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Archive of posts published in the tag: 上海后花园论坛

top job Tracey Marshall, global head of HR, Benfield Group

first_img Previous Article Next Article top job Tracey Marshall, global head of HR, Benfield GroupOn 30 Apr 2002 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. Tracey Marshall has been promoted to the position of global head of HR at reinsurance intermediary Benfield Group and hopes to drive forward with a strong training agenda.The newly created role is a fitting one for her as she has travelled extensively – spending eight months travelling prior to joining Benfield.She says: “We all live and work in a rapidly evolving world but as a responsible, entrepreneurial business, we have a duty to ensure every team member has the opportunity to develop and grow within our organisation.”Despite her financial background, Marshall has always had an interest in people matters – she worked in a children’s home in Brazil during her travels – and has been team leader of HR as part of her operations remit.The new global HR position will involve her in communicating the training opportunities available within the group.“I will also have a duty to ensure that the values we hold dear as a business are consistently and fairly interpreted and applied in all areas of our people management, from recruitment and selection through to reward and benefits,” says Marshall.She is relishing the challenge of balancing the needs of the business with those of the employees and believes HR can have a direct impact on efficiency and productivity.“HR can directly help the bottom line by getting the right people in the right roles. I want to look back in a year’s time and see that our team has played a key role in improving the value of our business, by helping our people maximise their potential,” adds Marshall. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

Chelsea star Tammy Abraham has ‘taken the pressure off Frank Lampard’, says Sol Campbell

first_img Metro Sport ReporterFriday 27 Sep 2019 11:44 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link1.9kShares Advertisement Tammy Abraham has netted seven times this season ahead of Chelsea’s clash with Brighton (Picture: Getty)Arsenal legend Sol Campbell has praised Tammy Abraham for taking the pressure off Frank Lampard and grabbing his opportunity with both hands at Chelsea.Abraham enjoyed a successful loan spell in the Championship last term, scoring 25 goals to help Aston Villa secure promotion to the Premier League, and the 21-year-old has picked up where he left off this season, except in Chelsea colours.The England striker has more than repaid Lampard’s tremendous faith with seven goals in his opening six matches in the English top flight and looks set to continue his run in the side at home to Brighton this weekend.AdvertisementAdvertisementFormer Arsenal and England defender Campbell has backed Abraham’s success in front of goal to continue and believes the forward is flying the flag for young English talent.ADVERTISEMENTMore: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man City‘With his history and what’s happened, how he’s got to Chelsea, how he nearly moved to Wolves but that didn’t happen… he’s taken his chance and he’s done fabulously for Frank,’ Campbell told the Kings of the Premier League show.‘It’s how he’s started, how he’s taken that mantle, taken the pressure and taken the pressure off Frank as well.‘You want these young players to take their chance and also given the opportunity, but then going for it. Some players get their chance and don’t take it, but he has.‘For me, banging on the drum about English players coming in…Tammy is the leading man [over the past month].’ Comment Chelsea v Brighton: Frank Lampard press conferenceTo view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video Play VideoLoaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 12:28FullscreenChelsea v Brighton: Frank Lampard press conferencehttps://metro.co.uk/video/chelsea-v-brighton-frank-lampard-press-conference-2014878/This is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Lampard has revealed that  both Andreas Christensen and Olivier Giroud should be available for Saturday’s match against Brighton.‘[Antonio] Rudiger, out. Toni has got a recurring injury in the groin, he still has some pain,’ Lampard said.‘Andreas, should be okay. A bit of pain but not a risk.More: FootballBruno Fernandes responds to Man Utd bust-up rumours with Ole Gunnar SolskjaerNew Manchester United signing Facundo Pellistri responds to Edinson Cavani praiseArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesOlivier (Giroud), yes he is over his illness. It left him pretty weak and he has got some strength.‘Emerson, other side of international break with hamstring. Ruben [Loftus-Cheek], no date but he is jogging outside.’MORE: Frank Lampard tells Callum Hudson-Odoi to model himself on ‘incredible’ Raheem Sterling Advertisement Chelsea star Tammy Abraham has ‘taken the pressure off Frank Lampard’, says Sol Campbelllast_img read more

Martin denies Day for URSS victory at 81 Speedway

first_imgJason Martin mastered traffic and held off Michael Day in winning the May 27 United Rebel Sprint Se­ries main event at 81 Speedway. (Photo by Mike Howard)PARK CITY, Kan. (May 27) – Jason Martin took the lead in the early stages and then held off a late-race challenge by Michael Day to claim the United Rebel Sprint Series 25-lap feature finale during at 81 Speedway’s Sprint Car Maynia II Sunday night.The 10th starting Martin passed both Colby Estes and Day in taking over the front spot just seven laps in the IMCA RaceSaver Sprint Car headliner. His first encounter with the back of the field began on lap 11 while holding onto his half-stretch lead at midway.With drivers utilizing the top and bottom of the 3/8’s mile oval, passing was intense throughout the event. With five laps to go, it appeared Martin would be able to cruise but Day closed the deficit to five car lengths with four laps to go.Approaching another slower car on the last lap, Day looked to make one last challenge for the lead but Martin got a good run between turns three and four to take the three car-length victory.Jake Martens came from his ninth starting position to finish third while J.D. Johnson came home fourth. Steven Richardson was fifth.Martin was also awarded the Keizer Aluminum Wheels hard charger of the race. All 21 starters finished the 25-lap event with only seven lapped cars and the only caution coming at the start of the event.The next event for the Rebels will be at Dodge City Raceway Park on Friday and Saturday night, July 15-16.Feature results – 1. Jason Martin; 2. Michael Day; 3. Jake Martens; 4. J.D. Johnson; 5. Steven Richardson; 6. Tyler Knight; 7. Koby Walters; 8. Jordan Knight; 9. Zach Blurton; 10. Taylor Ve­lasquez; 11. Colby Estes; 12. Tracey Hill; 13. Eric Matthews; 14. Ty Williams; 15. John Webster; 16. Jed Werner; 17. Chad Salem; 18. Brian Herbert; 19. Aaron Ploussard; 20. Cody Hays; 21. Kolt Washburn.last_img read more

Are plants conscious? The debate rages on

first_imgArticle published by malavikavyawahare Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Environment, Green, Plants center_img An opinion piece in the journal Trends in Plant Science emphatically argues that plants are not conscious.The article questions the soundness of widely covered studies that mimosa plants (Mimosa pudica) and peas (Pisum sativum) display learning behaviors that amount to having a consciousness.Plants do not have a brain or anything resembling it, the authors point out, and to possess consciousness a structurally complex brain is required.Monica Gagliano, who has reported learning behaviors in plants, rejects this view saying that the criteria used to determine animal consciousness cannot be uncritically extrapolated to plants, and that the opinion piece fails to cite sound evidence. While the world wonders whether sentient robots are in the offing, scientists continue to grapple with an ancient mystery: Are plants conscious?A new opinion piece in the journal Trends in Plant Science seeks to nip this debate in the bud. “We are arguing that the likelihood of consciousness in plants is effectively nil,” Lincoln Taiz, a co-author and professor emeritus of molecular, cell and developmental biology at the University of California, Santa Cruz, told Mongabay in an email.It’s the latest salvo in a heated debate sparked by the publication of studies widely covered in the media that suggest that plants exhibit learning behavior. Monica Gagliano, an evolutionary ecologist at the University of Western Australia, is a leading proponent of the idea that plant might possess consciousness, based on her experiments with mimosa (Mimosa pudica) and pea plants (Pisum sativum), which have generated tremendous interest and controversy.In 2014, her team published findings that mimosa plants “learn” not to fold their leaves in response to being dropped multiple times and not suffering any harm. In 2016, she and her colleagues published a paper in Nature’s Scientific Reports on “learning by association in plants,” based on experiments with peas that reportedly displayed “learned” behaviors.Gagliano rejected Taiz’s position in an emailed response, noting that “crucially in science, opinions are cheap, but can be valuable (and perhaps correct) if they are well-informed, balanced and based on the best available experimental research. The piece fails in just about all these criteria.”Taiz cites Gagliano’s work in the piece only to caution that the latter’s conclusions were hastily drawn. What we see in plants is actually an adaptive response, Taiz and his colleagues argue, adding that the studies were not rigorous enough and needed to be replicated.The argument against intelligent plant life rests primarily on two legs: given that even animal brains need a level of structural complexity to support consciousness, what chance do brainless plants have? They even lack neurons, opponents point out. Second, that the behaviors observed in flora can be explained by other things, not consciousness.The opinion piece draws heavily on the work of evolutionary biologist Jon M. Mallatt and neuroscientist Todd E. Feinberg, who studied the evolution of consciousness in animals and found that only vertebrates (including fish), arthropods (like insects and crabs), and cephalopods (like octopuses and squids), possess the hardware for consciousness.Gagliano said she believes their work has been unjustifiably extrapolated to plants.“It selectively piggybacks on one hypothesis — proposed by Feinberg and Mallat on the evolution of consciousness (in animals) — and appropriates it as the premise to affirm a pre-conceived and ontologically reductionist idea regarding (plant) consciousness,” she said.But Mallat and Feinberg themselves disagree.“We fully agree with their point that consciousness needs complex cellular networks for fast information-processing, which effectively means it requires neurons and brains, which plants lack,” they told Mongabay in a joint comment. They have expounded on their ideas in two books: The Ancient Origins of Consciousness (2016) and Consciousness Demystified (2018).They also appear to agree with Taiz that actions such as moving toward a food source or avoiding harm are adaptive behaviors. Highly complex reflexive actions do not qualify as proof of consciousness. For the two authors, possessing a consciousness means “neural complexity, using many elaborate senses to build mapped representations (‘mental images’) of the world in which one’s behavior occurs, learning complex new actions from experience, or self-delivery of analgesics to avoid pain.”Taiz and colleagues also contend that plants do not need consciousness because it bestows no evolutionary advantage. “They are perfectly able to carry out their physiological functions by means of genetic and epigenetic adaptations, without any need to invoke consciousness,” they write. In their view, having a brain or brain-like mechanisms would be costly for plants, depleting their energy unnecessarily with no real benefits.The debate about consciousness in plants has implications for humans, one of which is whether plant neurobiology is a valid science. Can you belong to a discipline that studies plant consciousness if its very existence is in question? The Society for Plant Neurobiology was founded in 2005, and a year later a 2006 article heralded the birth of “plant neurobiology” as a new field of plant biology. In 2009, in the face of criticism, the organization changed its name to the Society of Plant Signaling and Behavior.The debate is not merely a question of semantics. It reveals deeper fractures in the biological sciences about fundamental questions, such as: What is a brain? And what does it mean to have a consciousness. This is how Gagliano frames the question. “When we, as scientists, accept a particular idea without questions — for example, the idea that consciousness is a process that exclusively arises through the structure and dynamics of the brain — we are prone to bias of reasoning and at risk of resting our thinking on erroneous assumptions,” she said.Citations:Taiz, L., Alkon, D., Draguhn, A., Murphy, A., Blatt, M., Hawes, C., … Robinson, D. G. (2019). Plants neither possess nor require consciousness. Trends in Plant Science. doi:10.1016/j.tplants.2019.05.008Gagliano, M., Vyazovskiy, V. V., Borbély, A. A., Grimonprez, M., & Depczynski, M. (2016). Learning by association in plants. Scientific Reports,6(1). doi:10.1038/srep38427Gagliano, M., Renton, M., Depczynski, M., & Mancuso, S. (2014). Experience teaches plants to learn faster and forget slower in environments where it matters. Oecologia,175(1), 63-72. doi:10.1007/s00442-013-2873-7Banner Image: Leaves of a rainforest shrub illuminated in a ray of sunlight. Image by Rhett A. ButlerMalavika Vyawahare is a staff writer for Mongabay. Find her on Twitter: @MalavikaVyFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Uganda’s eco-feminists are taking on mining and plantation industries

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Banner image: Beatrice Rukanyana looks out over a sugar plantation near Bugoma Forest. Photo: Thomas Lewton for MongabayFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Bugoma is one of the most biodiverse forests in Uganda, home to a wide variety of plants and animals including chimpanzees and Uganda mangabeys (Lophocebus ugandae) like this one (photographed in Kibale National Park). Photo: Duncan Wright/Wikicommons (CC-SA-3.0) Article published by terna gyuse Agriculture, Community-based Conservation, Deforestation, Environment, Forestry, Forests, Global Forest Watch, Green, Palm Oil, Plantations, Rainforests, Tropical Forests Like other protected areas in Uganda, Bugoma Forest has been threatened by encroachment for decades; now up to a fifth of what remains could be cleared to plant sugar cane.Women, generally responsible for growing food, and collecting water and firewood, feel the impacts of forest degradation acutely.Despite many obstacles, they are taking up a leading role in defending the environment, particularly against increasing pressure from extractive industries. KAMPALA, Uganda – “How come these people are coming to Bugoma to destroy our nature? Nature is protecting us,” says Beatrice Rukanyanga as she strides along the forest boundary. Twisting hardwood trees protrude from a tangle of foliage on one side, neat rows of pine and eucalyptus stand on the other.Rukanyanga cuts into the forest and adeptly maneuvers through the thick undergrowth, selecting leaves from different plants as she goes. “I’m picking medicine for stomach upsets. We’ve also got plants that treat malaria and skin problems,” she explains. For women who live close to the forest, it has always been an important source of food, medicine, and firewood — resources that are dwindling along with the forest.Bugoma Forest spans 40,000 hectares (98,800 acres) along the northern tip of the Albertine Rift Valley, which divides Uganda and the Democratic Republic of Congo. Around 500 chimpanzees have made their home here, alongside a species of mangabey monkey found only in Uganda and hundreds of species of birds, trees and shrubs, making the forest one of the most biodiverse in the country.For decades, Bugoma Forest has been shrinking. Locals say illegal loggers pay off officials to turn a blind eye to their activities, while tea and timber plantations on the perimeter push the forest’s boundary back piece by piece. Across Uganda, forest cover has declined from 24 percent of the country’s total land area in 1990 to 9 percent in 2015, according to the Ministry of Water and Environment.Now the forest faces a new and grievous threat. On Bugoma’s northern edge, a yellow bulldozer stands, waiting to begin clearing away forest to make way for a sugarcane plantation. In 2016, the Bunyoro-Kitara Kingdom leased one-fifth of the remaining protected forest to Hoima Sugar Ltd. The lease was challenged, but a High Court ruling in April 2019 found in favor of Hoima Sugar and the Kingdom, once one of the most powerful empires in East and Central Africa, which still enjoys significant autonomy under the state. The National Forest Authority has applied for the court order to be suspended, and is appealing the decision.“When we were young, this forest was thick,” says Rukanyanga. “It was giving a lot of rainfall; it was dark wherever you passed.” Photo: Thomas Lewton for MongabayThe rise of extractivesFrom oil wells springing up along the Albertine Rift Valley, to forested islands on Lake Victoria razed for oil palm plantations, Uganda’s government is supporting the rapid growth of extractive industries. But ranged against this is the swift growth of an eco-feminist movement that regards protection of the environment as essential to the protection of human rights.A grassroots network of women is working to raise awareness, share knowledge, and directly resist the destruction of the environment while creating alternative models of development. The movement hopes to strengthen the political and economic power of women in society — and so push back destruction of the natural environment.“When we were young, this forest was thick,” recalls Rukanyanga, remembering a time before industrial plantations arrived in the region. “It was giving a lot of rainfall; it was dark wherever you passed.” Rukanyanga is the coordinator of the Kwataniza Women Farmers Group, who live near Bugoma Forest and who make and sell charcoal-saving stoves while also educating women about their land rights and the sustainable use of natural resources.Rainfall patterns in the region have been disrupted in recent years, which Rukanyanga attributes to widespread deforestation. A 2012 study in Nature found that deforestation in the tropics reduces local rainfall. “Climate change has been real,” she says. “Last year people waited for rains, planted and the seed just died in the soil. There is now food insecurity in most of our homes.”Traditionally, women are responsible for growing food, and collecting water and firewood — and so they feel the impacts of environmental destruction acutely. Incidents of domestic violence also increase when food is scarce. “When you violate these resources, you are also violating women,” says Sostine Namanya, who coordinates an eco-feminist network in her role for the National Association for Professional Environmentalists (NAPE).NAPE, along with sister organization the National Association for Women’s Action in Development, has brought together more than 5,000 women from across Uganda to demand both gender and economic justice from the government and its industrial partners. “Women get to know each other, they share experiences and strategize together,” she says, reflecting on how they facilitate exchanges between women’s groups across the country.They follow in the footsteps of pioneering African eco-feminists such as Wangari Maathai, who in the 1970s founded the Green Belt Movement — responsible for planting more than 50 million trees in Kenya and training tens of thousands of women in practices such as forestry and beekeeping.In Kampala, Uganda’s Fridays for Future movement, inspired by Greta Thunberg, has young women and girls at its forefront. And in the country’s north, radical feminist traditions are challenging the government and corporate interests. Here Acholi women are known to strip in public to invoke a curse on their enemies; in 2017, this tactic was used by elderly women leaders to oppose 10,000 hectares (24,700 acres) of land being taken to build a sugar-processing facility in Amuru district. The police responded with violence and, despite these protests, the government continued with land evictions.Speaking out publicly against the government, or the industries they back, is fraught with risk in Uganda. “They can teargas you,” says Rukanyanga, noting that the 2013 Public Order Management Act makes it illegal to organize public meetings without police consent. “So we make a peaceful demonstration. We write placards and we go with letters to the authorities,” she says.Earlier this year, women living around Bugoma Forest petitioned parliament to oppose the lease to Hoima Sugar, while community forest management groups, whose membership is majority women, patrol the forest boundary and inform the National Forest Authority if they suspect illegal activity.Namanya acknowledges that Uganda’s political climate limits the activities of the eco-feminist movement, noting that several members have been physically assaulted or unlawfully arrested after speaking publicly about land-grabbing.But working quietly, from the grassroots, changing attitudes and building communities, can be effective too, Namanya says. “The government, even the president, always says: ‘Ah, you [can] leave the women, they cannot change anything, they are not a threat.’ That is something that we silently take advantage of, to do the organizing and resisting.”A truck loaded with sugar cane on one of the dirt roads around Bugoma Forest. Photo: Thomas Lewton for Mongabay.Who benefits?With tax exemptions and long leases on land offered by the government, Uganda is considered an attractive destination for foreign investors in the mining and plantation industries. In the case of sugarcane, production has quadrupled in the last two decades, and Uganda now exports tens of thousands of tons each year.Fifty kilometers (30 miles) to the north of Bugoma Forest, a string of oil wells is under construction along the shore of Lake Albert. Since 2006, multi-billion-barrel reserves of crude oil have been discovered in the region, and with the first oil expected to flow in 2022, the Minister of Works and Transport anticipates up to $20 billion of investment in the next three years. And along the northern shore of Lake Victoria since 2003, BIDCO, a transnational soap and oil producer headquartered in Kenya, has cleared thousands of hectares of forest and grassland to plant oil palm.Government officials say that encouraging these industries is vital for the growth of Uganda’s economy and for local job creation, particularly in impoverished rural areas. Uganda’s GDP per capita is among the lowest in the world.But an investigation by the eco-watchdog Global Witness in 2017 exposed “endemic corruption and mismanagement” in Uganda’s fledgling petroleum sector, with local economic interests and protection of the environment losing out in favor of international investors and “crooked officials.”“It is the state, it is big shots in government, it is foreigners who benefit,” Namanya says, pointing to other mineral-rich countries in sub-Saharan Africa that have fallen foul of the resource curse. “How come they are still extremely poor and there is a gross violation of rights? It will not be different for Uganda. We have to find better ways,” she says.Of concern for the eco-feminist movement is the way in which land is acquired by extractive industries operating in Uganda; illegal evictions following false land claims, and inadequate compensation for land rights are common. On the island of Buvuma, chosen for the next phase of the government’s ambitious oil palm development project, the tensions between economic growth, gender justice and environmental protection are marked.Members of the Ganyana Women’s Group on Buvuma Island: women here have demonstrated a deep understanding of the value of land and the natural services it provides to their families. Photo: Thomas Lewton for MongabayCase study: Buvuma Island“At first, when I used to pass by, most of the islands had forests, but along the landing sites you could see timber waiting for boats to be taken across. Then after a few years it was charcoal,” says Jameson Muberwa, a government agricultural adviser who moved to Buvuma, a tropical island along Lake Victoria’s northern shore, in 1995. “Now you no longer see trees being brought along the landing site.”Between 1991 and 2014, the population of Buvuma increased fivefold to 90,000 people as cheap land and the hope of work encouraged mass immigration from the mainland. Much of the island’s enduring mosaic of indigenous forest, grass savanna, and wetlands quickly became agricultural land for smallholder farmers. Now dramatic changes are carving up the landscape once again with the imminent development of a 10,000-hectare oil palm plantation on the island, part of the government’s Vegetable Oil Development Project, in partnership with BIDCO.“The palm oil project is a welcome development for the people,” says Gladys Nalunkuma, Buvuma district’s natural resources officer. She notes how dwindling fish stocks in the lake, crop failures linked to reduced rainfall in recent years, and the decline of the timber and charcoal industries have plunged many residents into poverty. One-third of the land designated for oil palm has been earmarked for around 2,000 local farmers, who will supply palm fruit to BIDCO.Yet many of Buvuma’s residents are questioning whether they have anything to gain from the project.“For us local people who didn’t go to school, we would be earning very little,” says Shmirah Nansimbe, chairperson of the Bukigindi Tree Planting Women’s Group. Through dialogues with women on the nearby Ssesse Islands, the location of BIDCO’s original 10,000-hectare plantation, which began operating in 2003, eco-feminists share knowledge about the realities of industrial oil palm.While the Ssesse Islands project has created around 3,700 jobs, most of these jobs pay less than prevailing wages in the area — and often with poor working conditions. As a result, much of the workforce are migrants to the island, while local communities struggle to continue fishing, farming and living from forest products because of the environmental degradation. With smallholders’ land now occupied by oil palm, food prices on the island have also risen. Despite concerns that these conditions will be replicated on Buvuma, some residents have had little choice over whether they sell their land to the government.“When BIDCO came in they didn’t teach people about the positives and negatives,” says Mariam Nakatu, who is leading a legal case against the government by 250 evicted households of Buvuma. “One morning you just see BIDCO people coming with the local chairman, and they would say that the land title has already been given away [by the landlord].”She describes how land surveyors would then discreetly transfer the tenancy and occupancy rights of large segments of land to their associates, so they would only receive a fraction of the compensation they were due. A report published in 2019 by the NGOs Tropenbos International and the Ecological Trends Alliance found that the Uganda Land Commission skipped processes during land acquisition and created leaseholds in favor of BIDCO. According to the report, “free, prior informed consent was not strictly adhered to,” while a murky valuation and compensation process alongside a lack of legal representation led to “high numbers of very disgruntled” residents on the island.“When BIDCO came in they didn’t teach people about the positives and negatives,” says Mariam Nakatu, who is leading a legal case against the government brought by more than 600 evicted residents of Buvuma. Photo: Thomas Lewton for Mongabay.By bringing women to the fore during land negotiations, the eco-feminist movement hopes to slow the sale of land for extractive industries. Women, Namanya says, have a deeper understanding of the value of land and the natural services it provides to families, and so are less willing to sell in the first place. “Our husbands sell the land that we are farming on without us knowing, and when they receive the money they run off and marry other wives,” says Benine Naluyima, of the Ganyana Women’s Group, a cooperative making charcoal-saving stoves and replanting trees on the island.Seeking out alternative, sustainable livelihoods on Buvuma, the Bukigindi Tree Planting Women’s Group has also replanted 18 hectares (45 acres) of degraded land, which was once protected rainforest, with indigenous species such as mahogany and musizi. Nansimbe leads the group up a hillside, pointing out the crops the community is growing in the protective shade of young trees. Gradually, as the forest thickens, they will have a renewed source of firewood and other forest products.Yet the process of regeneration is slow, and their work is becoming more challenging as the climate changes. “The sun is shining too much during the dry season now, and it’s difficult to get water to the trees from the lake,” Nansimbe says.Considering the strength of the palm oil industry, and the government’s support of it, others are willing to compromise. Betty Kabwaalu Nanyonjo, who grew up on the Ssesse Islands, regularly visits Buvuma, sharing her experiences and advising women not to sell their land. “People from outside coming to buy your land. Is that development?” she asks. Yet Nanyonjo encourages women to “get involved” in growing oil palm. “Let the people grow the oil palm and the investors buy the oil,” she says. “You welcome the project, because whether you like it or not the project will take off.”The Bukigindi Tree Planting Women’s Group has replanted 18 hectares (45 acres) of degraded land near Bugoma with indigenous species. Photo: Thomas Lewton for Mongabaylast_img read more

Rapid expansion of protected areas around the world failing to reduce human pressures on land

first_imgA little over 20 million square kilometers, or about 15 percent, of Earth’s terrestrial surface is currently protected. It is likely the world will achieve the goal set out in Aichi Biodiversity Target 11 of the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2010-2020 to set aside “at least 17 per cent of terrestrial and inland water areas” by 2020.But a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) last month finds that the emphasis on rapidly scaling up protected area coverage to meet Aichi Biodiversity Target 11 has led to the establishment of many PAs that are not successfully reducing anthropogenic pressures on the land.Most strikingly, in South America, Southeast Asia, and Sub-Saharan Africa, average pressures from human activities inside PAs, especially conversion of land to agriculture, was found to be significantly higher than in unprotected areas. As the world races to meet the goal of protecting 17 percent of Earth’s land surface, a new study looks at how effective protected areas are at reducing human pressures — and finds that there is considerable room for improvement.According to the World Database on Protected Areas, 241,368 protected areas (PAs) have been designated around the world, mostly on land. A little over 20 million square kilometers, or about 15 percent, of Earth’s terrestrial surface is currently protected. It is likely the world will achieve the goal set out in Aichi Biodiversity Target 11 of the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2010-2020 to set aside “at least 17 per cent of terrestrial and inland water areas” by 2020.But a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) last month finds that the emphasis on rapidly scaling up protected area coverage to meet Aichi Biodiversity Target 11 has led to the establishment of many PAs that are not successfully reducing anthropogenic pressures on the land.Researchers at the University of Cambridge in the UK compiled data from 12,315 PAs in 152 countries to examine how well they reduce pressures from human activities. The researchers used satellite data to assess agricultural expansion and the number of lights visible at night in protected areas, together with census and crop yield data, to determine the extent of human encroachment into the study areas between 1995 and 2010. They then compared the findings for each PA with comparable areas of unprotected land in order to determine whether or not the PAs were actually impeding human encroachment.The researchers found that human pressures have increased in a majority of PAs in every region of the globe over the past 15 years. “Rapidly establishing new protected areas to meet global targets without providing sufficient investment and resourcing on the ground is unlikely to halt the unfolding extinction crisis,” Jonas Geldmann of the University of Cambridge Conservation Research Institute, the study’s lead author, said in a statement.Most strikingly, in South America, Southeast Asia, and Sub-Saharan Africa, average pressures from human activities inside PAs, especially conversion of land to agriculture, was found to be significantly higher than in unprotected areas. “Our study suggests that protected areas in more remote and wild parts of the tropics have experienced alarming increases in human pressure since 1995,” Geldmann said. “These places house a disproportionately high amount of the Earth’s biodiversity, and play an irreplaceable role in maintaining our most threatened species.”Not all of the study’s findings were negative. PAs in the Northern Hemisphere and Australia, for instance, were found to have been effective at slowing human encroachment over the past 15 years when compared to unprotected areas. The researchers say that PAs in nations with higher ranks on the Human Development Index tended to see the smallest increases in human pressures.Previous studies of the threats human activities pose to PAs have often been limited to forests, and Geldmann and co-authors note in the study that their results largely confirm those studies’ conclusions that protected areas can help reduce rates of deforestation. But PAs in other habitats, like savannahs, are not meeting with similar success, the present study found.Increases in human activity in the protected areas of East and Central Africa were especially high; for example, cropland inside PAs designated to conserve Sub-Saharan grasslands increased nearly twice as much as it did in unprotected areas. Agriculture inside PAs in grassland habitats in Southeast Asia expanded 8 percent more than in unprotected areas. Similarly, agricultural expansion in forested areas of South America outside of the Amazon was 10 percent higher in PAs than outside of them.“Our study shows that agriculture is the driving force behind threats to protected areas, particularly in the tropics,” Geldmann said. “Our data does not reveal the causes, but we suspect factors that play a major role include rapid population growth, lack of funding, and higher levels of corruption. Additionally, most unprotected land suitable for agriculture is already farmed.”Geldmann added that the study’s findings highlight the importance of establishing PAs with “the right funding, management and community engagement that is needed” to ensure their success. “Important ambitions to protect 17% of land by the end of this decade, expected to increase to 30% at a pivotal meeting next year in China, will not mean much if not accompanied by enough resources to ensure the preservation of precious habitats.”Yosemite National Park in the United States. Photo by King of Hearts, licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0.CITATIONS• Geldmann, J., Manica, A., Burgess, N. D., Coad, L., & Balmford, A. (2019). A global-level assessment of the effectiveness of protected areas at resisting anthropogenic pressures. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 201908221. doi:10.1073/pnas.1908221116• UNEP-WCMC, IUCN and NGS (2019). Protected Planet Live Report 2019. UNEP-WCMC, IUCN and NGS: Cambridge UK; Gland, Switzerland; and Washington, D.C., USA. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Agriculture, Anthropocene, Conservation, Deforestation, Encroachment, Environment, Land Use Change, Protected Areas, Research center_img Article published by Mike Gaworeckilast_img read more

Borneo locals win a court battle to bar a coal miner from their land

first_imgArticle published by Isabel Esterman Activism, Coal, Energy, Environment, Environmental Law, Indigenous Peoples, Land Rights, Mining, Rainforests, Threats To Rainforests Indonesia’s Supreme Court has ruled that a coal mining firm seeking to operate in South Kalimantan province should have its permit revoked.Indigenous activists, local officials and conservation groups successfully argued that the firm, PT Mantimin Coal Mining, should not have been issued a permit without a full environmental impact assessment.The verdict was issued in October but the parties to the case have still not been officially notified and PT MCM’s permit has yet to be revoked. JAKARTA — Indigenous activists in Indonesian Borneo have scored a big win in a lawsuit against a coal mining firm that sought to operate on their land.After a two-year court battle, Indonesia’s Supreme Court ruled in favor of a lawsuit that claims the permit for the mining firm, Indian-owned PT Mantimin Coal Mining (MCM) should be revoked.The national government granted the firm a permit in December 2017 to operate in the district of Central Hulu Sungai in South Kalimantan province. The issuance of the permit surprised local activists as well as local government officials, who had for decades opposed mining and plantation projects in the district. Central Hulu Sungai is the sole district in the province that remains free of both coal mining and oil palm plantations.With help from Walhi, Indonesia’s largest environmental NGO, local residents took MCM and the minister of energy and mineral resources to court, arguing the permit bypassed a critical step: the environmental impact assessment, which requires local approval.In parallel to the lawsuit, opponents of the mine mobilized a movement, operating online with the hashtag #SaveMeratus in honor of the region’s rainforested Meratus Mountains, and organizing the delivery of more than 1,000 handwritten letters to President Joko Widodo.“The Supreme Court’s ruling in favor of Walhi’s claim is a win for and with the people, and now almost everyone supports the #SaveMeratus movement,” said Kisworo Dwi Cahyono, the head of Walhi’s South Kalimantan chapter.Protest banner and a a cloth full of signatures expressing resistance to PT MCM’s planned mine, photographed in 2018. Image by Tommy Apriando/Mongabay-Indonesia.United local resistanceSimilar land conflicts have occurred throughout Indonesia, but Central Hulu Sungai is unique as local officials have stood alongside indigenous residents in their unwavering opposition to mining projects on their land, Kisworo said.“The people of Central Hulu Sungai have already agreed that government long-term plans should protect forests, so that we can prosper with agriculture and ecotourism and without mines and palm oil,” said the district’s environment office head, Muhammad Yanni.The 51,800-hectare (128,000-acre) Meratus Mountains are home to indigenous villages and forests, but mines and plantations have been making their way up the slopes for decades. Central Hulu Sungai district has refused entry to mines and plantations that have otherwise found concessions elsewhere in Borneo. If the mine project were to go forward, it would help fuel Asia’s coal-power boom while operating next to villages that still lack 24-hour electricity.More than half of the would-be mining area is a forested water catchment area as well as a river surrounded by several karst towers that stretched the length of the mountains and provided sources of livelihood and water for the surrounding 8,000 residents.“The area is vital because it’s the source of water for agriculture, drinking, and fishing,” Kisworo said.Part of the 2,000-ha (5,000-acre) concession area overlaps with village forest that the central government granted autonomy in 2017 and designated for beekeeping, farming, fishing, horticulture, and ecotourism.“If the river is damaged, food security will be, too. If it is mined, as we see from other districts’ mines, the water will turn acidic and fish will die,” said Sunarwiwarni, head of the district office for food and fisheries security.Batutannga village, one of the areas that would be affected if the PT MCM mine were to operate as planned. Image by Tommy Apriando/Mongabay-Indonesia.As a foreign company, PT MCM receives operating permits from Jakarta; local companies get theirs from district and provincial governments. PT MCM was granted its permit in Central Hulu Sungai because of a 2017 mining ministry regulation that allowed the company to advance multiple concessions through the licensing process as if they were one concession.Walhi’s lawsuit argued that this regulation allowed MCM and the ministry to bypass the requirement to provide an environmental impact assessment, which the district government, standing alongside local residents, retained as its shield against unwanted companies.PT MCM has been called a ghost company, as officials in the district, provincial and central governments said they did not meet any of its representatives before the permits were granted.Twice the lawsuit attempting to get PT MCM’s permit revoked was filed with Jakarta courts. The first time, in July 2018, a lower court’s examination of the case included a visit to the proposed mining area. The court refused to hear both the lawsuit and its appeal due to technicalities, so Walhi filed it with the country’s highest court in April 2019. Residents had already begun agreeing to receive compensation for giving their land to PT MCM.The court’s decision came on Oct. 15, 2019, but Walhi only discovered the decision in January, via a post on the court’s website. The group has yet to receive a copy of the court’s decision, in which the judges’ reasoning should be made clear.The court has ordered that PT MCM’s operating permit be rescinded, but the Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources has yet to do so. (In Indonesia’s judicial system, court rulings are not immediately actionable; all parties in a lawsuit must confirm receipt of a written copy of the verdict before being required to act on it.) In its lawsuit, Walhi had also demanded that the ministry and PT MCM cover all legal and court fees related to the lawsuit.Walhi’s win doesn’t mean the #SaveMeratus movement is over, Kisworo said in a press release. The mountain range is the province’s “roof,” he said, and half of the province’s land is covered in oil palm plantations or mines.“The struggle has been long, and it will continue to be long. The Supreme Court’s ruling should be further encouragement in the struggle to save the Meratus Mountains from other mining permits.”Banner image: A river running through Nateh village in Central Hulu Sungai district, by Tommy Apriando/Mongabay-Indonesia.This story was reported by Mongabay’s Indonesia team and was first published on our Indonesian site on Jan. 10, 2020.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

HPV test may replace Pap in cervical cancer screening

first_img“Overall, I don’t think there’s any doubt that HPV testing has a lot of advantages over the Pap test,” she said. Saslow said there are still issues to be resolved, and federal approval needed, but “it’s definitely coming.” She said experts expect that to happen sometime in the next decade. A Swedish study also in the journal compared Pap with HPV testing to Pap alone in 12,527 women in their 30s. They found the combo test detected precancerous lesions or cancer earlier than the Pap test alone. The Canadian study, which was government-funded, included 10,154 women ages 30 to 69 in Montreal and St. John’s, Newfoundland.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREGame Center: Chargers at Kansas City Chiefs, Sunday, 10 a.m.Franco said some feared the HPV test would result in more false alarms, causing anxiety and requiring more follow-up testing. In the study, there were only slightly more false positives for the HPV tests (6 percent) than the Pap smears (3 percent). HPV, or human papilloma virus, is a common sexually transmitted disease. Infections are mostly in young women and most go away on their own. The HPV test looks for the high-risk viruses that can cause cervical cancer if the infection persists. Like the Pap, it uses cells scraped from the cervix, the lower part of the uterus. Because the Pap test misses about half of the cases, doctors use frequent testing to catch the slow developing cancer at its earliest, most treatable stages. The HPV test has been available in the U.S. since 2000 and was first used for inconclusive Pap tests. Now women older than 30 can get a HPV test – but only along with a Pap – and wait three years to be tested again if both tests are negative. More recently, scientists have been studying whether the HPV test can be used alone and whether it can prolong the intervals between exams. Debbie Saslow, director of breast and gynecologic cancer for the American Cancer Society, said evidence from a number of studies supports using the HPV test in place of a Pap. NEW YORK – A relatively new screening test was about twice as accurate as the traditional Pap smear at spotting cervical cancer, according to the first rigorous study of the test in North America. The new test could replace the 50-year-old Pap in a matter of years, experts say. And there’s a bonus for women: They won’t need a screening test as often. The HPV test, which looks for the virus that causes cervical cancer, correctly spotted 95 percent of the cancers. The Pap test, which checks for abnormal cells under a microscope, only found 55 percent, according to researchers at McGill University in Montreal, who published their findings in the New England Journal of Medicine. “We’ve had the Pap test for over 50 years and it’s high time it be replaced by technology that’s more robust,” said Eduardo Franco, director of McGill’s division of cancer epidemiology, who led the study. last_img read more

Smriti Irani aide murder: Main accused held in Amethi after encounter

first_imgThe main accused in the killing of Surendra Singh, a close aide of Amethi MP Smriti Irani was arrested on May 31 following an encounter with police in Amethi, officials said.Waseem was held in Shalhapur area under the Jamo police station area on May 30 night, Amethi Assistant Superintendent of Police Daya Ram said. With this, all the five accused in the case have been arrested, he said.Waseem has suffered gunshot injuries and has been admitted to a community health centre, the ASP said, adding the Jamo police station in-charge also suffered minor injuries in the gunfight. A case was registered against five people for killing Surendra Singh.Ramchandra, Dharmanath, Naseem and Golu were arrested earlier. Mr. Ramchandra is a member of the kshetra panchayat and also a local Congress leader, the police said.Singh, 50, a former head of Baraulia village, around 25 km from the Amethi district headquarters, was shot at around 11.30 p.m. on May 25. He was referred to a Lucknow hospital, but succumbed to injuries during treatment.last_img read more

MTT Aussie Tour Diary Day 1 and 2

first_imghttp://www.sportingpulse.com/assoc_page.cgi?c=14-6460-0-0-0last_img