first_imgSanjiangyuan National Park is expected to open in 2020 as China’s first park in its new national park system.As many as 1,500 endangered snow leopards (Panthera uncia) live in the area. The cats are subject to poaching and persecution in retaliation for their predation on livestock, which are edging out their natural prey.The new park seeks to capitalize on the reverence many local Tibetan Buddhists have for wildlife, employing a conservation model that engages the public and attempts to ease tensions between people and predators.The new national park system is intended to create a more effective kind of protected area than currently exists in China. SANJIANGYUAN, China — Late at night on March 15, a snow leopard secretly entered the sheepfold of a Tibetan household in a remote pastureland in China’s western Qinghai province, killing one sheep. Local Tibetan nomads captured the cat and sent it back up into the surrounding mountains.Within two days, it returned to the same settlement twice and killed more sheep. After consulting with a wildlife expert, the local people realized that the animal was an aging cat that probably couldn’t survive without resorting to easy livestock kills and finally sent it to the Quinghai Wildlife Rescue and Breeding Center in Xining, the province’s capital city.It is fairly common for people living in most parts of Qinghai province’s Sanjiangyuan region to spot snow leopards (Panthera uncia), a generally elusive creature locals have nicknamed “snow mountain hermit.” It is also common for them to lose livestock to the cats, as well as to other carnivores that thrive in Sanjiangyuan’s rugged alpine terrain.Now the Chinese government is working to establish its first national park in the area, Sanjiangyuan National Park. The goal is to protect Sanjiangyuan’s tremendous water resources and rich biodiversity, including the area’s flagship species, the snow leopard. The big cats are subject to persecution in retaliation for livestock kills as well as to poaching. Figuring out how to help humans and snow leopards co-exist will be essential to the new park’s success at protecting the endangered cats.A snow leopard in China’s Sanjiangyuan region. Photo courtesy of Shanshui Conservation Center.A snow leopard in China’s Sanjiangyuan region. Photo courtesy of Shanshui Conservation Center.A snow leopard in China’s Sanjiangyuan region. Photo courtesy of Shanshui Conservation Center.A snow leopard in China’s Sanjiangyuan region. Photo courtesy of Shanshui Conservation Center.A snow leopard in China’s Sanjiangyuan region. Photo courtesy of Shanshui Conservation Center.A snow leopard in China’s Sanjiangyuan region. Photo courtesy of Shanshui Conservation Center.A snow leopard in China’s Sanjiangyuan region. Photo courtesy of Shanshui Conservation Center.A snow leopard in China’s Sanjiangyuan region. Photo courtesy of Shanshui Conservation Center.A snow leopard in China’s Sanjiangyuan region. Photo courtesy of Shanshui Conservation Center.A snow leopard in China’s Sanjiangyuan region. Photo courtesy of Shanshui Conservation Center.12345678910 read more

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first_imgRetaliatory killings of jaguar by cattle ranchers currently threaten the recovery of the species and the long-term viability of tour operators dependent on their presence.A recent study found that the value of jaguars to tourism (US$6,827,392) was far in excess of the cost to ranchers from depredation of their cattle (US$121,500).Tourists were overwhelmingly receptive to the idea of donating to a compensation fund for ranchers that live harmoniously with jaguars. From villain to hero, the jaguar (Panthera onca) stands at the cusp of a radical overhaul in its public image. As the largest cat in the Americas, the species commands a dominant role in the food chain of its native Pantanal – a vast swathe of tropical wetland that encompasses parts of Brazil, Paraguay and Bolivia. Once hunted for its fur, the jaguar’s appetite for the abundant prey in the Pantanal has led it into deadly conflict with ranchers in recent decades, casting it as the stalking menace of livestock and livelihood in a region where much of the land is reserved for cattle rearing. However, in a hopeful development for conservationists, researchers have revealed in a new study published in Global Ecology and Conservation that jaguars are worth 60 times more to tourism than the cost the big cats inflict on ranchers.“The study represents a regional reality in the Pantanal,” said Fernando Tortato, research fellow at Panthera, the global wild cat conservation group that helped lead the study. “Where the jaguar brings in far more revenue than the potential damage it can cause.”Once vilified for the threat it posed to livestock, the jaguar is enjoying a reassessment of its character in the Pantanal. Credit: Rafael Hoogesteijn/Panthera.org.Jaguars once abounded from the southwestern U.S. to Argentina, but their numbers have fallen due to hunting and habitat loss. In the Amazon rainforest, deforestation is an ongoing threat, even while the dense foliage often precludes human encounters with jaguars. In the absence of benign tourism opportunities there is demand for jaguar teeth, paws and claws as souvenirs.But jaguar’s predilection for lush and low-lying forest makes the Pantanal a stronghold for the species. The wetland’s web-like tributaries also open the wild cat’s home to human exploration, allowing tourists to share in their company.In the Pantanal, the biggest threat to their survival is conflict with ranchers. To address this tension, the study quantified the value of the jaguar to the growing tourism industry and explored how its benefits could be felt more keenly by those incurring its costs.Researchers focused on Encontro das Aguas State Park, using it as a representative portion of the Pantanal where ecotourism operates near livestock farms. The study defined the total area available here to tourism by mapping the riverside haunts of tagged jaguars that were visible from boats, to give a realistic spatial scale of the costs and benefits of living with the top predator. The minimum annual income of the tourism industry was calculated from the daily takings of seven lodges operating within this zone. This figure was then compared with a hypothetical estimate of damages to neighboring cattle ranches based on reported jaguar kills and the market value of each bovine.The difference was startling to the researchers.“Much greater than expected,” Tortato said.In comparison to an estimated yearly loss from cattle depredation of US$121,500, the researchers found the jaguar tourism sector was taking in a gross annual income of around US$6.8 million. Even then, they write that their potential revenue estimate was conservative – it only accounted for the earnings of established lodges within a specific portion of the Pantanal, not the entire host of smaller outfits operating there and elsewhere. Knock-on benefits to local businesses from tourists passing through the Pantanal were also not included, so the researchers say the full economic value of jaguar ecotourism is likely far greater.For conservationists, however, the study brought even better news.Cattle ranching has been the Pantanal’s most significant economic activity for more than 250 years. Credit: Steve Winter/Panthera.org.“What surprised us was the interest of tourists,” Tortato said. “Tourists who visit the Pantanal in search of jaguar are willing to pay for damages, and this reaches the root of the conflict, creating a pragmatic solution to the cattle losses of ranchers.”The researchers reckoned that the cost to cattle ranchers could be met with a one-off donation of US$32 per tourist. But their findings showed that 80 percent of tourists were happy to pay almost three times as much. Over a three-day stay, most were willing to donate an average of US$84 to a compensation scheme for inconvenienced ranchers.The study indicates that, if rolled out region-wide, the scheme would more than offset the costs of a thriving jaguar population, laying the groundwork for landscape-scale conservation that could overcome present barriers of private land ownership.Interaction between jaguars and cattle is likely to remain inevitable in the Pantanal, where over 90 percent of the territory is privately owned and overwhelmingly used for rearing livestock. Only five percent is protected today. Despite the local dominance of ranching, however, jaguars are entwined in the ecology and culture of the region. As an apex predator, they play an important role in the population dynamics of their prey, which include caimans, capybaras and deer.“In the process, they regulate the transmission of disease between these species, and from them to domestic animals and even man,” Tortato said.In Pantaneiro folklore, the jaguar is a talismanic symbol of the wilderness – an enduring relic of the region’s exciting and untamed past. From this, the idea of a new source of income sprung forth in one community.The Ribeirinhos are local people who inhabit the Pantanal’s riverbanks. Many rely on communal knowledge of the rivers to navigate tour boats for visitors. Usually poorer than their landholding compatriots, Ribeirinhos have profited from the new industry that has emerged on the backs of their once-feared enemies.“Today the jaguars are benefactors,” Tortato asserted. “[They’re] helping poor river peasants to reach a higher socio-economic level or better their education, thanks to the employment opportunities provided by jaguar-oriented tourism.”Boats packed with tourists scan the river banks for a glimpse of the elusive jaguar. Credit: Fernando Tortato/Panthera.org.The Pantanal biome is the world’s largest sheetflow wetland, spanning more than 160,000 square-kilometres in central South America. Credit: Steve Winter/Panthera.org.The experience of one jaguar tour provider seems to lend support to the study’s conclusion that a reward system levied by tourists could promote harmony.Dr. Charles Munn has been compensating a local cattle ranch for the last seven years and describes the scheme as “spectacularly successful” and responsible for maintaining an “extremely good” relationship between his business and neighbors. Munn owns SouthWild – a South American-based wildlife tourism company. In addition to his compensation scheme, he claims several “firsts” for Pantanalian ecotourism, such as “the jaguar guarantee.”“Give me three nights and four days and if you don’t see a jaguar in the day time, I pay back the entire cost.”Since 2005, he said he has only had to refund customers twice.“We have [jaguar] boat drivers with 5,000 hours of face-time watching wild jags with guests, which probably is 10 times more – maybe 20 or 50 times more jag face-time than all biologists have had in the history of our planet.”The success of SouthWild is one of the reasons why Munn believes the true value of the jaguar is far greater than the study’s estimate. Fifty regular jaguars make up most of Munn’s sightings in a 100-kilometer tract of the Brazilian Pantanal and Munn claims each big cat is worth around US$1 million to the country’s economy.From windfalls for national airlines to a flow of foreign tourists with disposable income, the returns from what Munn describes as “Jaguarland” easily dwarf the costs of cattle depredation. However, despite the enthusiasm surrounding the industry, Munn notes a hesitance by the local government to engage with it.“In 2006 I proposed that all my guests pay a conservation fee…the state government said that they appreciated the effort but could not accept any donations until there was a written management plan.”Tortato and his team also argue that greater state involvement could help unlock the full potential of ecotourism for jaguars and people.“The lack of management, supervision and taking advantage of the financial opportunities offered by protected areas in the Pantanal limits their potential for public use.”Panthera scientists are working to better understand the ecology and behaviour of jaguars, including their interactions with livestock. Credit: Steve Winter/Panthera.org.Among its other recommendations, Panthera has advice as to how the proposed donor fund could work in practice, from rewarding landholders for protecting jaguars on their property and regulating hunting so that there is sufficient wild prey for the top predators to ensuring cattle are managed in ways that deter jaguar predation.Throughout the rest of the jaguar’s range, Panthera are leading a three-year expedition across ten nations in Latin America to assess the status of the species and to draw international attention to its plight. Researchers traveling on the “Journey of the Jaguar” reached the Brazilian Pantanal this month. Among them is Panthera CEO Dr Alan Rabinowitz, who describes “the new culture of protection” which has arisen around the tourism industry in the Pantanal as “a wonderful success story in a truly unique place.”Jaguars are “smart,” Tortato said, and any measure would never completely end predation on cattle. But he says they could one day make jaguars a lesser concern than other causes of cattle mortality, such as snakes or disease.With characteristic zeal that seems to embody the optimism of this new industry, Munn claimed that jaguar tourism is poised to take off – with ensuing benefits for human and wildlife communities in the Pantanal.“A thousand high-quality jobs have been created already in Brazil by these 50 jags,” Munn said of the big cats his company depends on. “The biggest new source of nature-related jobs in Pantanal since 1960…and jag tourism is just in diapers, it could grow by a factor of 100 in the next 10 years.”Citation:Tortato, F. R., Izzo, T. J., Hoogesteijn, R., & Peres, C. A. (2017). The numbers of the beast: Valuation of jaguar (Panthera onca) tourism and cattle depredation in the Brazilian Pantanal. Global Ecology and Conservation, 11, 106-114.Banner image: A researcher records a jaguar at rest – an increasingly lucrative asset to South American tourism. Photo by: Fernando Tortato/Panthera.org. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Maria Salazarcenter_img Animals, Cattle Ranching, Conservation, Interns, Jaguars, Research, Tourism, Wildlife last_img read more

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first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored agribusiness, Agriculture, Cattle Ranching, Deforestation, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Livestock, UCSC Article published by Rhett Butlercenter_img Feedlot cattle have a smaller carbon footprint than pasture-raised cattle because they grow faster and produce higher meat yields, a new study has foundThis is important for countries that must balance the demand for beef with maintaining a fragile environment.However, grassland ranchers argue this is a short-sighted approach to take, and that, holistically, grass-fed cattle are better for the environment. The popularity of grass-fed beef owes much to the claim that the meat from cattle raised on pastures is superior to corn-fed beef. Many people may feel better knowing they just ate meat from an animal that spent its life on a picturesque green pasture, rather than packed into a dreary prison-like feedlot.But would those people still feel good about their choice if raising grass-fed cattle actually turned out to be worse for the environment?A new study suggests that might be the case. An analysis of emissions from different cattle-raising systems shows that producing beef using feedlot cattle results in a significantly smaller carbon footprint compared to grass-fed cattle, scientists reported recently in Science of the Total Environment.Cattle produce 41 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions from livestock. They also require large amounts of land and water. Understanding their environmental impact is particularly important for regions like the Brazilian Amazon, where the environment is fragile but cattle ranching is a major part of the economy.The global demand for beef is growing. Photo by A.C. Moraes.To assess how different cattle systems affect the environment, scientists from the Breakthrough Institute in Oakland, California, and Oregon State University compiled data on the greenhouse gas emissions of beef production techniques around the world.The team concluded that placing cattle in feedlots, where they eat corn-based feed for at least the last few months before slaughter, greatly decreases the carbon footprint of beef production. Cattle reared this way produce more meat per animal, on average, and they need less space compared to purely pasture-raised, grass-fed cattle.Some environmentalists suggest that the way to reduce the cattle industry’s impact on the environment is to encourage people to stop eating beef. But “it’s very hard to change our consumption habits, and demand [for beef] is growing,” study coauthor Linus Blomqvist, director of conservation at the Breakthrough Institute, said in an interview.Instead, Blomqvist and his colleagues suggest the industry needs to keep using feedlots while working on “reducing their environmental impact.” In places like the U.S., he said, the abundance of corn and the high price of land make feedlot operations more profitable and better for the environment than raising cattle in pastures.Some agricultural scientists say the presence of a corn belt in the U.S. makes feedlot cattle more cost-efficient and environmentally friendly. Photo by Greg Goebel.But the issue is contentious, and not everyone agrees with the study’s findings.“I think the feedlots are destructive,” Chris Kerston, director of events and public outreach at the Savory Institute in Boulder, Colorado, said in an interview. Kerston was a grassland farmer for many years and was not involved with this study. The Savory Institute promotes grass-fed cattle production as a way to holistically manage and improve grasslands.Kerston said the availability of corn doesn’t mean feedlots are the best choice. “Ecologically, that’s a short-sighted view,” he said. “We need to start producing food the way nature intended.” He said most of the “great breadbaskets of the world” are all former grasslands that, if restored, can sustain grazers and sequester carbon in the grass and soil.Brazil might be a good candidate for increased feedlot production of beef. Photo by A.C. Moraes.But Alison Van Eenennaam, an agricultural scientist at the University of California, Davis, who was not involved with this study, told Mongabay she appreciates that the authors “push back on this simplistic notion that grass-fed is good and corn-fed is bad.” Statements like that, she said, “are childish in terms of the real complexity of agriculture.”The authors realize that while feedlots work well in the U.S., that approach may not be best elsewhere. “Even though environmental performance would be better and emissions lower, that doesn’t mean the right thing to do right now is to build feedlots everywhere,” Blomqvist said. For instance, Australia lacks a corn belt to produce the crops required for feedlot cattle.Brazil, on the other hand, might be a good candidate to increase feedlot production. “We’re right at that threshold over the last decade where, in more and more places, the feedlots are starting to get a little more economical,” Blomqvist said. “You don’t just make this change overnight. It might be a long-term goal.”Grass-fed beef production generates more greenhouse gas than using feedlots. Photo by Scott Bauer.CITATIONSwain, M., Blomqvist, L., McNamara, J., & Ripple, W. J. (2018). Reducing the environmental impact of global diets. Science of The Total Environment, 610, 1207-1209.Kimberly Hickok (@kimdhickok) is a graduate student in the Science Communication Program at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Other Mongabay stories produced by UCSC students can be found here.last_img read more

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first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored In the 1980s and 90s, whale sharks were being killed in their hundreds off the western coast of India. Demand for the shark’s fins and meat in south-east Asia meant a fisherman could earn as much as $7,000 for a large shark.In 2001, India declared the whale shark a protected species. In 2004, the Whale Shark Conservation Project began its effort to spread awareness of the ban among the fishermen in the state of Gujarat, where the killing was taking place, and to convert the fishermen from hunters to protectors of the fish.Through a combination of community outreach, participation of a popular spiritual leader, and financial compensation, the community was convinced to stop killing the sharks. Since then, 710 whale sharks have also been rescued after getting entangled in fishing nets, while scientists have been able to tag eight sharks for research purposes. In the 1980s and 1990s, whale sharks (Rhincodon typus) were being slaughtered by the hundreds in the waters off the coast of Gujarat, a state in western India famous for being the last refuge of the Asiatic Lion. While the lions were protected under the Indian Wildlife Protection Act (WPA), 1972, the whale sharks were not.A whale shark from the Indian Ocean. Image by Abe Khao Lak, CC 4.0.Demand for the shark’s fins and meat in south-east Asia drove a roaring export trade. According to one study published in 2000 in the journal Current Science, over 1,700 whale sharks were killed between 1988 and 1998.  A further 600 were killed between 1999 and 2000, according to another study by WWF-India published in 2001. A single whale shark could earn a fisherman anywhere from $2,500 to $7,000, depending on its size.“It was happening because of greed,” Tulsibhai Gohel (bhai is an honorific that shows respect), the 42-year-old president of the Sagar Putra Foundation, a local fisherman’s association, told Mongabay. “We were getting so much money, it was impossible not to kill them.”In 2000, a documentary by Mike Pandey called Shores of Silence, which included footage of men cutting off a whale shark’s dorsal fin while the fish was still alive, drew widespread attention to the plight of these gentle giants. The government was lobbied and a year later the fish was added to Schedule 1 of the WPA, giving it the highest legal protection in India.Awareness campaignHowever, awareness of the shark’s protected status remained limited in Gujarat. In order to spread the message, the Whale Shark Conservation Project (Gujarat) was founded in 2004 as a partnership between Tata Chemicals, a public company, the Wildlife Trust of India, an NGO, the International Fund for Animal Welfare, and the Gujarat Forest Department.“To lose a species that has been estimated to be as old as the dinosaurs, and about whom enough knowledge has not been gained, would be a big loss. This prompted Tata Chemicals Ltd. to partner with the Wildlife Trust of India (WTI) to embark on the Whale Shark Conservation project,” Alka Talwar, the head of sustainability and corporate social responsibility at Tata Chemicals, told Mongabay.The port of Veraval, one of 5 fishing villages participating in the Whale Shark Conservation Project. Image by Tariq Engineer for Mongabay.Tata Chemicals has provided about $700,000 in funding since the project’s inception as part of its corporate social responsibility, WTI the scientific and conservation expertise, and the Gujarat Forest department legal sanction and economic support for the communities. The collaboration among a public company, an NGO, and the state is one of the project’s two pillars; the other is the fishing community. “The model has been so successful because we were able to convert the community from hunters to saviours,” Farukhkha Husenkha, WTI’s assistant manager, sociology for the project, told Mongabay.Husenkha joined the project in 2012 and operates out of Veraval, a fishing town that is the field base of the project. The project extends for roughly 160 kilometers (110 miles), and includes four other major fishing villages: Mangrol and Porbandar to the northwest of Veraval, and Sutrapada and Dhamlej to the southeast. The fishing seasons runs from September to June and can be quite lucrative, with fishermen earning up to $45,000 in a good year.In addition to the ban on killing the sharks, the fishing communities have been taught to rescue the shark if it gets entangled in their nets. The nets are 20 meters (66 feet) wide and 5 meters (16 feet) deep. As many 100 nets can be cast into the sea and left overnight, creating a wall over a mile long.Husenkha is one of three WTI employees in the region. He is joined by biologist Charan Kumar Paidi and field officer Prakash Doriya, a former fisherman who has been trained to help rescue and tag the sharks. “My role is to make sure that the fishermen’s motivation [to protect the shark] is maintained,” Husenkha said.The project has documented 710 whale shark rescues as of March 2019. Eight sharks have also been tagged for research purposes, while five whale shark pups have been logged by the local fishing community. According to BC Choudhury, the lead investigator of the project, the pups prove that whale sharks breed in the Arabian Sea off the western coast of India.The Project brings together a public company, a major scientific NGO, and state, and the local fishing community.These two photos show Project staff and fishers rescuing and tagging a whale shark in December, 2017. Images by Farukhkha Hunsekha.A spiritual approachTo win the hearts of the fishing communities, Morari Bapu – a spiritual leader who has a large following in Gujarat – was appointed the brand ambassador for the campaign. He would prove to be the perfect messenger.“The best thing that worked in the whale shark initiative was the involvement of Morari Bapu,” Anju Baroth, a scientist with the Wildlife Institute of India, told Mongabay. “If a scientist had gone and given a lecture about conservation, nothing would have gone into their heads. An approach which is close to their heart was required.”Since whale sharks are a migratory species, Bapu told the community a simple story: The whale shark, which he named Vhali, or ‘dear one’, was like a relative coming home to give birth. The community would not harm such a relative but protect and care for her and her child. In the same way, they must protect and care for the shark, which, despite its size, is a gentle creature that causes no harm. He also appealed to the community’s sense of Dharma. Killing the shark was a sin, he told them, while saving it would bring them good karma. To drive the message home, actors performed a skit based on this theme.Though it took a few years to convince all the fishermen to get on board, today, “there is a total ban [on whale shark hunting]. The mind-set has changed,” Gohel said.A 2016 community event in Porbandar that shows the life-size inflatable whale shark. Image by Maheshbhai (Porbandar).The project reinforces Bapu’s message every year with two community events. Since 2015, the project has celebrated international Whale Shark Day on August 30th. In addition, a culturally significant day in the Gujarati calendar has been designated Gujarat Whale Shark Day by the Forest Department. “On that particular day, the fishers will not go out to sea. It is an important day to spend with their families,” Husenkha said.Follow the leaderThe project’s other important activity in building community support was getting the community heads, known as Patels, on its side. Such is their tradition that the writ of these heads is the law in their communities. Tulsibhai Gohel is the Patel in Veraval and heads an association that counts 2,100 fishing boat owners as members. Those who do not follow their Patel’s instructions are blackballed.“Once the community leader has decided not to hunt, if someone offers even $10,000 for a shark, we won’t kill it,” said Patel Jivabhai Bariya, former head of the Sutrapada Koli Fisherman’s Association. Jivabhai has personally helped rescue around 50 whale sharks. There is a sense of pride that has come with being part of the project too. “The world knows that we have been protecting the whale shark and we are proud to be part of the project,” Jivabhai said.The project has also built community support through collaboration with village leaders, known as Patels, whose decisions traditionally serve as informal law in their communities. Three Patels spoke with Mongabay about their work with the Whale Shark Conservation Project: Patel Jivabhai Bariya (left), Patel in Sutrapada, Ratilal Haridas (center), Patel in Dhamlej Tulsibhai Gohel (right), Patel in Veraval . Image by Tariq Engineer for Mongabay.Monetary compensationIn late 2005, the Gujarat Forest Department agreed to compensate the fishermen for the nets that were ruined when they cut the shark free. “When the hunting stopped, the whale shark population increased and more were getting stuck in the nets,” Ratilal Hardas Bariya, Patel from Dhamlej, said. “It was causing the fishermen a lot of trouble.”The department has paid out around $130,000 in compensation up to 2018, the latest year for which data are available. In 2010, the department also agreed to let fishermen document the rescues themselves using plastic film cameras provided by the project. This significantly cut down on the time taken to rescue the shark, and thereby reduced the stress on the fish. This year, the project has launched the Vhali app, so the fishermen can take photos or video on their smart phones.“The institutionalisation of the process for providing monetary relief to fishermen for net damages incurred during whale shark rescue operations has also contributed to the project success,” Tata’s Talwar said.A holistic modelIn 2005, Tata Chemicals was awarded the Green Governance Award for the project, and in 2014, the Gujarat Forest Department received a Biodiversity award from the UNDP and the Ministry of Environment. The Project has just started a similar project in Kerala in India’s far south.The Whale Shark Conservation Project has been successful because each partner brought something different to the table. “All these blocks were put together and the puzzle was solved,” Baroth said. “Companies have the money and traditionally the research community is always in the need of money.”For Talwar, it also provides evidence that companies can play a big role in conservation, with or without the CSR act. “The need is for environmental organizations, which have knowledge about ecosystem and biodiversity, to raise the issues and rope in different companies depending upon their areas of influence.” Community-based Conservation, Conservation Solutions, Corporate Social Responsibility, Education, Endangered Species, Fishing, Oceans, Sharks, Whale Sharks Article published by Sue Palminteri FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. 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first_imgA recent study found that deforestation significantly increases the transmission of malaria, about three times more than previously thought.The analysis showed that a 10 percent increase in deforestation caused a 3.3 percent rise in malaria cases.The study’s authors analyzed more than a decade of data showing the occurrences of malaria in nearly 800 villages, towns and cities across the Brazilian Amazon.They also controlled for the “feedback” from malaria, by which a rise in the incidence of the disease actually slows deforestation down. Tropical deforestation may spur the transmission of malaria at levels much higher than once thought, according to a recent study.Disease ecologist Andrew MacDonald and his Stanford University colleague Erin Mordecai analyzed more than a decade of data showing the occurrences of malaria in nearly 800 villages, towns and cities across the Brazilian Amazon. They also looked at satellite-tracked deforestation over that same time frame.Understanding the effect each variable has on the other is tricky. That’s because the rise in malaria cases that follows deforestation appears, in turn, to diminish continued deforestation. The disease slows local economies and discourages people from settling in high-malaria areas.A soy field abuts the forest in the Brazilian Amazon. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.MacDonald and Mordecai found that a 1 percent rise in the incidence of malaria corresponds to a 1.4-percent dip in deforestation. This “feedback” has clouded conclusions from earlier research about deforestation’s true effect on malaria, MacDonald, now based at the University of California, Santa Barbara, said in an email.To cut through the confusion, the researchers controlled for malaria’s impact on deforestation in their analysis. They then found that previous estimates had been about three times lower than the actual effect of deforestation on malaria.The team calculated that a 10 percent rise in deforestation led to a 3.3 percent average increase in malaria transmission. For 2008, that amounted to another 9,980 cases across the Brazilian Amazon. They reported their results in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on Oct. 14.Plasmodium falciparum, the parasite that causes malaria. Image by Mae Melvin/CDC via Wikimedia Commons (Public domain).Geographically, deforestation touched off more malaria in the midst of the Amazon rainforest than it did around its fringes, probably due to how deforestation happens in the forest’s interior, MacDonald said.“Here there is small scale clearing for new settlements, which creates more forest edge habitat (and more mosquito breeding habitat), as well as increases human biting rate and human-mosquito contact rate,” he said. “In the outer Amazon, forest patches are fewer and farther between with less human contact with forest edge habitat.”A capuchin monkey in a Brazilian forest. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.Still, MacDonald added, it’s unlikely that malaria alone could stop deforestation altogether. What is clear from the data is that the advantages of preventing deforestation could extend beyond keeping carbon locked away in the trees and maintaining functioning ecosystems.“I think these results suggest that if conservation actions are focused on the large intact regions of the interior of the Amazon rainforest, it may have benefits for health in terms of reductions in malaria transmission,” he said.Banner image of an Anopheles mosquito by Jim Gathany/CDC via Wikimedia Commons (Public domain).John Cannon is a staff writer at Mongabay. Find him on Twitter: @johnccannonCitation:MacDonald, A. J., & Mordecai, E. A. (2019). Amazon deforestation drives malaria transmission, and malaria burden reduces forest clearing. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 201905315. doi:10.1073/pnas.1905315116FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by John Cannoncenter_img Agriculture, Conservation, Deforestation, Diseases, Ecology, Economics, Environment, Forest People, Forestry, Forests, Health, Illegal Logging, Infectious Wildlife Disease, Insects, Malaria, Mosquitoes, Nature And Health, Public Health, Rainforests, Research, Slash-and-burn, Threats To Rainforests, Tropical Forests, Zoonotic Diseases last_img read more

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first_imgSummer 2015 has been a blast for a group of over 40 youngsters from the traditionally tough community of Back Bush in Mountain View, St Andrew, courtesy of an exciting three-week baseball clinic which was staged by a team of professional coaches, with support from a prominent political and corporate representative.Leon Taylor, a professional scout for the Pittsburg Pirates Baseball Club in the United States and assistant district administrator for the Jamaica Little League Baseball Association, was in charge of the clinic recently when the one-day-a-week exercise entered its final leg. He and other coaches took the youngsters, aged between six and 16 years, through the fundamentals of the sport before treating the community gathering to an impromptu game.In between the activities, Taylor outlined that little league baseball is played in 86 countries globally, including Jamaica, with the sport being represented in places like Treasure Beach, St Elizabeth; Manchester, Portland and Westmoreland. Drawing on the accepted position that Jamaica produces an abundance of natural athletic talent, he said it is logical that the phenomenon will extend to baseball.guidance and attitude”Professional baseball players earn on average about US$1 million a year. With good opportunities through early introduction to the sport and the availability of scholarships, youth from Jamaica can make it there, with the right guidance and attitude, of course,” he indicated.The head coach said playing equipment will be left with the youngsters after the clinic, with two teams being formed to continue to train and compete with each other.Business executive and Jamaica Labour Party (JLP) caretaker for Eastern St Andrew, Fayval Williams, who partnered with the coaching panel and the Back Bush community to stage the clinic, was elated at the success of the event, to which there were continuous enquiries from youth groups engaged in other summer activities in neighbouring communities.”I am really delighted to partner with the Little League Baseball Association to bring this initiative to the community of Back Bush in Mountain View,” she said. “It is a relatively different sport from what we are used to in Jamaica, but it is exciting and the kids clearly love it.”Williams said offering opportunities to the youth fell within both her corporate and political responsibilities.”The opportunity that is provided to them can be really meaningful when fully exploited,” said Williams, who personally tried her hand at the game. “Sports in general fosters discipline and the kids are learning about this very important factor. Things like rules and teamwork help to shape their overall development, whether in the sport or otherwise in life.”last_img read more

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first_imgThe garden city of Georgetown, over the years, has seemingly wasted away to not only the ‘garbage city’ but now changing into the ‘sewage city’ as vendors are now complaining of being affected by sewage spills in several locations.On Saturday, several vendors reached out to Guyana Times to express frustration over the situation and its implications for their health as they continue to long for a breath of fresh air and clean environs.A few vendors on Avenue of the Republic wearing respirators to protect themselves as a sewage spillage has been reported in the areaA vendor who plies her trade on Avenue of the Republic in Georgetown explained that they are forced to wear respirators in an effort to protect themselves from the stench.“This thing here, it affecting we terrible so we have to go and buy the mask. It (the scent) goin all in yuh throat, it givin yuh bad feelings. Is a very long time this goin on,” she said.The vendors said that since the beginning of the year, they started to notice the stench and spillage.Another vendor, who spoke with this publication, explained that they reported the issue to the relevant authorities before and the spillage was cleaned; however, they were still hoping for their prayers to be heard soon and the situation permanently remedied.“This thing often going on and polluting the whole area here on Avenue of the Republic. Me ain’t know exactly where it coming from, but it polluting the whole area. It went to this extent before and it was reported and according to what I hear, it was taken care of, but it come back again,” he explained.According to another vendor in the area, she noticed that the spillage usually takes place around 10:00h to 18:00h. That vendor cried, “We keep inhaling it all the time and it affectin my throat.”She also related that her business is being affected by the stench, as customers are turned off by the odour and do not stop to shop.Vendors are now being forced to sprinkle detergents to help cover up the odour in a bid to attract their customers.Another frustrated male vendor said, “Over a month and change, this thing here goin on. This water here stink and it gun give people sick and all kind of thing. We got to put on this thing (respirator) every day. We can’t even get to sell goods.”That vendor argued that they pay monthly rents and the Mayor of the city must do something to ease their situation.A few vendors have even taken to social media in a bid to have their cries heard.Only recently, this newspaper reported that a Georgetown family has been living in sewage for the past few months, with little being done to ease their distress.last_img read more

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first_imgA local producer of rice varieties at the 2017 farmers marketGoing into its fourth year since the event was launched, the much anticipated Farmers Market Day organised and hosted by the Agriculture Ministry, through the New Guyana Marketing Corporation (GMC) is set to commence on June 1, with its main goal of promoting products and produce of local farmers and agro-processors.Farmers from various regions across the country are expected to flock D’Urban Park, Homestretch Avenue, Georgetown to display the variety and quality of their products with the purpose of widening their market supply.Some of the expected products range from fruits drinks, cooking sauces, oils and various rice varieties to the showcasing of plants, handmade craft and locally designed ornaments.General Manager of GMC, Ida Sealey-Adams, had noted that the role of the Marketing Corporation is to develop the non-traditional agricultural sector and to expand all production sectors locally, regionally and internationally.The event which was first held in 2017, directly after the country celebrated its 51st Independence anniversary, it was made a reality through a collaboration between the Agriculture Ministry and the Business Ministry.Only recently, the Public Telecommunications Ministry in an effort to introduce modern technology into the agriculture sector had commenced training for persons in the said field to successfully utilise the Agricultural Commodities Trading Exchange app which is expected to bring together producers, sellers and buyers of vegetables, fruits and other agricultural products anywhere in the world, into a single online marketplace.Business Analyst Tamika Inglis said by the time MoPT launches the National Agriculture Strategy later this year, most frontline operators in agriculture will be familiar with the app and farmers will be using it to market their produce.This new technology is recognised as a solution to the decades-old marketing problems faced by hinterland and remote farmers who lose revenue from spoilage.last_img read more

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first_imgA mother of one was on Saturday morning hacked to death by her husband.Dead is 20-year-old Omawattie Wazi called “Agile” of Lot 33 D Williamsburg, Rose Hall Town, Berbice, Region Six (East Berbice-Corentyne).Reports are Wazi and the suspect, Gavin Gill, have been living at Port Mourant Village for the past year but she recently moved to her mother’s Williamsburg, Rose Hall Town, home after her husband of 14 months became abusive.Guyana Times was told that the young mother moved out with her seven-month-old baby from the matrimonial home about two weeks ago. She started working on Monday last as a sales clerk at a hardware store. However, at about 07:55h while on her way to work on Saturday that her husband struck her down with his car. She was riding a bicycle at the time. This publication understands that the man then exited the car with a knife and stabbed her several times before chopping her with a cutlass.According to one eyewitness, Subnauth Bickam, after hearing the impact, he rushed towards his gate and saw the woman moving from the bonnet of the vehicle and landing on his bridge.He said he rushed outside to assist the woman but saw the driver coming towards her. He said that the man took a knife and started stabbing the woman and despite his pleas to get him to stop, he did not. He said that the man then rushed back to the car and came running at him with a cutlass. The man reportedly held the woman by her hair and began chopping her at the neck. Meanwhile, a mobile police patrol was passing at the time and the ranks rushed to the woman’s aid and apprehended her husband. He was taken to the Albion Police Station.According to the dead woman’s sister, Samantha Wazi, the couple had been married for 14 months, after the suspect returned to Guyana from the United States 17 months ago.She said that prior to the marriage, one of the suspect’s relatives reached out to her family and advised her sister not to marry the man.According to the grieving woman, her sister did not pay heed and went ahead and married Gill.Samantha Wazi explained that one Saturday, the family suspected that the man was abusing her sister but she hid the abuse from her mother.“He don’t buy milk for the baby and drinking rum all the time. We hear he does beat she bad but she don’t tell mommy. It get overbearing and she come home back,” the grieving sister said. This newspaper was told that after Wazi moved from the home, her husband made several threats that he was going to kill her. This led to the woman applying for and received a restraining order which forbade Gill from being within 100 feet of Wazi, her sister and her mother.Guyana Times was told that Gill is currently before the court for a robbery under arms charge.In that case, the police are alleging that he was the driver of the car which transported several bandits to and from a robbery at Corentyne, Berbice. (Andrew Carmichael)last_img read more

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first_imgBy Energeticcity.ca StaffRestaurant owners are being advised of a telephone scam.Northern Health says it has become aware of a scam in which a caller identifies themself as a health inspector and asks for information such as tax details.- Advertisement -Reports suggest the caller has threatened a fine if the requested information is not provided.Northern Health officials say they do not request sensitive information over the phone and their personnel carry nametags that properly identify them.The public should be careful when providing sensitive information over the phone or internet and should ask for a person’s identification if asked in person. Advertisementlast_img read more

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