first_imgArticle published by Glenn Scherer Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Accidental take of marine animals by commercial fisheries is a serious global environmental problem, with 40 percent of the world’s ocean fishing totals disposed of as bycatch annually.Roughly 63 billion pounds of unwanted wildlife — seabirds, marine mammals and sea turtles, countless fish species, rays, and cephalopods — are killed as bycatch due to the swallowing of baited hooks or entanglement in nets.Namibia, once known as the “world’s worst fishery” regarding avian bycatch is addressing the problem. It has installed “bird-scaring” lines on the nation’s 70 trawlers and on its 12 longline fishing vessels, and has also adopted other low cost methods to minimize avian bycatch, which once killed more than 30,000 birds annually.The Meme Itumbapo Women’s Group, known for its seashell necklaces and other jewelry, is now sustainably manufacturing and supplying the bird-scaring lines from their headquarters “Bird’s Paradise,” in Walvis Bay, Namibia. The hope is that these combined efforts will reduce avian bycatch by 85-90 percent in the near future. A juvenile Black-browed albatross caught on a baited hook. The bird was released by Albatross Task Force. Photo courtesy of the Albatross Task ForceMany years ago I joined my cousin, the mate on a sporting vessel, on a fishing trip off the North Carolina coast. We were trolling baited lines in hopes of catching striped bass.I was in the wheelhouse when a mighty expletive arose from one of the three paying client fishermen. Looking astern, I saw a large white bird floundering in the sea — it had dived to take one of the towed baitfish and now was hooked.The client angrily jerked the rod, reeling in the struggling animal, a Northern gannet. The bird, once on deck, was judged to have swallowed the hook. The captain moved swiftly to cut the line and toss the doomed bird overboard, but before he could act, I asked to examine the bird.He handed it over, all seven struggling, kicking, flapping pounds of it. The bird’s face, so close to my own now, was striking; its desperately clacking chisel-like bill, a slight taupe tincture at the top of the head, and staring white eyes ringed in startling turquoise.With the captain’s help, I pried the bill open and found that the hook hadn’t been swallowed but was merely caught in the bird’s throat. Using pliers, I reached into the wildly vocalizing mouth, seized the hook and with a quick downward motion removed it.The captain immediately, and with unexpected delight, hurled the bird high into the air, and we all watched silently as it departed our company at top speed. The client who’d been so enraged at the bird’s interruption of his fishing exclaimed quietly: “Man, that was… really something.”Unfortunately, this Northern gannet was one of the few lucky victims of bycatch. Most of the billions of animals swept up accidentally by commercial fishermen and sport anglers every year die. But in far away Namibia, they’ve found a simple solution to the problem the rest of the world could tune to as an inspiration and example.The Critically Endangered Tristan albatross (Diomedea dabbenena). Breeding populations are restricted to Gough Island, roughly 2,000 miles southwest of Namibia, according to the IUCN; adults fly above fishing waters several hundred miles off Namibia’s coast. A major threat to the species are longline fisheries. Photo by michael clarke stuff Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic licenseThe waste of bycatchAccidental take of marine animals by commercial fisheries is a serious but largely unsung global problem, with a breathtaking 40 percent of the world’s marine fishing haul essentially disposed of as garbage annually. That’s roughly 63 billion pounds of unwanted wildlife — seabirds, marine mammals and sea turtles, countless fish species, rays, and cephalopods — inadvertently killed by swallowing baited hooks or getting entangled in nets.This bycatch, as it is called, suffers the fate that our Northern gannet nearly experienced. All 63 billion pounds of marine animals, usually dead or dying, is thrown overboard, a tremendous waste of wildlife, that until fairly recently was casually taken for granted.Today, some governments — with an increasing understanding of the devastation wrought by traditional fishing methods — are beginning to require that commercial, and sometimes sport, fishermen apply specially designed devices to their equipment to minimize this senseless loss of life.An Endangered Atlantic Yellow-nosed albatross (Thalassarche chlororhynchos). Uncounted numbers of seabirds fall victim to bycatch every year, even though there are fairly simple and inexpensive devices available to prevent their deaths. Photo by JJ Harrison, Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License 3.0Turtle Excluder Devices or TEDs, for example, have been required in the United States since 1987, with the nets of shrimping boats mandated to include a metal grid that allows shrimp to pass through while blocking the turtles, sharks and other large animals that otherwise would be rendered as bycatch — this allows the unwanted animals to escape unharmed through a vent at the top or bottom of the net.This is a promising technological achievement for a rich country that long neglected its bycatch problem. But financially strapped nations in the developing world have been slow to follow with bycatch prevention equipment, or with the governmental programs needed to get it installed and accepted by traditional, often very conservative fishermen.Namibia leads the way in battling seabird bycatchLittle-known Namibia, in southwest Africa, could well be the nation that is currently leading the pack in protecting seabirds, a particularly interesting happening considering that the country was previously known as the “world’s worst fishery” in terms of avian bycatch.Namibia’s fishermen are usually going after hake, a cod-like fish that constitutes around 50 percent of the country’s N$11 billion (US$845 million) fishing industry. However, in the process, commercial fishermen have been killing more than 30,000 seabirds as bycatch every year, including the Tristan albatross (IUCN Red Listed as Critically Endangered); the Atlantic yellow-nosed albatross (Endangered); black-browed albatross and shy albatross (both Near Threatened); and the White-chinned petrel and Cape gannet (both Vulnerable).Albatrosses are the most highly threatened group of birds on earth, and at Namibia’s level of accidental take, the country’s fishing industry was on the way to playing a major role in helping these bird species spiral to extinction.Samantha Matjila preparing to go to sea. She’s found Namibia fishermen to be receptive to the introduction of new devices to prevent bycatch. Photo courtesy of the Albatross Task ForceSamantha Matjila is with the Namibia Nature Foundation, which represents her country on the international Albatross Task Force (ATF) composed of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Ecuador, Uruguay, South Africa and Namibia. Last spring, she enrolled in a program that the ATF, which is hosted by BirdLife International, had been conducting in Namibia since 2008, but which has been ramped up since the Namibian government introduced tight new regulations in 2014 to mandate the use of bycatch abatement equipment on all commercial fishing vessels, with a fine of N$500,000 (US$38,400) and up to ten years in prison awaiting violators.Matjila’s job is to show fishermen how to fit the various devices used to avoid bycatch to a boat’s fishing gear. Then she accompanies the fishermen out to sea to show them how the gadgets work in practice.The anti-bycatch tools are quite simple and easy to use, and include “bird-scaring” lines (also known as tori lines or streamers) that are being used by the nation’s 70 trawling vessels. Bird-scaring lines, along with line-weighting and nocturnal baiting techniques, are used by Namibia’s 12 longline fishing vessels.Albatrosses, some of which can live for 60 years, are caught and drown when they attack a baited hook before it can sink out of their diving range. The bird-scaring lines consist of 150-meter-long ropes with brightly colored streamers placed two or three meters apart. Line-weighting involves the placement of additional weighted sinkers on each line so the bait sinks more rapidly while setting a longline — a miles-long main line with as many as 2,500 baited hooks dangling from shorter lines. These lines are also set out at night to prevent the bycatch of diurnal albatrosses.Namibian fishermen sort through “bird scare” lines in preparation for their use. Photo courtesy of the Albatross Task ForceAcross the border in South Africa, where the ATF has been working with fishermen since 2006 using the same simple techniques, the successes have been astounding, with a decline of over 90 percent in seabird bycatch. Similar success is being seen in Namibia, with the ATF hoping to reach an 85-90 percent reduction in bycatch in the near future.The ATF first worked with volunteer Namibian fishermen in 2008, says Matjila. “We didn’t know what the impact of Namibian fisheries would be back then, but we knew there was an overlap of where albatrosses roam and where the vessels set their hooks. We also knew that simple, practical measures existed that could reduce seabird deaths.”But what about hostile reactions to new regulations (something seen at first when TEDs were introduced in the U.S.)? “Working with the fishermen and sharing in discussions with them about the bycatch law, it is safe to say that, yes, they are very accepting as they realize the benefits of the mitigation measures introduced to them,” Matjila says.After being certified by the ATF, Namibia’s commercial fishermen are monitored aboard their vessels by agents of the National Fisheries Observer Agency. Oliver Yates, BirdLife International’s Global Albatross Task Force Coordinator, says that today, “close to 100 percent of vessels carry observers. This is particularly good coverage and makes Namibia a perfect example of how this could/should work effectively,” around the globe.The Meme Itumbapo Women’s Group and their handmade bird-scaring lines. Photo courtesy of BirdLife InternationalSaving birds through a sustainable economyIt’s not just seabirds that benefit from Namibia’s program. According to Matjila, “The fishing companies purchase bird-scaring lines produced by a local organization called the ‘Meme Itumbapo Women’s Group.’ Meme Itumbapo is a consortium of five women, aged 33 to 47, who generate a small income from traditional jewelry sales. These women also now manufacture and supply the bird-scaring lines for the longline and trawling fisheries from their headquarters ‘Bird’s Paradise,’ in Walvis Bay, a coastal city.“The women are funded by an independent Namibian port authority, Namport, and we are working to make this a sustainable venture which will ensure provision of affordable bird-scaring lines for the fishery,” she says.These hardworking and adaptable women shifted easily from stringing together beautiful necklaces made out of seashells to supplying ten percent (so far) of the equipment needed by Namibia’s fishing fleet to save seabirds — an example of sustainable, affordable conservation, as well as gender equality.The ATF is now promising that, “Their hand-built, quality-assured, local, affordable lines will be flying off the back of more and more Namibian fishing boats in the next two years.”A Near Threatened shy albatross (Thalassarche cauta). Photo by JJ Harrison Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported LicenseClemens Naomab was one of the ATF’s first Namibian anti-bycatch trainers. He tells how he earned the trust of often insular and independent fishermen: “Namibians like to watch European football, especially the English premier league,” he explains. “Most of our relationships are developed by trading stories about football. When you have a good relationship with the fishermen it is easier to communicate with them.”Using the universal language of sports, Naomab broke through barriers and earned a place alongside his fishermen buddies, who all quickly absorbed his instructive and useful lessons and mastered the skills needed to save seabirds. “Most of the fisherman are quick to adopt the measures once you explain to them the procedures and what is required of them,” he says.Naomab adds: “I have always loved nature and everything that comes with it,” which is why he eagerly accepted his job with the ATF, a move he initially regretted when he realized he was prone to seasickness.Now he laughs off those early days of misery at sea, saying that, “My first few trips were hard, because I used to get really sick. At first I didn’t know much about seabirds, actually I never thought I would be involved with seabirds. As time passed, I started noticing how beautiful and majestic these birds are, and at the end of the day all those sleepless nights on the fishing vessels were worth it.”FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Clemens Naomab of the Albatross Task Force (ATF) cataloging seabirds. Photo courtesy of the Albatross Task Forcecenter_img Birds, Bycatch, Conservation, Featured, Fishing, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Innovation In Conservation, Marine Animals, Marine Biodiversity, Marine Birds, Marine Conservation, Marine Crisis, Marine Ecosystems, Oceans, Sustainability last_img read more

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first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Glenn Scherer President Trump has threatened to cut U.S. aid to developing nations by a third. This could impact Zimbabwe which receives $150 million annually to decrease food insecurity for 2.1 million people.Aid to Zimbabwe is important to rural farmers, victims of escalating drought due to climate change. USAID finances dams and irrigation projects, making agriculture sustainable.The 2018 budget isn’t due to be finalized by Congress until October 1, 2017, leaving Zimbabwe’s people in uncertainty as to the direly needed aid.What seems certain is that the climate resilience program will not be expanded to meet the needs of yet to be served Zimbabwean communities. Representatives from government and traditional community leadership inspect the Birirano village dam constructed last year under the ESNURE program funded by USAID. Photo by Munyaradzi Nkomo courtesy of World Vision ZimbabweA narrow dirt road snakes along the banks of a small river and leads to the remote village of Birirano. Marked by baobab trees and drought tolerent shrubs, this small community is sandwiched between desolate mountains in Zimbabwe’s eastern district of Chipinge. Far from the main highway, it is largely cut off from the rest of the country and the world.With limited livelihood possibilities, villagers here have long been locked in an unending cycle of poverty. Over the past decade, their hard scrabble lives have grown even harder as lengthy and intensifying climate change-induced droughts have made rain-fed agriculture increasingly unsustainable, with crops repeatedly withering and dying.Then, over the last few years, the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) stepped in and became synonymous with hope in Birirano, as the agency funded projects to build resilience against escalating global warming threats.USAID’s ENSURE program (Enhancing Nutrition, Stepping UP Resilience and Enterprise), for example, funded the construction of a weir dam that feeds water to new irrigation infrastructure, bringing the promise of a healthy harvest to thousands of local residents. While USAID provides the capital, a variety of NGOs pitch in to manage the actual work. In the case of Birirano, World Vision, a humanitarian nonprofit, oversaw the project.Thousands of livestock in Chipinge district, Manicaland province, Zimbabwe were saved from the severe drought experienced last year by the livestock support program funded by USAID. Photo by Andrew Mambondiyani for Mongabay“The Chipinge Rural District Council constructed an access road leading to the [new Birirano irrigation] project [while] other technical arms of government worked alongside World Vision [ENSURE] to monitor the work,” Richard Ndou told Mongabay. The World Vision Zimbabwe deputy chief explained that the US $55 million ENSURE program, has significantly benefited six food insecure districts in the drought-prone Bikita, Chivi and Zaka districts in Masvingo province; and the Buhera, Chimanimani and Chipinge districts in Manicaland province. Thanks to the program, more than 220 hectares are now under irrigation in the six districts with more than 4,200 small scale farmers benefiting.“The beneficiaries have had three crops under irrigation using a [new] drip irrigation system,” Ndou revealed. “This project is an example of what we can achieve when we work together with donors, in this case, USAID, communities and the government.”Ndou noted how each new project seems to inspire the next. After former Manicaland Provincial Administrator Fungai Mbetsa visited the new irrigation project, the Birirano School was rehabilitated through the Schools Improvement Grant. Then the school was provided with electricity through the Rural Electrification Program.The Birirano success story is just one of many USAID funded accomplishments. One villager, Amos Vhumbu, greatly troubled by his region’s recent recurrent droughts, is overjoyed by USAID’s contribution to his community: “This area is now very dry and this irrigation scheme is our only hope!” Vhumbu told Mongabay.However, all of these new hopes have now been put into doubt by the election of President Donald Trump, and with the announcement that his administration plans to drastically slash funding to USAID as part of measures to reduce foreign aid spending.Women and children in Chimanimani district, Manicaland province wait to receive food aid under the ENSURE program funded by USAID last year. Photo by Munyaradzi Nkomo courtesy of World Vision ZimbabweThe U.S. brings hope to ZimbabweThe USAID program to reduce the impacts of climate change-induced drought in Zimbabwe was launched by the U.S. government in 2013 with US $175 million in long and short term funding under the Development Food Assistance and Feed the Future programs. According to a summary report from the USAID mission in Zimbabwe, $55 million was earmarked for emergency assistance and $120 million for other food security activities over five years.Today, USAID funded projects aimed at curbing the worst impacts of climate change can be found across Zimbabwe, and those projects are currently benefiting more than a million people in food insecure rural areas.The US $55 million ENSURE program alone is expected to benefit 300,000 people over a five years period, providing them with new and rehabilitated dams, plus a variety of irrigation projects in the six targeted food insecure districts of Masvingo and Manicaland provinces. A related program, dubbed Amalima, funded to the tune of US $44 million, is running in four food insecure districts in Matabeleland North and South, also over five years.The dire need for U.S. foreign aid has been driven by two major factors: though Zimbabwe once had a vibrant agricultural sector, a double punch of bad government policies and worsening climate change intensified droughts have seen a deep decline in farm production.The 2015 and 2016 agricultural seasons were especially hard hit by the onset of El Niño. That particular El Niño-driven African drought was driven by “one of the strongest El Nino events of the last 50 years” which left more than 4 million people in the country in need of emergency food assistance. Climate scientists agree that the harshness of El Niño conditions experienced in Zimbabwe recently were exacerbated by climate change.Beneficiaries of USAID funded programs are mostly women and their families. Photo by Munyaradzi Nkomo courtesy of World Vision ZimbabweWhat’s been achieved“USAID helps rural Zimbabweans by addressing immediate food security needs, while gradually building resilience to climatic shocks,” reads part of the USAID Zimbabwe summary report.In addition to its climate resilence work, USAID is also promoting agricultural recovery and livelihood development under the Feed the Future program — aimed at reducing poverty in rural areas, raising incomes and improving food security at the household level.According to USAID, the $8 million Feed the Future crop development program is covering 15 districts in Matabeleland North, Mashonaland West, Manicaland, Masvingo and Midlands provinces, while the livestock program currently operates in 12 districts in Matabeleland North and South, Mashonaland East, Manicaland, Masvingo and Midlands provinces.The crop development program, if not slashed by President Trump, is expected to benefit more than 50,000 farmers, while the livestock development project would benefit 5,000 dairy and beef farmers over five years. Through the livestock program, thousands of dairy and beef cattle were served by the program and saved from last year’s drought.Tree death is an increasing problem in the area surrounding Birirano Village. The region is now extremely dry, and getting dryer, due to more frequent climate change-induced droughts. A USAID funded dam and a drip irrigation system have helped provide the community with food security. Photo by Andrew Mambondiyani for MongabayThe USAID programs are builidng resilience to climate change shocks through more efficient water harvesting, and they have gained increasing support from Zambabwe’s government. The former administrator for Manicaland province, Fungai Mbetsa told journalists in the city of Mutare emphatically last year that projects to harness water for irrigation, such as those funded by USAID, are the solution to the lengthening droughts being experienced in the province.“We need to harvest water by building dams for irrigation in the province,” declared Mbetsa. “We have plenty of perennial rivers flowing through the province and the water can be harvested for irrigation. The USAID funded projects have helped communities in drought prone areas.”Trump brings great uncertainty to AfricaMany drought stricken rural communities were hoping that their turn for much needed help would arrive soon, with new USAID funded programs initiated in their regions. But those hopes were largely dashed with the release of Donald Trump’s appropriately nicknamed “skinny budget” this spring.According to Foreign Policy, a U.S. publication, the Trump administration’s 16 March budget “proposal vowed to slash aid to developing countries by over one-third.”The worried question now on the minds of Zimbabwe’s rural poor: Will the Trump administration and the U.S. Congress — which has final say over the 2018 budget — slash some or all funding for aid projects in Zimbabwe?USAID Zimbabwe Mission Director in Zimbabwe Stephanie Funk (in glasses) visits a Chimanimani district, Manicaland province project which was funded by her agency last year. Photo by Munyaradzi Nkomo courtesy of World Vision ZimbabweNo one currently knows the answer. Some in the United States are strongly resisting Trump’s draconian budget proposals. U.S. Senator, Ben Cardin, a Democrat on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, for example, was quoted by Reuters recently, saying he was deeply disappointed and dismayed at President Trump’s proposal to slash foreign aid spending. Unfortuantely for Zimbabwe, the Democratic Party minority in the U.S. legislature has little deciding power at the moment.Shortly before Trump made his proposed cuts public last March, U.S. ambassador to Zimbabwe Harry Thomas Jr. told local media that he would reach out to the administration, urging it not to slash aid to the nation: “We are very proud that the U.S. government is the largest donor to Zimbabwe,” he said, “that we are giving $150 million each year to combat HIV/Aids, another $150 million to feed 2.1 million food insecure people… $10 million for democracy and governance.…” The result of Ambassador Thomas’ plea is unknown.While uncertainty rules for now, what it is clear is that the expansion of USAID projects to other affected areas in Zimbabwe is now gravely in doubt. The U.S. State Deoartment could not clarify the government position on USAID funding cuts or foreign affairs funding in general. Responding to a query from Mongabay, the State Department deferred: “Your query would be best answered by the Agency of International Development (AID),” it said.The USAID mission and US embassy in Zimbabwe both responded by saying that there is no clarity on the issue as yet. The USAID spokesperson in Zimbabwe, Doreen Hove, told Mongabay that: “We appreciate such requests as well as your interest in our work. However, we do not have clarity yet, on the important issues you have raised. Hence we will get back to you once we have clarity.” Aleksandra Ristovic, an official from the USAID home office, replied: “unfortunately we cannot offer an interview [to Mongabay] at this time.”Women from Nyanyadzi in Manicaland province receive food aid under the USAID funded ENSURE program as a short term measure during the El Niño and climate change intensified drought experienced last year. Photo by Munyaradzi Nkomo courtesy of World Vision ZimbabweU.S. Secretary of State, Rex Tillerson is more outspoken. He was recently quoted by Reuters defending the proposed cuts as a needed correction to a “historically high” State Department budget that had grown to address conflicts abroad in which the U.S. engages engage, along with disaster aid. Noting the massive contribution to disruptive climate change made by the United States, and by EXXON, Tillerson’s past employer, some critics characterize the U.S. threats to cut aid to developing nations, especially for climate change resilience, as hypocritical and cruel.Zimbabwe lawyer and human rights expert, Passmore Nyakureba was blunt in his assessment of what drastic USAID cuts would mean to his country’s social and economic future: “We are mainly a donor-funded economy, and the slashing of funding to [USAID] programs in Zimbabwe, or Africa in general, will spell doom and crisis in the country. So we urge President Trump to reconsider that stance and take into account that the decision might leave a trail of disaster not only in Zimbabwe but other developing countries.”The 2018 United States budget must be approved by Congress by the beginning of October. Until then doubt and confusion will likely reign in Zimbabwe and across the developing world.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Adaptation To Climate Change, Climate, Climate Change, Climate Change and Dams, Climate Change And Food, Climate Change Denial, Climate Change Politics, climate policy, Climate Politics, Dams, Drinking Water, Drought, Environment, Environmental Activism, Environmental Ethics, Environmental Law, Environmental Policy, Environmental Politics, Featured, Food, Food Crisis, food security, Foreign Aid, Global Environmental Crisis, Global Warming, Global Warming Mitigation, Globalization, Green, Poverty, Poverty Alleviation, Sustainability, Sustainable Development, Water Crisis, Water Scarcity last_img read more

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first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Rhett Butler Warren, a young male elephant, died recently during a dental procedure at Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo.Warren was one of 18 wild elephants captured from Swaziland 18 months ago and brought to three U.S. zoos in a controversial move.Shortly after Warren’s arrival in March 2016, he lost a piece of one of his tusks. He died during one of the subsequent procedures aiming to fix it. Staff at Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo may never know what, exactly, caused the sudden death of Warren, a young male elephant about eight or nine years old who died recently during a dental procedure.Warren was one of 18 wild elephants captured from Swaziland 18 months ago and brought to three U.S. zoos in a controversial move. Six went to the Henry Doorly Zoo, in Omaha, Nebraska, six to the Sedgwick County Zoo, in Wichita, Kansas, and five to the Dallas Zoo. One died awaiting relocation.Shortly after Warren’s arrival in March 2016, he lost a piece of one of his tusks. Then the zoo noticed that a lengthwise split at the end of his tusk had spread toward the top. Elephants in zoos use their tusks to strip bark off trees and move objects.“As he used it, the gap kept widening,” says Doug Armstrong, director of animal health at the Henry Doorly Zoo. Fearing an infection in the root, the zoo sedated and anesthetized Warren in July to trim his tusks. “Our hope was to cut off the part that was splitting. If there was no fresh fracture, he’d be able to use the tusk normally.”But six weeks later, a new crack formed. Staff began training so they could repair it without having to sedate and anesthetize him, but the crack progressed quickly. On September 7 they put him under to mold the tusk and make a cap. About 20 minutes into the procedure, Warren’s breathing stopped. Nothing the medical team/veterinarians tried could revive him.At a press conference, Armstrong said, “We instituted emergency procedures but they were unsuccessful. The elephant died. We don’t know the cause of death at this point. He was a young animal so it’s completely unexpected.” As he spoke, his voice cracked, the grief palpable.Young elephant in South Africa. Photo by Rhett A. ButlerProblems of captivity for elephants“Zoo staff did what they could,” says Ed Stewart, president and co-founder of the Performing Animal Welfare Society, which runs sanctuaries in California for abused, abandoned, and retired captive wildlife, including elephants. “But it’s captivity itself that’s the problem.”“Warren’s captivity is likely what prompted his tusk problem in the first place,” suggests Joyce Poole, co-founder of ElephantVoices, an elephant research and conservation organization. “I’ve never observed an elephant of his age with a broken or badly cracked tusk. The reason Warren’s tusk required treatment is undoubtedly due to the unnatural surfaces of his pen or enclosure. Elephants are so bored in captivity that they often repeatedly rub their tusks on the cables and wear them down. From images I have seen of Warren, his tusks look very worn—something you’d never see in the wild in an eight-to-nine-year-old elephant.”Cynthia Moss, program director for Amboseli Trust for Elephants, a Kenya-based nonprofit, concurs. Since 1972 she’s documented the lives and deaths of roughly 3,000 elephants in the longest-running study of elephant behavior in the wild. She says she has never seen cracked tusks like that, especially on a young elephant.“Sometimes adults might break a tusk in a fight,” she says. “That happens fairly frequently. If it breaks high enough up, then the elephant will lose that tusk altogether. If there’s a little left of the outer coat and nerve, then it’ll grow back. But we haven’t seen any cracked tusks and it would be extremely rare to break one.”Abandonment of calves is another area where there are differences between wild and captive elephants.A week before Warren’s death, the Pittsburgh Zoo euthanized a three-month-old calf that had been born prematurely and was rejected by its mother. Although staff tried multiple strategies to help—putting it with other elephants, hand feeding, using feeding tubes—the baby kept losing weight.In the wild premature births are rare, Moss says. “I’ve only seen it once. It was heartbreaking. The mother picked up the baby and carried it 250 yards to get it into the shade. She stayed with it for two days after it died. She wasn’t about to desert it.”Rejection seldom, if ever, happens in the wild, she says, “but in captivity it seems to happen a lot.” She thinks that’s because they don’t know what to do. They learn from living within a family—first as a baby, and later watching others and caring for calves as part of their extended family. “They have to see and experience it.”Statistics seem to support that. A 2012 Seattle Times analysis of more than 300 elephant deaths at accredited U.S. zoos over a 50-year period found that the infant mortality rate in zoos was 40 percent, triple that for wild babies. It also found that half the elephants died young—by age 23—compared with an expected life span of 50 to 60 years in the wild.Dan Ashe, president of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums and former head of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, questions that gap, saying life expectancy figures for wild elephants would be shorter if they included those killed by snares and poaching and not just those dying of natural causes. Not only don’t elephants in human care have to worry about those dangers, he says, but AZA members support for ivory regulations was of enormous help as FWS struggled to get them through.But a recent study by Moss of life expectancy for elephants in Amboseli found that even when droughts and poaching are taken into account, they live longer in the wild than in captivity: 44 years for females and 31 for males on average, with a maximum life span of 75 for females and 68 for males.It’s not just life expectancy.The Seattle Times investigation linked most of the elephant deaths to a captivity-related injury or disease, such as foot problems from standing on hard surfaces and arthritis from inactivity.Further, captivity stresses elephants. According to a 2013 study led by the Honolulu Zoo on using science to understand zoo elephant welfare that analyzed thousands of medical records, videos, and fecal and other samples, roughly two-thirds developed stereotypic behaviors—like pacing, repetitive swaying, or head-bobbing—and suggested better management could reduce that.At least 44 zoos around the world have closed their elephant exhibitions, including 29 in the U.S., according to an August 2017 report by conservation biologist Keith Lindsay, an elephant expert for the group Elephants in Japan.Wild African elephants in South Africa. Photo by Rhett A. ButlerEnhancing captive elephant welfare“Elephant management has changed dramatically in the last 10 to 15 years,” Henry Doorly Zoo’s Armstrong says. Indeed, the zoo’s new elephant facility reflects those changes. It has bigger spaces, a sandy floor to prevent foot problems, and uses hay-feeding nets and automated food dispensers to encourage movement. “We’ve tried to address past issues,” he says. “As we learn more, we’ll continue to change what we do.”All that is important, says Ed Stewart, of PAWS. But, he adds, even with improvements in captive conditions for elephants, they might have “a better life, but it’s not even close to what they should have.”“It’s not just the concrete or space,” he says. “They don’t have any function in captivity—it’s like they’re unemployed. Think of the texture of their life in the wild, their social structure. An elephant is a major part of an ecosystem. It’s like a symphony. In captivity it’s like one note.”center_img Animal Welfare, Animals, Elephants, Mammals, Zoos last_img read more

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first_imgCRICKET: Women’s Twenty20 World Cup DHARAMSALA, India (CMC): Wicketkeeper Merissa Aguilleira missed a run out as Natalia Sciver and Rebecca Grundy scrambled a bye off the final ball of the game to lift England Women to a one-wicket thriller over West Indies Women in their Group B contest of the Women’s Twenty20 World Cup here yesterday. Chasing a meagre 109 for victory at the HPCA Stadium, England Women appeared en route for a crushing win when their openers Tammy Beaumont (31) and Charlotte Edwards (30) put them in cruise control at 59 without loss in the ninth over. However, both fell in successive overs as England Women dramatically lost their next nine wickets for 47 runs, to set up a nerve-jangling end to the game. Starting the final over on 102 for eight and requiring seven to win, Anya Shrubsole (four) gathered four runs from the first three balls before medium pacer Deandra Dottin bowled her off the fourth delivery. Dottin then agonisingly sent down a wide, before Grundy scampered a single to point to give Sciver the strike. The right-handed Sciver missed the last delivery and Aguilleira missed her throw at the stumps, to hand West Indies Women their first loss as England Women remained unbeaten. Sciver finished on 19 not out from 22 balls, while Grundy was unbeaten on one. The Windies Women’s comeback was engineered by the leg-spin duo of Fletcher, who snatched three for 12 from her four overs and Shaquana Quintyne, who finished with three 16. Captain Stafanie Taylor picked up two for 18 with her off-spin. Earlier, Taylor top-scored with 35 from 47 balls with a single four, while Quintyne struck a breezy 29 from 28 balls with four fours, as West Indies Women prospered early on. Opting to bat first, they lost Hayley Matthews cheaply for nine at nine for one in the second over, but Taylor then anchored two successive partnerships to repair the innings. She put on 41 for the second wicket with Quintyne and a further 52 for the third wicket with Deandra Dottin, who scored 22 from 30 deliveries. However, both stands were slow ones and it meant West Indies Women only reached triple figures in the 18th over. Even so, there was no acceleration as they managed only eight runs from the last two overs. In reply, Player-of-the-Match Beaumont struck five fours and a six in a cameo 23-ball knock and she provided the momentum as Edwards supported with an innings that came from 29 balls with five fours. Once Fletcher trapped Beaumont lbw with the first ball of her second over — the ninth of the innings — the innings quickly declined. Edwards fell in similar fashion to Quintyne in the following over and when Fletcher removed the experienced Sarah Taylor for three in the 11th over at 69 for three, West Indies Women knew they were in with a shout. England are top of the group with six points, while West Indies are second on four points.last_img read more

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first_imgAnimals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Green, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Protected Areas, Reptiles, Wildlife Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored In Nepal, fewer than 100 mature adult gharials are estimated to remain, with only one population in the Narayani and Rapti Rivers of Chitwan National Park known to be breeding until recently.Now, researchers have recorded nesting sites and more than 100 gharial babies in yet another site, in Bardia National Park in southwest Nepal.The last time gharials were recorded breeding in Bardia was in 1982. There may be a glimmer of hope for the critically endangered gharial, a unique crocodile known for its long, narrow snout that ends in a bulbous growth resembling a cooking pot called a ghara.The fish-eating crocodile was once widespread across the rivers of the northern part of the Indian subcontinent. But now the gharial (Gavialis gangeticus) is on the brink of extinction, thanks to the loss and degradation of its riverine habitat, depletion of fish stocks in rivers, and accidental drowning in fishing nets.In Nepal, the situation is grave. Fewer than 100 mature adult gharials are estimated to remain in the country, with only one population, in Chitwan National Park, known to be breeding until recently. Now, researchers have recorded more than 100 gharial babies in yet another site, in Bardia National Park in southwest Nepal.Adult male gharial in India. Image by Charles J. Sharp via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 4.0).The last time gharials were recorded breeding in Bardia was in 1982, when gharial eggs were collected from the Babai River and taken to a captive facility, researchers say. Since then, both adult male and female gharials have been recorded in the Karnali and Babai rivers in Bardia, but never a nest with hatchlings.This year, researchers from the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) and Biodiversity Conservancy Nepal confirmed three gharial nests on a sandbank in Babai and counted around 100 gharial hatchlings, together with three adult females and one adult male.“Hatchlings were basking on the sand bank at the water’s edge when first encountered and female Gharials appeared to be guarding them by staying half submerged near the water’s edge,” they write in a report published in a newsletter by the IUCN SSC Crocodile Specialist Group. “When we approached closer (maintaining a safe distance), all hatchling quickly jumped into the river and started to swim.”Gharial hatchlings swimming in the Babai River in Bardia National Park. Image by Ashish Bashyal/ZSL.Figuring out where the gharials breed is the first step to protecting them, the researchers say. And protecting them is critical since Nepal’s gharial population has declined dramatically because of dams and barrages modifying river flows; sand mining, agriculture and pollution degrading and destroying their habitats; and declining fish numbers in the rivers.“Understanding whether gharials were breeding in Bardia National Park was considered to be a top priority for the species, as upcoming plans to divert nearby river systems — which would likely have an impact on the habitat and quality of the river for gharial, are currently underway,” Rikki Gumbs, a doctoral researcher with ZSL, said in a statement. “Given the species is limited to around five populations across its entire range, this is such a positive discovery, and a critical step for the long-term recovery of the species in Nepal.”Spotting hatchlings doesn’t necessarily translate to a better future for the gharials, though. The animals continue to be threatened across their range in Nepal, but conservationists have been trying to work with local communities living around the protected areas to help protect the animals.“People generally have a great affinity for gharials, they don’t attack humans as they generally feed on fish — and their snout is much too fragile,” said Ashish Bashyal, a conservation biologist with the Biodiversity Conservancy Nepal. “We want to try and harness that love for the animal into local community conservation action in order to help monitor how the hatchlings [fare].”Adult gharial with hatchlings. Image courtesy of ZSL.Banner image of gharial hatchling by Rikki Gumbs/ZSL.center_img Article published by Shreya Dasguptalast_img read more

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first_imgArticle published by Hans Nicholas Jong Conservation, Deforestation, Environment, Forests, Palm Oil, Plantations, Protected Areas, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforest Deforestation Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Mongabay Indonesia reporter Lusia Arumingtyas contributed to this report Banner image: A young Sumatran elephant, one of the many species whose habitats are threatened, in Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park, Sumatra, Indonesia. Image by Rhett A.Butler/Mongabay. Indonesia’s environment ministry says it’s open to working with WWF again on conservation programs after terminating their long-running partnership.A senior government official said the NGO would have to address the concerns cited for the termination, but also agreed that WWF Indonesia should be allowed a wider scope for work should the partnership be revived.WWF Indonesia has welcomed the possibility of resuming its work, which includes conservation projects on critically endangered species such as Sumatran and Javan rhinos and Sumatran elephants.The termination of the partnership has already forced WWF Indonesia to lay off a team of elephant rangers and threatens to end funding for ranger patrols for Javan rhinos. JAKARTA — Indonesia’s environment ministry says it’s willing to revive a partnership with WWF after abruptly terminating its long-running cooperation with the conservation NGO over a perceived social media slight.But a top ministry official conditioned such a move on WWF’s local office addressing the ministry’s concerns about its work, improving communications, and not trying to score social media points.“If [WWF Indonesia wants] new MOU, then go ahead,” Wiratno, the environment ministry’s director-general of conservation, told reporters in Jakarta. “[The opportunity] is still open. But I suggest WWF to do self-evaluation on what they’ve done that have raised the ministry’s concerns.”Wiratno’s statement came after the ministry formally published its decision last month to end its partnership with WWF Indonesia on forest conservation, signed in 1998 and due to expire in 2023. It cited violations by WWF Indonesia of the terms of the agreement, including the NGO’s work on issues beyond those defined in the memorandum of understanding.Wiratno cited the case of Bukit Tigapuluh National Park in western Sumatra, where WWF Indonesia had since 2015 been responsible for a forest restoration project. The project site was one of several areas burned by forest fires in 2015 and again in 2019. The ministry sealed off the concession after the latest burning last September, in what Wiratno called evidence that WWF Indonesia had failed to carry out its task of conserving the area.“If [they] have an ecosystem restoration area to manage, then they shouldn’t have let it burn,” he said. “Working on the ground [to prevent fires] is very important.”Wiratno also addressed the aftermath of the burning, which appeared to be the catalyst for the termination of the partnership. He criticized social media posts by two popular actresses who had served as ambassadors for WWF Indonesia and who had notably omitted mentioning the ministry when crediting WWF Indonesia and others for working hard to fight the fires. The ministry had condemned the posts for painting it in a bad light, and Wiratno said WWF Indonesia should focus more on educating the public rather than using celebrities to score points on social media.“Some of our personnel died [fighting the fires],” he said. “There’s no need to use artists. We’ve gone all out on the ground [to extinguish the fires]. Us working in the field is cooler than just talking on social media.”Tamed Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) named Rossa in Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park, Sumatra, Indonesia. Image courtesy of Gert Polet/WWF Indonesia.Narrow scope of workWiratno said WWF Indonesia also needed to improve its communication with the ministry, after failing to report its activities on a routine basis.“There should be a yearly evaluation [of WWF Indonesia’s operations],” Wiratno said. “[Meetings] should be held together, including with partners. [The communication is] not intensive enough.”Another reason cited for the termination of the partnership was that WWF Indonesia had been working on initiatives outside the scope of the original MOU, which focused on forest conservation. Wiratno acknowledged that this scope of work was too restricted, given the number and variety of conservation challenges that have arisen since that original agreement was signed more than 20 years ago.A new MOU, drafted once WWF Indonesia can address the ministry’s concerns, should allow a wider scope that could potentially include climate change and waste management, Wiratno said.WWF Indonesia’s acting CEO, Lukas Adhyakso, welcomed the opportunity to restore the partnership with the ministry under a broader brief. He also said it was regrettable that the original MOU was terminated instead of simply revised, given the impact on the various projects that WWF Indonesia administers throughout the country.“We’re still calculating the impact, but what’s serious is the fact that we have expertise that we contribute [to forest conservation],” he said. “Now we have to stop our conservation [work] in areas that fall under the authority of the environment ministry.”WWF Indonesia has five decades of experience in forest and wildlife conservation in the country, run through 24 field offices across the archipelago. It’s been involved in describing 400 new species of plants and animals in Borneo; one of its most prominent recent roles has been the capture, for the first time ever, of a wild Sumatran rhino (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in Borneo for a planned captive-breeding program.But that program, one of 30 that WWF Indonesia has been forced to withdraw from as a result of the partnership termination, is now in limbo: while WWF Indonesia is prohibited from being involved, the rhino sanctuary continues to depend on its veterinarians and keepers to care for the rhino.“Some [outside conservationists] have expressed [their concerns] and lamented [the ministry’s decision],” Lukas said. “We have the expertise that they need and we actually also need them. So it goes both ways.”Sumatran tiger cubs. Bukit Tigapuluh is famous for its diversity of mammals, including Sumatran orangutan, Sumatran tiger, Sumatran elephant, Sumatran rhinoceros, Asian tapir, sun bear, siamang, Sumatran surili, Sunda loris, and clouded leopard, among others. Photo courtesy of WWF.Programs in limboAnother program that’s at risk is a peatland restoration initiative in Sebangau National Park in Central Kalimantan province, home to critically endangered Bornean orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus). Prior to being designated a national park in 2004, the area was a logging concession. The companies that operated it dug a network of canals to drain the peat soil, drying out the thick ground layer of semi-decomposed vegetation and rendering it highly prone to burning.WWF Indonesia was tasked with blocking the canals and rewetting the land. Now, however, without the group’s involvement, that project could be compromised “in the blink of an eye,” Lukas said.“Maybe the [canal blockers] will get stolen, and if the water table is lowered there’ll be great fire risks,” he said. “We’re not saying we’re the only ones [protecting the peat forest], but what we’re contributing is huge.”WWF Indonesia’s partners on the ground have also raised concerns about how to pay to continue these projects, given the significant amount of funding that the organization has historically contributed. WWF Indonesia spends about 350 billion rupiah ($25.6 million) each year on its conservation activities. Some of that money goes toward monitoring and protecting critically endangered Javan rhinos (Rhinoceros sondaicus) at Ujung Kulon National Park in Java, where the NGO began its conservation work in Indonesia in 1962.Anggodo, the head of the national park agency, said the park might face financial constraints without funding from WWF Indonesia, which last year paid for 10 months’ worth of ranger patrols in the area.“There’s a likelihood that [our] operational budget will only be enough for the next two months,” he said as quoted by Tempo magazine. “We’ll have to cover the rest with other partners because WWF [Indonesia] is not here anymore.”At Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park in Sumatra, WWF Indonesia has had to lay off 20 rangers tasked with protecting critically endangered Sumatran elephants (Elephas maximus sumatranus) from being killed in conflicts with humans.“I’m sad that I can’t enter the national park anymore because there’s a ban,” said Rusmani, a member of the team.The termination of the partnership puts greater onus on the Indonesian government to fund and administer the various conservation programs that WWF Indonesia has had to withdraw from.“Maybe it’s already time for a transition, [for these programs] to be returned to the government,” said Alexander Rusli, chair of the WWF Indonesia board. “Maybe our role is not much needed anymore like at the beginning.”last_img read more

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first_img Last move CLEVELAND (AP): Andrew Bogut went from being perhaps the final puzzle piece to another missing one for the Cavaliers. The champions remain incomplete. Just an hour or so after saying how excited he was to be joining one of the league’s deepest teams, Bogut broke his left leg after playing just 58 seconds in his Cleveland debut on Monday night, an injury that could force the Cavs to resume their search for a big man. Bogut had just been welcomed with a roaring ovation by Cleveland’s crowd when his shin banged into the knee of Miami’s Okaro White in the first minute of the second quarter. Bogut immediately knew his leg was broken, and LeBron James said he heard Bogut’s bone crack on the collision. As Bogut was helped from the floor, Cavs general manager David Griffin could barely watch as his latest acquisition hobbled into the locker room. “It happened so quick,” said All-Star point guard Kyrie Irving, who knows about the suddenness of injuries after breaking his kneecap in the NBA Finals two years ago. “Adversity, it can come in waves. It can come just at the moment, and that’s what happened with Bogut.” Bogut’s injury came at the end of a day when the Cavs appeared closer to whole than they’ve been in months. At the team’s morning shootaround, All-Star forward Kevin Love did agility and shooting drills and appeared to be closer to a return than the projected six-week time frame the Cavs announced when he underwent knee surgery on Valentine’s Day. And then there was J.R. Smith playing in a vigorous 3-on-3 game before the Cavs’ 106-98 loss to the Heat. Smith, who has been out since December 20 after badly breaking his thumb and undergoing surgery, may be just a few days from making his return. Bogut’s signing, which came just days after the team locked up free agent and three-time All-Star guard Deron Williams for the remainder of the season, was supposed to be the last move the Cavs needed to make before the playoffs. Cleveland have needed a rim-protecting big man all season, and the massive Bogut was projected to give the Cavs more than that. The 32-year-old is a gifted passer with postseason savvy and was motivated to get back to the Finals for a possible shot at the Golden State Warriors, the team he won a ring with in 2015 but discarded him last summer to make room for Kevin Durant. It’s premature to say how long Bogut will be out, and the initial diagnosis of a fractured tibia doesn’t provide any time frame because it’s not known if he shattered the bone or chipped it.last_img read more

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first_imgPresident Ellen Johnson Sirleaf was accorded an awesome reception last week on her tour of Lofa County. In every city, town and village she entered, many expressed joy at seeing for the first time, the Liberian leader they have overwhelmingly supported over the years.It is no secret that Lofa County is a ruling Unity Party stronghold that overwhelmingly voted for Ellen in the 2005 and 2011 general elections. This is why the President, kicking off her 2014 nationwide tour with a first stop at Lofa, looks like an attempt at showing her appreciation.Mrs. Sirleaf was feted with traditional dances, and many other activities. These festivities did not stop the people from engaging their leader on critical issues that—if addressed—would improve their standard of living as well as that of future generations. Lofians had nothing more to demand from the Liberian leader than better health and educational facilities with a qualified and well-paid staff to carry out their duties effectively.The citizens said that most of the teachers and nurses assigned in their areas do not receive pay. This is a critical issue that government needs to take into consideration.The citizens also spoke of the need to have vocational and technical training centers constructed in strategic locations in the county that focus on the manpower development of young people and women. They indicated the empowerment of young people is a serious issue that needs immediate attentions.In various position statements presented to President Sirleaf, the citizens called on the Liberian leader to address the plight of teachers and nurses serving in the county. Some of these, they said are providing sacrificial services and are yet to be placed on government payroll.Vahun district Representative, Fofi Sahr Baimba, reading the district’s position statement told the Liberian leader that his people had unanimously agreed that education, including technical and vocational, was the best means by which their lives might be improved.He, however, asked President Sirleaf for the construction of a technical training center where the young people would go to acquire skills. The people of Vahun also asked for the construction of additional high schools in their district, due to the high number of school-age students.He said this would help keep the youths in the district and discourage migration in order to pursue higher education and opportunities. “Madam President, our young people are in need of empowerment, so we are asking you to please help us construct a vocation school in our district. That will help them acquire technical skills to sustain them and their families.”“The construction of an additional high school for our growing number of student will be laudable because we have only one high school in the district and this can no longer accommodate our children who want to seek high school education. If the vocational and the high school are built, it will help retain our children in the district, thereby discouraging migration,” Rep. Baimba said.The administrators of the various health facilities in Kolahun, Vahun, Foya, and Zorzor petitioned the Liberian President to augment the subsidies that they currently receive from the Central Government due to the administrative and financial constraints that they frequently face. They indicated that NGOs supports are no longer forthcoming and that government should now take full control.They also told President Sirleaf to help address the nurses that have served many years and continue to serve the public and are yet to be placed on payroll. Some of the nurses were observing the go slow action that is being observed by health workers throughout the country.Kolahun Hospital Medical Director, Dr. Josephus Bolongei said that the hospital now runs on only one generator. He requested that the Liberian leader lent a helping hand before the situation became worse.Dr. Bolongei said the hospital has carried out 60 successful operations, without any deaths, since August 2013 when it lost NGO support. He also admonished his medical staff to remain mature in seeking redress to their grievances.Meanwhile at the Telewoyan Memorial Referral Hospital, in Voinjama, nurses were said to be observing the go-slow when President Sirleaf arrived. The Medical Director of the hospital, Dr. Zuannah Kamara, informed the President that only he and his wife were keeping open the doors of the facilities, and that the two of them were able to treat and discharge all patients before the nurses went on their go- slow.At the St. Theresa Episcopal Church in Voinjama, where an intercessory service was held  to mark her arrival in Voinjama, President Sirleaf voiced serious disappointment over the conduct of the nurses at Telewoyan Hospital, calling their action a betrayal of their oath to save lives, come what may.“The nurses should know that their action is not harming me, nor Dr. Gwenigale, but the very people all of us took an oath to serve. Though they may have genuine concerns, the approach taken is wrong and should claim the attention of all of us in this church,” said President Sirleaf.“We know we have many challenges, but if anyone here says we have done nothing to address these concerns, then said person must be living on the moon,” she said. President Sirleaf said her government has always been open for dialogue to resolve issues. She encouraged the striking nurses in Voinjama to rethink their decision.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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first_img5 years after openingClose to five years after it officially opened its doors here, the Guyana Forensic Science Laboratory (GFSL) is now able to conduct critical tests that will aid in the fight against crime.Guyana Forensic Science LaboratoryOn Wednesday, the spanking new equipment funded by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) was commissioned at the lab which is housed at Turkeyen, Greater Georgetown.Director of the $1.049B building Delon France listed the newly added features.“The laboratory is now a national pioneer for human identification using Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA) testing and it enables us to conduct three main things: DNA testing for comparison or matching evidence to a suspect, paternity testing, family mapping or family testing where you can use the family DNA to identify a suspect even if we don’t have that particular suspect’s DNA. We can match a crime scene to a family member and then we can narrow it down through investigation of who actually committed the crime,” he explained.The Director noted that these tests can be conducted using samples from the human cheeks, semen and vagina, hair, blood and most importantly, finger prints or touch.When the building was first commissioned it had four departments including toxicology, documents, trace evidence and chemistry with six non-analytical departments namely security, quality system, information system, facilities operations, evidence and administration departments.Following its launch, however, the GFSL opened two other departments, namely the Forensic Radio Evidence and the DNA aspect which was commissioned Wednesday.Acknowledging that the wait for such services was indeed a lengthy one, the Director informed that four persons are being trained to use the long awaited equipment. In addition, a number of training sessions are also on schedule for crime scene personnel of the Guyana Police Force (GPF).Important to note, is that plans are afoot to establish a national DNA database.“With future expansion in mind, there are plans to establish a national DNA database that would require legal intervention and amendments to Chapters of the Laws of Guyana, especially the Police Act Chapter 16:01 Section 35 which should include DNA records to facilitate this venture,” France pointed out.Meanwhile, a smiling Public Security Minister, Khemraj Ramjattan, said the commissioning of such services was good news for the country as he explained how it will aid in crime fighting.He informed, “The Scanning Electron Microscope will be used for gunshot residue testing, and the presence or absence of this residue can corroborate with misstatements and testimony and provide investigational leads…this forensic equipment is important in crimes involving firearms and the discharge of those firearms”.While on investigations, he also assured that unresolved crime related matters, including murder, rape or found body parts can now come to a closure with the aid of the new tools.Along with reducing the time for an investigation, these equipment will also help to cut costs as usually about $1.5 million is spent on a DNA test. This will be slashed to about $60,000.Back in March, the Minister had assured that the Lab would be up and running before year end.Although the $1.049B building was opened since July 2014, the forensic laboratory was unequipped with the required tools it needed.AccreditationThe Director of the GFSL had noted that plans are in place to have the lab accredited to make it financially viable, by conducting DNA services to other countries.“Our main focus is on quality forensic service and we are currently working towards international accreditation with the aim to make our service more marketable to initiate activities under one of our core functions and objectives which is to make the organization financially viable, supported by our business plan that is drafted for local, international and regional clients,” he revealed.last_img read more

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first_imgElizabeth Freund, a spokeswoman for Apple Corps, the company that manages the Beatles’ affairs, said the settlement with EMI, first reported in British newspapers Thursday, was not directly related to any talks about digital downloads of the Beatles’ music. “Every little bit of news on this gets talked about over and over,” she said. Still, Eric Nicoli, chief executive of EMI, has said the company hoped to be able to sell the Beatles’ recordings online soon. And recent legal developments, including the settlement in February of a trademark dispute between Apple Inc. and Apple Corps, appeared to clear some of the hurdles. The settlement announced Thursday involved a lawsuit that Apple Corps filed in 2005, contending that an audit had shown that EMI was not living up to the terms of the contract under which it releases the Beatles music. Apple Corps contended that it was owed 30 million pounds ($59 million) in royalties and other payments. Both sides declined to detail the terms of the settlement. Amanda Conroy, a spokeswoman for EMI, said only that the companies had come to a “mutually acceptable” agreement last month. For EMI, which has recently issued a series of profit warnings, the Beatles remain a bright spot 36 years after the band broke up. “Love,” a compilation of remixed Beatles recordings, has been one of the company’s best-selling albums of the past year. LONDON – The company that manages the Beatles’ commercial interests and the EMI Group, which holds the rights to the band’s recordings, said Thursday that they had settled a dispute over royalties, renewing speculation that a deal to release the Beatles’ music in digital form might be near. The Beatles are among the last big holdouts from digital music services such as iTunes from Apple Inc. Expectations of a deal were raised last week when Steve Jobs, Apple Inc.’s chief executive, traveled to London for a news conference with EMI executives. The announcement, however, was that EMI had agreed to make its catalog available on iTunes without copy protection, with Beatles’ songs being excluded. Jobs also added grist to the rumor mill in January, when he introduced the new iPhone. At a news conference, he demonstrated the device’s abilities by displaying Beatles album covers and playing the song “Lovely Rita.” For most artists, the lure of royalties from digital sales has been enough to overcome hesitation about moving online. But the Beatles, along with such acts as Led Zeppelin and Radiohead, have resisted the trend.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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