first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Upset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Mike Gaworecki Animals, Bushmeat, Cattle, Conservation, Economics, Elephants, Environment, Lions, Mammals, Poaching, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation center_img Researchers interviewed 173 self-admitted rural poachers living in the margins of Ruaha National Park in Tanzania to understand why they harvest bushmeat.While poverty was a major factor, not all poachers were destitute; a sizeable proportion say they poach to supplement their income.How the villagers view their financial status compared to others reflected their poaching activities.Conservation strategies should adopt a multidimensional approach to target those who are well-off in addition to the poor, according to the researchers. A new study published in Conservation and Society probes self-admitted poachers living around Ruaha National Park in Tanzania on the reasons — both objective and subjective — that drive them to poach.For decades, Africa has been grappling with a poaching crisis that has resulted in precipitous declines in iconic large mammals such as elephants, rhinos, zebras, and gorillas. Some 26,000 elephants, three-quarters of the elephant population in the Ruaha-Rungwa region in Tanzania as of 2009, were killed over a five-year period, for instance. Much of the slaughter has been attributed to organized crime syndicates that are becoming increasingly militarized and employing sophisticated weaponry.Apart from organized poaching gangs, individual rural villagers are also involved, and poverty is thought to be the main driver. But few studies have explored whether this is actually the case.The results of the present study confirm the link between poverty and poaching, but they also reveal that many villagers harvest bushmeat to supplement their income and are not among the poorest of the poor, as is often assumed. More importantly, the study reveals that how poachers view their financial status relative to other villagers is a primary influence on poaching habits.“My assumption was that only extreme or absolute poverty, or desperate situations, would drive people to poach. I had no idea that subjective measures of poverty were equally important,” Eli Knapp, lead author of the study and assistant professor at Houghton College in New York, told Mongabay.Poachers are usually represented as “greedy,” but after hearing their stories Knapp said he learned that “the vast majority were good people making very rational decisions and doing anything and everything they could to feed their families in the face of yearly environmental stochasticity,” or variability.In the spring of 2015, Knapp and his team interviewed 173 villagers from three villages situated along the margins of Ruaha National Park, the largest park in Tanzania. Each of the interviewees admitted to currently being involved in poaching or to having poached in the past. The park, located within the Ruaha-Rungwa ecosystem in south-central Tanzania and spanning 45,000 square kilometers (17,000 square miles), is home to a tenth of the world’s lions.Some of the animals the villagers admitted to frequently poaching were impalas, giraffes, bushbacks, warthogs, elands, and kudus. The top three weapons used for poaching were guns, indiscriminate wire snares, and poison arrows.A varied groupIndeed, the study does show that poverty is a major driver of poaching. Close to half of the poachers (46 percent) considered their households as poor compared with other village households. These people poached for a longer period and more intensively than those living in average-income households.Four in five villagers said they engaged in poaching for food or income. Almost all (96 percent) claimed that they would stop if they received income through other means to meet their needs.But poverty was not the only driver, because over half of the poachers considered their household income as average compared to other villagers. These poachers had a higher proportion of income from non-poaching sources, such as cattle sales or outside employment, than households that considered themselves poor. They possessed more cattle, and a high proportion of them owned motorcycles, both of which enable alternative sources of income, yet they poached at levels on par with households that labeled themselves as poor.Despite the fact that a third of the poachers had some form of employment, a significant minority (20 percent) still poached to supplement their income beyond their basic needs. Among the remaining two-thirds who lacked employment, only eight percent used poaching as their main source of income.Out of 171 poachers, 60 had some form of employment, and 12 of those (20%) used poaching to supplement their employment income. For the 110 who lacked employment, 9 (8%) used poaching as their primary income (Knapp, Peace, & Bechtel 2017. doi:10.4103/0972-4923.201393).This shows that poachers are not necessarily mired in absolute poverty, but are moderately poor, and seek to supplement and diversify their income sources for upward mobility.“While our poachers and their households had adequate food and shelter, most lacked abilities to send children to school, or advance themselves in any meaningful way,” said Knapp. “This is what the 96 percent wants, an ability to educate children and advance themselves beyond year-to-year subsistence.”Only one respondent, who said he used to poach but no longer did, claimed his household was rich (although his house lacked a tin roof and cement flooring). He attributed his wealth to his large cattle holdings, which the authors believe may serve as a natural mobile bank account that acts as insurance to help overcome environmental uncertainties and reduce the pressure to poach.“This one respondent helped me understand poaching motivation better than anybody else,” revealed Knapp.The challenge of mitigating poachingThe study’s findings have huge implications for bottom-up conservation programs that target the poorest of the poor based on the assumption that poverty is the main driver of poaching. The authors say their study suggests that such anti-poaching programs should take a multidimensional approach, instead.In the 1990s, a bottom-up approach was implemented in Serengeti National Park to sell villagers legally accessed bushmeat for food in order to deter poaching, but it failed because the meat was costly and poached bushmeat was cheaper. And, those who poached for additional income would continue to poach anyway. As a result, the program did not address the motivations of all of the poachers.On the other hand, top-down measures relying on increasing patrols, arrests, and penalties through law enforcement may be sufficient to prevent poachers who poach to earn extra income, but they will be ineffective for those who do so to meet basic needs, the authors said. Also, if poachers from poor households have to face jail time or penalties, they may lose a significant source of livelihood, forcing other family members to take up poaching.“Only bottom-up strategies that seek to increase opportunities, capabilities and agency are likely to work for this group,” Knapp suggested.Poaching is used as a means to make the transition out of absolute or moderate poverty. However, the study makes it clear that poverty isn’t measured merely by the value of one’s assets and whether one’s income is sufficient to meet basic needs, but also by how one views their financial status relative to others around them. Emphasizing the term “relative poverty,” the authors write that “it is important that poachers do not feel poor relative to others in the village they are residing in.”Social factors also need to be taken into consideration when assessing a household’s vulnerability to unpredictable events. “A household can have very little income but be relatively secure if they have lots of friends and extended familial relations in their local village network. If a drought occurs or elephants damage their crops, these income-poor households can live off the largess of other households they are relationally connected to,” Knapp said.Overall, the villagers “want to be well off enough to break the cycle of tenuous subsistence living,” Knapp added. “I think this is a pivotal question bottom-up conservationists must face: to what level do households need to be elevated to delink them from poaching?”Knapp plans to investigate the answer to this question in a future study.Greater kudus in Ruaha in Tanzania. Photo Credit: Paul Shaffner / Flickr.CITATIONKnapp E.J., Peace, N., & Bechtel L. (2017). Poachers and Poverty: Assessing Objective and Subjective Measures of Poverty among Illegal Hunters Outside Ruaha National Park, Tanzania. Conservat Soc 2017;15:24-32. doi:10.4103/0972-4923.201393last_img read more

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first_imgThe Salamandra robotica I and Salamandra robotica II model the system of neural networks that guides both swimming and walking movements in live salamanders.The Pleurobot takes bio-inspired engineering a step further by modeling salamander skeletal kinematics.Amphibious biobots can be used for a variety of applications, including environmental monitoring animal behavior studies, and search-and- rescue missions. The Salamandra robotica II. Photo credit: Konstantinos Karakasiliotis, courtesy of the Biorobotics Laboratory, EPFLUndulating at the surface, the Salamandra robotica cruises through the water until it reaches the shore, then ambles forward through the sand with a lumbering gait on its four paddle-like, rotating legs. Unlike its amphibian muse, this robot salamander has no brain to dictate its motion, just a simple central pattern generator that controls its movement and a spinal cord that runs along its modular body.  Built to test the limits of engineering through bio-inspired technology, the Salamandra robotica models the neural system that guides locomotion in live salamanders.A team of researchers at Switzerland’s École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) modeled the neural networks of a salamander’s spinal cord in order to better understand how animals that use both swimming and walking gaits move.A salamander’s brain stimulates the animal’s neurobiological networks and creates ‘traveling’ or ‘standing’ waves that generate the movement of its body. ‘Traveling waves’ move along the body, from front to back, and are used to propel the salamander’s swimming body forward. ‘Standing waves’, on the other hand, involve fixed points along the salamander’s body, so that the animal moves its upper and lower body in opposite directions.A fire salamander in Normandy, FrancePhoto credit: William Warby via Creative Commons license“When an animal walks, it actually does this gait in synchrony with the legs,” explains Dr. Alessandro Crespi, a researcher with the EPFL Biorobotics Laboratory. “This is very important, because if the synchronization between the body and the legs is [poor], then the movement is extremely ineffective. That’s actually a point that we tested with the robots, because you cannot really do this kind of testing in the animals. In robots, you can, for example, change the coordination between the legs and the body, and then you can figure out…the effect of changing the coordination on the actual speed of walking [for] the robot.”Building the modelsThe researchers simulated locomotion through the biobots in order to study processes in completely controlled and simple subjects.According to Dr. Crespi, “…it’s extremely difficult to simulate [aspects] like hydrodynamics and contact forces with the ground with friction. It’s actually much easier to create an embodiment like a robot that contains our model and uses the real environment compared to a computation of simulations.”The models, Salamandra robotica I and Salamandra robotica II, don’t take into account the biological complexities of a real animal. Crespi explained that their team “made the hardware model as simple as possible” so that they could isolate and simulate solely the process of locomotion. For example, the differences in vertebra length and weight distribution of the body that scientists would find studying a live salamander were not factors that were included in the creation of the Salamandra robots.The Pleurobot modeling salamander-inspired movements. Photo credit: Konstantinos Karakasiliotis and Robin Thandiackal, courtesy of the Biorobotics Laboratory, EPFLCrespi explained, “The modeling was done in collaboration with neurobiologists from the University of Bordeaux in France, who are studying real salamanders. So we didn’t figure out the structure using the robots, but we used the robots to test that the structure we figured out was explaining the model…we wanted to verify if [the structure] can actually make our robots move in the real environment and not just a simulated model on a PC screen.”The next level of the salamander models, the Pleurobot, more closely resembles the physical structure of a salamander. This model enables the researchers to study the animals’ skeletal kinematics, or how the structural elements of the body guide an animal’s motion capabilities. Using the Pleurobot model, the EPFL team could analyze how the salamander’s body structure aids its swimming and walking movements. Both the Pleurobot and the Salamandra robotica I and II were modeled by studying the movements of live salamanders under an X-ray machine.“We [performed] a lot of manual tracking [of points along the body, shown in the video below] to extract all the [points of the] vertebrae from the cineradiography [X-ray recordings], so that we could see exactly how every vertebra is moving inside the animal while the animal is walking and swimming.”Video Playerhttp://biorob2.epfl.ch/movies/files/pleurobot_xray_tracking-hd.mp400:0000:0000:15Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Video courtesy of the Biorobotics Laboratory, EPFLIn order for the Salamandra robotica models to switch between walking and swimming gaits, the EPFL team programmed the robot’s central pattern generator. This algorithmic model controls the movements of the spinal cord to generate different gaits based on the level of stimulation sensed by the model’s leg oscillators. A lower stimulation level initiates the walking gait, whereas a higher stimulation generates a swimming gait. But since the robots do not have a brain to operate changes in gait, they must externally sense the presence of water. The researchers used an external water leakage sensor that senses if the biobot is partially or fully immersed in water and where the biobot is making contact with the water. A programmed algorithm in the central pattern generator makes the switch between gaits. The switch for the Pleurobot must be manually implemented with a remote controller.Also, the Salamandra robotica models are waterproof, whereas the Pleurobot is not, so it wears a specially-designed neoprene casing that protects it while allowing it to swim freely.Biobots for conservationThe Salamandra robotica models and the Pleurobot can all be adapted for use in conservation research and technology.A variant of the EPFL team’s Pleurobot model, the Crocodile-bot, was created to mimic crocodilian movements. Crocodile-bot used the hardware structure of the Pleurobot to star in the BBC documentary series Spy in the Wild. The Pleurobot’s legs, unlike those of the Salamandra robotica models, move freely. Their lifelike movements were adapted for the Crocodile-bot. The hardware was built at the EPFL and was housed in an external envelope created to look like a real-life crocodile and built especially for the documentary.Researchers from the EPFL, in collaboration with the BBC, developed crocodile and monitor lizard robots for the documentary series Spy in the Wild. Video courtesy of the Biorobotics Laboratory, EPFLYet another model—the Envirobot— will be used for environmental monitoring, such as to test pollution levels in lakes, during which it can swim freely, collect data, and return to the surface. The biobot is equipped with a GPS receiver and long-range communication capabilities. It was modeled closely after the Amphibot, a legless version of the Salamandra robotica I and II.Such an application is fitting: salamanders themselves are highly sensitive to their environments, and the presence of species such as the southern torrent salamanders can signal a healthy ecosystem. Amphibians, Conservation Technology, Monitoring, Research, Robots, Technology, Wildtech Article published by Sue Palmintericenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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first_imgFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.The Ebo forest is home to a mystery population of gorillas, only discovered by scientists in 2002. Two subspecies of gorilla are found in Cameroon, the Western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) and a small population of Cross River gorillas (Gorilla Gorilla diehli). Between these two populations, there is a third isolated Ebo population, completely cut-off from other sub-species, with no other populations found within a 200 kilometer (125 mile) radius. Photo by Rhett A. Butler Cameroon’s Ebo forest is home to key populations of tool-wielding Nigeria-Cameroon chimpanzees, along with an unspecified subspecies of gorilla, drills, Preuss’s Red Colobus, forest elephants, and a great deal more biodiversity.The forest is vulnerable, unprotected due to a drawn-out fight to secure its status as a national park. Logging and hunting threaten Ebo’s biodiversity. The Cameroonian palm oil company Azur recently began planting a 123,000 hectare plantation on its boundary.The Ebo Forest Research Project (EFRP) has been working successfully to change the habits of local people who have long subsisted on the forest’s natural resources — turning hunters into great ape guardians. But without the establishment of the national park and full legal protection and enforcement, everyone’s efforts may be in vain. A gorilla nurses her baby. An important gorilla population is found in Cameroon’s Ebo forest, an area that has long been promised — but not yet given — national park protection. Photo by Rhett A. ButlerEkwoge Abwe’s fight drags on. As the manager of the Ebo Forest Research Centre (EFRP), he’s been part of a long running battle to set-up a national park conserving Cameroon’s Ebo forest. Seven years ago, a World Wildlife Fund Cameroon press release trumpeted the new park, saying that its designation was imminent. A high-level forest fly-over was organized to seal the deal, with the press, government officials and community leaders all joining in.But today, Ebo remains only the Ebo forest; with no government protection, and still seen as critically important habitat renowned for its significant populations of great apes.The Ebo forest covers more than 1,500 square kilometers (386 square miles) in Cameroon’s Littoral region, and it is very rich in biodiversity. A healthy population of Nigeria-Cameroon chimpanzees (Pan troglydtes ellioti), estimated to be around 700 strong, is found within its borders. And among them is the only chimp population east of Ivory Coast known to use tools for nut-cracking. The Ebo chimps use wood and stone hammers and anvils to get at the meat of the coula nut; and they use long, flexible sticks to fish for termites.The forest also boasts Cameroon’s only Preuss’s Red Colobus (Piliocolobus preussi) population outside of Korup National Park, as well as one of Africa’s largest populations of endangered drills, (Mandrillus leucophaeus) and forest elephants.Ebo also harbors a mystery population of gorillas, only discovered by scientists in 2002. Two subspecies of gorilla are found in Cameroon, separated by the Sanaga River; the Western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) is found to the south of the river, and a small population of Cross River gorillas (Gorilla Gorilla diehli) is found to the north. Between them, 100 kilometers (62 miles) north of the Sanaga River, there is a third population, located in Ebo. These gorillas are completely cut-off from other sub-species, with no other populations found within a 200 kilometer (125 mile) radius.“Up until now we’re still uncertain whether they are Western or Cross River gorillas, or, more interestingly, they could be a third sub-species in Cameroon,” Abwe said.The Ebo forest is located in Cameroon’s Littoral region, near the cities of Douala and Yaoundé which both have thriving bushmeat markets. Commercial bushmeat dealers travel to Ebo’s local villages by taxi, motorcycle and on timber trucks to buy bushmeat from hunters. Map by Global Forest Watch.Palm oil on the border Last Spring, Abwe spoke to Mongabay about plans being developed by the Azur palm oil company to clear forest and create a 123,000 hectare (89 square mile) plantation on the western border of the proposed national park. “They’re not out to destroy the forest,” he said then, but was surprised to be reminded of those words nearly a year later.Azur manufactures soap and cooking oils for distribution within Cameroon. As of the end of 2016, forest had been cleared for the plantation, and a palm tree nursery was growing.Abwe now fears that the creation of this oil palm plantation will compound the many problems facing Ebo, making the fledgling national park that much more difficult to manage once it is established. “Because [once you plant the plantation] the next thing [to come] will be a large population of poorly paid workers, who want to complement their income through hunting and farming,” Abwe said. Plantation workers will easily be able to step into the forest, hunt a few monkeys, apes or duikers, and find themselves with some extra cash.Azur’s oil palm plantation on the edge of Ebo forest. Without national park status, it is feared that Ebo will remain vulnerable to economic interests, including palm oil and logging companies, placing its exceptional biodiversity at risk. Photo by Michelle Sonkoue WatioOne chief concern is that the environmental impact assessment (EIA) conducted for the new plantation was done by a firm closely connected with Azur, raising questions about the EIA’s validity. “You can’t really expect anything fair from them,” Abwe said flatly.He also indicated that the terms of the plantation agreement are not being respected. A buffer zone several kilometres wide was originally proposed, meant to create a wide gap between plantation and forest, Abwe explained. But as things stand now, the buffer on the western national park boundary will only be a few hundred meters wide — too narrow to keep people and wildlife separate and prevent conflicts with great apes and other animals.Source of bushmeatEbo already faces high hunting pressure due to its proximity to two major cities — Douala just 50 kilometers (31 miles) away from the forest, and Yaoundé, Cameroon’s capital which is 150 kilometers (93 miles) distant.Bushmeat is in high demand and commands high prices in these urban centers, so commercial hunters are increasingly attracted to nearby wild places to kill, carve up and roast animals to sell as meat.Commercial hunters, Abwe said, focus their attention on the western and southern part of the forest, closest to the city of Douala. Hunters in the northern part of the Ebo are generally local people who spend a few days hunting in a vicinity, then sell whatever they kill to dealers, known locally as “buyum sellums.”These commercial meat dealers travel to the local villages by taxi, motorcycle and on timber trucks and supply thriving bushmeat markets in Douala and Yaoundé. In the markets, Abwe said, you can find almost whatever kind of meat you want.Without national park protection, Ebo’s rich biodiversity will continue ending up on Douala and Yaoundé dinner plates.Although locals claim that hunters do not directly target Ebo’s great apes, poaching remains a problem and is one of the top two threats to the animals’ survival, alongside logging. When a hunter does not find anything else to shoot, explained Abwe, the prospect of bagging a chimp may be too enticing to ignore. And once bushmeat is prepared, most law enforcement officials wouldn’t be able to tell if the meat came from an endangered species or not.Drills photographed at the Limbe Wildlife Centre, Cameroon. Classified as Endangered by the IUCN, drill populations have declined by as much as 50 percent due to hunting and habitat loss. Ebo forest is home to one of Africa’s largest drill populations, and so is an important area for their survival in the wild. Photo by Bernard Dupont, CC ShareAlike 2.0 Generic licenseFrom hunters to forest guardians The Ebo Forest Research Project (EFRP) works with local people in the northern part of the forest to stem the flow of exploited wildlife. When the project began in 2005, its work was mainly biological. But EFRP biologists, going about their research, often came across wire snares or heard gunshots ring out through the forest. It was a problem they couldn’t ignore.As a result, the EFRP began working directly with hunters. The researchers raised ecological awareness by educating local people to the consequences of commercial hunting, which culls vast quantities of wildlife from the forest to feed urban populations. The scientists explained that large-scale hunting leads to the “removal of a trophic level,” and that because of this “you end up having an empty forest,” Abwe said.“We came now to a crucial part,” he added. Even though many hunters understood the importance of conserving the forest and its wildlife, and recognized that the hunting of endangered species was illegal, that awareness wasn’t enough to curtail the practice.That’s because hunting remains an important source of income for the people living in the 19 villages surrounding the Ebo forest. A 2016 study published in International Forestry View suggests that bushmeat may be worth as much to Cameroon’s GDP as its mining sector; that’s around €97 million (US$106 million). So giving up hunting, which can be very lucrative, is often not an easy or financially feasible choice for fiscally strapped families.The EFRP-sponsored Club des Amis des Gorilles manioc grinding mill at Logndeng, a village on the edge of the Ebo forest. Hunting to survive has long been an economic reality here, but the grinding mill helps provide an alternative income for villagers, reducing the need to hunt. Photo by Daniel MfossaA cocoa nursery in Lognanga. Abandoned plantations like this one are being regrown with the help of the Club des Amis des Gorilles to provide an alternate cash income, reducing the need to hunt in Ebo forest. Photo by Daniel MfossaThat’s why it isn’t practical to criminalize hunting without providing viable alternative livelihoods. EFRP realized that finding other sources of income for villagers was absolutely essential if Ebo’s biodiversity was to survive.So Abwe’s team went directly to the hunters to find out what they would rather do than hunt. Their responses were varied, ranging from livestock raising (pig farming), to aquaculture (fish ponds), to agriculture (growing cocoa). The EFRP team next took the hunters on a field trip to Limbe, so they could see these livelihoods in action and talk to people who were practicing them.“Many of the [hunters] went back [to the Ebo forest villages] and started implementing these things,” Abwe said. Cocoa farms that had been abandoned were restarted, and fish ponds were created. Conflicts between hunters and law enforcement were reduced.In 2013, Abwe was awarded the Whitley Award, also known as “The Green Oscars,” for his innovations in conserving the Ebo Forest. The funding that followed allowed EFRP to expand their Club des Amis des Gorilles (Gorilla Guardian Clubs) initiative.A Club des Amis des Gorilles monitoring team examines a field map. The clubs are made up of local community members, many of them ex-poachers, who are recruited to help survey and protect the local fauna. Photo courtesy of EFRP-ZSSDThe 200 members of the clubs recruited to date are former hunters from the villages encircling Ebo. Membership begins with a simple signature and a pledge to conserve the forest and the gorillas within the proposed park’s borders.Members are charged with monitoring local gorillas, and are accompanied on their mission by a member of the EFRP team. Earlier this year Ebo’s ape population was filmed for the first time by camera traps set-up by the Club des Amis de Gorilles.The Gorilla Guardian model has been such a success that EFRP is planning to expand the clubs to other communities, although given the limited range of gorilla populations, the focal species will change. Abwe envisages Club des Amis de Chimpanzees, or even using endangered drills as the face of conservation in the future.Ebo Forest National Park, but when?When asked if he knows when Ebo forest will become Ebo National Park, Abwe laughs. “I would love to have an answer to that,” he said, adding that the national park designation seems stuck in the bureaucratic pipeline“We’ve done a lot, and the traditional [Ebo community] rulers have done a lot. We are just waiting.” Meanwhile, hunters continue killing Ebo’s animals for bushmeat, and trees continue to be felled for Azur’s palm oil plantation or by loggers.Individuals from the EFRP team and the Club des Amis des Gorilles set up camera tracking equipment in gorilla habitat. Camera traps like these captured the first ever photos and video of Ebo’s unknown species of gorilla. Photo courtesy of Daniel Mfossa/ZSSDTrue, Ebo’s problems are hardly new. They began in the late 1960s along with Cameroon’s bid for independence, when violent conflict spread across the country. To sooth some of that tension and improve control over the local populace, the government moved the people who lived inside the borders of the proposed national park to two villages outside.“Much of what is today the Ebo forest was peppered by numerous small villages until the period of civil unrest,” Philip Forboseh, program manager for WWF-Cameroon’s coastal forests program, told mongabay.com.WWF-Cameroon played a key role laying the groundwork for the park, actively supporting its creation for nearly five years, but pulling out in 2013 when progress toward the goal seemed permanently stalled. WWF judged then that it could no longer justify a costly full-blown program in Ebo without assurance of national park status, Forboseh explained.According to Abwe, some of the community’s traditional rulers are now saying that instead of the forest being designated a national park, the people should be allowed to return to their old homes, re-establishing the former villages inside Ebo.But other traditional rulers in surrounding villages are still in favor of the creation of the park, and in May 2014 they petitioned the government to move forward with the plan, though with no success. The opposition from the traditional rulers who wish to return to the forest has ground the process to a halt.“We understand that the files are pending approval at the level of the Presidency, hence there is no official designation of a national park at Ebo as yet,” Forboseh said.So the wait goes on.Avoiding another paper park Even if national park designation is soon forthcoming, that won’t end Ebo’s challenges. Cameroon already has several national parks, but that designation often doesn’t stop poaching and illegal logging. Bushmeat hunted in some parks is still found on sale in urban markets and wood grown on conserved lands is still shipped out to foreign markets.While some parks are well protected, others known as paper parks are protected in name only. Many wonder if Ebo will become one of those .Abwe is confident that the Ebo forest will not go down that route. He believes that the inclusive model that has come to dominate there — involving everyone from government officials to local traditional leaders to farmers, hunters and researchers — will save Ebo from a paper park destiny.It’s not all work and no play. The Club des Amis des Gorilles organize community events, like this Gorilla Cup, a local football tournament, to raise awareness of the need to protect Ebo’s great apes, and to generate pride in the community’s key conservation role. Photo courtesy of Daniel Mfossa“Over the years we have adopted community conservation, whereby the communities get involved in managing their resources,” adding a legal arm, in the form of the national park, would formalize this relationship, he said. “We want a situation where there is ongoing biological research, ongoing community conservation in collaboration with the government to ensure the forest’s protection.”Ebo conservation efforts are already having a significant impact, he asserted. Where before people would see a bird or monkey as little more than food for the pot, they now take pride in the biodiversity that surrounds them. They are looking, conserving, rather than just eating, he said.But these changes in local people’s attitudes may mean little ultimately, if the forest isn’t granted protection soon.“Until we have a national park and all these boundaries are legalized and recognized by everyone, we will continue to have this situation whereby people will be able to come and set up everything based on their economic interests,” Abwe concluded.Whether it is palm oil companies picking away at the edges of the Ebo forest, or commercial bushmeat hunters plundering its diversity, until Ebo is offered proper protection, its ecological riches will remain at risk and up for grabs. That places one of Cameroon’s greatest natural treasures — along with its important populations of great apes — in grave danger. Agriculture, Animals, Apes, Biodiversity, Bushmeat, Chimpanzees, Community Forestry, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Farming, Featured, Forests, Gorillas, Great Apes, Hunting, Indigenous Communities, Indigenous Groups, Industrial Agriculture, Mammals, Over-hunting, Palm Oil, Primates, Protected Areas, Rainforest People, Rainforests, Sustainable Forest Management, Tropical Forests, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Trade Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Glenn Schererlast_img read more

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first_imgAnimals, Biodiversity, Endangered Species, Environment, Mammals, Megafauna, Rainforest Animals, Rhinos, Sumatran Rhino Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Puntung, one of three Critically Endangered Sumatran rhinos known to survive in Malaysia, is suffering from an abscess in her jaw.The rhino’s caretakers feared she would not survive the infection despite receiving round-the-clock veterinary care.Since Saturday, Puntung has shown signs of improvement, although she is “not out of the woods yet.” “After a week of grave concern, we have some positive news,” the Borneo Rhino Alliance (BORA) announced today. “Puntung looks like she’s getting better.”Female Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) Puntung, is suffering from an abscess in her jaw, a condition that could lead to sepsis and eventually death. As recently as Friday, the rhino’s caretakers feared she would not survive the weekend.The life-threatening abscess in Puntung’s jaw. Photo courtesy of the Sabah Wildlife Department.Puntung, estimated to be around 25 years old, is one of three Sumatran rhinos known to survive in Malaysia. All three were born in the wild and are currently cared for at the Borneo Rhino Sanctuary in Tabin Wildlife Reserve in Malaysian Borneo’s Sabah State.Sumatran rhinos were declared extinct in the wild in Malaysia in 2015. Between 50 and 100 of the Critically Endangered species are believed to survive in Indonesia, including seven at the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary in Way Kambas National Park in southern Sumatra.Puntung’s severe illness had raised alarm due to the low overall numbers of Sumatran Rhinos, and to the role BORA hoped she might play in efforts to breed more rhinos using experimental in vitro fertilization (IVF) techniques. Puntung has reproductive pathologies that leave her unable to carry a pregnancy, but is still producing eggs.Deteriorating health, then signs of improvementAccording to the Sabah Wildlife Department, Puntung showed alarming symptoms on Thursday and Friday, including loss of appetite and energy, and bleeding from her left nostril.“She ate very little over those two days, and spent most of the daytime lethargic in her wallow,” Sabah Wildlife Department director Augustine Tuuga said in a press statement.On Saturday, the bleeding stopped and Puntung became more active — an improvement BORA attributes to constant attention, antibiotics, fruit and supplements.The rhino’s caretakers are cautiously optimistic about her condition. “While we are delighted that she is eating once again, she’s not out of the woods yet,” BORA said. “We still have much to do and need to proceed with caution and urgency.”Puntung will continue to receive care at the Borneo Rhino Sanctuary. The facility is also in contact with specialist rhino veterinary surgeons in South Africa, although Puntung has reportedly not cooperated with attempts to get a clear x-ray of her jaw.“We have been trying to take an X-ray for the past four days but she is irritated not only by pain but by our attention, not least the injections,” the sanctuary’s manager and veterinarian Zainal Zainuddin explained in a press statement.Banner Image: Courtesy of the Sabah Wildlife Department.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Article published by Isabel Estermanlast_img read more

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first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by mongabayauthor Certification, Corporate Environmental Transgressors, Deforestation, Environment, Forestry, Forests, Indigenous Peoples, Land Grabbing, Palm Oil, Plantations, Rainforests, Rspo, Tropical Forests, Zero Deforestation Commitments center_img The RSPO ordered Goodhope to freeze its operations in Indonesia earlier this month amid allegations of land grabbing and forest destruction.Goodhope said recently that it needed more time than the RSPO had given it to bring its operations into compliance with the roundtable’s standards.The company says it is working with credible auditors to conduct new assessments of its concessions, after the RSPO deemed previous audits the firm had commissioned as lacking in credibility. A month after the world’s largest sustainable palm oil association took action against one of its most prominent members, Goodhope Asia Holdings, over failures to comply with its standards on new planting, doubts remain over the future of their relationship.On Apr. 28, the Complaints Panel of the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) wrote to the Singapore-based company calling for work to be frozen on seven concessions in Indonesia as a result of “poor quality” audits and insufficient documentation, which fell short of the requirements of the body’s New Planting Procedures.Issues reportedly included failures to protect areas of high conservation value, such as primary forests; to identify how the company had negotiated with local communities to use their land; and to submit documentation identifying land converted from forest to palm.The RSPO said the action was taken as a “precautionary measure,” as it set out a series of deadlines for Goodhope to re-do crucial land assessments and submit new documents.In what was heralded by environmental groups as a rare move from an association often accused of failing to uphold its own sustainability standards, the RSPO warned Goodhope that any deviation from this timeline would “be viewed severely and may lead to suspension and eventual termination of membership.”However, in a progress update sent to stakeholders earlier this month, Goodhope suggested that it would not be able to meet all the deadlines.“Goodhope has been trying to expedite the works to meet all the necessary requirements as set by the RSPO. However, due to some challenges in the availability of credible partners and the religious festivities of Ramadan and Eid Mubarak in June the completion of necessary reports and documents will have to take [a] longer time,” the company wrote.It added that its officials would meet with the RSPO on May 26 to “amend the time-bound plan to adjust with the field reality.”On the eve of the reported meeting, RSPO communications chief Stefano Savi said there had been no communication with Goodhope since the roundtable called for the freeze.“Only the Complaints Panel [CP] can decide on any active complaints. The parties in the complaint will direct any requests to the CP, via the secretariat. No such request has been received to date by the Secretariat,” he confirmed.Savi told Mongabay that the RSPO was continuing to “measure progress based on the milestones and timeline that have been established,” and that “any variation to these” could lead to further action, including suspension or termination.The Papuan hornbill is one of the birds-of-paradise for which New Guinea island’s rainforests are famous. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.But despite the conflicts over the deadlines, Goodhope insists that it is committed to remaining a member of the multistakeholder organization.Goodhope will showcase “stronger sustainability credentials in time to come. So far we are on track with our commitments,” said Sustainability Director Edi Suhardi, who has temporarily suspended himself from all positions within the RSPO — including vice president of the body — until the issue is resolved.Following the freeze on the seven concessions — Goodhope operates a total of 15 in Indonesia, all on the island of Borneo and in the Nabire district of Papua province — the company launched a new sustainability policy, announced plans to release a fully traceable supply chain, and said it was working with credible auditors to conduct new assessments.The company also said it had made progress in its land dispute with the indigenous Yerisiam community on its PT Nabire Baru concession, which has been described by watchdog awas MIFEE as “possibly the most controversial plantation in Papua” amid allegations of grabbing ecologically important forestland held sacred by the community.Indigenous rights NGO Pusaka confirmed that it had met with Goodhope to discuss the dispute, and was working towards a resolution.Pusaka Director Franky Samperante stressed that the precautionary action taken by the RSPO against Goodhope does not solve the demands of the Yerisiam community, who are urging the company “not to expand their land and not to do forest clearing anymore.”Islands off the Bird’s Head Peninsula of Indonesia’s West Papua province. Photo by Rhett A. Butler for Mongabay.In the case of Nabire Baru, Audrey Versteegen, a forest campaigner with the Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA), a London-based NGO, said the RSPO’s action had come “a little too late,” as the company “is already in open conflict with local communities and has already clear-cut a significant area of primary forests and peatland.”However, she said the decision to freeze Goodhope’s operations had “reassured us that the RSPO Secretariat may still at times be willing to make the right decision in order to ensure the implementation of its standard.”Versteegen added that the EIA does not believe the deadlines set by the RSPO were unrealistic, but said it is “ultimately the decision of the RSPO Secretariat whether they will accept yet more excuses from one of their private sector members.”Meanwhile, Greenpeace said Goodhope “only has itself to blame for these tight deadlines.”“No responsible company should be buying Goodhope’s palm oil and it should remain suspended until it has met RSPO’s deadlines and started restoring the forest it destroyed. The longer it takes to meet the RSPO’s deadlines, the longer it should be locked out of the market,” the NGO added.Banner image: A praying mantis on a pink leaf in Indonesia’s easternmost Papua province. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

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first_imgGabon remains a relative stronghold for endangered wildlife like chimpanzees and forest elephants.Singapore-based Olam International, one of the world’s largest agribusinesses, has agreed not to plant palm oil in protected wetlands, and also set aside conservation areas and corridors for wildlife in its concessions in Gabon.But there is only so much that can be done to minimize the impact of clearing 26,000 hectares in the middle of one of the world’s most forested countries.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. The chimpanzee nest was a few months old, but there it was, right next to the tracks of the endangered forest elephant. We were in a conservation area that had been protected by Singapore-based Olam International, one of the world’s largest agribusinesses. But just 100 yards away, there was no more forest, no more chimpanzees, and no more elephants. Instead monoculture palm oil plantation spread almost as far as the eye can see grown palm oil used as a common additive in everything from doughnuts to shampoo.We were in Gabon, a densely forested country on Africa’s Atlantic Coast, which remains a relative stronghold for endangered wildlife like chimpanzees and forest elephants. Olam’s plantation is far from the world’s worst: Olam has agreed not to plant palm oil in protected wetlands, and also set aside conservation areas and corridors for wildlife. The company has worked closely with local communities to minimize the negative impacts of its plantation on water quality and traditional access, invested in some smallholder agriculture, and respected at least some communities’ decision to refuse to allow the plantation to extend into their traditional lands. While the company is still expanding into savannah areas, it has also set aside several thousand acres of these highly biodiverse landscapes.Olam’s oil palm nursery on its plantations in Mouila, Gabon, with a riparian area in the background and the palm plantation stretching toward the horizon. Use of water for irrigation for the palm oil nurseries has caused some dispute with local communities. Courtesy of MightyA bulldozer near Olam’s new palm oil mill in Mouila, Gabon. Courtesy of Mighty.But there is only so much that can be done to minimize the impact of clearing 26,000 hectares in the middle of one of the world’s most forested countries. From a climate perspective, that amount of deforestation is simply incompatible with achieving reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. For wildlife, despite the conservation corridors, the forest elephants simply can’t access all their usual habitat. They are then forced into the pathway of local communities, creating potential for human-elephant conflict.And as much as Olam has done to try to protect water sources, the company is still using a large quantity for their nurseries and irrigation, in some cases impinging on access to water for communities. To be sure, Olam has created 6,500 jobs in palm oil.. But the project is inevitably disrupting village life. Gabonese culture is intertwined with the forest: every morning and evening, hunters head out into the forest to find food, villages depend on the forest for clean water and medicine, and it is the site of traditional religious practices, which remain widespread. But where there are plantations, young people are moving away from the villages to live on the plantation or in the nearby town of Mouila. Olam’s rubber plantations in Bitam in the north of Gabon have had similar effects on both the ecology and communities of the area.In other words, Olam’s plantation is almost as well-executed as a large-scale plantation in a forest landscape could be, but it’s still not pretty.Forest elephant in Gabon. Photo for Mongabay by Rhett A. Butler.A view of Olam’s oil palm nursery under irrigation. Courtesy of MightyUltimately, the tragedy of this kind of deforestation is that it is entirely unnecessary: In the tropics alone, there are more than one million square kilometers of previously deforested lands where agriculture can be expanded without threatening native ecosystems – far more than is needed to meet human agricultural demand for decades to come.Most countries – even ones with vast remaining forests like Brazil, Bolivia, and Indonesia – have lots of these degraded lands where they can expand agriculture. Some have made significant efforts to focus agricultural development there: for instance, Brazil has virtually eliminated deforestation for soybeans in its part of the Amazon, even as it has expanded the area planted with soy by 2.6 million hectares in the last ten years. In most countries, large-scale agricultural development doesn’t have to come with such negative environmental costs.However, there are a handful of countries that, for one reason or another, have done such a good job of protecting their forests over the centuries that it’s difficult to develop large-scale plantations without deforestation. In Gabon , 85% of the nation is a sea of green from the ocean all the way inland. Ecologically, these large-scale forests are considered the most important to protect. Some companies argue that conservation standards should be lowered for high forest cover countries like Gabon so they can benefit from large-scale plantation agriculture. And governments are tempted by the money that can come with industrial agricultural development. In Gabon, for instance, the government is eager to diversify its economy away from its heavy reliance on its oil reserves.But these countries face two realities: first, when industrial agriculture starts, it’s hard to keep it under control. Most large plantation companies have an insatiable appetite for land, and the willingness to do whatever it takes to acquire and convert forests. Second, in today’s global marketplace, people simply don’t want to buy food or soap that’s grown by destroying elephant and chimpanzee habitat. Indeed, we and our Gabonese partner Brainforest were able to persuade Olam to declare a one-year moratorium on deforestation largely by rallying the large global food companies that purchase raw materials from Olam, as well as Olam’s investors, to demand that the company cease deforestation. It worked: while it still has a lot to do, Olam has now started to act on its pledge to chart a more responsible future for its operations in Gabon.Palm fruit bunches collected for processing at Olam’s mill in Mouila, Gabon. Courtesy of Mighty.A community meeting near Olam’s palm plantations. Some community members work on Olam’s plantations, and many have concerns about the operations of the plantations. Courtesy of MightyOther companies that have sought to establish large-scale plantations in forest regions of Africa have either had to curtail their plans after facing NGO campaigns and hostility from local communities and investors. Others, like GAR and Sime Darby in Liberia and Wilmar in Nigeria have implemented the High Carbon Stock methodology for identifying degraded lands where agriculture can be developed while protecting forests. It’s insane to put a huge monoculture plantation in the middle of one of the world’s last intact rainforests when there are so many places agriculture can be expanded without deforestation. As a result, companies and countries that engage in deforestation increasingly just cannot find reliable, high-value markets for their goods, or even attract large-scale investment into their agriculture and forestry sectors.The good news for high forest countries like Gabon is that prosperity does not rely on destroying forests for large-scale plantation agriculture. Indeed, deforestation is antithetical to development. Instead, countries like Gabon can diversify their economies while protecting their resources for their people for the long term.The Ngounié River, one of Gabon’s most important waterways, which forms the border of Olam’s concession. Courtesy of Mighty.Palm oil trees near the border of a conservation area. Courtesy of MightySmallholder production of high-value crops like cocoa and coffee is one option that could dramatically increase high forest cover countries’ revenue without deforestation, if managed well. High forest cover countries like Bolivia, Papua New Guinea, and Gabon, all have long histories of successful smallholder production of crops like cocoa, coffee, and coconut, which don’t require deforestation. There can even be a role for companies like Olam to bring professional expertise and market access to the cultivation of these crops.In addition, high forest cover countries have the potential to become ecotourism meccas with a bit of concentrated effort and investment. People from all over the world want to visit national parks where they can see amazing creatures like forest elephants, chimpanzees, and gorillas. Rwanda has 600 gorillas, but attracts hundreds of millions of dollars a year from gorilla tourism. Kenya, Tanzania, and South Africa have even bigger eco-tourism businesses.A wetland savannah in the midst of a forest inside one of Olam’s conservation areas near its palm oil plantations in Mouila, Gabon. Courtesy of MightyGabon, in contrast, has more than 30,000 gorillas but receives very few tourists each year. The Gabonese government has developed highly sophisticated plans for sustainable eco-tourism, but they have not deployed them yet. In order to develop their potential, the government would have to do away with its existing onerous visa requirements, which have the effect of discouraging tourists, and also end poaching: in places where wildlife are under significant hunting pressure, they are much less likely to show themselves to humans, making the visits less attractive to potential tourists.Donor governments can play an important role in helping countries like Gabon remain forested. While most investment for forest conservation has gone to combatting deforestation where agriculture is already expanding on a grand scale, countries like Gabon, Republic of Congo, and Laos could all be eligible for enduring financial incentives to continue protecting their forests, presuming they enact needed reforms. Gabon is off to a good start: the Norwegian and French governments just provided $18 million in funding through the CAFI initiative to support Gabon’s forest conservation efforts. In turn, Gabon reduced the area under logging concessions by half, and took a range of other forest conservation measures.Combined, high value crops produced by smallholders, ecotourism, and increased international support can provide an economically viable pathway for forest countries to achieve prosperity while maintaining their forests intact.There are many fewer of these vast intact forests than there were even a decade ago. The ones that remain should be all the more prized. Companies and countries alike should be investing as many resources as necessary to ensure that these forests last long into the future.The author inside a conservation area near Olam’s plantations in Mouila, Gabon. Courtesy of MightyA pickup truck drives down one of the many dirt roads on Olam’s Mouila palm oil plantation, coating the trees on the side of the road with dirt. Courtesy of Mighty Article published by Rhett Butler Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Agriculture, Commentary, Conservation, Deforestation, Editorials, Elephants, Forest Elephants, Forests, Gorillas, Palm Oil, Plantations, Rainforests last_img read more

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first_imgArticle published by mongabayauthor North Konawe bupati Aswad Sulaeman was named a corruption suspect this week.He allegedly took bribes totaling nearly a million dollars from companies he gave mining permits to.North Konawe is a district in Southeast Sulawesi province, home to one of the world’s largest nickel deposits. The governor is also being investigated for corruption linked to the issuance of mining licenses. A district chief from the Indonesian island of Sulawesi was named a corruption suspect this week over “unlawful” nickel mining licenses he issued to eight companies.Aswad Sulaiman, the former head, or bupati, of North Konawe district, Southeast Sulawesi province, is the second district chief to be named a suspect by the Corruption Eradication Commission (KPK) in as many weeks, as the Indonesian agency continues its push into the natural resources sector. Last week, Rita Widyasari, a bupati from the Indonesian part of Borneo, was named a corruption suspect over a license she issued to an oil palm plantation company. Both arrests mark a departure from the KPK’s usual format for catching corrupters, which is by arresting them red-handed in the act of taking a bribe. Still, the agency accused Aswad of trading the permits for bribes worth 13 billion rupiah ($964,000).North Konawe district, Image by Jack Merridew/Wikimedia Commons.After the 1998 fall of the dictator Suharto, who plundered Indonesia’s resources for three decades, bupatis were given expansive new powers and autonomy over land and resources in their jurisdictions. Many of them have abused those powers to profit personally from the nation’s vast natural wealth.Corruption in the logging sector cost Indonesia $9 billion in state revenue from unreported timber sales between 2003 and 2014, a government study found.In Aswad’s case, “The total estimated state losses reach 2.7 trillion rupiah [$200 million] from the sale of nickel produced by miners that earned their permits illegally,” KPK deputy chairman Saut Situmorang told reporters on Tuesday.Aswad became the district’s caretaker bupati after it formed in 2007, and he was elected to the position in 2011, before losing the race for a second five-year term.Southeast Sulawesi Governor Nur Alam has also been implicated in a corruption case related to the issuance of mining permits. The province is “one of the few strongholds” of the National Mandate Party (PAN), of which the governor is a member. Aswad was a member of the Democratic Party.Indonesia is the world’s most abundant source of nickel, and the mother lode of the archipelago’s deposits lies in Southeast Sulawesi. The province has seen its share of environmental destruction as mining and smelting companies operate with little oversight. Banner image: Aswad Sulaiman, former bupati of North Konawe. Photo by Asdar Yusuf/Flickr. Corruption, Environment, Environmental Crime, Law Enforcement, Mining Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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first_imgAnimals, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Critically Endangered Species, Endangered Species, Environment, Fishing, Gillnets, Illegal Fishing, Illegal Trade, Mammals, Marine Animals, Marine Biodiversity, Marine Conservation, Marine Mammals, Saving Species From Extinction, Wildlife Article published by Mike Gaworecki Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img VaquitaCPR, the emergency conservation team pulled together by the Mexican government in a desperate attempt to save the vaquita from extinction, announced last Friday that its capture program had come to an end.Just two of the marine mammals were taken into captivity by VaquitaCPR’s scientists, and neither was able to adapt to human care. The second, a breeding-age female that was not pregnant or lactating, responded poorly to being under the care of humans and died as the team was attempting to return her to the wild.With the vaquita population continuing to plummet, a prohibition on the use of gillnets adopted by the Mexican government does not appear to have made much difference thus far — but environmentalists say that much tougher enforcement of the ban is the only way to save the vaquita at this point. VaquitaCPR, the emergency conservation team pulled together by the Mexican government in a desperate attempt to save the vaquita from extinction, announced last Friday that its capture program had come to an end.There are only 30 vaquita believed to still be alive in the wild. VaquitaCPR launched its effort to capture them in October. The plan was to keep the animals safe in specially built, floating sea pens until the species’ survival was no longer threatened by the illegal fishing activities and trade that have decimated its numbers.The vaquita is found nowhere else on Earth but the Upper Gulf of California, the body of water that separates the Baja California Peninsula from mainland Mexico.Just two of the marine mammals were taken into captivity by VaquitaCPR’s scientists, and neither was able to adapt to human care. The first, a juvenile female vaquita, was successfully released after veterinarians determined that captivity had caused the animal too much stress. The second, a breeding-age female that was not pregnant or lactating, also responded poorly to being under the care of humans, and died as the team was attempting to return her to the wild.VaquitaCPR immediately suspended the capture program following the vaquita’s death, and ended its field operations in the Gulf of California as of November 10.“Because of the vaquita’s reaction towards human care, VaquitaCPR lead scientists made a unanimous recommendation to an independent review panel of experts to cease the capture portion of the operation,” VaquitaCPR said in a statement. “The independent review panel agreed with this recommendation. VaquitaCPR suspended catch operations on November 4 and changed the operational focus to conducting photographic identification of individual animals, to better refine our understanding of abundance and ranging patterns.”Dr. Lorenzo Rojas-Bracho, a scientist with Mexico’s environment ministry and the International Committee for the Recovery of the Vaquita (CIRVA) who is also the head of VaquitaCPR, said that the team of 65 scientists from nine countries was not giving up on its fight to save the Critically Endangered vaquita (Phocoena sinus) from extinction.“While field operations end today, VaquitaCPR stands for Conservation, Protection and Recovery of the vaquita porpoise,” Rojas-Bracho said in a statement released on Saturday. “We will not give up, we will continue our efforts to save the vaquita.”A necropsy was performed on the deceased vaquita and tissue samples sent to a lab for analysis. A full report on the cause of death is reportedly forthcoming.VaquitaCPR also said that, together with the independent review panel assembled expressly for this purpose, it will be reviewing the results of its field operations and making a technical recommendation to the Mexican government through CIRVA regarding the next steps that should be taken to save the small porpoise.The vaquita has been driven to the precipice of extinction by gillnet fishing, the true target of which in the Gulf of California is the totoaba (Totoaba macdonaldi), another Critically Endangered species. Totoaba swim bladders are in such high demand in Asian countries like China, where they are believed to have medicinal value, that they can fetch prices of over $9,000 per pound. (There is no scientific evidence showing that the swim bladders have any medical properties whatsoever.)They may not be the species targeted by the gillnets, but vaquita become entangled in them all the same and drown. In response, Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto adopted a two-year gillnet ban throughout the vaquita’s range in April 2015. The ban was made permanent as of July 2017.With the vaquita population continuing to plummet, the prohibition on the use of gillnets does not appear to have made much difference thus far — but environmentalists say that much tougher enforcement of the ban is the only way to save the vaquita at this point.“The CPR efforts were a bold move and as they end, we urge all those who care about the vaquita to show similar courage and commitment to ensure a gillnet-free Upper Gulf of California,” Jorge Rickards, CEO of WWF-Mexico, said in a statement.The fact that the VaquitaCPR team observed vaquita mothers and calves during its field operations shows that we still have an opportunity to save the critically endangered marine mammal, Rickards noted.“Even though the situation seems dire, we cannot give up now, especially when there remains a glimmer of hope with vaquitas reproducing in the area,” he said. “Any available resource must be immediately directed to habitat protection in the Upper Gulf of California to ensure strict and full enforcement of the gillnet ban and removal of ghost nets. Illegal fishing cannot be allowed, as that will lead to only one possible outcome: extinction.”David Bader, a spokesperson for VaquitaCPR, echoed this sentiment in comments to Mongabay.“It’s important to note that VaquitaCPR is part of a much broader conservation effort for the vaquita,” Bader said. “VaquitaCPR has always been focused on ex situ conservation efforts for the vaquita, finding a way to buy time for them while bringing them into protected sanctuaries where they can be safe from gillnets, which are the key problem and also one of the most difficult things to solve here in the Upper Gulf. Now that these efforts haven’t succeeded, all of our efforts — and by ‘our’ I mean the global community, governments and citizens — need to focus on this region of the Upper Gulf to make sure it is gillnet-free.”VaquitaCPR team members with a vaquita calf that had been taken into captivity and held in a floating sea pen. Photo credit: VaquitaCPR.last_img read more

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first_imgA recent study finds that financial incentives to move people away from cattle ranching don’t address cultural and logistical hurdles to changing course.Even though ranchers could earn four times as much per hectare farming soy or up to 12 times as much from fruit and vegetable farming, many stick with cattle as a result of cultural values.Ranchers, along with small-scale farmers, could benefit from targeted infrastructure investments to provide them with easier access to markets, according to the study.The researchers argue that their findings point to the need for policies that take these obstacles into account. Cattle ranching can be a scourge to forests, requiring vast tracts of cleared land to produce relatively small amounts of food. It is also the primary cause of deforestation in Brazil. In an effort to protect Brazil’s remaining forests in the Amazon, leaders have come up with programs to tempt ranchers into other lines of work, such as giving them a break on interest rates charged for loans to invest in more sustainable livelihoods. But these initiatives haven’t made much headway in reducing ranching, puzzling many researchers.A recent study, published in the most recent issue of the journal Ecology and Society, provides some clues to why many of these attempts might not be successful. The team behind the research, led by environmental scientist Rachael Garrett of Boston University, has found that Brazilian ranchers have more than money on their minds and face challenges in spite of these programs. Their conclusions shake up the calculus required to help them transition to more lucrative, less environmentally destructive livelihoods.“Throwing money at farmers in the Amazon is not going to solve all of our problems because there are major, long-standing, cultural traps that prevent farmers from wanting to move out of what they’re doing,” Garrett said in an interview. “That’s particularly strong with respect to ranching because that’s such a deeply embedded practice.”Cattle graze on deforested land in Brazil. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.Garrett and her colleagues noticed that, despite the fact cattle ranching isn’t very profitable for many of its practitioners in Brazil, many seemed reluctant to move into higher-paying sectors, such as growing soybean or farming fruit or vegetables. They calculated that soybean farmers earn about $1,000 per hectare, four times what cattle ranchers earn on average. Fruits and vegetables are even more profitable commodities.That led Garrett to wonder, “If they’re not doing these things because of income, why are they doing it?”At the same time, the team had “rich data on subjective well-being” from interviews with farmers and ranchers in 2010 and 2011 living in two regions in the Amazonian state of Pará. When she analyzed the data, Garrett arrived at a startling conclusion.“I was just totally shocked that there was no relationship between any of the income metrics that we had and any of the happiness metrics,” she said.From their responses, cattle ranchers, in particular, seemed to favor a quiet life in the countryside to more intensive farming or to moving into areas closer to cities, even though those changes might have meant a bigger paycheck.Clearing land for cattle ranching is the largest driver of deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.But while part of the explanation came from a culture that values the “tranquility” of a life of cattle ranching, Garrett said that wasn’t the whole story.“Instead of finding a lot of positive reasons why they [continued ranching], I found a lot of barriers as to why they might not be doing [better-paying forms of work],” she said.Among them was the difficulty in getting farmed goods into the hands of buyers. That’s especially important for farmers trying to get vegetables or fruits to market before they spoil. And the data revealed that it isn’t just ranchers who cling to less-than-optimal food production methods, Garrett said.“You’ll see small farmers doing all of the things that the large farmers do, in terms of really low-income cattle ranching, using fire, eking out a really measly income,” she said.This new information points to the need for “a national-scale policy” that takes into account the needs of these farmers and ranchers.The researchers found that culture, along with infrastructure hurdles, kept people in cattle ranching, despite potentially more efficient and profitable uses of their land. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.“They really need to be investing in infrastructure, and I don’t mean roads,” Garrett said. “Roads are highly controversial.”She said that processing facilities — those that might turn fruit into easier-to-ship purees, for example — as well as assistance with refrigerated transport for their goods, could help “small and unmechanized farmers” diversify beyond “the major export commodities like beef and soy.”With that help, farmers and ranchers could move into production processes that yield more food from smaller areas of land, while at the same time boosting their bottom lines.New policies need to be aimed at tackling “this persistent problem of low-income, environmentally degrading land uses in the Amazon,” Garrett said. “It’s about getting the best bang for your buck in terms of sustainability if you are going to invest in development and infrastructure.”CITATIONSGarrett, R. D., Gardner, T. A., Morello, T. F., Marchand, S., Barlow, J., Ezzine de Blas, D., … & Parry, L. (2017). Explaining the persistence of low income and environmentally degrading land uses in the Brazilian Amazon. Ecology and Society, 22(3).Henders, S., Persson, U. M., & Kastner, T. (2015). Trading forests: land-use change and carbon emissions embodied in production and exports of forest-risk commodities. Environmental Research Letters, 10(12), 125012.Banner image of cattle in Colombia by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Follow John Cannon on Twitter: @johnccannon Article published by John Cannon Agriculture, Amazon, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Amazon People, Amazon Soy, Cattle, Cattle Ranching, Conservation, Deforestation, Development, Drivers Of Deforestation, Ecology, Environment, Fires, Forests, Rainforest Agriculture, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest People, Rainforests, Ranching, Research, Saving Rainforests, Saving The Amazon, Soy, Sustainability, Sustainable Development, Threats To The Amazon, Tropical Forests center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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first_imgRecord-breaking rainfall hit Jakarta and its satellite cities on New Year’s Eve, causing widespread flooding and leading to at least 19 deaths, authorities reported.Officials have attributed the severity of the disaster to years of environmental damage and waste dumping in the city’s rivers.The disaster has displaced more than 30,000 people, shut down an airport, and cut off some roads. More heavy rain is forecast through to next week. JAKARTA — Flash floods triggered by the heaviest rains ever recorded in Jakarta wreaked havoc across the Indonesian capital and its satellite cities on the first day of the new year. Authorities have attributed much of the damage from the disaster, in which at least 19 people have died, to years of environmental degradation.The downpour began on the night of Dec. 31 and continued into the following morning, causing rivers to spill over and cause widespread flooding across Greater Jakarta. The flooding has displaced more than 30,000 people, cut off electricity and piped water, severed a number of roads, and shut down one of the city’s two airports. The National Disaster Mitigation Agency, known as the BNPB, says 19 people have died in the disaster as of Jan. 2, although the minister of social affairs has reportedly put the death toll at 21. Some of the reported deaths were caused by drowning, landslides, electrocution and hypothermia.Authorities have dispatched rescue teams to locations where floodwaters were reported as high as 2 meters (6 feet).Residents in Bekasi, on Jakarta’s eastern fringe, leave their flooded homes. Image by Tirza Meggy/Mongabay Indonesia.Speaking to reporters in Jakarta on Jan. 2, President Joko Widodo blamed a combination of environmental damage and waste dumping in rivers for the disaster. On his Twitter account, the president also cited delays in flood control infrastructure projects, noting that some of the projects had been held up since 2017 due to land acquisition issues.The BNPB said environmental damage in upstream areas of the Ciberang River, one of more than a dozen waterways that weave through Jakarta from the mountains south of the capital, contributed to the overflow and flash floods.“The rain on New Year’s Day was so extreme … causing massive floods,” the BNPB said in a statement published on Jan. 1. “This is not ordinary rain,” the agency added.The national meteorological agency recorded 377 millimeters (14.8 inches) of rainfall during the period, and said it was the highest daily volume seen in Jakarta since records began in 1866.A flooded neighborhood in Jakarta. Image courtesy of the Indonesian National Disaster Mitigation Agency.More heavy rain across the Greater Jakarta area, home to some 30 million people, is expected to continue through Jan. 7, the meteorological agency said.While floods are common in the Indonesian capital around this time of year, the current disaster is one of the deadliest in recent years. At least 50 people died in Jakarta’s deadliest floods in 2007; in 2012, much of the city’s downtown business district was flooded after canals overflowed. A commonly cited factor is the deforestation of the hilly upstream areas for residential and tourism developments. This has resulted in silt washing into the rivers, making them shallower downstream and more likely to overflow during heavy rains.Jakarta itself is sinking at a record rate as a result of groundwater extraction. As such, floodwaters tend to stagnate in the city rather than wash out to sea quickly.Flooding is one of the main reasons President Widodo wants to relocate the capital to the island of Borneo in the next few years.A flooded house in East Jakarta on New Year’s Day. Image by Gilang/Mongabay Indonesia.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Basten Gokkoncenter_img Degraded Lands, Disasters, Ecological Restoration, Environment, Flooding, Freshwater Ecosystems, Land Use Change, Mudslides, Rivers last_img read more

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