first_imgHolmes’s stunning return came on the back of his five-try performance against Samoa last week, as the Kangaroos ran away with a 10-tries-to-one victory.The Fijians started with intensity in the early exchanges and opened the scoring with a penalty goal in the second minute. Jarryd Hayne was in the thick of it early with a big hit on Billy Slater but his team conceded too many penalties to stay in the contest.Slater crossed for the Kangaroos’ first in the 15th minute on the left flank – becoming the World Cup’s leading try-scorer of all time – as Australia exploited an overlap. The second try was easier, with Holmes rising high above Suliasi Vunivalu to score in the corner.Holmes grabbed a first-half double when he went over unmarked through some quick passing.Dane Gagai then danced his way across the line, with a long Cooper Cronk pass giving the winger space to cut in on the inside in the 32nd minute.The Australians kept up the pacing in the second half, scoring two tries in five minutes. Holmes celebrated a hat-trick with a 90-metre intercept try and Slater brushed the Fiji defence with speed to score his second.The Bati registered their first try when Vunivalu showed great hands – juggling the ball around his ankles – but Australia kept pressing for points.Holmes added three more tries to complete the rout, becoming the first Australian player to score six tries in an international since Kevin Irvine in 1960 against Italy.Australia 54 (Holmes 6, Slater 2, Gagai 2 tries; Smith 7 goals) def. Fiji 6 (Vunivalu try, Koroisau goal) at Suncorp Stadium. Half-time score: 22-2. Crowd: 22,073. Photo by: Scott Davis. Copyright: NRL Photos.Australian try-scoring sensation Valentine Holmes.last_img read more

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first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Mike Gaworecki The 12-time Grammy-winning singer-songwriter recently announced on Mongabay.com that he is embarking on a 17-date US concert tour, with all proceeds benefitting Half-Earth, an initiative of the E.O. Wilson Biodiversity Foundation.Mongabay contributor Justin Catanoso interviewed Paul Simon about his long-time friendship with E.O. Wilson and why Dr. Wilson’s Half-Earth idea inspired him to get involved in this environmental cause.We also feature another Field Notes segment, this time with Zuzana Burivalova, a conservation scientist at Princeton University who has recorded the soundscapes of over 100 sites in the Indonesian part of Borneo. On this episode of the Mongabay Newscast, we’re thrilled to feature a conversation with the one and only Paul Simon, who’s just announced he’s going to tour in support of the environment. The 12-time Grammy-winning musician recently announced on Mongabay.com that he is embarking on a 17-date US concert tour, with all proceeds benefitting Half-Earth, an initiative of the E.O. Wilson Biodiversity Foundation.Mongabay contributor Justin Catanoso interviewed Paul Simon about his long-time friendship with E.O. Wilson and why Dr. Wilson’s Half-Earth idea inspired him to get involved in this environmental cause. You can find info on Paul Simon’s 17-date tour in support of Half-Earth here.Also on the program, we feature another Field Notes segment, this time with Zuzana Burivalova, a conservation scientist at Princeton University who has recorded the soundscapes of over 100 sites in the Indonesian part of Borneo together with colleagues from The Nature Conservancy. We listen to a variety of those recordings, each made in a different type of habitat, from protected rainforest to an oil palm plantation, and Burivalova explains what we’re hearing — and in some cases, what we’re not hearing.Here’s this episode’s top news:13,000 acres of cloud forest now protected in ColombiaCruise ship wrecks one of Indonesia’s best coral reefs at Raja AmpatInvestigation reveals slave labor conditions in Brazil’s timber industryStepping on their paws: study explores recreation’s unfun impacts on wildlifeRare beaked whale filmed underwater for the first timeIf you enjoy this podcast, please write a review of the Mongabay Newscast in the Apple Podcasts app, iTunes store, Stitcher page, or wherever you get your podcasts from! Your feedback will help us improve the show and find new listeners. Simply go to the show’s page on whichever platform you get it from and find the ‘review’ or ‘rate’ section: Stitcher, TuneIn, iTunes, Google Play, Android, or RSS.Paul Simon performing at a conference sponsored by the E.O. Wilson Biodiversity Foundation. Photo by Chris Sims, E.O. Wilson Biodiversity Foundation.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Acoustic, Animals, Bioacoustics, Bioacoustics and conservation, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Bold And Dangerous Ideas That May Save The World, Conservation, Coral Reefs, Environment, Environmental Heroes, Human Rights, Illegal Logging, Illegal Timber Trade, Interviews, Law Enforcement, Mammals, Marine Mammals, Podcast, Protected Areas, Video, Whales, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation last_img read more

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first_imgSets of remote cameras placed in trees can detect a wide range of diurnal and nocturnal arboreal vertebrates and help assess species presence relative to environmental factors.This relatively cost-effective, non-invasive monitoring technology requires effort to design and set up, but it can function for months with minimal oversight or maintenance.Three studies suggest solutions to various challenges—including leaf-triggered photos, high humidity, and insect infestation—facing research teams interested in surveying and monitoring vertebrate communities in the canopy. Detecting elusive species Wildlife researchers are expanding the use of camera traps—remote cameras triggered by animal movement—to study arboreal animals and their use of the forest canopy.Camera traps provide photographic evidence of species that are rare, elusive, nocturnal or otherwise difficult to photograph in person. Since the 1990s, scientists have used camera traps to inventory vertebrate communities, confirm the presence of rare or cryptic species, determine a species’ range limits, examine mammal community structure, compare seasonal dynamics of animal presence, and estimate abundance of species with markings unique to individuals (e.g. tigers).Curious Sumatran tiger caught on camera. Markings on tigers and other striped or spotted animals can be used to identify individuals. Photo credit: Arddu, Creative CommonsCamera trap use is relatively cost-effective, low-effort, and non-invasive, and traps collect data day and night on a wide range of species, including those that avoid people.Some three quarters of tropical forest vertebrates and a large proportion of the mammals live in the forest canopy. Arboreal animals may be particularly vulnerable to forest loss and degradation, yet they are difficult to study and monitor. Vegetation can be dense, and seeing animals 20 to 40 meters above the ground is challenging at best.Standard line transect surveys conducted on foot or in a vehicle can detect most primate species, which are mainly diurnal and often conspicuous, but rarely find other canopy species, especially those that are nocturnal or cryptic. Transect surveys are also labor intensive, requiring a trained team to cover many hundreds of kilometers to obtain sample sizes large enough to estimate population density.Seeing the forest (animals) for the treesCamera traps offer an alternative approach to surveying and studying canopy vertebrates. A few early studies, including a 2004 study of buff-headed capuchin monkeys and a 2007 investigation of kinkajou foraging, used remote cameras to study a single species, at relatively low strata in the canopy.Brown, or tufted, capuchin climbing. Photo credit: SCBI-CCS (Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute-Center for Conservation and Sustainability)Scientists are now testing the utility of camera traps to inventory arboreal mammals, model species’ local distributions relative to hunting pressure, and assess animals’ use of canopy. They have also compared the relative cost and effort of camera traps, compared to ground-based inventories, to detect arboreal species’ presence. Mongabay-Wildtech reviewed several of these studies, all of which took place in Peru, and reports on some of the challenges and solutions to date in deploying cameras in the canopy.Elevating camera technology to new heightsDr. Tremaine Gregory of the Smithsonian Institution’s Conservation Biology Institute is one of the first to bring a set of remote cameras up into the tropical forest canopy.In a 2014 publication, Gregory and colleagues assessed the usefulness of standard camera traps to document animal movements across 13 natural canopy bridges over a clearing for natural gas pipeline in Peru’s Lower Urubamba region.Woolly monkey using a canopy bridge left over a pipeline right-of-way. Photo credit: SCBI-CCS“Initially,” explained Gregory, “we considered radio collaring members of primate groups in order to follow their movements…. we realized that monitoring the bridges themselves would give us a much more focused view of their use. Sitting under the bridges for 24 hours a day didn’t seem like a viable option, so we began to consider camera traps. Camera traps had never been used in the high canopy, [but] we were pleasantly surprised to see that they were highly effective in monitoring the bridges.”The team placed a camera to monitor all the connecting points in each bridge, so some bridges had up to four cameras on them. They also placed camera traps on the ground to see if arboreal mammals crossed without using bridges and to compare crossing rates between the bridges and the ground to see which the arboreal mammals preferred.Tremaine Gregory programming a camera trap to monitor a canopy bridge. Photo credit: Farah Carrasco-RuedaWith 25 cameras set up for more than 3,600 camera trap days during six months, the team logged over 215,000 images. Over 8,200 of these images were target vertebrate species. Most of the remaining 97% of photo events were false triggers caused by moving leaves, branches, or insects, far more than for corresponding ground-based camera traps, where surrounding vegetation had been cleared.The researchers set the cameras up to take three rapid images of each passing animal, for a total of 1,522 “photo events” of a target animal passing in front of the cameras. In these events, the researchers recorded 47 vertebrate species—20 mammals, 23 birds and four reptiles—most of which differed from the species captured in similar camera traps placed on the ground below each canopy bridge.Tamandua and her young cross the canopy bridge after midnight. Photo credit: SCBI-CCSThe research team found that the rates at which animals passed in front of the arboreal cameras did not decrease over time, which suggests that cameras did not cause a negative response among the target species. If cameras are generally non-invasive (but see Schipper (2007)), they can be used to monitor a range of different species in a variety of environments at all times, especially where the presence of researchers affects animals’ use of locations or resources.Assessing efficiency and utility of cameras vs line transect surveysA more recent (2016) study led by Dr. Andrew Whitworth compared the cost, effort, and species of larger mammals detected by arboreal camera traps with those associated with standard ground transects. This research team also assessed the ability of arboreal camera traps to record hard-to-find species in lower and upper canopy strata.The researchers set up 30 cameras at two hunted sites in southeastern Peru over three months to inventory arboreal mammals. They positioned cameras at two heights in the canopy, for a total of over 2,900 camera trap days, setting the cameras to take both a photo and a video when triggered.Although nine cameras failed due to depleted batteries, filled-up memory cards from false triggers, or batteries that dislodged during setup, the camera trap setup detected 18 arboreal mammal species in 339 records, while line transects (diurnal and nocturnal) detected 13 species in 862 records.Four species detected by Whitworth and colleagues using arboreal camera traps in southeastern Peru. A silky pygmy anteater (top left), two bicolour-spined porcupines (top right), a black-faced spider monkey moving at night (bottom left), and Bolivian red howler monkey (bottom right). Photo credit: Whitworth et al 2016.In this study, neither the camera trap inventories nor the transect inventories captured all expected mammal species, indicating that greater survey effort (more camera days or more transect walks) would be needed to detect all species.The study’s cost-effort analysis suggested that the upfront equipment costs, training in climbing and camera use, and installation time needed for arboreal camera trapping was balanced by relatively little effort during data collection. Overall, costs were similar to those of line transect surveys, which require less training and equipment but much greater time and effort to cut the transects and walk them repeatedly.Modeling species occupancy related to hunting pressureA research team led by Dr. Mark Bowler also compared the use of camera traps to line transect surveys in inventorying medium-sized and large arboreal mammals in a hunted area along Peru’s Rio Napo. They further examined whether they could use camera trapping methods to reliably model the animals’ occupancy based on distances from human hunting access.They placed 42 cameras at intersections of a large grid, in trees that were safe to climb and had branches touching those of at least one adjacent tree. They set the cameras to record 10-second infrared video clips, instead of still photos, to capture the characteristic movements of otherwise similar-looking nocturnal species.A ball and socket joint like the one used to mount this camera providers flexibility in positioning cameras in trees. Photo credit: Bowler et al (2016).Analyzing a survey effort of nearly 3,150 camera trap days, the team logged over 700 events (videos) of 18 medium-sized and large mammals, as well as a number of small mammals (e.g. rodents and opossums), birds, and reptiles. They set their cameras to record a photo at noon each day so they would know the dates of any camera failures.The camera traps and the 2,014 kilometers of line transect surveys each detected all but two of the expected medium-sized and large diurnal mammal species. The cameras also detected eight nocturnal mammals; detecting these species during transect surveys would require an additional series of nocturnal survey walks. Models for most species showed a low rate of occupancy that tended to increase (not significantly so) with distance to the nearby village.A pair of black-mantled tamarins in the canopy wonder about the device that is taking their photo. Photo credit: Bowler et al. (2016)An infrared flash shows this nocturnal western woolly opossum without bothering it. Photo credit: Bowler et al. (2016)ChallengesDeploying camera traps in the forest comes with a set of specific challenges, some specific to setting up camera traps high up in the forest canopy, including the following: White flash can cause animals to avoid a camera and may impair the vision of nocturnal mammals, which have sensitive eyes for moving in darkness.Two of the studies used an infrared flash, which produced images that were less clear but did not disturb the target wildlife. Article published by Sue Palminteri Teams need climbing gear, climbing expertise, and time to install, maintain, and take down cameras.No way around this, though clearing paths to camera sites ahead time might shorten this time.  Gregory and colleague Farah Carrasco-Rueda learned to climb the trees and checked the cameras every couple of months. Batteries, Camera Trapping, cameras, data collection, Forests, Monitoring, Research, Sensors, surveys, Technology, Wildtech Arboreal camera traps incur false alarm triggers from the movement of leaves and branches. These images filled up 11 of the 4GB memory cards.This problem affects all camera traps, but the wind and branches in trees can trigger the camera and deplete battery and space on memory cards.Gregory’s team reduced false triggering by 80% by moving leaves away from in front of the cameras.They also switched to 16 GB memory cards. These 16 GB and the 32 GB memory cards used by Bowler et al. (2016), did not reach capacity before being checked months after deployment. Setting up the cameras requires finding trees that can be climbed safely, with branches that connect with those of other trees, and camera positions and angles that allow capture of whole animals.Place more than one camera in each location, such as at different angles or heights in the canopy, can improve likelihood of successfully detecting species with distinct movement patterns.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Finding appropriate camera locations that remain stable and capture movement of various species in a 3-dimensional habitat makes positioning these cameras even more tricky.Unlike setting up a camera on the ground, Gregory said, monitoring the canopy requires the cameras to be angled in multiple directions—not just directly ahead.Stability: place camera as close to trunk as possible to minimize movement of cameras and possible damage due to wind.Flexibility: Gregory et al. (2014) created custom mounts with two ball joints that enhanced versatility in positioning the camera. “We designed a mount with PVC tubing, nylon webbing, and a couple of universal joints that allowed us to aim the cameras in any direction,” she described and added that more companies may be designing mounts with these capabilities. A pair of bald-faced sakis, which are canopy specialists, pose for a photo on a canopy bridge. Photo credit: SCBI-CCSA role for camera traps in studying arboreal wildlifeArboreal camera trapping offers the potential to better understand the occupancy dynamics, behaviors, and effects of forest disturbance on a suite of even secretive species.“Camera traps were originally designed for use on the ground, but our study, and others, have demonstrated that they are also very useful in the canopy,” said Gregory. “In the canopy, the conditions seem to be harsher, and we experienced higher camera malfunction rates and ended up with many thousands more photos [triggered] by leaves and insects. However, they were very effective in capturing crossing events, and their nearly non-invasive data collection capabilities made them ideal for these circumstances.”Nevertheless, she continued, “unlike on the ground, where cameras are sampling a plane, cameras in the canopy are only capturing events at specific branches, so the sampling is somewhat more biased.”Emperor tamarin using a canopy bridge. Arboreal camera traps must be positioned to consider 3-D movement on specific branches. Photo credit: SCBI-CCSOther studies suggest that diurnal line transects may be more cost-effective than cameras for detecting most large diurnal species, such as primates, in non-hunted areas. Camera traps have lower cost per detection for hunted (wary) species, as well as nocturnal and cryptic species. Conducting both types of surveys will more effectively assess the whole mammal community.While camera trapping can feasibly determine the presence of multiple arboreal species relative to environmental factors, its use cannot yet help estimate population abundance or density.Some helpful referencesBowler, M. T., Tobler, M. W., Endress, B. A., Gilmore, M. P., & Anderson, M. J. (2016). Estimating mammalian species richness and occupancy in tropical forest canopies with arboreal camera traps. Remote Sensing in Ecology and Conservation.Gregory, T., Carrasco Rueda, F., Deichmann, J., Kolowski, J., & Alonso, A. (2014). Arboreal camera trapping: taking a proven method to new heights. Methods in Ecology and Evolution, 5(5), 443-451.Gregory, T., Carrasco-Rueda, F., Alonso, A., Kolowski, J., & Deichmann, J. L. (2017). Natural canopy bridges effectively mitigate tropical forest fragmentation for arboreal mammals. Scientific reports, 7(1), 3892.Kays, R., & Allison, A. (2001). Arboreal tropical forest vertebrates: current knowledge and research trends. In Tropical Forest Canopies: Ecology and Management (pp. 109-120). Springer Netherlands.Peres, C. A. (1999). General guidelines for standardizing line transect surveys of tropical forest primates. Neotropical Primates 7:11-16.Rovero, F., Zimmermann, F., Berzi, D., & Meek, P. (2013). ” Which camera trap type and how many do I need?” A review of camera features and study designs for a range of wildlife research applications. Hystrix, the Italian Journal of Mammalogy, 24(2), 148-156.Schipper, J. (2007). Camera-trap avoidance by Kinkajous Potos flavus: rethinking the “non-invasive” paradigm. Small Carnivore Conservation, 36, 38-41.Whitworth, A., Braunholtz, L. D., Huarcaya, R. P., MacLeod, R., & Beirne, C. (2016). Out on a limb: arboreal camera traps as an emerging methodology for inventorying elusive rainforest mammals. Tropical Conservation Science, 9(2), 675-698.  (a 2015 mongabay.com post shows some of this study’s photos) Up to 30% of the arboreal cameras malfunctioned, due to the light sensor or other internal workings or to movement and damage by water or wildlife.Gregory’s cameras “were invaded multiple times by tiny ants and termites that entered through a small pressure-release valve on the casing of the camera.”Simple tricks—such as surveying during dry season, putting silica gel inside cameras, or putting steel wool or petroleum jelly around the camera to keep out insects—can help keep cameras running correctly for longer periods.  Gregory added that Reconyx, the maker of their cameras, “has modified their camera design in order to prevent invasions of canopy insects” by eliminating the pressure-release valve, making the cameras more resistant both to insects and to humidity. CAMERA TRAPPING CHALLENGESPOTENTIAL SOLUTIONSlast_img read more

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first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Community-based Conservation, conservation players, Environment, Forest Loss, Grasslands, Habitat, Habitat Loss, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Reserves, Interviews, Iucn, Primary Forests, Protected Areas, Rainforests, Savannas, Temperate Forests, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Wildlife, World Heritage Convention FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Morgan Erickson-Daviscenter_img Citations:Banner image of Sundarbans mangrove forest by user Bhushanfromindiasunderbanswidlife via Wikimedia Commons (CC 4.0)Cyril F. Kormos, Tim Badman, Tilman Jaeger, Bastian Bertzky, Remco van Merm, Elena Osipova, Yichuan Shi, Peter Bille Larsen (2017). World Heritage, Wilderness and Large Landscapes and Seascapes. Gland, Switzerland: IUCN. viii + 70pp. Since its inception in the 1970s, the UNESCO World Heritage Convention has officially recognized 1,052 sites of cultural or ecological importance around the planet.Making the list as a World Heritage site can help provide a location with increased protection and attention.The International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), an advisor to the World Heritage Committee, released a study showing that 1.8 percent of wilderness areas are covered under World Heritage protection.The IUCN recommends a more methodical approach to the designation of World Heritage sites to help fill these gaps. The 41st session of the World Heritage Committee (WHC) is convening this week and next in Krakow, Poland, drawing participants from 21 member states, 170 observer nations and a multitude of NGOs. The July 2-12 conference aims to assess how conservation is faring at 154 UNESCO World Heritage sites, and consider the inclusion of 33 nominated sites.Since its inception in the 1970s, the UNESCO World Heritage Convention has officially recognized 1,052 sites of cultural or ecological importance around the planet. They include diverse locations, from the Sundarbans mangroves that straddle India and Bangladesh to the Minaret and Archaeological Remains of Jam in Afghanistan to Brazil’s Atlantic Forest South-East Reserves.Making the list as a World Heritage site can help provide a location with increased protection and attention. For instance, data from the University of Maryland show areas included in the Atlantic Forest South-East Reserves site experienced far less tree cover loss than land outside its bounds. Potential environmental threats to the Sundarbans from an upstream power plant currently under construction resulted in a visit by a UNESCO mission and a report urging the plant be relocated to a less ecologically sensitive area (however, this recommendation has not been heeded and plant construction is continuing).The Atlantic Forest once ringed much of Brazil’s coastline, but most of it has been cleared. Scientists estimate as little as 3.5 percent of the biome’s old-growth forest may remain today. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / MongabayThe potential environmental protection benefits of attaining World Heritage status is prompting the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) to advocate for a big increase in UNESCO attention to more wilderness areas. The IUCN is an official advisor to UNESCO’s WHC, and conducts independent monitoring of World Heritage sites. In step with the conference, the IUCN released a study on how the World Heritage Convention can more effectively conserve remaining wilderness areas.The study describes the fast pace at which wilderness areas are disappearing, and how the Convention’s success at combining conservation with social equity and biological integrity is helping safeguard remaining wilderness areas and the ecological and human communities that depend on them.But while the authors laud what the Convention has done so far, they found that many important wilderness areas are currently excluded from UNESCO coverage. According to their study, 1.8 percent of the world’s total wilderness area has World Heritage protection. Of this, they write that two biomes – tropical and subtropical coniferous forests, and temperate grasslands, savannas and shrublands – have particularly low levels of protection, with less than 1 percent designated as World Heritage sites. Five other biomes are close behind, with less than 2 percent under UNESCO protection.Terrestrial wilderness as of 2009 and extent of World Heritage sites. From Kormos et al, 2017.In their study, the authors write that a more methodical approach to the designation of World Heritage sites could help fill these gaps. They provide two overarching recommendations for the WHC: assess existing sites to see if they’re large or connected enough to maintain integrity into the future, and invest in new sites to fill gaps in wilderness coverage.Mongabay caught up with study co-author Cyril Kormos, IUCN-WCPA Vice Chair for World Heritage and Vice President for Policy at the WILD Foundation, to ask him a few questions about how the World Heritage Convention could help improve wilderness conservation.How does wilderness protection fit into World Heritage? Kormos: The World Heritage Convention has always played a big role in helping to protect large, ecologically intact and iconic areas around the world, both on land and on sea. For example, the Kluane / Wrangell-St Elias / Glacier Bay / Tatshenshini-Alsek World Heritage site, a protected area complex shared by the United States and Canada, is almost 10m [million] hectares. Both the Central Amazon Conservation Complex and the Selous Game Reserve are over 5m hectares. Several marine sites are even bigger: for example, the Great Barrier Reef is almost 35m hectares and the Phoenix Islands Protected Area World Heritage site is about 41m hectares.Although there are only 238 natural and mixed World Heritage sites (the latter being recognized for both natural and cultural values) inscribed on the World Heritage List, this represents roughly 8% of the global protected areas estate and an area about the size of India (286m hectares). So the World Heritage Convention makes a very important contribution to wilderness conservation globally. But the World Heritage Convention could do even more by adopting an explicit and systematic wilderness and large landscapes and seascapes focus, and this new IUCN study explains how it could do so.How would extending the World Heritage Convention benefit wilderness and remaining intact areas?Kormos: Natural World Heritage sites are recognized by the international community as the planet’s most precious areas – places of importance to everyone and which we must all work collectively to safeguard for future generations. The World Heritage Convention provides an important added layer of international protection. The Convention emphasizes the importance of the good protection and management of World Heritage sites, and includes provisions for monitoring and reporting by governments, IUCN and UNESCO.  World Heritage status is also highly prestigious, raising the profile of a particular site and greatly enhancing awareness of its unique values. As a result of this increased prestige and awareness, it is often easier to raise funds for research and management of these sites and World Heritage status also helps drive tourism.Which regions are most in need of this protection?Kormos: This new report identifies some broad gaps in World Heritage coverage which may have potential for new World Heritage sites – from Amazonia to Central Asia to Southern Africa. But beyond this very broad scale gap analysis, there is potential for creating new large World Heritage sites with strong wilderness values around the world.Another crucial part of a strategy on World Heritage, wilderness and large landscapes and seascapes is also to expand existing World Heritage sites, and ensure they are adequately buffered and connected to other protected areas. So this is not just about [establishing] new sites – it’s also about enhancing wilderness values in existing sites and taking action to ensure they can be protected into the future.What about land occupied by Indigenous Peoples and local communities? What effects would expansion of the Convention have on them? Kormos: World Heritage nominations (proposals by governments to inscribe sites on the World Heritage List) and management of World Heritage sites must always fully respect the rights of local communities and Indigenous Peoples. In addition, World Heritage status and the commitment governments make to manage World Heritage sites to the highest international standards can also serve to recognize community and indigenous rights and can also help ensure community participation in the stewardship and governance of World Heritage sites.Many of the planet’s remaining large, intact landscapes and seascapes are the traditional lands of Indigenous Peoples and have remained in good condition precisely because of stewardship by indigenous cultures over centuries or millennia. Most indigenous cultures see no distinction between nature and culture and it is therefore more appropriate to understand these landscapes as biocultural landscapes. So a crucial goal is to make certain that a focus on wilderness and large landscapes and seascapes helps recognize rights and strengthens participation in management.Where would the financing for this increased protection come from?  Kormos: Unfortunately, the Convention itself does not have significant funding it can provide for management of World Heritage sites. However, World Heritage sites often receive additional resources, partly because of the requirements of the Convention that they be well-managed, and partly because they are of such importance to national governments – as a source of pride and as centers for tourism.Their unique values also attract research funding as well as international funding from bilateral donors and multilateral donors and from NGOs. Many World Heritage sites need additional funding – but World Heritage status can provide a significant boost in fundraising efforts.See https://www.iucn.org/theme/world-heritage for the IUCN’s recommendations to the World Heritage meeting currently being held in Krakow.last_img read more

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first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored In 2011, the Norte Energia consortium made an agreement with the Brazilian government to provide adequate housing to the more than 20,000 people to be displaced from their homes due to the building of the Belo Monte dam in Pará state in the Amazon.On September 20th a federal court suspended Norte Energia’s installation license and ordered it to shut down the dam because it violated that agreement, breaking pledges to provide different-sized houses to accommodate variously sized families, and to resettle displaced people within two kilometers of their original homes.The court order, which went into immediate effect, included an exceptional provision that federal police could be called on to force Norte Energia to comply with the ruling and shut down the dam.The consortium has so far refused to cease operations at the dam, and argues that it has yet to see the court order, and that its operating license supersedes its installation license. A 2010 Greenpeace Brazil protest against the proposed Belo Monte dam. Photo by Roosewelt Pinheiro / Agência BrasilThe legal troubles surrounding the Belo Monte dam and Norte Energia, the consortium that is building and operating it, continued this week, with Brazilian litigators promising to use federal police to enforce a court order to shut down the dam if Norte Energia does not immediately comply with the litigation.In mid-September, a federal court in Brasilia ordered the suspension of Norte Energia’s installation license. The decision went into effect when it was published in the Brazilian government’s Official Judicial Registry on September 20th. The ruling was exceptional in that it authorized the use of police action to enforce the decision, if the consortium failed to shut down the dam. The September 20th ruling allocates a fine of R$100,000 (US$31,500) for each day that Norte Energia fails to comply.In 2011, the government made an agreement with Norte Energia to properly manage the resettlement process for more than 20,000 people displaced by what was designed to be the third-largest hydropower project in the world. The court has now suspended the installation license due to violations of that agreement stemming from inadequacies in the housing Norte Energia assigned to those displaced, which included indigenous and traditional people living beside and near the Xingu River.The case, filed by the Federal Public Ministry in 2015, argued that the consortium reneged on its initial pledge to provide three different size homes to accommodate families of varying sizes. It also argued that the promise to resettle people within two kilometers of their original homes was broken. The Brazilian news site UOL reports that there are 21 different lawsuits pending against the Belo Monte consortium.The Belo Monte dam, the third largest hydroelectric project in the world, seen here under construction. Photo by Pascalg622 licensed under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or laterIn a press release issued at the time of the September 20th ruling, Norte Energia argued that its operating license supersedes the installation license that the court suspended. It also said that the decision changed little in practice since the dam has been operational since early 2015. Construction on the facility is, however, still incomplete and not expected to finish until 2019.Asked to comment on the stipulation that police could be used to enforce the cease and desist order, Norte Energia said that it has not as yet had access to the decision. The consortium reiterated its position that the terms of its operating license allows it to continue running the facility, despite suspension of the installation license.Federal prosecutor Felicio Pontes, who was involved in the case, told Mongabay that since the decision has been published in the judiciary’s official publication, the ruling is already in effect, regardless of whether it has been delivered to the company.Pontes told Mongabay that the ruling: “is the only way to get the company to respect the rights of those affected by the project. For this reason, the Public Ministry wants installation halted immediately.”FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Glenn Scherercenter_img Amazon Conservation, Amazon Dams, Amazon Destruction, Amazon People, Controversial, Culture, Dams, electricity, Energy, Energy Politics, Environment, Environmental Crime, environmental justice, Environmental Politics, Ethnocide, Green, Hydroelectric Power, Hydropower, Indigenous Culture, Indigenous Cultures, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Infrastructure, Land Conflict, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Rivers, Saving The Amazon, Social Conflict, Social Justice, Threats To The Amazon, Traditional People, Tropical Deforestation last_img read more

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first_imgArticle published by Glenn Scherer British fast food restaurants and grocery chains, including Tesco, Morrisons and McDonald’s, buy their chicken from Cargill, which feeds its poultry with imported soy, much of it apparently coming from the Bolivian Amazon and Brazilian Cerrado — areas rapidly being deforested for new soy plantations.A decade ago, Cargill and other global commodities companies agreed to stop buying soy from the Brazilian Amazon and established a Soy Moratorium in the region.But a recent study showed that Cargill and other companies simply began sourcing their soy purchases from nearby areas, including the Bolivian Amazon and Brazilian Cerrado, a vast area of savanna, part of which is included in Brazil’s definition of Legal Amazonia.That shift has resulted in rapid deforestation in both areas; a Mighty Earth report revealed that U.S. soy distributor Cargill is a major soy buyer there. Efforts to extend the soy moratorium to the Bolivian Amazon and Brazilian Cerrado have long been opposed by Cargill, despite calls to do so by NGOs, scientists and the Brazilian environment minister. Greenpeace protests against McDonald’s — like this one, showing Ronald McDonald wielding a chainsaw — helped lead to the Amazon Soy Moratorium in 2006. But Cargill and other transnational commodities firms have since sourced much of their soy (which is fed to chickens in Britain) to the neighboring Bolivian Amazon and Brazilian Cerrado, leading to intensified deforestation in those regions. Photo credit: © Richard Stanton / GreenpeaceA Mongabay investigation, prompted by a report done earlier this year by the NGO Mighty Earth, suggests that customers buying chicken from some of Britain’s largest supermarkets and fast food chains may unwittingly be fuelling rampant deforestation in the Bolivian Amazon and Brazilian savanna.Tesco, Morrisons and McDonald’s buy their chicken from Cargill, the biggest private company in the world, which feeds its poultry with imported soy. The U.S. food distributor purchases its soy from large-scale agribusiness operations that often burn and clear large swathes of native forest to make way for their plantations.Ten years ago, soy traders agreed to stop buying soy from the Brazilian Amazon following severe pressure from activists, consumers and retailers such as Tesco and McDonald’s.However, in the wake of this agreement known as the “soy moratorium,” global soy traders simply shifted their sights to nearby areas where deforestation is now rife in the Bolivian Amazon and Brazilian savanna — a region known as the Cerrado, part of which lies inside Legal Amazonia as designated by the Brazilian government.A fenced and gated Cargill facility in Brazil. Photo credit: sara y tzunky via VisualHunt.com / CC BY-NCLarge swathes of forests in these regions are being razed to make way for soy plantations, according to a report by the environmental NGO, Mighty Earth released in February of this year. The NGO used drones and satellite imagery to identify deforested areas, and conducted interviews with farmers in more than 28 deforestation hotspots in Bolivia and Brazil. The research revealed that U.S. soy distributor Cargill is a major buyer.“Cargill is ignoring a tidal wave of pressure from its customers to protect South America’s threatened ecosystems from soy,” said Glenn Hurowitz, CEO of Mighty Earth. “Unlike both their competitors and suppliers, they don’t seem to have wrapped their head around the urgency of protecting the world’s last wild frontiers from the onslaught of their soy.”Brazil is the biggest producer of soy consumed in the United Kingdom, and 70 percent of it is imported into the UK by Cargill. Although soy is commonly associated with milk and meat substitutes, in Britain the vast majority is fed to animals, making up 20-25 percent of British chicken feed. According to the Stockholm Environment Institute, Britain imported 394,000 tons of soy from Brazil in 2015, of which 277,000 came from Cargill. In the same year, Britain imported 223,000 tons of soy from the Cerrado.Morrisons buys chicken from Cargill, which feeds its poultry with imported soy. Cargill purchases its soy from large-scale agribusiness operations that often burn and clear large swathes of native forest and savanna to make way for soy plantations in the Bolivian Amazon and Brazilian Cerrado. Photo by Mr Biz, licensed for reuse under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 licenseCargill’s Brazilian soy is fed to chickens processed at the transnational company’s chicken plant in Hereford, UK, which slaughters over a million birds per week. The company requires its supplying farmers to buy its soy-based chicken feed rations.Cargill then sells its chicken products to British supermarkets and fast-food chains. Morrisons named Cargill its “supplier of the year” in 2015. Tesco boasts on its website that it works with Cargill to “make joint decisions on price and volume commitments for the wheat and soy that make up our animal feed,” while McDonald’s has cited Cargill as its main chicken provider.Hurowitz said it is important that UK retailers use their influence to apply pressure on distributors higher up in the supply chain, like Cargill, by refusing to do business with them until they stop sourcing from newly deforested land.In 2006, Greenpeace launched an aggressive campaign against retailers for buying soy sourced from the Amazon. The NGO distributed posters of Ronald McDonald wielding a chainsaw, and chicken costume-clad activists invaded several McDonald’s stores, chaining themselves to chairs.Imaginative demonstrations at McDonald’s, like this one conducted by Greenpeace, led to the ground breaking 2006 Amazon Soy Moratorium. But that hasn’t prevented a rapid escalation of deforestation in surrounding biodiverse regions. Photo credit: © Jiri Rezac / GreenpeaceIt worked. An alliance of retailers, including McDonald’s, Tesco, Marks and Spencer, and Sainsbury’s, convinced Cargill and other distributors to create the Soy Moratorium, which has contributed to an impressive fall in the rate of deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon. However, large-scale soy growers found a workaround: they simply moved their operations to surrounding areas, where deforestation, production and profits have since soared.Ten years later, Cargill still opposes an extension of the moratorium to the Bolivian Amazon and the Brazilian Cerrado despite calls to do so by NGOs, scientists and the Brazilian environment minister, Jose Sarney Filho.Retailers have so far not used their leverage over Cargill to compel it to support a soy moratorium expansion.In the Brazilian Cerrado, a tropical savanna ten times the size of Britain, deforestation has been fuelled by a rapid expansion of soy farming. Known as an “upside-down forest” for its small trees with deep roots, the biodiverse region possesses an enormous storage capacity for climate change causing CO2, but only around 50 percent of its vegetation remains intact. In 2016, researchers used satellite data to determine that cropland within a 45 million-hectare Cerrado study doubled over the past decade, increasing from 1.3 million hectares in 2003 to 2.5 million hectares in 2013.Tesco is another UK chain supplied with Cargill chicken fed on soy likely coming from the Bolivian Amazon and Brazilian Cerrado. Photo by Maxwell Hamilton licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported licenseIn the Bolivian Amazon, an area twice the size of Greater London has been deforested for agriculture each year since 2011, according to estimates from the nongovernmental Bolivia Documentation and Information Center. This is twice the rate seen in the 1990s.Deforestation is contributing significantly to the destabilization of the Earth’s climate. When trees are cut down and burned, their stored carbon is immediately released into the atmosphere as carbon dioxide, generating one-tenth of all global warming emissions, according to the Union of Concerned Scientists.Deforestation also does major harm to habitat and wildlife, and natural aquifers. In addition, the soy industry is a heavy user of chemical pesticides and petrochemical fertilizers.There are half a billion acres of degraded land across Latin America where Cargill and other transnational commodities companies such as Archer Daniels Midland, Bunge, and Amaggi could, if they chose, expand their enterprises without sacrificing native ecosystems.Cargill described Mighty Earth’s Bolivian Amazon deforestation allegation as “simply inaccurate.”“We buy less than 10 percent Bolivian soybeans and are very clear that if a farmer has deforested land, we will not source from that grower,” said Cargill’s Corporate Vice President, Devry Boughner Vorwerk.However, The New York Times conducted their own interviews and confirmed that farmers engaged in deforestation in Bolivia were selling to Cargill.Legal Amazonia encompasses all of the Amazon biome, plus a portion of the Cerrado biome, as can be seen here. However, the Amazon Soy Moratorium as originally negotiated covers only the Amazon biome, and none of the Cerrado. Cargill continues to resist the inclusion of the Cerrado in the moratorium. Map by Mauricio TorresCargill also claimed that portions of the Brazilian Cerrado mentioned in the report had been reviewed by the company’s geospatial analytical team which had found that this area was not planted with soybeans during the last crop season. “Because they have not planted soybeans, we are not buying from these farms,” Cargill said in a statement.Mighty Earth countered that these denials are misleading because their report refers to recently cleared forest areas that would not be ready for soy planting as yet. However, those areas are owned by farmers who currently sell to Cargill from their other farms. Lisa Rausch, a researcher from the University of Wisconsin, confirmed that it usually takes two to three years after an area is first cleared before it is planted with soy.A follow-up report by Mighty Earth, published in May, found that even after the publication of the original investigation, Cargill suppliers continued to engage in forest clearance.Toby Gardner, Senior Research Fellow at the Stockholm Environment Institute, explained that it is extremely hard for Cargill to give an assurance that they know the original source of all their soy.Earlier this year he was in Brazil helping to release a new transparency platform, Trase (www.trase.earth) that enables consumers and distributors to track the origin of soy and other commodities down to city level.“Cargill sources from over 10,000 farms in Brazil and current data limitations mean that they do not have an adequate system of due diligence in place for inspecting and investigating them,” he said. “The work we are doing with Trase is one effort to try and help address this lack of information.”A Cargill soy terminal in Santaremon, Brazil, on the Tapajós and Amazon Rivers. The immense size of the facility offers some perspective on Cargill’s soy trade. Photo credit: sara y tzunky via VisualHunt.com / CC BY-NCMcDonald’s and Morrisons did not provide a comment for this story about the implication of their sourcing of soy from recently deforested areas of Latin America, or their stance on an extension of the soy moratorium to other regions, especially the Cerrado.Peter Andrews, Sustainability Policy Research Advisor for The British Retail Consortium, responded on behalf of Tesco: “All our members are committed to working towards responsibly sourced soy from non deforestation sources. They have shown that through working with other retailers and suppliers, it is possible to make progress as demonstrated by the Soy Moratorium in Brazil.“Our members continue to look at opportunities to extend their influence outside the Amazon, but the UK is a relatively small buyer and progress will depend on further collaboration.”Britain is Cargill’s fifth largest import destination for soy from the Brazilian savanna, surpassed only by China, Thailand, the Netherlands and France.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Tractors clearing the Cerrado. Soy expansion is proceeding at full throttle here. Mighty Earth, a global environmental NGO, recently reported that: “Across the Cerrado, we visited 15 locations that spanned hundreds of kilometers. Over and over again, we found the same thing: vast areas of savanna recently converted to enormous soybean monocultures that stretch to the horizon.” Photo by Rhett A. Butler / Mongabay Agriculture, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Logging, Amazon People, Amazon Soy, Biodiversity Hotspots, Controversial, Corporate Environmental Transgressors, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Politics, Featured, Food, Food Crisis, forest degradation, Forest Destruction, Forest Loss, Forests, Green, Industrial Agriculture, Infrastructure, Land Use Change, Meat, Monitoring, Protests, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Logging, Rainforests, Saving The Amazon, Soy, Threats To The Amazon, Tropical Deforestation center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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first_imgNigeria’s Omo Forest Reserve provides important habitat for animals such as forest elephants, as well as drinking water for the city of Lagos.But the reserve has been severely deforested, losing more than 7 percent of its tree cover over the past two decades. Satellite data indicate 2019 may be a particularly bad year for the reserve’s remaining primary forest.The primary cause of deforestation in Omo is cocoa farming. Seeking fertile soil and a respite from poverty, the reserve has attracted thousands of small farmers. They’re living in the reserve illegally, but the government is hesitant to evict them as doing so would disrupt their livelihoods and require a significant amount of funding.Instead, the focus is on preventing more farmers from invading Omo. This is the goal of rangers who patrol Omo’s remaining forests looking for footprints and listening for chainsaws and gunshots. While they’ve been successful at preventing some encroachment, the reserve is too big for the relatively small team to effectively monitor in its entirety. LAGOS, Nigeria — Emmanuel Olabode stands over the fire at the Eri camp in Omo Forest Reserve, in southwest Nigeria’s Ogun state. The tongues of flames flicker to the wave of the wind, casting shadows on his khakis and the branches of nearby shrubs.The songs of night birds rise as the cover of darkness grows thick, mingling with the voices of rangers sharing their encounters with farmers and hunters. Olabode sits quietly on a log bench on the deck framed of wood and rusted zinc, listening, noting, and laughing.“Maybe, if the farmers don’t start going to jail,” one of the rangers says, “the forest will [be finished] because some of these people are stubborn.” The rangers laugh, some nodding approval and others waving objection.“The farmers have the money to bribe the judges and police,” counters another. “People who can raise millions aren’t spending a day in jail.”Emmanuel Olabode leads a project aimed at protecting the last forest elephants of Omo Forest Reserve. Photo by Orji Sunday for Mongabay.Olabode manages the Forest Elephant Initiative, a program spearheaded by the Nigeria Conservation Foundation, alongside Wild Planet Trust, Whitney Wildlife Conservation Trust and the Ogun Ministry of Forestry, to help protect the country’s dwindling population of forest elephants (Loxodonta cyclotis). This team of 12 rangers, all barely a year into the job, work with Olabode to ward off hunters and farmers encroaching into what remains of one of Nigeria’s most important rainforest areas.While Omo’s 132,000 hectares (326,000 acres) of forest is granted official protection, with a 640-hectare (1,580-acre) portion in the middle designated a “strict nature reserve” — the reserve is under heavy pressure from farmers, hunters and loggers.Between 2001 and 2018, Omo lost more than 7 percent of its tree cover, according to satellite data from the University of Maryland (UMD). So far in 2019, UMD has recorded more than 2,000 deforestation alerts – most of which occurred in May and June.Satellite data show Omo Forest Reserve has lost much of the primary forest it had in 2001. Source: GLAD/UMD, accessed through Global Forest Watch“There may not be Omo in the next 10 years or so if efforts are not intensified and sustained,” says Onoja Joseph, director of technical program at the Nigeria Conservation Foundation. “And it’s scary to imagine because of the ecological imbalances that [it could cause] not just to the local communities but Lagos.”That’s because Omo serves as a major watershed for the rivers that provide drinking water to Lagos — one of Africa’s largest commercial cities, home to more than 20 million people. And as one of the largest remaining tracts of primary forest in the region, Omo is also vital for safeguarding the fragile ecological balance of southwest Nigeria.Researchers have long feared that few forest elephants may remain in the reserve — if any at all. But early last year, it became clear that many elephants still inhabit the reserve, when a herd burst onto the Lagos-Ore-Benin Highway that transects Omo. Multiple eyewitnesses told the rangers they counted more than 60 individual elephants.“Aside the 60 repeatedly quoted by many eye witnesses and villagers, we still found [more] in the forest here. I think we can say there are around 80 elephants here, if not more,” Olabode says.last_img read more

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first_imgArticle published by Hans Nicholas Jong Air Pollution, carbon, Carbon Emissions, Clean Energy, Climate, Climate Change, Coal, Emission Reduction, Energy, Environment, Fossil Fuels, Fossils, Green Energy, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Pollution, Renewable Energy Banner image of activists demanding that Japan stop financing coal projects overseas during the 2018 U.N. climate talks in Katowice, Poland. Image by Hans Nicholas Jong/Mongabay. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Japan is investing heavily in building coal-fired power plants overseas that would fall short of its own domestic emissions standards, according to a Greenpeace report.Pollution from these plants, in places such as India, Indonesia, Vietnam and Bangladesh, could potentially lead to 410,000 premature deaths over the 30-year lifetime of the plants.Japan is the only country in the G7 group of wealthiest nations still actively building coal-fired plants domestically and overseas, which threatens international efforts to reduce carbon emissions and stall global warning.Activists say by building on its own renewable energy potential, Japan can set a positive example for the countries in which it’s investing in energy infrastructure. JAKARTA — Japan is exporting pollution and endangering public health overseas by funding coal-fired power plants that wouldn’t meet the strict emissions standards it imposes at home, a new report says.Emissions from the plants being financed by Japanese public institutions could lead to 410,000 premature deaths over a 30-year period, according to the report published Aug. 20 by Greenpeace. That’s because the countries in which they’re located, including India, Indonesia, Vietnam and Bangladesh, typically have less stringent emissions controls than in Japan.In some cases, the report says, the Japanese-funded plants could emit up to 13 times more nitrogen oxides, 33 times more sulfur dioxide and 40 times more dust pollution than coal-fired plants in Japan.Japan is the only country in the G7 group of wealthiest nations still actively building coal-fired plants domestically and overseas, according to Greenpeace. Exacerbating this “pollution export” is the fact that many of the countries hosting these overseas plants already struggle with poor air quality from other causes, including forest fires, vehicle emissions, and burning of fuelwood.“Japanese investments in coal power are making it even harder for these countries to reduce air pollution and meet public health standards,” the report says.Activists protesting the construction of a Japanese-funded coal power plant in Java wear ghost costumes as they demonstrate outside the Japanese Embassy in Jakarta. Image by Safir Makki/Greenpeace.‘Not good enough’By continuing to fund coal projects overseas with poor emission standards, Japan has broken its own promises of exporting quality infrastructure, said Hanna Hakko, Greenpeace Japan senior energy campaigner.The policy is also at odds with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s global call to “join Japan and act now to save our planet” by reducing the use of fossil fuels, as well as Japan’s past environmental leadership as the host of the landmark 1997 Kyoto Protocol, which committed nearly 200 nations to cutting greenhouse gas emissions.“Japan should honor its trading partners and citizens of those countries by promoting energy technologies that stop hurting people’s health and the environment,” Hakko said.Tata Mustasya, Greenpeace Southeast Asia regional climate and energy campaign coordinator, said Japan’s double standard on emissions standards was unacceptable.“If it’s not good enough for Japan, it’s not good enough for Indonesia,” he said.Indonesia could potentially account for up to 72,000 premature deaths as a result of exposure to the pollution from the Japanese-funded coal-fired power plants there over the 30-year lifetime of the plants, the Greenpeace report estimates. It also warns of up to 160,000 premature deaths in India, 36,000 in Vietnam, and 14,000 in Bangladesh.Japan has faced criticism for its involvement in Indonesia’s coal industry. Here, a street theater performance is held in front of the Japanese Embassy in Jakarta to protest Japanese financial institutions’ support of a coal-fired power plant in Java. Image by Jurnasyanto Sukarno/Greenpeace.More money in coalAs a growing number of governments around the world, including Indonesia, push to phase out coal in favor of cleaner energy sources, Japanese banks, insurance companies and trading houses have begun scaling back their investments in coal projects.But the Japanese government continues to pour money into coal plants overseas through its public finance agencies: $16.7 billion between January 2013 and May 2019, according to Greenpeace.As a result, Japan is the second-biggest public investor in overseas coal plant projects among the G20 countries, behind only China.In Indonesia, Japan has underwritten nearly 3,000 megawatts of coal power plants in the past eight years, and China nearly 1,000 megawatts, according to an analysis by the local NGO Association of Ecological Action and People’s Emancipation (PAEER). By 2022, Japanese- and Chinese-funded coal plants will account for more than double that capacity, nearly 9,000 megawatts.“Japanese and Chinese companies’ involvement in coal-fired plants helps to dictate the energy landscape in Indonesia,” PAEER researcher Jasman Simanjuntak said. “In coming years, their involvement in coal will increase. But the destructive impact that goes along with it also needs to be considered.”Japan’s continued investment in coal infrastructure both at home and overseas makes it an outlier among developed countries, with an estimated development pipeline of 18 gigawatts.That may be because of how lucrative the coal power business remains in developing countries. A 2018 survey of energy stakeholders in Indonesia by the consultancy PwC found that most expected returns of more than 15 percent on investments in power plants. The global average was 10.6 percent.Greenpeace activists and fishermen occupy piling barges in Batang, Central Java, on March 30, 2017. a 2,000-megawatt coal-fired power plant, said to be the largest in Southeast Asia, is being built there at a cost of $4 billion, funded in part by the government-owned Japan Bank for International Cooperation (JBIC). Image by Micka Bayu Kristiawan/Greenpeace.Starting at homeIn Japan, coal accounts for about a third of the energy mix, a reliance that the government has justified on the fuel being “cheap and more economical with scale.”The Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) says the country faces insurmountable challenges, particularly geographical ones, in promoting renewables. Due to the mountainous terrain, there’s not much suitable land for solar farms, making solar generation twice as expensive per kilowatt hour in Japan as in Europe.But analysts say developing renewables over coal energy still make financial sense in the long run. Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF) estimates that a new utility-scale solar PV will be cheaper than coal in 2024, while the best new onshore wind projects will be cost-competitive with new coal before 2030.The government has a target of increasing the share of renewables in the energy mix from 15 percent in 2016 to up to 24 percent by 2030. During that same period, it also envisions reducing the share of coal from 32 percent to 26 percent.Giving up coal would also allow Japan to contribute to international carbon-reduction efforts to limit global warming under the 2015 Paris Agreement. Japan’s current policies and plans for new coal-fired power generation would result in levels of carbon pollution almost three times what’s consistent with the Paris deal between now and 2050, according to a report published by Climate Analytics with the collaboration of the Renewable Energy Institute of Japan (REI).That should give the government in Tokyo a good reason to tap into Japan’s renewable potential and start exporting clean technology overseas to set an example for other countries, Greenpeace’s Hakko said.“Japan could become a champion for renewables, but that requires giving up the harmful export of polluting coal technology,” she said.The governments in the countries hosting the Japanese-funded coal plants should also take action to limit the pollution and emissions from these plants, Greenpeace’s Tata said. They can do this by “setting stronger emission standards and rapidly transitioning away from coal to clean and renewable energy,” he said.“This change in policies and investments has to happen now, for human and environmental health, and to safeguard the future of our planet,” Tata said. FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

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first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Banner image: Beatrice Rukanyana looks out over a sugar plantation near Bugoma Forest. Photo: Thomas Lewton for MongabayFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Bugoma is one of the most biodiverse forests in Uganda, home to a wide variety of plants and animals including chimpanzees and Uganda mangabeys (Lophocebus ugandae) like this one (photographed in Kibale National Park). Photo: Duncan Wright/Wikicommons (CC-SA-3.0) Article published by terna gyuse Agriculture, Community-based Conservation, Deforestation, Environment, Forestry, Forests, Global Forest Watch, Green, Palm Oil, Plantations, Rainforests, Tropical Forests Like other protected areas in Uganda, Bugoma Forest has been threatened by encroachment for decades; now up to a fifth of what remains could be cleared to plant sugar cane.Women, generally responsible for growing food, and collecting water and firewood, feel the impacts of forest degradation acutely.Despite many obstacles, they are taking up a leading role in defending the environment, particularly against increasing pressure from extractive industries. KAMPALA, Uganda – “How come these people are coming to Bugoma to destroy our nature? Nature is protecting us,” says Beatrice Rukanyanga as she strides along the forest boundary. Twisting hardwood trees protrude from a tangle of foliage on one side, neat rows of pine and eucalyptus stand on the other.Rukanyanga cuts into the forest and adeptly maneuvers through the thick undergrowth, selecting leaves from different plants as she goes. “I’m picking medicine for stomach upsets. We’ve also got plants that treat malaria and skin problems,” she explains. For women who live close to the forest, it has always been an important source of food, medicine, and firewood — resources that are dwindling along with the forest.Bugoma Forest spans 40,000 hectares (98,800 acres) along the northern tip of the Albertine Rift Valley, which divides Uganda and the Democratic Republic of Congo. Around 500 chimpanzees have made their home here, alongside a species of mangabey monkey found only in Uganda and hundreds of species of birds, trees and shrubs, making the forest one of the most biodiverse in the country.For decades, Bugoma Forest has been shrinking. Locals say illegal loggers pay off officials to turn a blind eye to their activities, while tea and timber plantations on the perimeter push the forest’s boundary back piece by piece. Across Uganda, forest cover has declined from 24 percent of the country’s total land area in 1990 to 9 percent in 2015, according to the Ministry of Water and Environment.Now the forest faces a new and grievous threat. On Bugoma’s northern edge, a yellow bulldozer stands, waiting to begin clearing away forest to make way for a sugarcane plantation. In 2016, the Bunyoro-Kitara Kingdom leased one-fifth of the remaining protected forest to Hoima Sugar Ltd. The lease was challenged, but a High Court ruling in April 2019 found in favor of Hoima Sugar and the Kingdom, once one of the most powerful empires in East and Central Africa, which still enjoys significant autonomy under the state. The National Forest Authority has applied for the court order to be suspended, and is appealing the decision.“When we were young, this forest was thick,” says Rukanyanga. “It was giving a lot of rainfall; it was dark wherever you passed.” Photo: Thomas Lewton for MongabayThe rise of extractivesFrom oil wells springing up along the Albertine Rift Valley, to forested islands on Lake Victoria razed for oil palm plantations, Uganda’s government is supporting the rapid growth of extractive industries. But ranged against this is the swift growth of an eco-feminist movement that regards protection of the environment as essential to the protection of human rights.A grassroots network of women is working to raise awareness, share knowledge, and directly resist the destruction of the environment while creating alternative models of development. The movement hopes to strengthen the political and economic power of women in society — and so push back destruction of the natural environment.“When we were young, this forest was thick,” recalls Rukanyanga, remembering a time before industrial plantations arrived in the region. “It was giving a lot of rainfall; it was dark wherever you passed.” Rukanyanga is the coordinator of the Kwataniza Women Farmers Group, who live near Bugoma Forest and who make and sell charcoal-saving stoves while also educating women about their land rights and the sustainable use of natural resources.Rainfall patterns in the region have been disrupted in recent years, which Rukanyanga attributes to widespread deforestation. A 2012 study in Nature found that deforestation in the tropics reduces local rainfall. “Climate change has been real,” she says. “Last year people waited for rains, planted and the seed just died in the soil. There is now food insecurity in most of our homes.”Traditionally, women are responsible for growing food, and collecting water and firewood — and so they feel the impacts of environmental destruction acutely. Incidents of domestic violence also increase when food is scarce. “When you violate these resources, you are also violating women,” says Sostine Namanya, who coordinates an eco-feminist network in her role for the National Association for Professional Environmentalists (NAPE).NAPE, along with sister organization the National Association for Women’s Action in Development, has brought together more than 5,000 women from across Uganda to demand both gender and economic justice from the government and its industrial partners. “Women get to know each other, they share experiences and strategize together,” she says, reflecting on how they facilitate exchanges between women’s groups across the country.They follow in the footsteps of pioneering African eco-feminists such as Wangari Maathai, who in the 1970s founded the Green Belt Movement — responsible for planting more than 50 million trees in Kenya and training tens of thousands of women in practices such as forestry and beekeeping.In Kampala, Uganda’s Fridays for Future movement, inspired by Greta Thunberg, has young women and girls at its forefront. And in the country’s north, radical feminist traditions are challenging the government and corporate interests. Here Acholi women are known to strip in public to invoke a curse on their enemies; in 2017, this tactic was used by elderly women leaders to oppose 10,000 hectares (24,700 acres) of land being taken to build a sugar-processing facility in Amuru district. The police responded with violence and, despite these protests, the government continued with land evictions.Speaking out publicly against the government, or the industries they back, is fraught with risk in Uganda. “They can teargas you,” says Rukanyanga, noting that the 2013 Public Order Management Act makes it illegal to organize public meetings without police consent. “So we make a peaceful demonstration. We write placards and we go with letters to the authorities,” she says.Earlier this year, women living around Bugoma Forest petitioned parliament to oppose the lease to Hoima Sugar, while community forest management groups, whose membership is majority women, patrol the forest boundary and inform the National Forest Authority if they suspect illegal activity.Namanya acknowledges that Uganda’s political climate limits the activities of the eco-feminist movement, noting that several members have been physically assaulted or unlawfully arrested after speaking publicly about land-grabbing.But working quietly, from the grassroots, changing attitudes and building communities, can be effective too, Namanya says. “The government, even the president, always says: ‘Ah, you [can] leave the women, they cannot change anything, they are not a threat.’ That is something that we silently take advantage of, to do the organizing and resisting.”A truck loaded with sugar cane on one of the dirt roads around Bugoma Forest. Photo: Thomas Lewton for Mongabay.Who benefits?With tax exemptions and long leases on land offered by the government, Uganda is considered an attractive destination for foreign investors in the mining and plantation industries. In the case of sugarcane, production has quadrupled in the last two decades, and Uganda now exports tens of thousands of tons each year.Fifty kilometers (30 miles) to the north of Bugoma Forest, a string of oil wells is under construction along the shore of Lake Albert. Since 2006, multi-billion-barrel reserves of crude oil have been discovered in the region, and with the first oil expected to flow in 2022, the Minister of Works and Transport anticipates up to $20 billion of investment in the next three years. And along the northern shore of Lake Victoria since 2003, BIDCO, a transnational soap and oil producer headquartered in Kenya, has cleared thousands of hectares of forest and grassland to plant oil palm.Government officials say that encouraging these industries is vital for the growth of Uganda’s economy and for local job creation, particularly in impoverished rural areas. Uganda’s GDP per capita is among the lowest in the world.But an investigation by the eco-watchdog Global Witness in 2017 exposed “endemic corruption and mismanagement” in Uganda’s fledgling petroleum sector, with local economic interests and protection of the environment losing out in favor of international investors and “crooked officials.”“It is the state, it is big shots in government, it is foreigners who benefit,” Namanya says, pointing to other mineral-rich countries in sub-Saharan Africa that have fallen foul of the resource curse. “How come they are still extremely poor and there is a gross violation of rights? It will not be different for Uganda. We have to find better ways,” she says.Of concern for the eco-feminist movement is the way in which land is acquired by extractive industries operating in Uganda; illegal evictions following false land claims, and inadequate compensation for land rights are common. On the island of Buvuma, chosen for the next phase of the government’s ambitious oil palm development project, the tensions between economic growth, gender justice and environmental protection are marked.Members of the Ganyana Women’s Group on Buvuma Island: women here have demonstrated a deep understanding of the value of land and the natural services it provides to their families. Photo: Thomas Lewton for MongabayCase study: Buvuma Island“At first, when I used to pass by, most of the islands had forests, but along the landing sites you could see timber waiting for boats to be taken across. Then after a few years it was charcoal,” says Jameson Muberwa, a government agricultural adviser who moved to Buvuma, a tropical island along Lake Victoria’s northern shore, in 1995. “Now you no longer see trees being brought along the landing site.”Between 1991 and 2014, the population of Buvuma increased fivefold to 90,000 people as cheap land and the hope of work encouraged mass immigration from the mainland. Much of the island’s enduring mosaic of indigenous forest, grass savanna, and wetlands quickly became agricultural land for smallholder farmers. Now dramatic changes are carving up the landscape once again with the imminent development of a 10,000-hectare oil palm plantation on the island, part of the government’s Vegetable Oil Development Project, in partnership with BIDCO.“The palm oil project is a welcome development for the people,” says Gladys Nalunkuma, Buvuma district’s natural resources officer. She notes how dwindling fish stocks in the lake, crop failures linked to reduced rainfall in recent years, and the decline of the timber and charcoal industries have plunged many residents into poverty. One-third of the land designated for oil palm has been earmarked for around 2,000 local farmers, who will supply palm fruit to BIDCO.Yet many of Buvuma’s residents are questioning whether they have anything to gain from the project.“For us local people who didn’t go to school, we would be earning very little,” says Shmirah Nansimbe, chairperson of the Bukigindi Tree Planting Women’s Group. Through dialogues with women on the nearby Ssesse Islands, the location of BIDCO’s original 10,000-hectare plantation, which began operating in 2003, eco-feminists share knowledge about the realities of industrial oil palm.While the Ssesse Islands project has created around 3,700 jobs, most of these jobs pay less than prevailing wages in the area — and often with poor working conditions. As a result, much of the workforce are migrants to the island, while local communities struggle to continue fishing, farming and living from forest products because of the environmental degradation. With smallholders’ land now occupied by oil palm, food prices on the island have also risen. Despite concerns that these conditions will be replicated on Buvuma, some residents have had little choice over whether they sell their land to the government.“When BIDCO came in they didn’t teach people about the positives and negatives,” says Mariam Nakatu, who is leading a legal case against the government by 250 evicted households of Buvuma. “One morning you just see BIDCO people coming with the local chairman, and they would say that the land title has already been given away [by the landlord].”She describes how land surveyors would then discreetly transfer the tenancy and occupancy rights of large segments of land to their associates, so they would only receive a fraction of the compensation they were due. A report published in 2019 by the NGOs Tropenbos International and the Ecological Trends Alliance found that the Uganda Land Commission skipped processes during land acquisition and created leaseholds in favor of BIDCO. According to the report, “free, prior informed consent was not strictly adhered to,” while a murky valuation and compensation process alongside a lack of legal representation led to “high numbers of very disgruntled” residents on the island.“When BIDCO came in they didn’t teach people about the positives and negatives,” says Mariam Nakatu, who is leading a legal case against the government brought by more than 600 evicted residents of Buvuma. Photo: Thomas Lewton for Mongabay.By bringing women to the fore during land negotiations, the eco-feminist movement hopes to slow the sale of land for extractive industries. Women, Namanya says, have a deeper understanding of the value of land and the natural services it provides to families, and so are less willing to sell in the first place. “Our husbands sell the land that we are farming on without us knowing, and when they receive the money they run off and marry other wives,” says Benine Naluyima, of the Ganyana Women’s Group, a cooperative making charcoal-saving stoves and replanting trees on the island.Seeking out alternative, sustainable livelihoods on Buvuma, the Bukigindi Tree Planting Women’s Group has also replanted 18 hectares (45 acres) of degraded land, which was once protected rainforest, with indigenous species such as mahogany and musizi. Nansimbe leads the group up a hillside, pointing out the crops the community is growing in the protective shade of young trees. Gradually, as the forest thickens, they will have a renewed source of firewood and other forest products.Yet the process of regeneration is slow, and their work is becoming more challenging as the climate changes. “The sun is shining too much during the dry season now, and it’s difficult to get water to the trees from the lake,” Nansimbe says.Considering the strength of the palm oil industry, and the government’s support of it, others are willing to compromise. Betty Kabwaalu Nanyonjo, who grew up on the Ssesse Islands, regularly visits Buvuma, sharing her experiences and advising women not to sell their land. “People from outside coming to buy your land. Is that development?” she asks. Yet Nanyonjo encourages women to “get involved” in growing oil palm. “Let the people grow the oil palm and the investors buy the oil,” she says. “You welcome the project, because whether you like it or not the project will take off.”The Bukigindi Tree Planting Women’s Group has replanted 18 hectares (45 acres) of degraded land near Bugoma with indigenous species. Photo: Thomas Lewton for Mongabaylast_img read more

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first_imgA little over 20 million square kilometers, or about 15 percent, of Earth’s terrestrial surface is currently protected. It is likely the world will achieve the goal set out in Aichi Biodiversity Target 11 of the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2010-2020 to set aside “at least 17 per cent of terrestrial and inland water areas” by 2020.But a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) last month finds that the emphasis on rapidly scaling up protected area coverage to meet Aichi Biodiversity Target 11 has led to the establishment of many PAs that are not successfully reducing anthropogenic pressures on the land.Most strikingly, in South America, Southeast Asia, and Sub-Saharan Africa, average pressures from human activities inside PAs, especially conversion of land to agriculture, was found to be significantly higher than in unprotected areas. As the world races to meet the goal of protecting 17 percent of Earth’s land surface, a new study looks at how effective protected areas are at reducing human pressures — and finds that there is considerable room for improvement.According to the World Database on Protected Areas, 241,368 protected areas (PAs) have been designated around the world, mostly on land. A little over 20 million square kilometers, or about 15 percent, of Earth’s terrestrial surface is currently protected. It is likely the world will achieve the goal set out in Aichi Biodiversity Target 11 of the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2010-2020 to set aside “at least 17 per cent of terrestrial and inland water areas” by 2020.But a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) last month finds that the emphasis on rapidly scaling up protected area coverage to meet Aichi Biodiversity Target 11 has led to the establishment of many PAs that are not successfully reducing anthropogenic pressures on the land.Researchers at the University of Cambridge in the UK compiled data from 12,315 PAs in 152 countries to examine how well they reduce pressures from human activities. The researchers used satellite data to assess agricultural expansion and the number of lights visible at night in protected areas, together with census and crop yield data, to determine the extent of human encroachment into the study areas between 1995 and 2010. They then compared the findings for each PA with comparable areas of unprotected land in order to determine whether or not the PAs were actually impeding human encroachment.The researchers found that human pressures have increased in a majority of PAs in every region of the globe over the past 15 years. “Rapidly establishing new protected areas to meet global targets without providing sufficient investment and resourcing on the ground is unlikely to halt the unfolding extinction crisis,” Jonas Geldmann of the University of Cambridge Conservation Research Institute, the study’s lead author, said in a statement.Most strikingly, in South America, Southeast Asia, and Sub-Saharan Africa, average pressures from human activities inside PAs, especially conversion of land to agriculture, was found to be significantly higher than in unprotected areas. “Our study suggests that protected areas in more remote and wild parts of the tropics have experienced alarming increases in human pressure since 1995,” Geldmann said. “These places house a disproportionately high amount of the Earth’s biodiversity, and play an irreplaceable role in maintaining our most threatened species.”Not all of the study’s findings were negative. PAs in the Northern Hemisphere and Australia, for instance, were found to have been effective at slowing human encroachment over the past 15 years when compared to unprotected areas. The researchers say that PAs in nations with higher ranks on the Human Development Index tended to see the smallest increases in human pressures.Previous studies of the threats human activities pose to PAs have often been limited to forests, and Geldmann and co-authors note in the study that their results largely confirm those studies’ conclusions that protected areas can help reduce rates of deforestation. But PAs in other habitats, like savannahs, are not meeting with similar success, the present study found.Increases in human activity in the protected areas of East and Central Africa were especially high; for example, cropland inside PAs designated to conserve Sub-Saharan grasslands increased nearly twice as much as it did in unprotected areas. Agriculture inside PAs in grassland habitats in Southeast Asia expanded 8 percent more than in unprotected areas. Similarly, agricultural expansion in forested areas of South America outside of the Amazon was 10 percent higher in PAs than outside of them.“Our study shows that agriculture is the driving force behind threats to protected areas, particularly in the tropics,” Geldmann said. “Our data does not reveal the causes, but we suspect factors that play a major role include rapid population growth, lack of funding, and higher levels of corruption. Additionally, most unprotected land suitable for agriculture is already farmed.”Geldmann added that the study’s findings highlight the importance of establishing PAs with “the right funding, management and community engagement that is needed” to ensure their success. “Important ambitions to protect 17% of land by the end of this decade, expected to increase to 30% at a pivotal meeting next year in China, will not mean much if not accompanied by enough resources to ensure the preservation of precious habitats.”Yosemite National Park in the United States. Photo by King of Hearts, licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0.CITATIONS• Geldmann, J., Manica, A., Burgess, N. D., Coad, L., & Balmford, A. (2019). A global-level assessment of the effectiveness of protected areas at resisting anthropogenic pressures. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 201908221. doi:10.1073/pnas.1908221116• UNEP-WCMC, IUCN and NGS (2019). Protected Planet Live Report 2019. UNEP-WCMC, IUCN and NGS: Cambridge UK; Gland, Switzerland; and Washington, D.C., USA. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Agriculture, Anthropocene, Conservation, Deforestation, Encroachment, Environment, Land Use Change, Protected Areas, Research center_img Article published by Mike Gaworeckilast_img read more

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