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Program, Budget and Finance completes work on budget

first_img General Convention 2012, Rector Albany, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Tags Submit a Job Listing The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Events Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Martinsville, VA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Knoxville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Press Release Press Release Service Program, Budget and Finance completes work on budget Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Featured Jobs & Calls Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Collierville, TN General Convention, AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT center_img Submit an Event Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Smithfield, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Shreveport, LA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Hopkinsville, KY By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jul 9, 2012 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Program Budget & Finance Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 [Episcopal News Service — Indianapolis] The Joint Standing Committee on Program, Budget and Finance finished work July 9 on the budget that it will propose to the Episcopal Church’s General Convention tomorrow.The 2013-2015 triennial budget is balanced at $110,516,032, compared to $111,808,350 for the current triennium and reflects a $30,000 surplus, Diocese of Maine Bishop Steve Lane told ENS in an interview after the committee passed the budget unanimously.The budget’s income is “pretty flat” compared to the current triennium, he added.PB&F decided July 7 to keep at 19 percent the amount that the church asks dioceses to annually contribute to the church-wide budget. That percentage is what was asked for this year, and had declined from 21 percent in 2010 and 20 percent in 2011.Lane called it a “major advance” that “the budget contains resources to encourage collaborative relationships across the varying levels of the church — congregations, dioceses and the Episcopal Church — to work together to do new work for impact at the local level.”“When I look at this budget that’s where a lot of money and effort has gone, is to develop these collaborative relationships across the various levels of our church,” he said. “We’re really encouraging the church center and the church staff to be in dialogue and relation with both dioceses and congregations in service to God’s mission.”The committee increased the money in the budget that goes to mission, according to Lane and PB&F chair Diane Pollard, deputy from New York, by taking at least some of the needed money from internal restructuring in terms of administration and governance and modest staff reductions.Those church-wide staff reductions are due to be accomplished in part by attrition and redeploying staff, according to Pollard.The committee added block grants in each of the Five Marks of Mission areas around which the proposed budget in organized, they said.“I think PB&F listened very hard to the testimony of the church and responded, putting money into requests for new programming of various kinds,” Lane said.Further details of the budget will not be available until the budget committee presents it to a joint session of the House of Deputies and House of Bishops at 2:15 p.m. July 10 in the House of Deputies.Both Pollard and Lane again expressed concerned about the reduced time that PB&F had to do its work during a convention that is two days shorter than the previous one.“We really felt as a committee that the shortened nature of this convention and that the two days we might have had after our hearing[s] to unpack [the testimony] and to receive further requests through the resolution process, we didn’t have and, consequently we’ve put this budget forward without receiving many resolutions,” Lane said. “We hope our listening to the church had been sufficient but we recognize that that this is an impediment or a problem in this year’s process.”Pollard said that the committee worked “in a collegial, thoughtful, prayerful way, but recognizing our responsibility as the side of the church that needed to be the fiduciaries and be responsible business people”She suggested that it might be helpful to the convention for PB&F to be able to have a hearing after the committee presented its budget and before it is debated in both houses.Still, Pollard said the committee was pleased with the fact that each of its committee sessions were attended by other convention participants and that there was only once instance when one of the committee’s subsections went into an executive session.Pollard and Lane suggested that the new iteration of PB&F, which must be appointed by Dec. 15, ought to be able to be involved in the building of the budget before the January before General Convention next convenes.The church’s Executive Council typically approves a budget the January before convention convenes and gives it to PB&F as required by church canon (in Canon I.4.6) and the General Convention’s Joint Rules (in II.10 10 (a)).“Calling Program, Budget and Finance into the process in the last six months is not acceptable,” Lane said. “We don’t have time to absorb what’s been done to consider all of the data and then to make thoughtful, prayerful adjustments to the budget in that timeframe. There has to be on-going consultation.”— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector Columbus, GA last_img read more

Pakistani bishop urges government to curb ‘misuse of blasphemy law’

first_img Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 [World Council of Churches] While accusations of blasphemy in Pakistan have once again captured the news headlines, Bishop Samuel Azariah, moderator of the Church of Pakistan, hopes for the Pakistani government to consider repealing the controversial clause in the Pakistan Penal Code which, he says, invokes misuse of the blasphemy law.Bishop Azariah, who is a member of the World Council of Churches (WCC) Executive and Central Committees, considers the WCC hearing on “Misuse of the blasphemy law and the plight of religious minorities in Pakistan” an opportunity for Christians along with their Muslim partners to “register their concern and protest against abuse of the law”.The international hearing is held from 17 to 19 September in Geneva, Switzerland, organized by the WCC Commission of the Churches on International Affairs (CCIA).The blasphemy law provision has existed in Pakistan since its foundation in 1947. No government during the first forty years felt the need for any changes until General Zia-ul-Haq introduced a number of amendments to the Pakistan Penal Code in the 1980s at the behest of the Islamic parties.The amendments were made to statutes related to religion, including sections 295 to 298. Since then the B and C clauses of section 295 in the Pakistan Penal Code have been used to victimize religious minorities. The blasphemy cases have resulted in death penalties and mob-instigated violence.Commenting on the recent case of Rimsha Masih, an eleven year old girl accused of blasphemy, Azariah said that “churches in Pakistan, media and civil society in the country have raised their voices against this case. This is evidently a proof of the misuse of the law.”“Yet, Rimsha’s case is one among many,” he added.Rimsha Masih was arrested on 16 August on a charge of blasphemy. Recently she was released and taken to an undisclosed location due to security threats.For Azariah, cases like Rimsha’s create a sense of fear and insecurity. “The religious minorities and even some sects of Muslims have been affected by the misuse of the blasphemy law. A majority of the cases have proved to be false, which has disturbed the fabric of trust in our society,” he said.Azariah explained that abuse of the blasphemy law leads to injustice and violation of human rights. For him the purpose of the WCC hearing is to raise assertive Christian voices on the issue of the blasphemy law. “This dialogue is an attempt to improve churches’ understanding of the situation of religious minorities in Pakistan.”“With a constructive debate on the blasphemy law among the Pakistani churches, civil society representatives and our Muslim partners in dialogue, we hope to raise awareness about our situation among the international community,” said Azariah.Azariah also expressed appreciation for the participation of Pakistani churches and representatives of Muslim and Hindu religious communities in the hearing, and for the WCC’s support to persecuted minorities in the country irrespective of their religious affiliations.He said, “The CCIA consultation has provided us with an opportunity to advance the debate on the issues of the dignity and rights of religious minorities in our country. I hope our voices are noted by the higher authorities in Pakistan.”Read also: WCC to hold international hearing on the plight of religious minorities in Pakistan (WCC press release of 22 August 2012)WCC Central Committee statement on the misuse of the blasphemy law in Pakistan, September 2009WCC Central Committee statement on forced conversion and forced marriages in Pakistan, September 2012WCC Commission of the Churches on International AffairsWCC member churches in PakistanThe World Council of Churches promotes Christian unity in faith, witness and service for a just and peaceful world. An ecumenical fellowship of churches founded in 1948, today the WCC brings together 349 Protestant, Orthodox, Anglican and other churches representing more than 560 million Christians in over 110 countries, and works cooperatively with the Roman Catholic Church. The WCC general secretary is Rev. Dr Olav Fykse Tveit, from the [Lutheran] Church of Norway. Rector Bath, NC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Featured Events An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Asia, Press Release Service Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Ecumenical & Interreligious Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Collierville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Washington, DC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Press Releasecenter_img Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Rector Columbus, GA Pakistani bishop urges government to curb ‘misuse of blasphemy law’ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Belleville, IL Tags New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Job Listing Rector Tampa, FL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit an Event Listing Advocacy Peace & Justice, Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Albany, NY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Shreveport, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Posted Sep 17, 2012 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, MElast_img read more

Back 2 School: Blessing backpacks, blessing lives

first_img Fr. Michael Neal says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Shreveport, LA August 23, 2013 at 4:28 pm What a great story! I just want to add another school supplies story. Here in New Bern, North Carolina, Interfaith Refugee Ministry receives about 150 refugees each year, mostly from Burma. As many of you know, refugees come with nothing, so buying all that school stuff on the list as well as uniforms is nearly impossible. But with God’s ever present blessings and a great dose of assistance from Christ Episcopal Church parishioners, we were able to completely outfit over 30 new and returning students as well as having some extras for new arrivals next month. It’s wonderful to see so many other stories like this. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Youth Minister Lorton, VA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Comments are closed. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Tags Submit an Event Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Press Release Service Comments (3) In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ August 27, 2013 at 2:15 pm Wonderful story…………God bless…………………………..:) Rector Smithfield, NC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Events Rector Collierville, TN Youth & Young Adults center_img Submit a Job Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 By Pat McCaughanPosted Aug 23, 2013 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Hopkinsville, KY Susan Husson says: Rector Bath, NC Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Church of the Redeemer’s “Day of Hope” provides much-needed supplies and haircuts as Sarasota, Florida kids prepare to go back to school. Photo: Episcopal Diocese of Southwest Florida[Episcopal News Service] Kids of all ages are enjoying a seasonal rite of passage – the blessing of the backpacks – and even getting a little help from their local Episcopal churches to go back to school.For Jalen Henderson, 12, a member of St. Mark’s Episcopal Church near downtown San Diego, attending the congregation’s second annual “Back 2 School Bash” on Aug. 17 meant receiving new paper, pencils, calculator and other school supplies, and socks, shoes, a haircut, photo, lunch and games.“Thank you for giving me my backpack and other supplies,” Henderson wrote appreciatively during one of his last stops of the day – a crafts and activities table in the parish hall. “I think sixth grade will be very fantastic.”Mu Aye, a Karen refugee living in San Diego, also penned her gratitude: “I really love my backpack and I got everything I need. Without you, we would have to take a lot of money out of our pockets. I see everyone’s happy including me,” according to the community college student.At All Saints Church in River Ridge, Louisiana, Robin Peters, 55, admitted to being one of the “taller” kids and to feeling multiple blessings as the Rev. Jay Angerer prayed Aug. 18 for students, teachers, parents, the school year and backpacks.“I needed some blessings,” said Peters, a kindergarten teacher who also attends education courses at Tulane University and who also has an adult daughter in college.The blessings, along with an “Undie Sunday” underwear giveaway and an ice cream social, combined to make it “sacred and sweet and funny and fun” for Peters to lug her black, lime green and neon-colored polka dot backpack to the altar rail along with about eight others.“Everybody needs God’s blessing when you head back to school,” she said during an Aug. 22 telephone interview from her Jefferson Parish home. “It is a time of change, and excitement and uncertainty.”The All Saints’ blessings “made me feel good,” according to 6-year-old Claudia Berault, a kindergartener at the Lycée Français charter school in New Orleans. For her mom Eleanor, the ritual, while tender, is “always sort of bittersweet,” a recognition that “they grow up so fast.”“The tradition of the blessing of the backpacks we’ve just started in the last few years has been really nice,” Berault said during an Aug. 23 telephone interview. “It’s this symbol that we’re all there to support all of them even though we’re not their direct family. It’s like that communal ‘I will’ during baptisms, that we’re all here, we’re part of your people. It’s a nice thing.”Many congregations across the country, from Trinity Church in Fort Wayne, Indiana to Christ Church in San Antonio, Texas, customarily bless backpacks as summer concludes and students return to school. Many congregations also have formed community partnerships and paired the ritual with outreach efforts, offering clothing and personal hygiene giveaways, health exams, meals, games and other activities.In Sarasota, Florida, the Episcopal Church of the Redeemer’s “Day of Hope” felt like Christmas in August, according to Donna Derosier.At team of volunteers club together for Episcopal Church of the Redeemer’s “Day of Hope” to provide much-needed supplies as Sarasota, Florida kids prepare to go back to school. Photo: Episcopal Diocese of Southwest FloridaFor Derosier, 55, a single parent raising her 15-year-old son Fuller and her 11-year-old granddaughter Breanna, the day felt like an answer to prayer.“It’s been tough,” she said during a recent telephone interview. “I worked for the state for 25 years. I had a car accident and was hospitalized for three months and they didn’t hold my job, after 25 years. Once you lose your job, everything snowballs.”Struggling, her home in foreclosure, she was “ecstatic” to receive a call from Laura Crouse, a Redeemer parishioner and the Aug. 3 event organizer, inviting her to participate.“I asked her how she got my name; she got it from the backpack program at a school where the children are allowed to bring snacks and food home on the weekend,” Derosier recalled.It only got better from there.She and her family arrived to a hearty breakfast of sausage and eggs, scrambled by Redeemer parishioner and professional chef Jeff Trefry, who was “happy to be able to use my gifts to help out.” Later, he served up a beef brisket and mashed potatoes lunch as well as a variety of snacks throughout the day.Throughout the day, the Derosiers were shepherded through all the stations – medical, dental and eye examinations, dental fluoride treatments, a makeshift beauty salon/barber shop, and photo studio. They received school supplies, personal hygiene items, clothing and shoe gift cards, Bibles, and games and even a chance to play fireman – suiting up with fire hats, jackets and gear of local fire fighters, on hand to support day’s activities.Crouse said the event served about 150 children, “as much as our campus can accommodate,” from fundraising and personal donations totaling about $16,500.Olivia White, 16, Crouse’s niece, served as an ambassador for a family of five “so they were never left alone” the entire day.Her charges, 15 and 13 year old girls, and five and six year old boys, were not all that enthusiastic about the health check-ups but perked up when they got new hairstyles and cuts, White said.“That’s where the magic happens,” she said. “They [the volunteer stylists] make you feel so special and that’s a big thing. When you look good, you feel good. One girl was 15 and is starting high school and she was happy she got to do that.”The photos are also a big attraction. “The pictures are great. They each get an individual photo and they also get a family portrait. It’s really cool.”As the day progressed, friendships grew, White added. “We eat together. We end up playing together. Outside, there’s a ring toss, nail painting, there’s snow cones and popcorn. The day is amazing. They end with lunch; we send them off with a full stomach. The whole thing takes about five hours, but it goes by so fast.”Similarly, St. Matthew’s Church in Ontario, Oregon, partners with the state Department of Human Services, schools and other organizations, who together “are able to do more than we can separately.”St. Matthew’s fundraises and serves as the distribution center for the backpacks, in conjunction with other organizations, according to Prudence Sherman, a member who organized the Aug. 12 event.The church’s average Sunday attendance is about 45 but this year the event served about 600 children altogether, as leftover supplies are distributed locally, she said. “We may be small in number, but we’re not cowed by our size,” said Sherman, a former teacher. “We saw a need and we got involved. We have a lot to do and we are committed to do it.”Janie Padgett, community development coordinator for the Oregon Department of Human Services, said the area is a farming community and economically challenged but that “despite the disadvantages, we find ways to serve the kids. It’s a good example of how, when the church and government and the business community partner together, we are a lot better able to serve the needs of our communities.”Heather Smith of St. Mark’s Church said that at least 15 congregations in the San Diego diocese have supported the Back 2 School Bash, in its second year.Increasingly, more community members and organizations are also getting involved and she hopes that number continues to grow, so more children may be assisted, she added. About 200 children who pre-registered through the church’s afterschool tutoring, food pantry and distribution and other programs and about 25 others who had not pre-registered were assisted, she said.“Our idea was that every kid should be excited and have what they need to go back to school and that’s not the reality for many kids,” said Smith, 34. “The idea was that we could make small changes that mean a lot to them. They face enough challenges already, and this can make a lasting impact.”For Derosier in Sarasota, visiting the Church of the Redeemer’s “Day of Hope” was all that, and more.“Little did I know when I got there, that it would be so extensive and well-organized,” she said. “It was unbelievable.”And, the best takeaways?“Now, I have got the most beautiful pictures, a really, happy, great picture of my granddaughter. I haven’t been able to buy any school pictures, I just haven’t had the money.”And outside, as they left: “There was a plant giveaway. Now, I’ve got a tomato plant, growing in my backyard, and it has a tomato on it. It was really, really nice to spend the day that way with my son and granddaughter.”–The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. She is based in Los Angeles. Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Tampa, FL Back 2 School: Blessing backpacks, blessing lives Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Belleville, IL Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books August 23, 2013 at 12:50 pm What an uplifting story. I was touched by how even though the parishoner’s numbers are small, they were able to do so much. What a wonderful idea to give hope and dignity to so many students and their families. I am sure the gestures will be something they will not forget. Director of Music Morristown, NJ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Johanna Fredrics says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Albany, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Knoxville, TN last_img read more

A summary of Executive Council resolutions

first_img Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Tags An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET [Episcopal News Service – Phoenix, Arizona] During its June 10-12 meeting here, the Episcopal Church’s Executive Council adopted multiple resolutions, which are summarized below.Executive Council* Accept audited financial statements covering fiscal year ended Dec. 31, 2013 (EC010).Advocacy and Networking for Mission* Declare that electronic cigarettes, also known as E-cigarettes, be considered tobacco products for the purposes of the church’s policies regarding socially responsible investments (A&N028).* Invite Episcopalians to join Anglicans in Canada in observing the Seventh Sunday of Easter each year, commonly known as the Sunday after Ascension Day, as Jerusalem Sunday and on that day to give special attention to the spiritual heritage of all Christians in the land of Our Lord’s birth, death, and resurrection, and the continuing witness in our day of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem and the Anglican Bishop in Jerusalem, and commit to learning about the role of the Diocese of Jerusalem and its affiliated institutions in providing healthcare, education, and other vital social services to the communities of the Holy Land, and to supporting the ministry of those institutions; council requests that the staff of Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society’s Office of Justice and Advocacy Ministries make available appropriate resources for commemoration of Jerusalem Sunday and fulfillment of this resolution; council expresses “its solidarity with all Israelis, Palestinians, and others around the world working for peace in the land called holy by all the children of Abraham” (A&N029).* Give thanks for the life and service of Chester Nez, one of the original Navajo Code talkers who was recruited in World War II to serve in the United States Marine Corps to help develop an unbreakable code that aided U.S. forces in the Pacific; commend and express deep gratitude for the service of all veterans and in particular the many veterans of native and indigenous descent who have sacrificed much in the service of our nation (A&N030).* Commend the City of Seattle and other cities for passing minimum wage ordinances higher than $10.10 an hour; express disappointment at the U.S. Senate for failing to bring to debate legislation to raise the Federal Minimum Wage to $10.10 an hour and the U.S. House of Representatives for its refusal to consider at all the legislation; endorse the work of church’s Office of Justice and Advocacy Ministries on behalf of all Episcopalians in continuing their work with interreligious and ecumenical coalitions that address economic insecurity, wealth disparity, and the pursuant social inequalities in the United States; council says it is committed to this advocacy and encourages Episcopalians and dioceses to study and stand in public solidarity with our low-wage brothers and sisters in legal work actions for legislative change at the federal, state and local level that give low-wage workers greater access to the economic prosperity so many in our nation enjoy (A&N031).Advocacy and Networking for Mission & World Mission* Reaffirm Episcopal Church commitment to comprehensive immigration reform with a pathway to citizenship as a primary solution to the plight of undocumented immigrants who have established roots in the United States as members of our communities and as substantive social, economic, and spiritual contributors to our nation; to proportional and humane immigration enforcement policies; deplore unprecedented levels of detention and deportation carried out by the [federal] Administration against individuals who pose no threat to society such as individuals who have committed reentry violations, traffic related offenses, minor criminal offenses, and actions that are retroactively considered deportable offenses, and individuals with U.S. citizen or Lawful Permanent Resident status, spouses, or parents; urge the Administration to provide for timely and readily available access to the child welfare system for detained parents, so that they have real and appropriate opportunities to make informed decisions on behalf of their children and families, increased use of alternatives to detention for those who pose no threat,  elimination of detention bed mandate, which requires the federal government to detain 34,000 immigrants on a daily basis and encourages the use of detention over more humane and cost-effective alternatives; urge that, when deportations do occur, individuals be repatriated in a safe and humane manner with their belongings, during daylight hours, to secure locations, with appropriate facilities for women and children; and that, when multiple members of a family are deported, they are not needlessly separated or returned to different ports of entry from one another; urge all Episcopalians to advocate and pray for humane comprehensive immigration reform so that immigrants, their families, and their communities may know peace, safety, and respect for the dignity of all people (A&N/WM001)Finances for Mission* Establish Trust Fund # 1063 as the National ECW Board Scholarship Memorial Fund (FFM044).* Establish Trust Fund # 1064 as the St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Fort Thomas, Kentucky, Donor Restricted Endowment Fund (FFM045).* Establish Trust Fund # 1065 as the St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Fort Thomas, Kentucky, Unrestricted Endowment Fund (FFM046).* Ratify the approval made on March 25, 2014, by the Executive Committee of Executive Council to enter into a refinancing of the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society’s Credit Agreement with U.S. Bank, continuing the existing term loan and expanding the line of credit to $15 million. (FFM047).* Authorize DFMS treasurer to enter into agreements with U. S. Bank to renegotiate the current term loan outstanding in the principal amount of $31,162,800 as of June 4, 2014, with a term of no less than five years and an effective fixed interest rate below the current 3.69 percent per annum; authorize treasurer to incorporate an interest rate swap or similar derivative instrument to reduce the effective fixed interest rate further; authorize and direct treasurer to take such further action on behalf of DFMS as is deemed necessary to effectuate the foregoing (FFM048).* Authorize DFMS chief operating officer and treasurer in collaboration with the chairs of the joint standing committees on Finances for Mission and World Mission to negotiate a loan of up to $2.5 million to the Diocese of Honduras to enable it to further its plan of sustainability by refinancing loans the diocese has previously undertaken with external lenders; that the analysis, terms and repayment of loan shall consider and reflect the consolidated operations and assets of the consolidated activities of the diocese; that the lender and borrower agree a mutually satisfactory sustainability plan (FFM049).* Authorize additional line of credit to the Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin of $785,000 to be accessed through December 31, 2015, for support of the continuing diocese; authorize a separate additional line of credit to the diocese of $775,000 to be accessed through December 31, 2015, if necessary to support maintenance of any recovered property; lender and borrower agree on a mutually satisfactory sustainability plan that the lender and borrower regularly review; terms and conditions of this line of credit to be developed by DFMS chief operating officer and treasurer in collaboration with the chairs of Executive Council’s Joint Standing Committees on Finances for Mission and Local Mission and Ministry (LMM); that the repayment shall be secured by liquid assets of the diocese; that the diocese provide semi-annual financial reports to DFMS chief operating officer, treasurer and the chair of FFM (FFM050).* Approves an increase in the triennial disbursement for Navajoland Area Mission of $225,000 to a total of $1.225 million, to be made available before December 31, 2015 (FFM051).* Add $256,000 be added to the existing $863,245 in the Information Technology budget, bringing the triennial total to $1,119,245 to cover department costs, including an upgrade of DFMS technology platforms to MSOffice 365 (FFM052).Governance and Administration for Mission* Amend Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society Employee Handbook Policy number 110 on Anti-Fraud, Dishonest Activity, and Whistleblowing (GAM017).* Amend Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society Employee Handbook Policy number 112 on Nepotism (GAM018).* Adopt a revised and restated Conflict of Interest Policy Statement and Disclosure Form for the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society (GAM019).Finances for Mission & Governance and Administration for Mission* Directs the Finances for Mission & Governance and Administration for MissionSubcommittee on the Location of the Church Center to continue to evaluate the location Episcopal Church headquarters based on a wide range of factors including cost and financial affordability, travel and geographic accessibility, employment and justice concerns, partnership opportunities; charge subcommittee with continuing to gather all available data to complete evaluation, and to hire or retain necessary professionals and consultants to complete task; authorize subcommittee to spend up to $100,000 to accomplish work (FFM-GAM002).Local Mission and Ministry* Affirm the following ministries as Jubilee Ministries: Fundacion Pastraol Para La Promocion Humana, Parroquia El Buen Pastor, Cucuta (Diocese of Colombia); All Saints’ Community Center; Lakewood, New Jersey (Diocese of New Jersey); Holy Spirit Emergency Food Pantry,El Paso, Texas (diocese of the Rio Grande) (LMM010).World Mission* Recognize companion diocese relationship between the Diocese of Southeast Florida and the Diocese of Toliara until such time as this relationship is terminated by mutual consent (WM020).* Recommend approval of United Thank Offering grants as listed in nava report (WM021).* Acknowledge the good work of the Rev. Heather Melton in this new UTO grant process (WM022).* Recommend UTO individual grant summaries prepared for Executive Council include the “Focus or Criteria” guideline(s) under which the grant application is approved by UTO (WM023).* Affirm the good news of the 75th Anniversary of Episcopal Relief & Development and encourage all Episcopalians and Anglicans everywhere to fully participate in this season of celebration with Episcopal Relief & Development (WM024). Rector Belleville, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Events Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit a Press Release Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Martinsville, VA Submit an Event Listing Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Tampa, FL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Featured Jobs & Calls Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector Columbus, GA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Posted Jun 12, 2014 Rector Bath, NC Rector Collierville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Albany, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Executive Council June 2014 Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Washington, DC Executive Council, Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA A summary of Executive Council resolutions Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Youth Minister Lorton, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit a Job Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Shreveport, LA Press Release Service Course Director Jerusalem, Israellast_img read more

Being people of God together in mutual relationship

first_img This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Comments (2) Submit an Event Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Missionaries, Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Belleville, IL Rector Hopkinsville, KY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Washington, DC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY June 14, 2016 at 11:59 am This is a good article that sets forth the themes of mutuality and companionship that are center-stage in mission thinking and practice today. It was great to have the 20 missionaries at the Global Mission Conference in Poncé, and they contributed much to the discussions. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Titus Presler says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Comments are closed. May 31, 2016 at 3:44 pm It’s ironic that an “aboriginal elder” is quoted on the same web page as the Archbishop of Uganda is quoted as warning against syncretism. Surely we have elders of our own whose words inspire us. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Shreveport, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Press Release Service J. Douglas Ousley says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Being people of God together in mutual relationship Missionaries share lessons from the field Tags Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Press Release Youth & Young Adults Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Featured Events An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Job Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Collierville, TN Rector Tampa, FL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Albany, NY Long-term missionaries and Young Adult Service Corps missionaries posed with Presiding Bishop Michael Curry following a meeting held during the 21st annual Global Episcopal Mission Network Conference May 18-20 in Ponce, Puerto Rico. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service] “If you have come to help me, you are wasting your time. But if you have come because your liberation is bound up with mine, then let us work together.”Lilla Watson, an aboriginal elder, activist and educator, from Australia is credited with these words, spoken by her and others in the early 1970s at a time when white Australians were becoming aware of the effects of racism and colonialism on the country’s indigenous people. These words were not only meant to challenge people working toward social justice, but reflected the frustration felt by the Aborigine toward the efforts of whites who in their offers of assistance, further perpetuated colonial perceptions and attitudes.The words, used to provoke discussion in a small group session during last week’s 21st annual Global Episcopal Mission Network conference in Puerto Rico, resonated with Rachel McDaniel, a Young Adult Service Corps missionary serving her second year in Brazil.Being a missionary, she said, is about “experiencing the love of God in Christ together.”The Global Episcopal Mission Network, or GEMN, annually brings together short- and long-term missionaries to empower and educate them in their work. Increasingly, the old way of being a missionary , and of mission trips focused on projects and doing things for others, is being replaced by a model centered in mutual respect and accompaniment, and developing a deeper understanding of one another’s context.“We still have a tendency in the Episcopal Church to want to, as many people have said before, we want to try to fix things for others and we see that as something that is important for us, but while we can work alongside our partners in helping them strengthen their communities, being present I think is even more important,” said the Rev. David Copley, the Episcopal Church’s officer for mission personnel and global partnerships.Copley’s office provides support for 51 adult and young adult missionaries in 20 countries around the Anglican Communion.Since his consecration in November 2015, Presiding Bishop Michael Curry has shared his vision for the Jesus Movement and its two components – evangelism and reconciliation – and what it means for Episcopalians and the Episcopal Church to be a part of that movement. In his keynote address to the more than 120 people attending the GEMN conference, he talked about mission as a way of embodying Jesus in the world.“Bishop Curry talked about evangelism a lot and I think one of the things that our missionaries are learning and sharing is very much what we talk about as an ‘incarnational theology of mission,’ that sense of Christ is present amongst all people,” said Copley. “We are definitely not going to bring Jesus and share the Good News because it’s already there. But what we are doing is if we enter into a meaningful relationship then we see the Christ in the other and they see the Christ that is in us.“I think that there is also a mutual evangelizing that is happening when we are in a meaningful relationship. And again that was something that Bishop Curry touched upon in his opening talk when he talked about that sense of if you are living in the Jesus Movement then that comes out through your very being.”Twenty young adult and adult missionaries attended the GEMN conference, where they had the opportunity to share their experience with the presiding bishop and talk about mission and the Episcopal Church. They also shared their experiences with others on a panel where they answered questions such as, “How did you discern your call for long-term mission.?”For Monica Vega, a long-term missionary who served in South Africa for 14 years and now serves in Brazil, one man’s example led her to missionary life. When Vega was in her early twenties and living in Buenos Aires, Argentina, she’d cross the city by bus on the weekends to volunteer in a shantytown where a man simply referred to as “Brother Domingo” repaired shoes.“He was this tiny guy with a thick French accent working on shoe repairs … and this man was a missionary and he was living among the people there and his only work was repairing shoes and he was the center of that shantytown,” said Vega during the workshop. “He didn’t do anything in the way of preaching, from time to time he’d do a Sunday school or prayer, but he said that really wasn’t his job, and one day I said, I want to do that.”For Alan Yarborough, who served two years as a YASC missionary in Haiti and who then stayed on to work at the St. Barnabas Center for Agriculture in the country’s north, he knew upon graduation from Clemson University in South Carolina that he wanted to experience of living and working abroad. Initially, he considered applying to the Peace Corps, but upon learning about the YASC program, he decided he wanted an experience where he’d be in relationship with others in the Episcopal Church, not just an American abroad, he said.In his second year of service in Haiti, Yarborough built time into his schedule to return to South Carolina, building stronger connections between parishes in the Diocese of Upper South Carolina and in Haiti.“That’s the real mission, bringing it back,” said Heidi Schmidt, in response to what Yarborough shared during the panel.Schmidt served alongside Vega in South Africa where they helped build Isibindi, a community-based program that trains unemployed community members to provide child and youth care services that allow orphaned children to be cared for in their communities by older siblings or other family members.Schmidt and Vega worked with locals, training them to run the program and eventually turning it over to them. They now work in São Paulo alongside women street venders, providing support for them, many of whom are migrant workers and vulnerable to gender-based violence.“Heidi and Monica spent seven years working in South Africa with a phenomenal program … this model was adopted in other parts of South Africa and is continuing today even though they are not there because they helped empower and  enable the community to continue that ministry,” said Copley. “They moved to Brazil and will only stay there as long as they feel they have something to contribute.”In Vega’s words: “You arrive where no one needs you and you leave when people think they need you.”Missionaries are not bringing God to communities, God already is there and they are not there to solve problems, build infrastructure or teach in schools; they are there to be present and learn about the lives of other people in community with them.“The reality is that in most parts of the world there are teachers and nurses that are able to do the work that missionaries used to be doing 50 to 100 years ago,” said Copley. “We want to make sure we’ve transitioned away from a colonial model and now we want to make sure we move away from a paternalistic model into a model where there’s mutual learning from one another.”The new model, he said, applies to both short-term mission trips and the YASC and long-term adult missionary models; it’s something people interested in short-term mission trips can learn from the young adult and adult missionaries.“I think sometimes we can focus so much more on the task itself and very little time on getting to know and understand one another,” said Copley. “I think in our culture we feel not that it’s a waste of time, but I think we feel as if we need to have what we see in our culture as meaningful experience and contribute something physically to a partner to make the trip worthwhile. We have to do something physical otherwise we can’t justify this, I think it’s allowing ourselves the understanding that we can justify a deepening a relationship in some ways as a more meaningful way of engaging in mission.”— Lynette Wilson is an editor/reporter for Episcopal News Service. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC By Lynette Wilson Posted May 26, 2016 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Young Adult Service Corps, last_img read more

Kathryn Ryan elected bishop suffragan for Texas’ western region

first_img Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Shreveport, LA [Diocese of Texas] The Rev. Canon Kathryn ‘Kai’ Ryan was elected Feb. 22 as bishop suffragan for the western region of the Episcopal Diocese of Texas.Ryan, 54, currently serves as Canon to the Ordinary for the Diocese of Texas. She was elected to become the next bishop suffragan as lay and clergy delegates gathered at the 170th Diocesan Council at The Woodlands Waterway Marriot. Ryan received 283 of 441 votes cast in the lay order and 137 of 235 cast in the clergy order on the first ballot.The other candidates were:The Rev. Hannah E. Atkins Romero, Rector, Trinity Episcopal Church, Houston, Texas.The Rev. Canon Glenice Robinson-Como, Canon Missioner for Outreach and Justice Ministries, Christ Church Cathedral, Houston, Texas.By canon, a bishop suffragan will serve “under the direction” of Diocesan Bishop Andy Doyle and will have oversight of congregations in the western region of the diocese, with an office in Austin.“I am so grateful to the search committee and the transition committee and all who have worked on this process over the past year. This has been a really long year and the fact that we got through it has been a result of walking together,” said Ryan. “I especially want to thank Hannah, Glenice and their families. I trust that God and you will teach me how to be the bishop that God and you need.”Ryan’s breadth of experience includes working in four dioceses as well as involvement in Provincial Synod and General Convention. She also participated in the national Gathering of Leaders for young clergy and served nearly 15 years in a culturally diverse parish as rector.Ryan will be seated and consecrated as bishop suffragan on June 1 in Austin, Texas. Tags Bishop Elections, Rector Knoxville, TN Women’s Ministry Rector Belleville, IL Featured Events Submit an Event Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Albany, NY Posted Feb 25, 2019 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC House of Bishops, Press Release Service People, Rector Tampa, FL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Pittsburgh, PA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit a Job Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA center_img Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate Diocese of Nebraska This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Kathryn Ryan elected bishop suffragan for Texas’ western region Submit a Press Release Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Bath, NC Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Featured Jobs & Calls AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VAlast_img read more

Pittsburgh parish marks its role in radio history

first_img A section of the January 2, 1921, bulletin of Calvary Episcopal Church, Pittsburgh. The service was the first-ever to be broadcast on the brand new medium of radio.[Episcopal Diocese of Pittsburgh] It was the first Sunday in 1921. While Pittsburgh’s Calvary Episcopal Church started its day in typical fashion with Holy Communion and Morning Prayer, it would later hold an evening service unlike anything that had ever taken place before.“An interesting arrangement has been made for tonight’s service,” Calvary’s then rector, the Rev. Edwin Jan van Etten, wrote in the parish bulletin. He noted that the International Radio Company (part of Westinghouse Electric) had installed wireless equipment in the church, and that the hymns and sermon to be preached by his associate, the Rev. Lewis Bliss Whittemore, would be “flashed for a radius of more than a thousand miles through space!”Thus, Calvary came to host and officiate the first religious service ever broadcast to the world.Westinghouse’s KDKA radio station had just become the first in the country to begin broadcasting a mere two months earlier. And it had never originated a program outside of its own studios until that night at Calvary.Calvary’s weekly presence on KDKA would last for more than 40 years. The station’s “clear-channel” license allowed it to broadcast at 50,000 watts on a frequency that was not shared with any other station. That meant its programs could be heard in much of the eastern and central United States, and if atmospheric conditions were right, well beyond.Calvary’s national prominence grew, as did the profiles of its clergy. Whittemore would later become Bishop of Western Michigan. Van Etten headed to Boston to serve as dean of the cathedral. He was succeeded by the Rev. Arthur Kinsolving, himself a former dean and future bishop. Calvary would attract rectors from the likes of the Rev. Sam Shoemaker, who helped established Alcoholics Anonymous, and in more recent times, the Rev. Dr. Harold T. Lewis. The current rector, the Rev. Jonathon W. Jensen, was the dean of Trinity Cathedral in Little Rock.Notable guests would also grace Calvary’s pulpit over the years. The church has hosted several presiding bishops, former Archbishop of Canterbury George Carey, and the Nobel Peace Prize winner, Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu of South Africa.On Sunday, Jan. 3, 2021 – exactly one hundred years plus one day after that groundbreaking Evening Prayer – Calvary commemorated its role in broadcast history. The 11 a.m. Eucharist featured the music played during its 1921 inaugural broadcast and Jensen preached about the anniversary.Just as it did a century ago, Calvary’s service went out to the entire world, although this time using the modern technology of live streaming over the Internet. Calvary has been streaming its services and parish life regularly since the onset of the Covid pandemic, and the church is now permanently equipped with five video cameras that are fully integrated with the audio system.The Jan. 3 commemoration can be accessed through the parish website at www.calvarypgh.org/live or on its Facebook page www.facebook.com/CalvaryEpiscopalChurch.Additional material, including the full Jan. 2, 1921 service leaflet, appears in the December edition of Calvary’s newsletter, Agape. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Knoxville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Job Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Director of Music Morristown, NJ Posted Dec 30, 2020 Press Release Service Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Press Release Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Bath, NC Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Tampa, FL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Smithfield, NC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Events Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Pittsburgh parish marks its role in radio history Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Albany, NY Rector Belleville, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OHlast_img read more

Property Tax office open in Apopka today

first_img UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Property owners received their Truth-In-Millage (TRIM) notices last week. These letters detailed valuations for properties, as well as proposed property taxes.What if you do not agree with the valuation?  You have until until September 19, 2016 to inquire about the proposed property taxes.The easiest way to inquire is to stop by one of the Temporary Satellite Offices run by the Orange County Property Appraiser (OCPA).These satellite offices serve to:Ensure tax payers are utilizing available exemptions to save as much money as possible.Educate the community on what TRIM notices entail.Accommodate tax payers by going to their communities.The Temporary Satellite Offices are hosted by OCPA twice a year for TRIM Notices and Homestead Exemptions.The Temporary Satellite Offices in Apopka are:Monday, August 29 from 1:00 PM to 7:00 PM at the Fran Carlton Recreation Center, 11 N. Forest Avenue.Wednesday, August 31 from 1:00 PM to 7:00 PM at Bravo Supermarket, Apopka Plaza, 519 S. Orange Blossom Trail, Apopka.Use this link to see a full list of the dates, hours and locations of all 19 Temporary Satellite Offices.“My foremost goal is to help educate and accommodate our customers; therefore at OCPA our objective is to be as easily accessible as possible to answer any questions on TRIM notices,” said Property Appraiser Rick Singh. “Everyone having a thorough understanding of the proposed taxes is of vital importance to us.”Residents will be able to meet one-on-one with OCPA staff and real estate experts. Representatives will have full access to the OCPA database in order to accomplish everything on site while saving residents a trip to the downtown office.The schedule is subject to change. For more information or questions call (407) 836-5044 or visit the OCPA’s website at http://www.ocpafl.org/ Dale Fenwick TAGSOCPAOrange County Property AppraiserProperty Taxes Previous articleShare to Win a Family 4-Pack of Tickets to Disney on IceNext articleCity Council schedules special meeting for KaBoom! grant Dale Fenwick RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter August 29, 2016 at 1:00 pm John Stammos Reply I received my TRIM Notice and was disappointed to see a proposed 20% INCREASE in APOPKA Taxes! There needs to be a NEW emphasis on eliminating City wasteful spending rather than increasing my taxes! Eliminate the Mayor’s $20,000.00+/yr radio show, stop wasting money on failed ventures (ie. The Outdoor Festival with a $500,000 budget and loses $100,000.00 per year of taxpayer money and if it ever makes money, none will be used to replace the lost reserves!!!!!!!!!!!!!!) We’ve wasted $500,000+ on consultants and the list goes on and on and on. Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom center_img The Public Budget Hearings are on 9/14 and 9/28. 2 COMMENTS You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 August 29, 2016 at 12:56 pm Reply LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Please enter your name here Please enter your comment!last_img read more

Report: Florida residents pay 6th lowest state taxes

first_img Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom “Florida has the sixth lowest total tax burden at 6.79 percent mostly because the state has no income tax,” WalletHub analyst Jill Gonzalez said. “One of the advantages is that residents here pay the third lowest total taxes at $2.385 per capita, but there’s also a notion of ‘you get what you pay for’ in terms of government services, according to our taxpayer Return On Investment report.”Florida TaxWatch president and chief executive officer Dominic M. Calabro said the low tax burden is a plus for Florida families and businesses.“Florida’s tax climate makes it an attractive option for families and businesses alike to move to and flourish,” Calabro said. “A lower tax burden allows businesses to create more jobs and expand, while allowing taxpayers to have more money in their pockets that can then be spent and funneled back into the economy.”Calabro said Florida still could do more to reduce the tax burden. His organization “also called for burdensome taxes to be cut to improve our tax climate further.”The proposed changes include reducing or eliminating the state’s business rent tax and communication services tax.According to a briefing published by Florida TaxWatch, “Florida subjects commercial lease and license payments to the state and local sales tax and it is the only state in the nation that does so.”As a result, Florida TaxWatch said the state government mandated an increase of up to 8 percent in occupancy costs for all business that rent property, “a cost they would not incur in any other state.”“Florida businesses pay more than $1.7 billion a year as a result of this tax,” the briefing said.In addition, Florida TaxWatch said renters must pay local option sales taxes, increasing the tax burden for these businesses by an estimated $230 million.In a separate briefing, Florida TaxWatch said, although the combined state and local tax rate in the state tops out at 7.5 percent, the purchase of cell phone and other taxable communications services drives the tax rate to more than 14 percent and even in excess of 16 percent.“Florida has one of the highest tax rates on communications services in the nation,” the briefing said.Richard C. Auxier of the Urban Institute/Tax Policy Center, said it’s important to understand what rankings like the ones reported by WalletHub “say and what they don’t say.”Accordiing to Auxier, Urban Institute has found that “state tax cuts do not automatically lead to economic growth.”Auxier said “politicians certainly care about rankings like WalletHub’s, but the study only analyzed property tax, individual income tax, sales tax and excise tax.A business considering moving its operations to Florida would want to know about other taxes such as corporate income taxes, gross receipts taxes, fees and all the taxes levied at the city or county level, he said.In addition, he said state residents are also affected by different taxes.“For example, Florida does not tax income,” Auxier said. “That’s great if you’re earning a lot of money. But if you’re not earning much, Florida’s no income tax is not helpful and its high sales tax is harmful, and there are states with far better tax systems for you.”Auxier said “businesses think about a lot of things other than taxes.” He said a 2016 study ranked highway access, availability of skilled labor and cost of labor as the most important business location factors, “with tax incentives and rates ranking fifth or lower.”Meanwhile, Auxier said individuals consider schools, commute times and other issues when deciding whether to move to a specific state or area.“All those things – roads, workforce, schools, parks, etc. – are affected by a lot of things governments do and spend on,” Auxier said.Auxier said some independent state tax commissions use rankings like the ones reported by WalletHub to boost their argument for cutting income taxes or corporate taxes.Enterprise Florida communications director Nathan Edwards feels that Florida’s low state tax burden and lack of government interference in spending decisions have benefits for the state’s residents and businesses.“Business dollars go a lot farther in Florida given the state’s tax advantages, tax exemptions and no state personal income tax,” Edwards said. “Businesses and citizens know how to spend their money better than government. Florida’s leaders recognize this and keep government out of the way.” Focus on FloridaBy Carrie Salls of Watchdog.org (contributor)  TALLAHASSEE – Florida residents have the sixth lowest state tax burden in the U.S., according to a recent WalletHub report. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Please enter your name here Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 TAGSFocus on FloridaTaxes Previous articleIn case you missed it: The Apopka news week in reviewNext articleAAA: Florida gas prices reach 20-month high Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR 1 COMMENT What about the gasoline tax were do we stand in the rankings with other states and why is every new major road in Orange County becoming a toll rd Reply Joe LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Please enter your comment! April 24, 2017 at 10:03 am You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address herelast_img read more

Orange County pet adoptions hits record high

first_img Please enter your name here Please enter your comment! Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 1 COMMENT You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Good news for a change. I am so thankful more animals are being adopted. That photo of the beagle puppy is so sweet, I can almost smell his puppy breath! Oh, and those puppy eyes……..too cute! Mama Mia August 4, 2017 at 3:45 pmcenter_img UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Reply Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter From the Orange County Public Information OfficeOrange County Animal Services (OCAS) is pleased to announce 922 adoptions in the month of July, the highest number of pet adoptions in the agency’s 48-year history. The adoption of 473 dogs and 449 cats, was the highest number the shelter has ever achieved in one month’s time. The record was especially rewarding since the shelter reached capacity in early July with more than 500 animals in their care at one time. The spike in population prompted officials to place an urgent call for adoptive homes to the community and rescue partners, which was clearly heard.“Pumpkin,” a 15 lb. orange tabby cat adopted by her new family on July 31, was ultimately the adoption to break the all-time record.“920 adoptions in one month is an incredible milestone to have achieved,” said Orange County Mayor Teresa Jacobs. “This record-breaking number demonstrates how deeply our community cares – and the same goes for our Orange County Animal Services staff.  In partnership with citizens and local families, as well as our dedicated volunteers and awesome rescue partners, we continue to surpass expectations in finding ‘forever homes’ for our four-pawed friends.”In addition to the July record number of adoptions, OCAS celebrated additional milestones:10,316 guests visited with animals at the shelter.930 pet spay and neuter surgeries were performed by clinic staff.170 pets were taken in by rescue partners.Orange County Animal Services also credits the Pet Alliance of Greater Orlando, United Paws Rescue and CARE Feline TNR with helping to find placement for dozens of cats and orphaned kittens requiring special care.“We can’t do this alone,” acknowledged Dil Luther, manager of Orange County Animal Services. “We have an incredible team of staff and volunteers who love animals, and we’re within a tremendous community that does as well.”While celebrating this victory, shelter staff are aiming for another successful month. Orange County Animal Services is currently offering the “Pawgust” promotion which reduces dog adoption fees to $15 and cat adoption fees to $10. Adoption includes spay or neuter surgery, initial vaccinations and microchip implantation for identification purposes.Although adoption remains a top priority, shelter staff plan to do more work later this year to help encourage greater spay and neuter services within the community to control pet overpopulation.About Orange County Animal ServicesOrange County Animal Services is Central Florida’s largest pet rescue and adoption center. Last year, Animal Services received nearly 20,000 animals at its shelter. For more than 40 years, the agency’s mission has been to protect the citizens and animals of Orange County. Its vision is to give abandoned and neglected pets a second chance to live long, healthy lives in safe, loving homes.Orange County Animal Services is located at 2769 Conroy Road in Orlando near the Mall at Millenia. The facility is open for adoptions Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, please call (407) 254-9150 or visit www.ocnetpets.com. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. TAGSOrange County Animal Services Previous articleNo friend of change? It’s not looking for friendsNext articleOrange County budget nears $4 billion, but increase is only 18% in four years Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORlast_img read more