first_imgEvery month, a group of wealthy women representing some of Brazil’s most exclusive and powerful land-owning families, meets in São Paulo at the Brazilian Rural Society. One of the leading lights of the 23 “ladies of agribusiness,” as they’re known, was a glamorous socialite named Ana Luiza Junqueira Vilela Viacava, who often featured in Brazil’s Vogue magazine. In 2012, she declared: “I like land and the security it gives me for the future.”In July 2016, Ana Luiza was arrested and charged with land grabbing. An unflattering picture of her startled face, taken by the police after her detention, appeared in the national press.Ana Luiza Junqueira Vilela Viacava, arrested as part of the Flying Rivers Operation. Courtesy of Brazil’s Federal PoliceShe was charged as part of the Flying Rivers Operation (Operação Rios Voadores), a well-planned, well-coordinated law enforcement action launched on June 30, 2016 by several arms of the Brazilian government. Its objective: to dismantle a powerful gang of land thieves who had illegally occupied and deforested huge tracts of public land near Castelo de Sonhos, a town on Brazil’s BR-163 highway in Pará state.Heading the gang of Amazon land grabbers was Ana Luiza’s brother, 39-year-old Antônio José Junqueira Vilela Filho, known as AJ Vilela, or Jotinha. The gang’s number two was Anna Luiza’s husband, Ricardo Caldeira Viacava.The band had been operating for years and had illegally cleared 300 square kilometers (74,132 acres) of forest, an area 5 times larger than New York’s Manhattan island. It was all public land.This made AJ Vilela “the largest individual clearer of land in the Amazon, since the monitoring of deforestation began,” according to Juan Doblas, one of the authors of a recently published book about land grabbing and deforestation called “Dono é quem desmata” (which translates inelegantly as “the owner is the person who clears the land”).It took two years of careful investigation to bring the Flying Rivers Operation to fruition. It mobilized 95 federal police, 15 tax experts and 32 employees from IBAMA, Brazil’s federal environment agency. Authorization was given to tap phones and hack into bank accounts, and the operation was launched last June with the issuance of 24 federal arrest warrants.At first, Ana Luiza was only required to give a police statement — an order not enforced as she was on vacation in the U.S. However, in the days following the initial bust, police wiretaps showed that, she was making calls from outside the country, urging people in Brazil to destroy or hide evidence that could incriminate her still at large brother, already imprisoned husband, and other gang members.When she landed in Guarulhos Airport in São Paulo on July 4, 2016, she was arrested. A few days later, her brother, who had gone into hiding, gave himself up.An area of Amazon forest cleared by the AJ Vilela gang near the Baú indigenous reserve. Photo courtesy of Brazil’s Environmental Protection Directorate (Diretoria de Proteção Ambiental – IBAMA)A life of privilegeAJ Vilela and Ana Luíza are the offspring of Antônio José Rossi Junqueira Vilela, known as AJJ, a prominent, wealthy cattle rancher whose achievements as a breeder of Nelore cattle have long been praised in the nation’s agribusiness media. One influential magazine acclaimed him as “a model of success from whom large and small ranchers can learn lessons.”AJJ saw to it that his children achieved celebrity status, with photos of AJ Vilela and Ana Luíza often appearing in Brazil’s most exclusive social columns — posing, smiling, at private art exhibit openings and exclusive fashion shows, rubbing shoulders with the elite. In 2010, AJ Vilela traveled to the tiny Caribbean island of Saint Barts to marry Ana Khouri, a fashionable Brazilian jewelry designer whose work adorns Madonna and other celebrities; they separated in 2012.* A high point of 2013’s social calendar was an extravaganza celebrating AJ Vilela’s 35th birthday at his luxury home in Jardim Europa, one of São Paulo’s most exclusive neighborhoods.But even as AJ Vilela enjoyed the very public life of a privileged socialite, he was illegally clearing land in the Amazon as far back as 2010, and illegally appropriating and deforesting public lands to create cattle pasture as recently as 2016, while keeping workers in conditions analogous to slavery.In truth, the wealth boasted by family patriarch AJ Vilela arose from unsavory business activities conducted near the impoverished, remote Amazonian town of Castelo dos Sonhos, a world away from the rich, well-connected surroundings of São Paulo’s Jardim Europa.Ricardo Caldeira Viacava, who along with the rest of the gang, was accused of utilizing slave labor and violating labor legislation, as well as being charged with illegal deforestation of public lands in the Amazon. Photo courtesy of facebookAJJ, the fortune hunterTo unravel and understand AJ Vilela’s criminal history, we need to look back at the life of his father, Antônio José Rossi Junqueira Vilela, known simply as AJJ.AJJ, as with many other self-made men in the Amazon, got his big break in Mato Grosso state in 1967 when, at the age of 20, he procured 10,000 hectares (24,710 acres) from the Brazilian authorities, which were eager to push out indigenous and traditional peoples and repopulate the Amazon with new settlers. In that then remote and wild, forested region, AJJ “set out to achieve his dream of becoming a great and respected cattle raiser”.On the way to achieving this dream, he worked for a time in the state of Rondônia in the Southwestern Amazon basin, where he took over the Yvypytã Ranch. There, his name became associated with some gruesome events, though charges were never filed: in 1983 he was accused of ordering the killing of miners panning for gold on his land; and in 1986, he was alleged to have been involved in an attempt to wipe out a group of isolated Indians, also living on his land, by poisoning them with sugar laced with arsenic.Back in Mato Grosso, AJJ became “great and respected,” though he openly boasted that in his early days as a rancher, he carried out extensive deforestation: “I bought a lot of land in Mato Grosso, when land was still cheap. I paid a symbolic amount. Something like a dollar a hectare. So I bought large areas, opened ranches and then sold them on. During this period, I had as much as 200,000 hectares [494,210 acres]. ”He didn’t only deforest his own land. Eventually he was fined R$60 million (US$20 million) for clearing land within the Cristalino State Park, then the highest penalty ever charged by the Mato Grosso state government for such a crime.But AJJ never paid the fine. More remarkably perhaps, he still received public funding to build two small hydroelectric plants inside the park, with money coming from the FDA, Amazon Development Fund (about R$60 million; US$19 million); BNDES, the National Economic and Social Development Bank (R$10 million; US$3 million); and Banco da Amazônia (about R$ 9.9 million; US$3 million). All this despite reports of irregularities in permits granted for the work — including the most obvious, the concession of a license for a hydroelectric dam within a conservation unit.The case was reviewed by the Parliamentary Commission of Inquiry into small-scale hydro-projects in the Mato Grosso Legislative Assembly, because accusations had been made that the project licenses were obtained using false documents. It was reported at that time that AJJ was an important backer of the former governor of Mato Grosso, Blairo Maggi, and that the licenses had been granted as part of a political deal. Today, Blairo Maggi is Brazil’s agriculture minister.The construction work on the dams was halted, but AJJ’s cattle went on grazing inside the park, despite the lawsuits and the fines. Impunity was then rife in the region but, even so, AJJ had a special knack for living safely outside the law.IBAMA offical views a tree cut by the AJ Vilela gang. Photo courtesy of Brazil’s Environmental Protection Directorate (Diretoria de Proteção Ambiental – IBAMA)Like father, like sonAJ Vilela appears to have begun his illegal deforestation activities in Pará in 2010 and 2011. IBAMA soon became aware of his clear cutting, and imposed heavy fines and banned any further economic activity on the cleared lands.AJ Vilela followed in his father’s footsteps, and even outdid him; today he holds the record for the largest fines ever imposed on an individual by IBAMA for environmental crimes: R$332,765,736.50 (US$111 million).He followed his father’s example in another way, and simply ignored the fines. Not that they would have bankrupted him: they amounted to not even a fifth of the R$1.9 billion (US$600 million) that passed through his bank accounts between 2012 and 2015, according to the Federal Public Ministry (MPF), Brazil’s independent public prosecutors.Few in Brazil are surprised by his failure to pay: “Have you ever heard of organized crime paying its fines?” responded Luciano Evaristo, IBAMA’s head of environmental protection, when asked whether AJ Vilela had ever paid any of the huge penalties imposed on him.So, like the father again, the son shrugged off the setbacks, opened new pastures, put cattle on them and went on clearing rainforest. When he was finally arrested in the Flying Rivers Operation, more than four years after beginning his illegal activities — and after making it clear that he had no intention of stopping — he had cleared forest covering ​​300 square kilometers (74,132 acres).Environmental and social costsAJ Vilela and his illegal activities left a swath of environmental and social damage. Throughout our journey to the Amazon basin last November, people spoke to us of the violence that he and his gunmen have used to impose their rule of terror in the region and of the failure of the authorities for many years to hold the gang to account.Many farmers, from small landowners to peasant families, spoke of the way people had been violently — and illegally — evicted from their land. One peasant farmer, who wanted to speak off the record for understandable reasons, told us: “The man who was farming this land before was kicked off by brute force. It was the Vilelas who did it. They used bullets. Anyone who returned was killed. So people are very frightened of the Vilelas, You just have to say the name Vilela and people tremble, they shiver. Because they’re barbaric”.On one occasion AJ Vilela was taken to court for attempted murder. He and his henchmen were accused of ambushing and firing on a rural landless worker, Dezuíta Assis Ribeiro Chagas, who was taking part in a peaceful occupation near a farm belonging to the Vilela family in Pontal do Paranapanema.According to press reports, “the Federal Police recorded a conversation in which AJ Vilela’s lawyer ordered him to get rid of weapons used in the crime.” This is part of the transcript:Lawyer: They [AJ Vilela’s gunmen] may be called in for questioning or even arrested.AJ Vilela: Okay.Lawyer: And make sure to get rid of the tools [the Federal Police term for weapons].Mongabay has learned that the case, which had been put on hold due to lack of evidence, was recently reopened.Map showing the Baú indigenous lands and some of the illegally cleared forest areas, which remain officially embargoed. Locals told Mongabay last November that the gang continues to raise cattle on the land. Map by Mauricio TorresSlavery in the AmazonIn addition to accusations of land theft and deforestation, AJ Vilela and his brother-in-law, Ricardo Caldeira Viacava, have been accused of utilizing slave labor and violating labor legislation.Viacava — Ana Luíza’s husband — likewise comes from a wealthy São Paulo family that made its fortune in ranching. His father, Carlos Viacava, was Minister of Finance during the military government of General João Baptista Figueiredo and owns large ranches. A former president of the Association of Nelore Breeders of Brazil, he was chosen by Dinheiro Rural magazine as one of the 100 most influential personalities in agribusiness for 2016.IBAMA launched a separate action at the same time as the Flying Rivers Operation. That investigation ended with AJ Vilela and Ricardo Viacava being accused of holding laborers, employed to clear forest, in conditions “analogous to slavery.” According to charges filed by the MPF, the workers “began to clear forest at 4.30am and only stopped work at 5:30 pm,” and were “subjected to gruelling working hours.”Interestingly, the two men were not caught due to the federal government’s sophisticated surveillance of illegal logging in the Amazon, using “real time” geo-monitoring, but by the Kayapó Indians, an Amazonian indigenous group that has developed their own even more effective — if somewhat less high-tech — system for monitoring goings on in their territory.Outwitting satellite images, but not IndiansSatellite images can, by their nature, only record harm done to a forest after it has occurred. Remote sensing only detects changes in vegetation cover after a forest has been felled and when bare ground has been revealed. Then alerts are triggered and an inspection team is sent into the field to confirm the devastation. But by then, the trees have already been cut and there is rarely any sign of the slave labor often employed to do the logging.In 2014, a gang headed by AJ Vilela started clearing an area of ​​14,000 hectares (34,595 acres) on the border of the Baú Indigenous Territory, which belongs to the Kayapó Indians. His gang organized 20 camps, each with 10 workers, distributed across the area.They ran a technologically-savvy operation, calculated to avoid the prying eyes of satellites. Chainsaw operators felled the understory and some big trees, but left untouched just the right number of large trees to keep the canopy cover intact, so that the satellites failed to spot bare ground.AJ Vilela — both a sophisticated entrepreneur and criminal — had hired geo-monitoring whizz kids to inform his overseers in the field precisely how many trees they could safely fell without their work being captured by the satellites. “In this way, the system did not emit deforestation alerts and, without alerts, there was no reason to go to the area,” explained Evaristo.When understory clearing was complete, the remaining large trees could then be felled. Only then would the damage be seen by the satellites and, by the time IBAMA arrived in the area, the land thieves would be gone.However, the gang underestimated the territorial monitoring capacity of the Kayapó.Evaristo, told us: “The Kayapó came to Brasilia to report the terrible deforestation that was being carried out on the border of their territory and they demanded that measures be taken.”Kayapó Indians talk to IBAMA official. Without the careful forest monitoring of the Kayapó, the AJ Vilela gang may have not been caught in its illegal deforestation activities utilizing slave labor. Photo courtesy of Brazil’s Environmental Protection Directorate (Diretoria de Proteção Ambiental – IBAMA)This indigenous report took the government by surprise — the geo-monitoring system wasn’t registering any deforestation where the Indians said it was happening. IBAMA scrambled to send in investigators, including the director of environmental protection. “The Indians took us directly to five camps, and there we found 44 people busy at work in conditions analogous to slavery,” said Evaristo.The director was astonished at the Indians’ ability to monitor the forest: “The Indians have an efficient intelligence system, and the various villages use radio to tell each other in Kayapó what is going on,” he said. “In this way, they always know what is happening in their territory.”The discovery of slave labor in the tree clearing camps led authorities to intensify their investigation and to broaden the sweep of the on-going Flying Rivers Operation.Kayapó Indians stand with an IBAMA official as chain saws and other equipment used in the illegal deforestation operation are destroyed. Photo courtesy of Brazil’s Environmental Protection Directorate (Diretoria de Proteção Ambiental – IBAMA)Are things different today?AJ Vilela’s father, AJJ, was never punished for his criminal activities, even though he was given very heavy fines (few of which he ever paid) and lawsuits were brought against him.Ana Luiza was reportedly freed on 20 July, after two weeks in jail. AJ Vilela was behind bars for a while longer, being released in October 2016. The whole family has disappeared from the social columns. Court cases are on-going. Brazilian justice is notoriously slow and the gang has very good lawyers defending it, so no one knows when the verdict will come, or what it will be.Even so, the Flying Rivers Operation achieved something important. Until recently, AJ Vilela’s father, AJJ (who has disappeared from the scene and apparently suffers from Alzheimer’s disease), was committing acts much like his son and boasting about it in the press. Before now, it was extremely unusual for leading figures in agribusiness to be arrested.However, the state has not reclaimed the land that AJ Vilela, Ricardo Caldeira Viacava and their crew illegally occupied. On our November visit to Pará state, we found that this land, though officially embargoed, is still recognized as belonging to them by neighbors, while men employed by the gang, we were told, are still fattening cattle on these properties.So, as things stand: the defendants are not in jail, but await trial; large past fines against them have not been paid; the embargo on land use is not being respected; and, most seriously, the public land that AJ Vilela illegally occupied is still indisputably in his gang’s hands.Luciano Evaristo, IBAMA’s head of environmental protection. Photo courtesy of Brazil’s Environmental Protection Directorate (Diretoria de Proteção Ambiental – IBAMA)In light of this, we asked Evaristo if anything has really changed. Thanks to the embargo, he said, “the gang will not be able to sell the cattle they have fattened on their land, because the slaughterhouses will not purchase cattle from embargoed areas.” Also, the gang will be unable to get legal titles to the land.But locals told us that there are easy workarounds: while the slaughterhouses have pledged not to buy cattle reared on embargoed land, it is straightforward, quick and cheap to “launder the cattle.” Livestock illegally fattened in one place, simply need to be taken for a short while to a legal ranch, as the slaughterhouses only check the last supplier.Federal prosecutor Patrícia Daros Xavier said that, “there are documents that show that big slaughterhouses are acquiring cattle reared on illegally cleared land” and these claims are being investigated. As several studies have noted, the cattle industry is “lagging behind” in addressing Amazon deforestation.The fact that the gang is unable to get legal title to the land doesn’t seem to cause serious problems either, as it doesn’t stop them from running their ranch on the property as before.People living in the region commonly agree: “the owner is the person who clears the land”. Accordingly, the land thieves are viewed as the rightful owners, and they can readily sell the land on the open market and make a large sum in the bargain. In practice, it seems to make little difference whether those who clear a parcel have legal title to it or not.The body responsible for ensuring that illegally appropriated public land is returned to state ownership is the federal government’s Terra Legal Program. But people to whom we made inquiries in Pará say that that these officials are doing nothing to reclaim illegally cleared land. We asked the person in charge of the Terra Legal Program in the west of Pará why measures had not been taken to reclaim the gang’s land but we didn’t get a reply.All things considered, it seems that the Flying Rivers Operation, with its 2 year investigation, its 95 federal police, 15 tax experts, and 32 IBAMA employees, plus 24 arrest warrants, though successful on its own terms, has not been able to put an end to the most serious problem: those deforesting public lands can still keep that land, use it, make hefty profits from it, and maybe not face much punishment. This, to be fair, was something that lay beyond the scope of the federal operation.So, Ana Luiza Junqueira Vilela Viacava, her brother and husband, can go on declaring, at least for now, that: “I like land and the security it gives me for the future.” Land grabbing and illegal ranching (even on public lands) has long been, and still is, big business in the Brazilian Amazon. Last year the Brazilian government launched its most ambitious crackdown ever. And some of the criminals caught up in the federal police net were members of Brazil’s richest families.In June 2016, federal law enforcement pounced on a gang of land thieves. Antônio José Junqueira Vilela Filho, known as AJ Vilela, and Ricardo Caldeira Viacava, among others, were charged with clearing public lands — 300 square kilometers (74,132 acres) of forest, in total — an area 5 times larger than Manhattan, and of using slave labor to do it.One of the gang’s innovations was to use sophisticated technology to work out just how much forest they could clear without being detected by monitoring satellites. Unfortunately for the offenders, they were spotted by Kayapó Indians who had their own sophisticated monitoring system (called radio!); they reported the crime to federal police.But by October 2016, AJ Vilela was out of jail and awaiting trial. And unofficial reports from Pará state, gathered there by Mongabay in November, say that the gang is carrying on as before, illegally raising cattle on the public lands they illegally deforested. Question: why hasn’t the land been reclaimed by the government? AJ Vilela who holds the record for the largest fines ever imposed on an individual by IBAMA for environmental crimes: R$332,765,736.50 (US$111 million). Photo courtesy of ver-o-fato.com.br(Leia essa matéria em português no The Intercept Brasil. You can also read Mongabay’s series on the Tapajós Basin in Portuguese at The Intercept Brasil)The Tapajós River Basin lies at the heart of the Amazon, and at the heart of an exploding controversy: whether to build 40+ large dams, a railway, and highways, turning the Basin into a vast industrialized commodities export corridor; or to curb this development impulse and conserve one of the most biologically and culturally rich regions on the planet.Those struggling to shape the Basin’s fate hold conflicting opinions, but because the Tapajós is an isolated region, few of these views get aired in the media. Journalist Sue Branford and social scientist Mauricio Torres travelled there recently for Mongabay, and over coming weeks hope to shed some light on the heated debate that will shape the future of the Amazon. This is the tenth of their reports. Article published by Glenn Scherer (Leia essa matéria em português no The Intercept Brasil. You can also read Mongabay’s series on the Tapajós Basin in Portuguese at The Intercept Brasil)*The original version of this story accurately reported additional details concerning Ana Khouri’s business. However, in an email received by Mongabay on 26 April 2017, Khouri requested that those details be removed from the story so as to dissociate her legitimate business activities from the illegal activities of her ex-husband. The authors did not intend to imply any wrongdoing on Khouri’s part, nor is there any evidence to suggest there was any, so Mongabay has deleted the passage.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Illegally cut trees loaded on trucks without license plates roll through the Amazon rainforest. These particularly trees were not cut by AJ Vilela’s organization, but illegal deforestation continues to plague the Amazon basin, occurring especially along new roads, such as the recently paved BR-163 where AJ Vilela operated. Al Vilela’s gang illegally appropriated public land, deforested it and converted it into cattle pasture using slave labor. Photo by Sue Branfordcenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Agriculture, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Logging, Amazon People, Cattle, Cattle Pasture, Cattle Ranching, Controversial, Corruption, Environment, Environmental Crime, Featured, Forests, Illegal Logging, Indigenous Cultures, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Land Conflict, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Logging, Rainforests, Saving The Amazon, Social Justice, Threats To The Amazon last_img read more

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first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Conservation, Environment, Research, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation Calculating a moving average is a common way researchers “smooth” out the irregularities in year-to-year counts produced by the way the counts are actually performed.Yet this method has never been subjected to much scrutiny, according to Brian Gerber of Colorado State University and William Kendall of the U.S. Geological Survey, the authors of a study published late last month in the journal The Condor: Ornithological Applications.Gerber and Kendall used the results of 31 annual surveys of sandhill cranes (Antigone canadensis) in North America’s Rocky Mountains to examine how accurate moving averages really are, then compared those results to the estimates produced by a more advanced statistical approach known as a hierarchical Bayesian time series (HBTS) model. New research that takes a look at the reliability of traditional survey methods finds that there are ways to improve how wildlife populations are estimated.In order to properly design measures for the preservation of a particular species, one fundamental piece of information you need to know is how many individuals are left in the population you’re seeking to protect, of course. Acquiring that data is not simply a matter of going out into the field and counting every single animal in a given population, however, as that would be difficult if not impossible in most cases, as well as costly.Observational surveys done in the field can vary from year to year based on how the animals are actually counted — for instance, the time of year might be different from one count to the next, or the species being studied might migrate at slightly different times of the year, meaning the count could be off because of the number of animals available to be counted, not because of an actual change in the population size.One of the chief ways researchers seek to reduce the variation in their annual counts, known as “smoothing” their data, is by using a three-year moving average, in which the latest three years of counts are averaged together. As another year’s count is added to the dataset, the most current three years are averaged to arrive at the latest “smoothed” population number.There are other ways to account for the limitations of such time-series population data, such as tagging individual animals and doing a capture-recapture estimation. But a moving average is a common tool researchers use to smooth out the irregularities in their year-to-year counts produced by the way the counts are actually performed.Yet this method has never been subjected to much scrutiny, according to Brian Gerber of Colorado State University and William Kendall of the U.S. Geological Survey, the authors of a study published late last month in the journal The Condor: Ornithological Applications.Gerber and Kendall used the results of 31 annual surveys of sandhill cranes (Antigone canadensis) in North America’s Rocky Mountains to examine how accurate moving averages really are, then compared those results to the estimates produced by a more advanced statistical approach known as a hierarchical Bayesian time series (HBTS) model.“We compared the different estimation methods (three-year average and HBTS) by using a mechanistic population model of sandhill cranes (i.e., based on survival, recruitment, and harvest),” Gerber told Mongabay. “We evaluated whether the changes in the population estimates using the count data were realistic, given what we know about sandhill crane population dynamics.”Gerber says that he and Kendall simulated “imperfectly observed” population dynamics and then evaluated which methods produced the more accurate estimates of the sandhill crane population size. “We found the HBTS model produced more realistic population estimates under a wide array of population trajectories (population decline, population increase, population increase and decline),” he said.Using a Bayesian approach allowed Gerber and Kendall to include additional information that they already knew about sandhill crane population dynamics as well as about how sandhill cranes are counted. “Namely, that their population growth is fairly small and the variables that affect how cranes are counted can likely causes changes in population counts to a greater extent than true population changes,” Gerber said. “By including this information we can constrain the model in biological ways to hopefully produce more realistic predictions.”There are a number of other advantages to the HBTS model, according to Gerber. For one thing, the HBTS model offers a measure of uncertainty about population estimates, which isn’t provided by a three-year moving average, he said. The Bayesian approach can even be used to predict a population size in years when a survey can’t be done, “providing information to resource managers who are charged with making complex decisions about animal populations,” Gerber noted.In a statement accompanying the publication of the study, Gerber said that he and Kendall’s findings suggest that collecting long-term population data is not only worthwhile for crane management (goals for maintaining sandhill crane populations in the Rocky Mountains appear to have been met, based on the available evidence), but that the more sophisticated statistical method can be applied to other species, as well.“Looking forward,” he said, “managers may still be interested in adopting our more robust modeling approach due to its flexible framework, which makes implementing any changes relevant to the survey easier.”Sandhill cranes from the Rocky Mountain population have been monitored annually for over thirty years. Photo Credit: T. CacekCITATIONGerber, B. D., & Kendall, W. L. (2017). Evaluating and improving count-based population inference: A case study from 31 years of monitoring Sandhill Cranes. The Condor, 119(2), 191-206. doi:10.1650/CONDOR-16-137.1center_img Article published by Mike Gaworeckilast_img read more

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first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored The government in Central Kalimantan’s West Kotawaringan Regency plans to construct a reservoir adjacent to Lake Gatal.Many in Rungun Village, a fishing community that relies on the lake, fear the project will leave them without a source of income.The project also threatens to flood fields, houses and sacred sites, community members say. CENTRAL KALIMANTAN, Indonesian Borneo — Dense vegetation presses up to the banks of the Lamandau River, with tree branches dropping low overhead to form a natural tunnel. Occasionally, the calls of birds echo through the surrounding forest as our boat motors through.About 45 minutes after passing a fork in the river, the landscape opens, and Lake Gatal lies wide in front of us. Fishermen in small boats head toward the lake, seeking catfish, snakeheads and other freshwater fish.But despite the tranquil surroundings, fishers on the lake are filled with deep misgivings due to a government plan to create a reservoir by damming the river about 600 meters from the lake.“We are afraid that access to Lake Gatal will become difficult, because we hear the river will be dammed. If it’s dammed, our boats cannot pass anymore,” said Gusti Hidayat, a fisherman from Rungun Village, located in the Kotawaringan Lama subdistrict of Central Kalimantan’s West Kotawaringin Regency.Like many in Rungun Village, Hidayat also is concerned that his catch will be reduced if the project is completed. At 15-20 kilograms (33-44 pounds) of fish per day, he said his average haul is already far below the lake’s heyday, when catches could reach 100 kilograms per day.“Also, if it’s dammed, and at any later time the reservoir breaks, our village will be affected,” he told Mongabay.The local government, on the other hand, says the project will provide a reliable source of freshwater to surrounding districts during the dry season. “The government’s aim is to contain the water that is in the lake,” explained Sayuti, the project contractor, who like many Indonesians goes by only one name. “Later, it will be used to provide clean water and also for tourism. Water will not go directly into the river. We will build a floodgate.”The project will require an estimated 10,000 cubic meters of earth to build the dam and embankment, and according to the design the dam itself will be 10 meters (33 feet) high. According to Sayuti, the budget for the project this year amounted to 12 billion rupiah (about $900,000), for building a dam and entrance channel as well as for related road construction.Fishing activities in Lake Gatal. Local fishers fear a dam would block the passage of boats from the river to the lake. Photo by Indra Nugraha for Mongabay-Indonesia.The traditional leader of Rungun Village, Muhamad Baid, said he is opposed to the plan, along with most of the community. He said residents do not support the construction of a reservoir, fearing it will block access to the lake and could lead to flooding of their land and homes.“We insist that our lake remains as it is now. Because out of the 400 families of Rungun Village, the majority are fishers in this lake. We want Lake Gatal to stay natural, as it is today,” Baid said, adding that he had organized a petition against the development that will be submitted to the regent and the local parliament.In addition to blocking access to the lake, Baid said the reservoir would threaten the residents’ crops, particularly plots of oil palm oil owned by residents who supply oil to the PT Bumitama Gunajaya Agro palm oil company. He fears that if the lake is dammed, about four of these oil palm plots could be submerged.Even those residents who serve as palm oil suppliers cannot completely rely on agricultural income, Baid said: “They only make 750,000 to 1 million rupiah per month (about $56-75).” This is not enough to live on, so the fish caught from Lake Gatal are the primary livelihood for the people of Rungun Village, he explained.Rungun Village residents pray at a grave site near Lake Gatal. Photo by Indra Nugraha for Mongabay-Indonesia.Sacred sitesCommunity members also raise concerns about the impact the project would have on religious and cultural sites near the lake.According to Rohadi, a local Islamic scholar, around 20 graves of ancestors and clerics that are sacred to the local people lie just beside the lake. The area also holds the remaining traces of an Islamic boarding school where the family of the Kotawaringin Sultanate — a historical dynasty — once studied, he said.Such historical sites should not be lost to build a reservoir, Rohadi argued. “Hopefully the government can give an explanation,” he said. “As a religious scholar, my observation is that everything depends on the benefits. If you bring benefits, blessings, comfort, yes, please come. But if, for example, this project brings suffering for the people, do not.”Government response“We are trying to understand why there is opposition from the people, but for the time being there does not seem to be any common ground,” said Subdistrict Head Yudi Harun.Harun said his team is currently coordinating with the new regent of West Kotawaringan.“The regent’s response is that if there are obstacles from the community, these must be resolved first,” Harun said. However, he added, “we must complete it.”The wave of opposition from Rungun Village is quite large, Harun confirmed. He said he has asked that the development project be reviewed and communication opened with residents about why they are against the project.Harun also claimed never to have seen the project’s environmental impact assessment, which he said it beyond the bounds of his authority: “My access does not go this high. I do not yet have the full picture.”Fish caught from Lake Gatal by the fishers of Rungun Village. Photo by Indra Nugraha for Mongabay.A different pathMardani, a local organizer for the Indigenous Peoples Alliance of the Archipelago (AMAN), criticized the lack of community outreach about the project. Communities should be involved from the beginning, he said, in order to ensure that such projects move forward by mutual consent and without any parties feeling aggrieved.AMAN plans to map customary landholdings in Rungun Village, Mardani said. “This traditional community plans to map their customary territory so that they have the power of the law behind them. So far, they have not had recognition of their customary territory.”According to Mardani, the government is obliged to protect the indigenous people of Rungun Village, including their livelihoods. Opposing the construction of a dam does not mean rejecting development, he said, but measures must be taken to ensure development programs do not damage the environment and the livelihoods of the area’s people.Meanwhile, according to Mardani, if Lake Gatal is maintained authentically and sustainably, it has great potential to become a tourist destination. Tourists who come to Lake Gatal can not only see the beauty of nature, but also learn about the culture and customs of the surrounding community, he said.This story was reported by Mongabay’s Indonesian team and was first published on our Indonesian site on June 11, 2017.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Dams, Environment, Fishing, Human Rights, Indigenous Peoples, Land Rights, Rainforest People center_img Article published by Isabel Estermanlast_img read more

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first_imgAnalysis, Animals, Biodiversity, Camera Trapping, Cats, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Human-wildlife Conflict, Mammals, Protected Areas, Research, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation One researcher spotted a young fishing cat in the sanctuary in broad daylight, suggesting the population may not be under heavy pressure.Globally, the cat’s numbers have plummeted by over 30 percent in the last 15 years, putting the species at high risk of extinction.Research on the fishing cat began only in 2009, but it is already believed to be extinct in Vietnam; meanwhile, there are no confirmed records in Laos PDR and scarce information from Myanmar, Thailand, and Cambodia.This article is a news analysis by a non-Mongabay writer. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. Clinging on to rapidly disappearing Asian wetlands, the fishing cat (Prionailurus viverrinus) is at high risk of extinction.The cat is believed extinct in Vietnam; meanwhile, there are no confirmed records in Laos PDR and scarce information from Myanmar, Thailand and Cambodia. A recent extensive survey for fishing cats on Java came up empty-handed, prompting fears that the species is slinking out of existence in Southeast Asia.But things in the region may be looking up for the water-loving, medium-sized wild feline. A survey has confirmed that a population survives in southwest Cambodia’s Peam Krasop Wildlife Sanctuary (PKWS) — one of only two locations in Cambodia where the fishing cat has been recorded since 2003.Last February, researchers from the Kla Trey | Cambodian Fishing Cat Project placed over 30 camera traps in key mangrove habitat as part of the region’s first conservation project dedicated to the species.“This is a first glimpse of the fishing cat population in PKWS,” Cambodian Fishing Cat Project leader Vanessa Herranz Muñoz said in a statement, “but our preliminary findings are very promising.”The results provide the first images of fishing cats in Cambodia since a brief survey in 2015 turned up the first evidence of the species in over a decade: three fishing cats at two coastal sites with no previous records. Two of those individuals were in PKWS, and were later identified as a male and a female.Camera trap photo of a fishing cat in Cambodia. Photo by Kla Trey | Cambodian Fishing Cat Project.Camera traps have recently revealed that these two cats are still present, with the female “showing us a fascinating display of the intimate life of fishing cats in the wild, possibly in response to marks left by the male,” Herranz Muñoz said.“Good news”“The recapture of the fishing cats after two years is good news,” Dr. Jan F. Kamler, Southeast Asia Leopard Program Coordinator for global wild cat conservation organization Panthera, said via email, “as it indicates that snaring could not have been high in that area.”A new individual yet to be identified was also photographed slinking over mangrove roots in the distance, highlighting the scarcity of dry land in this frequently inundated habitat.In a recorded first for Cambodia, researcher Sarady Moul spotted a fishing cat in broad daylight, while en route to check camera-traps along a narrow channel. “I was so surprised that I almost jumped out of the boat,” he said. “At around 8:45am, I saw it peering out of the mangrove roots – I never expected to see one at that time.”Scrambling to take a photo, Moul asked the boat driver to move closer, prompting the cat to turn tail and vanish into the mangroves. “Seeing a fishing cat in the wild was incredible,” Moul said of the experience.“My hypothesis is that the young cat may have been looking for a site to swim across the channel and disperse to other islets,” Herranz Muñoz added. “Fishing cats are known to be nocturnal – seeing the individual in the morning may be explained by the tide being at its lowest point at that time, making the shore accessible.”Moul deployed a camera-trap as close to the site as possible. “We are hugely excited by the prospect of our camera-traps capturing a fishing cat swimming in the wild,” Herranz Muñoz said. This would be a global first for fishing cat research.At 100 meters across, the channel is one of the narrowest in the area and carries a lot of boat traffic. “Sightings like this are very rare and would be highly unlikely if the population were under heavy pressure,” Herranz Muñoz noted.A small cat facing big threatsIn the past, fishing cats in the region have not been so lucky. Back in 2014, in an interview with Mongabay on Southeast Asia’s smaller cats, experts from the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s (IUCN) Cat Specialist Group declared the fishing cat in need of immediate research and attention due to its “rarity and levels of threat faced.”According to the IUCN Red List assessment, the cat’s numbers globally have declined by over 30 percent in the last 15 years, but nowhere is the rate more alarming than in Southeast Asia, where the greatest threat to the cat’s survival is human persecution.In 2015, killings of fishing cats in PKWS in retaliation for damaging fishers’ nets was identified as a major threat to the population, but fishers’ focus has now shifted to crabs, and “people have no will to hunt or kill fishing cats because there is no perceived conflict,” Community Officer Sothearan Thi said after recent interviews with villagers.Communities report that hunting in the area is infrequent, thus fishing cats in PKWS may be relatively safe from the snaring crisis that is sweeping Asian forests, according to a group of scientists writing recently in Science. Panthera’s Kamler describes snares as “a major issue for most wildlife in Cambodia and other areas of Southeast Asia.”What’s more, villagers welcome measures to mitigate future human-fishing cat conflict. Herranz Muñoz sees this as a very positive sign and is hopeful that “together we can ensure that fishing cats persist in the Cambodian mangroves.”In order to further reduce threats to the population, Kla Trey has teamed up with the country’s leading organization for direct protection of threatened habitat and species, Wildlife Alliance. In February, their mobile environmental education unit conducted awareness raising workshops alongside Kla Trey staff.The two organizations will work closely to promote the “importance of coastal zone conservation in the Cardamom Landscape — something for which the fishing cat is an important flagship,” Dr. Thomas Gray, director of science and global development for Wildlife Alliance, told Cambodian press in January. He and Herranz Muñoz have since provided training to rangers in neighboring Botum Sakor National Park on camera-trapping fishing cats to further research their distribution within the Cardamom Landscape.One of the last strongholds for fishing cat in Southeast Asia?“We’re seeing a southern and southeast Asian cat become strictly a South Asian cat because of habitat loss, poaching and retaliatory killing,” Jim Sanderson, manager of Global Wildlife Conservation’s Small Wild Cat Conservation Program, said in a blog post. Fishing cats are listed as one of the most vulnerable of the small and medium sized cats in Southeast Asia according to the IUCN.Across the species’ range, Sanderson continued, “the replacement of coastal mangroves with industrial fish and shrimp farms has caused a massive loss of prey and habitat.” Today such farms are absent from PKWS, with much of the mangrove restored.“Finding fishing cats in intact mangrove is great news for fishing cats and adds another reason to protect the mangroves,” Sanderson added via email.Management zoning of the protected area — approved in 2011 — is seen as an important pilot for the rest of the country. Furthermore, 60 percent of PKWS falls within the Koh Kapik and Associated Islets Ramsar Site. However, numerous threats are still present and as Sanderson points out, “constant vigilance is warranted.”One thing’s for sure: PKWS holds one of the largest and densest area of mangroves in the region, and may be one of the last strongholds for fishing cats in Southeast Asia.While zero records from Java was disheartening, “by calling attention to the rarity of fishing cats… heroic efforts can be made to locate [and] save them in places they still exist,” Sanderson said. “We must not let them slip away without trying.”Camera trap photo of fishing cat in Cambodia. Photo by Kla Trey | Cambodian Fishing Cat Project.CITATIONSDara, A., Kimsreng, K., Piseth, H., & Mather, R. (2009). An Integrated Assessment for Preliminary Zoning of Peam Krasop Wildlife Sanctuary, Zoning of Peam Krasop Wildlife Sanctuary, Southwestern Cambodia. Available at www.iucn.org.Gray, T. N., Lynam, A. J., Seng, T., Laurance, W. F., Long, B., Scotson, L., & Ripple, W. J. (2017). Wildlife-snaring crisis in Asian forests. Science, 355(6322), 255-256. doi:10.1126/science.aal4463IUCN. (2016). The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2016-3.1 (IUCN) Available at www.iucnredlist.org.Mahood, S. et al (2014). Chinese Egret Egretta eulophotes, Spoon-billed Sandpiper Calidris pygmaea and Lesser Crested Tern Thalasseus bengalensis: new for Cambodia.Marschke, M., & Nong, K. (2003). Adaptive co-management: lessons from coastal Cambodia. Canadian Journal of Development Studies/Revue canadienne d’études du développement, 24(3), 369-383. doi:10.1080/02255189.2003.9668927Claire B. Munton specializes in writing about environmental and rural livelihood issues in Southeast Asia. Based in Cambodia, she is Communications Officer for the Kla Trey | Cambodian Fishing Cat Project and works in-house for Master Media co. ltd.The survey was conducted by the Kla Trey | Cambodian Fishing cat Project in collaboration with the Cambodia-based Centre for Biodiversity Conservation with support from global wild cat conservation organization Panthera, the Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation Fund and Denver Zoo.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Mike Gaworeckilast_img read more

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first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored 12 read more

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first_imgA proposed revision of Indonesia’s 1990 Conservation Law provides a mechanism for companies to obtain a waiver for geothermal drilling in forest areas zoned for conservation, currently off-limits to the industry.Lawmakers are considering a proposal from companies that their security guards be allowed to arrest trespassers in their plantation and mining concessions.The law would include heavier penalties for wildlife traffickers. JAKARTA – It was supposed to be about cracking down on the illegal wildlife trade, as traffickers move online.But a conservation bill now making its way through Indonesia’s parliament is drawing fire for stipulations that would open new forest areas for geothermal drilling and empower plantation-company security guards to make arrests.Indonesia, a heavily forested archipelago country, is home to incredible biodiversity. But poor governance has allowed the trade in rare animals to flourish, especially as the Internet provides new tools with which to connect with buyers.In 2015, news of the arrest of a smuggler who had stuffed 24 rare cockatoos in plastic water bottles prompted many Indonesians to turn over their illegal pets to the government. Not long after that, President Joko Widodo’s administration announced plans to revise the 1990 Conservation Law, which lays out penalties for traffickers, in order to fight criminal traders.But some have criticized a recent draft of the bill from the House of Representatives that provides a mechanism for companies to obtain a waiver for geothermal drilling in forest areas zoned for conservation, currently off-limits to the industry.“This conservation law should have been the last standing fort,” said Nur Hidayati, executive director of the Indonesian Forum for the Environment (Walhi), the country’s largest environmental pressure group. “Instead there are loopholes that would allow extractive industries to exploit more protected areas.”The debate over the drilling stipulation comes as President Jokowi, as he is popularly known, aims to increase Indonesia’s electricity generating capacity, with demand in the country of 260 million people expected to double by 2020 over 2012 levels.At the same time, Jokowi plans to cut Indonesia’s reliance on petroleum in favor of renewable energy sources like geothermal, which releases fewer greenhouse gas emissions.The rub: a huge portion of Indonesia’s geothermal reserves – the largest in the world – lie in conservation forests. For some time, the industry has been trying to open these areas for geothermal drilling, arguing that keyhole drilling operations have a minimal environmental footprint. Critics, however, say supporting infrastructure required by drilling rigs, especially road networks built to service them, fragments the forest in a way that can hasten its destruction.Not all NGOs believe geothermal rigs should be kept out of conservation forests. Indra Sari Wardhani, climate and energy manager of WWF-Indonesia, said it would be better to allow this kind of drilling than for Indonesia to increase its dependence on coal. She believes the conservation law should regulate geothermal drilling in away that ensures it is done sustainably.“Geothermal is an important energy source for Indonesia to shift from fossil fuels to renewable energies,” she said.Power plants, she added, should be kept out of conservation forests. Walhi’s Hidayati argued geothermal should be excluded from the conservation bill, since the industry is already regulated in a 2014 law. “This bill should no longer regulate things that already has its own law,” she said. Farmers work a potato farm near a geothermal plant on the Dieng Plateau, on the Indonesian island of Java. Photo by Raditya Mahendra Yasa/Flickr.Another subject of debate is a proposal from companies that their security guards be allowed arrest encroachers in their concessions, an idea opposed by critics who say it would deepen conflicts with surrounding communities.Corporate representatives aired the idea at a recent parliamentary hearing, according to Walhi’s Hidayati. The existence of the proposal was confirmed by House member Viva Yoga Mauladi, head of the parliamentary committee overseeing the bill. “There’s an idea to give limited authority [to private security guards] to make arrests whenever there’s a violation [of the law],” he said. “Violators would be handed over to state officials to be processed according to the law.”Encroachment is widespread in company concessions, many of which cover huge areas the size of small cities. The same is true in many national parks and other forest reserves, with the government devoting few resources to securing these areas. A massive nature reserve in Borneo has just three forest rangers assigned to patrol it, according to a scientist working there.Hidayati opposes the idea of empowering company guards. “This is going wild wild west,” she said. Satrio Adi Wicaksono, forests and landscape restoration manager at the World Resources Institute, a U.S.-based thinktank with an office in Jakarta, said it would be better to encourage partnerships with indigenous and other rural communities to patrol conservation areas rather than rely on private forces. He also suggested remote sensing and other technololgy could aid law enforcers. “High-resolution satellite images could be used to monitor deforestation in conservation areas in almost real time,” he said. “It would be great if there was infrastructure that could alert [forest rangers] about deforestation.” Article published by mongabayauthor Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Banner image: A geothermal power plant in the Ulubelu field in Indonesia’s Lampung province, on the island of Sumatra. Photo by Aldio Dwi Perkasa/Flickr.last_img read more

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first_imgArticle published by Basten Gokkon Activism, Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Critically Endangered Species, Environment, Environmental Activism, Extinction, Mammals, Rhinos, Sumatran Rhino, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img More than 100,000 people have signed an online petition to Indonesian President Joko Widodo to do more to save the critically endangered Sumatran rhino from extinction.The petition was launched several days after a Mongabay series looked into the current state of the species, which may number as few as 30 individuals in the wild.The series also identified the Indonesian government as hampering much-needed efforts to stave off the disappearance of the Sumatran rhino from poaching and habitat loss. Over 100,000 people have signed an online petition calling for the Indonesian government to do more to save the Sumatran rhino from extinction.“It is imperative [that] the Indonesian government act now to assist conservationist[s] in their effort to save the Sumatran rhino,” the petition says. “Any more delays puts their future in jeopardy.”The petition, “Act Now to Save the Sumatran Rhino,” is seeking 110,000 signatures before it gets delivered to President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo. At the time this article was published, it had already garnered global support from 101,471 people.“Without the rhino, the character of the forest will change, setting off cascades of loss in other species as well,” one of the online supporters wrote.The petition was launched on Nov. 20, less than two weeks after the publication of the last article in Mongabay’s three-part series looking into the current state of the critically endangered Sumatran rhino (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis), a species that is on the brink of extinction.Ratu the rhino. Photo courtesy of the Sumatran Rhino SanctuaryThe series looked into the current state of the species and how efforts to protect it have fared so far. The first part suggested there were fewer than 30 individuals left in the wild. The second article highlighted the overwhelming consensus among experts that captive breeding is a top solution to save the population. The final article in the series showed how efforts to save the species faced roadblocks from the Indonesian government.Poaching and loss of habitat from deforestation and mining have hammered the population of the Sumatran rhino, a solitary creature that typically lives in dense mountain forests.Banner image: Rhino calf wallowing in mud at the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

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first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Scientists contributing to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) have published a new report examining the interactions between climate change and land use. Agriculture, forestry, and other land uses are responsible for nearly a quarter of all man-made greenhouse gas emissions. But forests are also one of our planet’s biggest carbon sinks and can contribute to carbon removal, thus constituting a key piece of the land and climate puzzle.The report provides a comprehensive look at the forest-related solutions we have, among other land-based responses, that could help us mitigate and adapt to climate change and the possible synergies and trade-offs with other critical land-related issues, including land degradation and desertification and food security.We now need the political will and action from governments, the private sector, and consumers to change the way society values forests, to stimulate forest protection, and to embrace sustainable forest management and forest restoration while reversing the pressure on forests. And we need to do so without displacing that pressure to other ecosystems.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. The vital contribution of forests in protecting biodiversity, regulating the climate, and enhancing human well-being is being recognized as never before.Forest-related responses to tackling the climate crisis are increasingly being seen as a cost-effective option among nature-based solutions. By protecting existing forests and halting deforestation, we can maintain some of our most important carbon sinks, and by restoring forests we can remove significant quantities of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.There is, however, a vast gap between these solutions and reality. Climate change is placing additional stress on forests, and climate change impacts, compounded by trends such as consumption growth, infrastructure expansion, and increased food production, will put additional pressures on land. We are seeing this unfold at this moment in Russia, where record levels of forest fires have sparked fears about an ecological disaster. Or in Guatemala, where rapid deforestation has led to floods and water shortages.On August 8, scientists contributing to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) published a new report examining the interactions between climate change and land use. Agriculture, forestry, and other land uses are responsible for nearly a quarter of all man-made greenhouse gas emissions. But forests are also one of our planet’s biggest carbon sinks and can contribute to carbon removal, thus constituting a key piece of the land and climate puzzle.Cane fires burning, Mount Inkerman, Queensland, Australia. The sugar industry has made many improvements to look after the environment including reducing burning of the crops before harvesting. Burning takes the organizing matter out of the system. Photo Credit: © WWF / James Morgan.The IPCC Special Report on Climate Change and Land synthesizes and provides the science we need to advance our understanding of what the pressures on land are and the potential and limitations of the response options. The report provides a comprehensive look at the forest-related solutions we have, among other land-based responses, that could help us mitigate and adapt to climate change and the possible synergies and trade-offs with other critical land-related issues, including land degradation and desertification and food security.We now need the political will and action from governments, the private sector, and consumers to change the way society values forests, to stimulate forest protection, and to embrace sustainable forest management and forest restoration while reversing the pressure on forests. And we need to do so without displacing that pressure to other ecosystems.Our call to action is challenging, but not impossible. Forest-related solutions are cost effective precisely because we can harness the power of nature to address climate change. But it also requires a fundamental shift in behaviors — in the way we use land for agriculture and in the way people consume and eat.The Special Report arrives shortly before the UN General Assembly and the Climate Summit in September, and the UN climate talks in December. It is a critical moment to reflect on responses related to forests and assess how they can be incorporated into national agendas and climate action plans of both developing and industrialized countries.Tractors for conversion of grasslands into crops, north of Pierre, South Dakota. Photo Credit: © Day’s Edge / WWF-US.Focus on forestsMost of the pressures on forests come from outside forests and the forestry sector — whether that’s demand for land to grow food, or because of policies and financial systems that don’t take account of the full value of forests. Effective forest protection, then, needs to originate outside forests, too — through improving land management, transforming food systems, and advancing more responsible finance and investment. And it needs to adapt to specific contexts to ensure the most cost-effective options for mitigation and adaptation to climate change, while ensuring synergies with land restoration and food security.Forests play a key role in the integrated response options that contribute to pathways limiting global warming to 1.5o degrees Celsius. Some of the forest-related solutions have clear win-wins, in the context of a broad range of land-based options. These include forest conservation, sustainable forest management, reducing deforestation and forest degradation, and agroforestry, given their co-benefits for mitigation, adaptation, reversing land degradation and food security.Expanding tree cover through reforestation and afforestation is expected to have positive benefits for mitigation and adaption and reversing land degradation, but there needs to be a concerted to avoid negative impacts on food security when deployed at a large-scale, as well as social and environmental impacts. Small-scale deployment with the use of best practices in managed landscapes under strong governance could bring some greater co-benefits. And these risks and benefits will require careful assessment depending on the context.Amoron’i Onilahy is a Protected Area managed by local communities who work to protect their natural wealth through ecotourism and the promotion of biodiversity. WWF is an important partner in that area. Photo Credit: © Martina Lippuner / WWF-Africa.In addition, the potential of forest and ecosystems restoration, while not fully analyzed in the report, has taken center stage recently. For example, a recent study, based on different type of assumptions, has shown the technical potential for tree restoration to be as high as 900 million hectares (about 2.2 billion acres), though it is important to note that there is a large gap between the technical potential and the actual feasibility, and several barriers will have to be overcome. Another recent study found that the world’s largest carbon sinks are located in young forests regrown on former agricultural or deforested areas.The IPCC Special Report synthesizes our scientific knowledge about the potential of different forest-related responses in the context of integrated response options. But as critical as it is to take stock of our current knowledge, it is just as important to translate this knowledge into action, and actions to protect and restore forests will depend on collaboration between many actors — governments, donors, local communities, farmers, and the private sector.These actions have the potential to deliver significant benefits under approaches to manage whole landscapes or jurisdictions in a sustainable way. And these approaches require meaningful partnerships between governments, investors, and private companies with the close involvement of local farmers and communities.It is now time to scale this up and put science into action.Deforestation for future agriculture plantation in Tahuamanu Province, heading to Centro Poblado de Alerta, Madre de Dios Region, Peru. Photo Credit: © Nicolas Villaume / WWF-USCITATIONS• Bastin, J. F., Finegold, Y., Garcia, C., Mollicone, D., Rezende, M., Routh, D., … & Crowther, T. W. (2019). The global tree restoration potential. Science, 365(6448), 76-79. doi:10.1126/science.aax0848• Blanco G., R. Gerlagh, S. Suh, J. Barrett, H.C. de Coninck, C.F. Diaz Morejon, R. Mathur, N. Nakicenovic, A. Ofosu Ahenkora, J. Pan, H. Pathak, J. Rice, R. Richels, S.J. Smith, D.I. Stern, F.L. Toth, and P. Zhou. (2014). Drivers, Trends and Mitigation. In: Climate Change 2014: Mitigation of Climate Change. Contribution of Working Group III to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [Edenhofer, O., R. Pichs-Madruga, Y. Sokona, E. Farahani, S. Kadner, K. Seyboth, A. Adler, I. Baum, S. Brunner, P. Eickemeier, B. Kriemann, J. Savolainen, S. Schlömer, C. von Stechow, T. Zwickel, & J.C. Minx (eds.)]. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York, NY, USA.• Pugh, T. A., Lindeskog, M., Smith, B., Poulter, B., Arneth, A., Haverd, V., & Calle, L. (2019). Role of forest regrowth in global carbon sink dynamics. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 116(10), 4382-4387. doi:10.1073/pnas.1810512116Pablo Pacheco is Global Forest Lead Scientist for WWF.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Mike Gaworeckicenter_img Climate Change, Climate Change And Forests, Climate Change Policy, Commentary, Editorials, Environment, Food, Forests, Global Warming, Land Use Change, Research, Researcher Perspective Series, Restoration last_img read more

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first_imgWith the killing of sharks and rays on the rise, Sri Lanka played a lead role in pushing three proposals to extend global protection to 18 species at the recently concluded CITES wildlife trade summit in Geneva.Sixty-three sharks and 42 ray species are found in Sri Lankan waters, and are threatened by overexploitation driven by an ever-increasing demand for sharks fins, meat, and liver oil.While five species of sharks currently enjoy legal protection against the species trade in Sri Lanka, conservationists see an urgent need to extend protection to all reef sharks and other endangered shark and ray species. Decades ago along the beaches of Sri Lanka, fish sellers used bicycles to transport their catch, including sharks. It was said the sharks were often so big that, when tied down to the bicycle frame, their snouts and tail fins would touch the ground at either end.“But not anymore,” says Hiran Jayawardene, the founder and former chairman of the National Aquatic Resources Research and Development Agency (NARA). He says this decline is evident at shark landing sites around the country, where fishermen are no longer pulling in the large sharks they did before.Sri Lanka’s waters are home to 63 shark and 42 ray species, but many are threatened by overexploitation to feed the growing demand for shark fins, meat, and liver oil.The result of the voting at the CITES summit in Geneva in favor of the uplisting of mako sharks to Appendix II. Image courtesy of IISD Reporting Service.But the country is looking to change that, rolling out a raft of regulations in the past two decades to protect various shark species domestically, and, more recently, spearheading a push for the global protection of highly exploited and endangered mako sharks.Among the many proposals it supported at last month’s global summit of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), Sri Lanka called for the inclusion of the two species of mako sharks, shortfin (Isurus oxyrinchus) and longfin (I. paucus), in CITES Appendix II, which would subject their trade to strict rules. It also called for similar protections for six species of giant guitarfishes and 10 species of wedgefishes.The IUCN Red List includes both species of mako sharks as endangered, all six species of giant guitarfishes as critically endangered, and nine of the 10 species of wedgefishes as critically endangered.“All these species have seen very steep declines in their populations in recent decades and this is mostly due to overfishing, habitat destruction and degradation,” Rima Jabado, the IUCN Shark Specialist Group’s regional vice-chair for the Indian Ocean, told Mongabay.Kim Friedman, senior fisheries resources officer at the U.N.’s Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), said a mere listing would not protect the species. “It matters to change the management framework of fisheries to get implemented at ground level.”More than 100 million sharks are killed every year, mainly for their fins. Image by Malaka Rodrigo.Protecting the ocean’s predatorsIn Sri Lanka, five species of sharks enjoy legal protection: the pelagic thresher shark (Alopias pelagicus), bigeye thresher (A. superciliosus), common thresher (A. vulpinus), oceanic whitetip shark (Carcharhinus longimanus), and whale shark (Rhincodon typus). Since 2001, local fishing regulations have required that any of these sharks that are caught must be brought to shore with their fins attached. The rule was enforced to curb shark finning, the practice of catching a shark, cutting off its fins mid-ocean, then dumping the live shark back into the water, where, unable to swim, it dies.In 2013, Sri Lanka went further and introduced a five-year National Plan of Action for the Conservation and Management of Sharks (NPOA), specifying measures for adoption and implementation of new shark conservation and management mechanisms.Sisira Haputhantri, an ocean fisheries expert at NARA, told Mongabay that the shark action plan, since extended for another five years, should help monitor the implementation of the conservation initiatives.Over the past 10 years, the country has official exported 59 metric tons of shark fins annually. But there’s evidence that greater volumes of shark fins are being smuggled out of the island.There are recorded and unrecorded instances of fins being exported as dried fish, said Sevvandi Jayakody, Sri Lanka’s coordinator for the recent CITES summit.By listing mako sharks in Appendix II, scientists can gather accurate figures of sharks killed as part of the international trade, which would help determine whether catches are reaching what’s known as the maximum sustainable yield (MSY), Jayakody said.“We do not want to stop shark fishery but we do want sustainable fishery. CITES should help educate regulators and fisherfolk alike, on the new developments,” she said.Both species of mako are oceanic, roam the high seas, and undertake long-distance migrations, making local protection mechanisms of somewhat limited value, according to Rex I. de Silva, author of Sharks of Sri Lanka. The CITES listing is therefore vital to protect the species in international seas.A shark is finned at the Negombo shark landing site in western Sri Lanka. Image by Malaka Rodrigo.John E. Scanlon, former secretary-general of CITES, told Mongabay that the convention had been used effectively since 2013 to regulate the international trade in commercially harvested sharks and rays. These include hammerheads (family Sphyrnidae), porbeagles (Lamna nasus) and oceanic whitetip sharks and manta rays, as well as silky (Carcharhinus falciformis) and thresher sharks together with devil rays (genus Mobula) since 2016. Mako sharks are the latest to join the list.“Following the 2003 listing of sharks, there had been great progress in the conservation of white sharks, basking sharks and whale sharks,” Jabado said. “The other listings are much more recent, and it is unlikely we will see a difference in the population size of these species just yet.”Conservation management What countries need is better fisheries management to curb overexploitation, Jabado said.“Many species in the Indian Ocean are considered migratory but many are endemic to this region,” she said. “This means, we need higher levels of species protection. To ensure protection of the migratory species, the best strategy is collaboration with other countries in the region, both on research and conservation.”Daniel Fernando of Blue Resources Trust initiated a nine-day survey of fish markets and landing sites at 11 localities in Sri Lanka that led to the identification of 34 shark species. Five of them are sharks new to science. “If a short survey of nine days could help discover new species, it shows the need for greater research on Sri Lanka’s sharks,” Fernando told Mongabay.Following the listing of sharks and rays to Appendix II during the 2013 CITES summit in Bangkok, Sri Lanka’s Department of Fisheries Resources and the FAO conducted a joint survey to identify the successes and challenges experienced in the implementation of CITES provisions.The survey showed poor awareness about the CITES process among stakeholders. However, they had a satisfactory level of knowledge of other measures, with more than 69 percent of respondents having awareness of management measures.Sharks caught for their fins. Finning often takes place at sea, with the live shark thrown back into the water, where it’s unable to swim and quickly dies. Image by Malaka Rodrigo.“Shark conservation in Sri Lanka appears to be at the starting point: It has a long way to go in order to reach conservation efforts undertaken by neighbours such as the Maldives,” said  Howard Martenstyn, a marine biologist with the Centre of Research for Indian Ocean Marine Mammals (CRIOMM).Promotion of ecotourism of sharks and manta rays as an alternative to fishing can offer a different revenue model for the local economy, Martenstyn said. Article published by dilrukshi Banner image of a stuffed shark toy at the Sri Lankan delegation’s seat at last month’s CITES summit in Geneva. Sri Lanka played a leading role in pushing for greater protection for sharks and rays at the summit. Image courtesy of IISD Reporting Service. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Cites, Conservation, Environment, Marine Biodiversity, Oceans, Overfishing, Sharks last_img read more

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first_imgHe said new terminal will provide passengers with high quality services remarkably improved airport transportation efficiency and raised Liberia’s stature in West Africa.The terminal, Zhou said, will also contribute to the single airport transport market and strengthen flight connectivity between Africa and the regional belt.He added, “This new terminal was constructed with a concessional loan from China, which was also attached with great importance from the Chinese and Liberian governments.”LAA’s Board Chairman Musa Shannon said the historical significance of the project brings back memories of excitement and prosperous times in Liberia’s aviation history. He recalled that in 1974, the last new terminal building was opened and, “for the first time in nearly 30 years, we have the opportunity to re-brand and re-establish ourselves globally, regionally and continentally.”He said it is imperative for Liberian visions, policies and strategies, include industries best standards, high safety and security standards and professional work ethics that will make RIA one of the best airports in the region, stating that “Liberians should be proud of this achievement.”He lauded former President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf and the former managing director Bako Freeman for their pivotal roles played, as well as the Chinese Government in making the dream a reality for all Liberians.Mr. Shannon described the new RIA terminal as the new face of Liberia, adding: “This nation must no longer take itself for granted, but continue to strive for greatness.”Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Amb. Zhou lauded the government and people of Liberia for the successful completion of the projects, thus expressing gratitude to the Liberian contractors.“The RIA’s new terminal plays a pivotal role in the economy and social development; a job beautifully done by China engineering company. This modern terminal with advanced equipment and completed functions will become an important facility for the airport,” Amb. Zhou said. The RIA newly constructed passengers’ terminal.President George Weah said his government is prepared to make the Roberts International Airport (RIA) regain its rightful place as cargo and aviation hub in West Africa.In his remarks during the dedication of the new RIA passenger’ terminal, runway and the Liberia Airport Authority (LAA)’s office complex on Thursday July 25, 2019 at the RIA in Margibi County, President Weah said his government will expand the airport’s facilities and capacity, including the construction of the new terminal ‘B.’He expressed gratitude to former President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf under whose leadership the project commenced, as well as members of the 53rd Legislature that ratified the financing agreement for the project.President Weah also expressed gratitude that Liberia now has a “new airport,” while calling on Liberians to be proud of the new face of the country. He indicated that Liberia now has a talking airport.“My sincere gratitude to the People’s Republic of China (PRC) for making the dream come true. Our bilateral friendship, which is based on the one China policy, remains strong and it is a win-win for both countries,” President Weah said.Meanwhile, the President has warned the management of LAA not to misuse the facilities, but to keep the them clean at all times.“I will be watching, inspecting, because this is a facelift of the country. I will come here any time to check on the facilities without further announcement,” President Weah said.The project is financed by China Exim Bank in the amount of US$50 million through a concessional loan.John Allan Klayee, LAA managing director, lauded President Weah for his “timeless engagement and effort toward the progress of the airport.”“As we strive to execute our mandate and make our contribution to the success of the Pro-poor Agenda to which you gave birth, we can also recall with deep gratitude the tremendous stride of former President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf, particularly the Ministry of Public Works contractors from the project implementation unit and those institutions and persons of goodwill that identified with the project,” Klayee said.He said the three landmark projects, which began in 2017 have all been successfully completed.He said of the projects, the runway was the first to be completed with the latest technological equipment in place, including modern landing and lighting systems, which have made it easier for pilots to land and takeoff at ease without complaining of poor visibility.The new terminal has two jet bridges, two escalators, two elevators, a remote gate, baggage carrot cells, 10-check-in counters, a flight information display system, eight stores, a restaurant, four Boeing gates, business class lounge, spacious immigration facility and tour gate. The terminal also contains a water treatment plant, and pilot substation outside.The terminal is expected to process about 350,000 to 500,000 passengers per year; a major breakaway from the past in terms of space.Klayee said while everyone is excited about the new terminal and its beauty, the management is equally concerned about its maintenance and has assured the senators of doing all possible to keep the structures clean and functional at all times.He said the management has begun in-house training program with the help of some partners to ensure a total Liberian ownership in the coming years.Mr. Klayee said the training is geared towards expanding the capacities of LAA’s staff in technical services, operations and administration, as well as provide maintenance and repair services on one hand and to provide new customer service culture, which will resonate with LAA’s customers and the clients.He said the LAA’s authorities have been making a business case by negotiating with airlines to increase the traffic and the process is on course.Zhou Yuxiao, Chinese Ambassador for the Forum on China-Africa Cooperation (FOCAC) Affairs, said the new terminal demonstrates the relations between the two countries and a shining example of China-Africa cooperation, while expressing honored to be back in Liberia to attend the dedication of the RIA new terminal. Amb. Zhou served as Ambassador of China to Liberia from June 2007 to April 2011 before being reassigned to Zambia from 2011 to 2014.last_img read more

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