb environmental destruction. The British military has for years sourced beef for soldiers’ ration packs from scandal-plagued Brazilian meatpacker JBS despite its history of corruption, poor environmental record and links to human rights abuses, research by NGO Earthsight has found.Ration packs supplied to the UK armed forces between 2009 and 2016 were found to be manufactured by JBS. By analysing shipping records, Earthsight found that Vestey Foods, a major supplier to the UK Ministry of Defence (MoD), used JBS beef in at least four official ration packs.While JBS was no longer named as the producer of the ration packs from 2016, shipping data showed the firm supplied hundreds of tons of Brazilian beef and chicken worth $4.2 million to Vestey Foods between 2014 and 2019. However, Earthsight notes, the sources of JBS beef imported by Vestey into the UK could not be confirmed.“[A]lthough the army ration packs that have previously contained JBS beef may not have come from illegally deforested lands or suspect supply chains, questions remain about the MoD’s possible continuing relationship with a firm that has such a chequered history,” Earthsight said.Cattle ranching is the largest single driver of deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon and a significant contributor to tropical carbon emissions. A recent wave of forest fires in the region prompted a global outcry and calls for tougher action to curb environmental destruction.JBS is one of three Brazilian firms known to have supplied beef to the UK armed forces, along with Minerva and SulBeef, which supply beef to armed forces personnel stationed in Bahrain, according to Earthsight.Sam Lawson, Earthsight director, said JBS had “flouted environmental standards for years and for the UK government to have been bumping up their profits, even if indirectly, is a major environmental own goal.”The MoD, JBS and Vestey Foods did not respond to a request for comment, but the MoD told Earthsight it was “committed to upholding ethical procurement practices” and was “working with our suppliers to address any concerns surrounding the recent link between sourcing beef from Brazil and deforestation.”In an FOI response to Earthsight the MoD said that 107 products were “deemed available to be ordered” in 2017 and 2018 that contained beef or beef products and that “four contain beef sourced from Brazil using Brazilian meat,” but added that it could not confirm how many of those products were actually supplied.British army ration packs have used JBS meat since 2009. Photo by Earthsight.JBS is the world’s largest meat producer with revenues last year of more than $43 billion. Until 2016, the company sourced beef from notorious rancher Antônio José Junqueira Vilela Filho, who was arrested in 2016 following a two-year criminal investigation that found he led a sophisticated criminal network responsible for illegally clearing over 30,000 hectares of public forests in the Brazilian state of Para.The following year, JBS was fined £6.5 million ($8.1 million) for buying 50,000 cattle from deforested Amazon land. The company denied wrongdoing. Also in 2017, JBS was raided by federal agents after it was discovered to have bribed sanitation inspectors to allow rotten meat to be sold.JBS’ founders, brothers Joesley and Wesley Batista, admitted last year to making about $180 million in illegal campaign donations over a decade to more than 1,800 candidates in return for favorable policy-making as part of Operation Car Wash, one of the largest corruption scandals in Latin American history.“The fact that the Ministry of Defence allowed JBS beef to be used in contracts in the past, and possibly still does, is at best a procurement oversight,” Lawson said. “If the UK government is truly committed to protecting the Amazon and preventing deforestation, then ensuring that none of its departments are using beef from potentially suspect sources in Brazil would be a good place to start.”last_img read more

Indonesia to revive idle shrimp farms to boost fisheries and save mangroves

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored More than half of the shrimp farms carved out of mangrove forests in Indonesia have been left idle or abandoned.The government plans to revive these aquaculture farms to both boost fisheries production and prevent the clearing of more mangroves.Fisheries experts have welcomed the plan to boost aquaculture, but say the government should focus on boosting yields from existing shrimp farms rather than expanding the number of operating farms.In addition to the deforestation of mangroves, shrimp farms have drawn criticism for degrading the quality of freshwater available for communities living in the vicinity of the ponds. KUTA, Indonesia — Indonesia plans to restore more than 300,000 hectares (741,300 acres) of idle shrimp-farming ponds to boost its fisheries and reduce deforestation of the country’s mangrove ecosystems, according to a top official.More than double that area, much of it in coastal regions rich in mangroves, have been cleared for shrimp farms, but only about 40% of the farms are in production, according to 2018 government data. “We must revitalize this area that’s abandoned or poorly managed … over the next five years,” Alan Koropitan, a senior expert in the office of the president’s chief of staff, told Mongabay on the sidelines of an event in Kuta, Bali, on Dec. 11.He said rebuilding shrimp farms on these idle lands could give a much-needed boost to the Indonesian fisheries sector. While Indonesia is a top global exporter of frozen seawater shrimps, the Southeast Asian country lags behind its neighbors in exports of freshwater shrimps and fresh, salted or smoked shrimps. Some of its top seafood exports include Asian tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) and whiteleg shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei).“But we don’t want to clear more land either [for shrimp farms] by clearing mangroves and such,” Alan said.Shrimp harvested from aquaculture farms in Indonesia. Image courtesy of the Indonesian Ministry of Maritime Affairs and Fisheries.Shrimp farming is a major driver of the deforestation of mangroves, a crucial habitat for coastal marine life, in Indonesia. In 1999, 350,000 ha (865,000 acres) of mangroves were cleared across the archipelago to make way for shrimp ponds — the highest rate of mangrove deforestation in the world, according to World Bank in 2003. Shrimp farming has also drawn criticism for degrading the quality of freshwater available for communities living in the vicinity of the ponds.Alan said President Joko Widodo had ordered the fisheries ministry to map out the idle or abandoned shrimp farms across the country that would be feasible for revival.Fisheries experts have welcomed the government’s intention of boosting Indonesia’s aquaculture sector, but say the way to do it is through intensification — getting greater yields from the same area of fish and shrimp ponds — rather than increasing the number of such ponds.“Expansion efforts would not fit with the current state of shrimp aquaculture in Indonesia,” said Susan Herawati, the general secretary of the People’s Coalition for Fisheries Justice, an NGO.She cited the revitalization of Bumi Dipasena, one of Indonesia’s main sites for shrimp fisheries, spanning 17,000 ha (42,000 acres) in Sumatra’s Lampung province.“Bumi Dipasena is the largest shrimp farm in Asia, maybe even in the world,” Susan said. “The fisheries ministry must be able to intensify the production of this site to fulfill demand.”She called for improving road infrastructure and ensuring access to reliable electricity and clean water, both to boost logistics for the Bumi Dipasena shrimp producers and to help the thousands of families living in the area.Shrimp farms in Bumi Dipasena, in Sumatra’s Lampung province. Image courtesy of Bumi Dipasena Village official website.Earlier this month, Indonesia’s fisheries minister, Edhy Prabowo promised to work with other government institutions to revive Bumi Dipasena. One of the main challenges is the limited capacity of the existing shrimp ponds and infrastructure to boost yields, the minister said.Reviving Bumi Dipasena would also require introducing community-based management and phasing out top-down corporate control of the farms, according to experts.Operational control of the shrimp farms there previously fell under Jakarta-listed aquaculture company PT Central Proteina Prima, working under a partnership scheme with small-scale farmers. At its peak in the 1990s, Bumi Dipasena was producing 200 metric tons of shrimp a day on average, and generating an estimated $3 million a year in export revenue. But the company was secretly slashing half of the bank loans meant for the farmers, leading to the decline of the entire operation.“If the restoration program indeed takes place, then the shrimp fisheries in Dipasena would reach its optimum operation and could re-emerge as a top shrimp producer like it used be,” said Dedi Adhuri, a researcher at the Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI).“Not only would the farmers benefit, but also the rest of the nation,” Dedi added.Some shrimp farmers continue to work at Bumi Dipasena, but profits are narrow.“We’ll keep on fighting, and we urge the government to play its role,” said Nafian Faiz, one of the farmers.Farmers harvest shrimp. Image courtesy of the Indonesian Ministry of Maritime Affairs and Fisheries.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Basten Gokkoncenter_img Coastal Ecosystems, Conservation, Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Policy, Fish, Governance, Green, Land Use Change, Mangroves, Wetlands last_img read more

Borneo locals win a court battle to bar a coal miner from their land

first_imgArticle published by Isabel Esterman Activism, Coal, Energy, Environment, Environmental Law, Indigenous Peoples, Land Rights, Mining, Rainforests, Threats To Rainforests Indonesia’s Supreme Court has ruled that a coal mining firm seeking to operate in South Kalimantan province should have its permit revoked.Indigenous activists, local officials and conservation groups successfully argued that the firm, PT Mantimin Coal Mining, should not have been issued a permit without a full environmental impact assessment.The verdict was issued in October but the parties to the case have still not been officially notified and PT MCM’s permit has yet to be revoked. JAKARTA — Indigenous activists in Indonesian Borneo have scored a big win in a lawsuit against a coal mining firm that sought to operate on their land.After a two-year court battle, Indonesia’s Supreme Court ruled in favor of a lawsuit that claims the permit for the mining firm, Indian-owned PT Mantimin Coal Mining (MCM) should be revoked.The national government granted the firm a permit in December 2017 to operate in the district of Central Hulu Sungai in South Kalimantan province. The issuance of the permit surprised local activists as well as local government officials, who had for decades opposed mining and plantation projects in the district. Central Hulu Sungai is the sole district in the province that remains free of both coal mining and oil palm plantations.With help from Walhi, Indonesia’s largest environmental NGO, local residents took MCM and the minister of energy and mineral resources to court, arguing the permit bypassed a critical step: the environmental impact assessment, which requires local approval.In parallel to the lawsuit, opponents of the mine mobilized a movement, operating online with the hashtag #SaveMeratus in honor of the region’s rainforested Meratus Mountains, and organizing the delivery of more than 1,000 handwritten letters to President Joko Widodo.“The Supreme Court’s ruling in favor of Walhi’s claim is a win for and with the people, and now almost everyone supports the #SaveMeratus movement,” said Kisworo Dwi Cahyono, the head of Walhi’s South Kalimantan chapter.Protest banner and a a cloth full of signatures expressing resistance to PT MCM’s planned mine, photographed in 2018. Image by Tommy Apriando/Mongabay-Indonesia.United local resistanceSimilar land conflicts have occurred throughout Indonesia, but Central Hulu Sungai is unique as local officials have stood alongside indigenous residents in their unwavering opposition to mining projects on their land, Kisworo said.“The people of Central Hulu Sungai have already agreed that government long-term plans should protect forests, so that we can prosper with agriculture and ecotourism and without mines and palm oil,” said the district’s environment office head, Muhammad Yanni.The 51,800-hectare (128,000-acre) Meratus Mountains are home to indigenous villages and forests, but mines and plantations have been making their way up the slopes for decades. Central Hulu Sungai district has refused entry to mines and plantations that have otherwise found concessions elsewhere in Borneo. If the mine project were to go forward, it would help fuel Asia’s coal-power boom while operating next to villages that still lack 24-hour electricity.More than half of the would-be mining area is a forested water catchment area as well as a river surrounded by several karst towers that stretched the length of the mountains and provided sources of livelihood and water for the surrounding 8,000 residents.“The area is vital because it’s the source of water for agriculture, drinking, and fishing,” Kisworo said.Part of the 2,000-ha (5,000-acre) concession area overlaps with village forest that the central government granted autonomy in 2017 and designated for beekeeping, farming, fishing, horticulture, and ecotourism.“If the river is damaged, food security will be, too. If it is mined, as we see from other districts’ mines, the water will turn acidic and fish will die,” said Sunarwiwarni, head of the district office for food and fisheries security.Batutannga village, one of the areas that would be affected if the PT MCM mine were to operate as planned. Image by Tommy Apriando/Mongabay-Indonesia.As a foreign company, PT MCM receives operating permits from Jakarta; local companies get theirs from district and provincial governments. PT MCM was granted its permit in Central Hulu Sungai because of a 2017 mining ministry regulation that allowed the company to advance multiple concessions through the licensing process as if they were one concession.Walhi’s lawsuit argued that this regulation allowed MCM and the ministry to bypass the requirement to provide an environmental impact assessment, which the district government, standing alongside local residents, retained as its shield against unwanted companies.PT MCM has been called a ghost company, as officials in the district, provincial and central governments said they did not meet any of its representatives before the permits were granted.Twice the lawsuit attempting to get PT MCM’s permit revoked was filed with Jakarta courts. The first time, in July 2018, a lower court’s examination of the case included a visit to the proposed mining area. The court refused to hear both the lawsuit and its appeal due to technicalities, so Walhi filed it with the country’s highest court in April 2019. Residents had already begun agreeing to receive compensation for giving their land to PT MCM.The court’s decision came on Oct. 15, 2019, but Walhi only discovered the decision in January, via a post on the court’s website. The group has yet to receive a copy of the court’s decision, in which the judges’ reasoning should be made clear.The court has ordered that PT MCM’s operating permit be rescinded, but the Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources has yet to do so. (In Indonesia’s judicial system, court rulings are not immediately actionable; all parties in a lawsuit must confirm receipt of a written copy of the verdict before being required to act on it.) In its lawsuit, Walhi had also demanded that the ministry and PT MCM cover all legal and court fees related to the lawsuit.Walhi’s win doesn’t mean the #SaveMeratus movement is over, Kisworo said in a press release. The mountain range is the province’s “roof,” he said, and half of the province’s land is covered in oil palm plantations or mines.“The struggle has been long, and it will continue to be long. The Supreme Court’s ruling should be further encouragement in the struggle to save the Meratus Mountains from other mining permits.”Banner image: A river running through Nateh village in Central Hulu Sungai district, by Tommy Apriando/Mongabay-Indonesia.This story was reported by Mongabay’s Indonesia team and was first published on our Indonesian site on Jan. 10, 2020.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Celebrating Open Government: Sunlight Foundation Turns Five

first_imgWhy Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… The Sunlight Foundation, a non-partisan organization that uses the Internet to promote government transparency and openness, is celebrating its fifth anniversary this week. The foundation uses data analysis to report on government activity and trains journalists in the use of data to tell the story about what the federal government is actually up to.We often cover the Sunlight Foundation and what they are doing. For the anniversary they sent a note to all their kindred spirits in the cause of open government. “We’ve grown from a small organization with big ideas to a connected community whose call for greater government openness and transparency is heard throughout the country,” wrote Nicko Margolies, communications coordinator at the Sunlight Foundation.Among the various activities that the Sunlight Foundation takes part in are funding database initiatives, creating mobile applications to put Congress in the hands of the people, fostering a community of “civic hackers” and helping craft policy on the Internet age. All of that and more.“The Sunlight Foundation will continue to work with you explore how to enhance our democracy and citizen engagement with our public officials using online tools,” wrote executive director and co-founder Ellen Miller. “Sure, there’s a lot more to be done. As a wise person once said, if this was easy, it would have been done already. And we promise you – the best is yet to come!”The Sunglight Foundation put together a YouTube video to celebrate its fifth year. Check it out below. Related Posts dan rowinskicenter_img Tags:#Government#NYT#web Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more