first_imgLEADING JOCKEY PRAT WINS SIX RACES ON SUNDAY, NEARLY TYING THE LEGENDARY PINCAY’S SEVEN-WIN DAY 33 YEARS AGOHIS BIG DAY IS HIGHLIGHTED BY VICTORY ABOARD BELLAFINA IN GRADE III DESERT STORMER STAKESARCADIA, Calif. (May 17, 2020)–With six wins to his credit through nine races, including a victory aboard Bellafina in the Grade III, $100,000 Desert Stormer Stakes, French-born jockey Flavien Prat was poised to join the legendary Laffit Pincay, Jr. on Sunday as the only other jockey to ever record seven wins in a single day at The Great Race Place as one dance remained on the 10-race card.Alas, it wasn’t to be, as Prat ended up a non-threatening sixth aboard 9-5 favorite Winning Element in the 10th, a one mile allowance for 3-year-olds and up.In notching six wins, Prat nonetheless joined some very select company, as the feat had only been accomplished 12 times dating back to Dec. 25, 1934.  The first jockey to ever win six in a day at Santa Anita was the immortal Bill Shoemaker, a 17-time leading rider here who won six races on Feb. 23, 1962.(Pincay’s seven-win day came on March 14, 1987).With three jockeys turning the six-win trick twice each, Pincay (Oct. 23, 1973 & March 4, 1981), Sandy Hawley (Feb. 20, 1976 & March 26, 1976) and Darrell McHargue (March 5, 1978 & Oct. 25, 1979), five riders, Steve Valdez (Oct. 15, 1973), Patrick Valenzuela (Oct. 21, 1978), Martin Pedroza (Oct. 31, 1992), Corey Nakatani (April 23, 2000) and Rafael Bejarano (April 8, 2006) each did it once each.“That’s quite an amazing group of riders,” said Prat, 27, when apprised of those who had preceded him in winning six in a day.  “It was one of those days when everything you do is right.  It’s so good to be back racing here and I rode good horses all weekend.“Even though we had the break (with no racing until this past Friday, dating back to March 27), I thought I was fit and ready to come back.  I’ve never worked out so hard at home.  I’ve got a stationary bike and I lifted weights, not heavy, but enough to maintain flexibility.”With 55 wins through 44 racing days, Prat is 13 winners in front of Abel Cedillo in the current jockey standings and he’s looking forward to continued success this coming Memorial Day Weekend.“I’m really excited to ride War of Will for Mark Casse in the Shoemaker Mile (Grade I, $300,000 on May 25).  He was one of the best 3-year-olds in America last year and he’s proven he likes the grass.  I think the distance is going to be very good for him.“We’ve got good business all weekend and I know United is doing very well for Richard Mandella.  He was training great for Dubai, but we weren’t able to run and I think he’s sitting on a big race here in the (Charles) Whittingham (Grade II, $200,000 at 1 ¼ miles on turf) on Saturday.”Prat’s six-win hit parade began in Sunday’s first race aboard the Peter Miller-trained Querelle ($10.00).  His next win came in the fourth, aboard Phil D’Amato’s Noor Khan ($7.60), the fifth aboard Leonard Powell’s Bud Knight ($4.80), the sixth aboard Collusion Illusion ($7.40), the eighth aboard Simon Callaghan’s Bellafina ($3.60) and the ninth with Carava’s Harper’s Gallop ($8.00).With six wins from his nine mounts, Prat’s win percentage for the day totals 66 percent.Racing resumes at Santa Anita with a four-day week on Friday.  First post time for a nine-race card is at 12:30 p.m.  Due to the current pandemic, there is no public admittance.  Fans are encouraged to watch and wager via 1stBet.com or through Xpressbet.  For additional information, please visit santaanita.com or call (626) 574-RACE.last_img read more

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first_imgIn a given year, an estimated one to two million wildlife-vehicle collisions occurs in the United States alone.A meta-analysis comparing data on the effectiveness of road-kill mitigation efforts found that fencing yields the best results.Although the most effective road-kill reduction measures can be the most costly, the study emphasizes that they have high returns on investment. The United States alone has over four million miles of roadways, according to the Federal Highway Administration (FHA). Wildlife is threatened along every mile of this road network, as well as roads around the world, but policy makers and researchers are working on prevention methods to lessen the number of wildlife-vehicle collisions (WVCs).In a study published in November 2016, Dr. Trina Rytwinski and a multi-institutional team of researchers analyzed data from 50 studies in North America, Europe and Oceania on the effectiveness of road mitigation efforts.  Forty-one studies were conducted in North America.A 2008 FHA study reported that the United States crash database records contain about 300,000 WVCs. However, the study estimates that the real number of collisions is between one and two million, as many go unreported.Two elephants block the roadway in Kruger National Park, Kenya. Photo credit: Sue Palminteri.WVCs can have consequences for both the motorist and the animal. Impacts on people include vehicle damage, emotional distress, and travel delays. Although injuries and fatalities caused by WVCs are rare, they do occasionally occur when the vehicle strikes larger animals.Animals are more often faced with death when WVCs occur, and deaths can seriously impact wildlife populations. The FHA reported that road mortality is one of the major threats to 21 threatened or endangered species in the U.S.Comparing wildlife-vehicle collision prevention methodsThe analysis compared the relative effectiveness of different strategies in reducing WVCs, as well as the effectiveness of the various methods in protecting particular taxa.Avoiding WVCs entails strategic approaches in influencing both the motorist’s behavior and the animal’s behavior along the roads, and the current study analyzed the effectiveness of both techniques.The published studies reviewed by the researchers described or implemented over 40 types of WVC mitigation methods. The data collected came mainly from assessments of crossing structures (under- and over-passes), fencing, reflectors and animal detectors.Roadway structures are set up to reduce wildlife road mortality by either blocking wildlife movements across roads or assisting in them. Technologies such as wildlife reflectors and mirrors, lighting, and the more costly animal detection systems, which include radar detection and laser tripwires, focus on reducing collisions with large mammals.The analysis also examined if combinations of methods, such as the use of both fencing and crossing structures, are more effective than single methods.Certain methods, such as motorist warning signs, speed reducers such as speed bumps, reflectors or repellants, might be chosen because they are cheaper to set up and maintain, but they may be ineffective. More expensive measures, including fencing, crossing structures and animal detectors, may more effectively reduce collisions but may be too costly or lack public support.In Canada, an example of a motorist alert sign warns against the possibility of moose, bear and wolf crossings. Photo credit: Antony Stanely, Creative Commons.Despite the efforts of many localities to reduce the WVCs, the effectiveness of their mitigation actions is largely unknown.According to the study, previous analyses of approaches for WVC avoidance lacked research methods such as baseline data collection, comparisons between areas with the mitigation measure and control sites, and comparisons of different areas using the same methods.The lack of knowledge of the most suitable mitigation strategies for particular situations or taxa makes it difficult to determine which would best suit an area’s individual purposes.ResultsAnalysis from the 50 studies revealed that areas using at least one mitigation method experienced 40 percent fewer WVC incidents than control sites where no methods were used.The researchers found that, between target and control areas, fencing alone reduced road-kill by 86 percent.However, when fencing was combined with the crossing structures, they found that the road-kill rates reduced by a much lower 51 percent. In contrast this combination showed a far greater reduction in wildlife mortality than crossing structures alone, which surprisingly showed a 23 percent increase in roadkill.“One could argue that crossing structures without fencing are not intended to reduce road-kill in any case, but rather to increase movement of animals across roads,” the study said. “However, the fact that some researchers measure road mortality before and after the installation of a crossing structure without fencing means that reduced road-kill was at least part of the objective for the structure.”Along the Trans-Canada highway in Banff, Alberta, an example of a wildlife crossing structure is built over the road. Photo credit: m01229, Creative Commons.Although these results could be skewed by differences among the contributing studies, they could also indicate that adding fencing to crossing structures would improve reduction rates and that there is no added road mortality benefit in adding crossing structures when fencing is already installed.Additionally, the researchers found that animal detection systems resulted in a 57 percent decrease in road-kill. In an interview with Mongabay-Wildtech, Rytwinski suggested that this technology should be installed in conjunction with fencing, at a gap in the fence or at its end.The inexpensive option of wildlife reflectors resulted in only a one percent reduction rate. According to the study, wildlife initially reacts to the reflectors, but animals eventually become habituated and their response declines.“While manufacturers often claim that reflectors are a scientifically proven method for reducing deer-vehicle collisions, their long-term effectiveness is rarely considered and road planners should not take these claims at face value,” the study said.Reducing road-kill successfullyOverall, the study’s results provide evidence that wildlife fencing should be included in any attempt to reduce road-kill. However, cost is often a factor when communities are deciding on the best road-kill reduction strategy.More costly options such as fencing, typically made of page wire or cyclone fence, can have customized designs in areas that experience more deaths of climbing or burrowing animals, better excluding these animals from the roads.A python lays along the roadside in Khao Yai National Park, Thailand. Photo credit: Sue Palminteri.“For example, for species that climb, some fences have been designed with a flat surface, or a ‘floppy top’ or ‘overhanging lip’ to prevent them from climbing over,” Rytwinski said. “Some studies have also used electrified mats to discourage animals from entering roadway at designed breaks in fences.”Fences are also often equipped with wildlife jump-outs or escape ramps, in case the animal is stranded on the road between fences.Rytwinski said that the cost of crossing structures will vary depending on their design, dimensions and materials used. However, they are generally more costly than fencing.“The cost-benefit of measures should also be considered because many of the more expensive measures (e.g. animal detection systems, crossing structures with associated fencing), have shown high returns on investment, with the ongoing benefits exceeding their costs over time,” the study said.To enhance the effectiveness of fencing, Rytwinski recommended that they be properly and regularly maintained. Additionally, she said that tactics for reducing road-kill for a single species, such as a loose mesh fence for large ungulates, should be avoided, as it would be more cost-effective and beneficial to a wider range of species to install a single fence with different sizes of mesh.According to the study, more comprehensive research needs to be completed to better understand how to minimize road-kill.To best benefit the various animals moving across a given stretch of roadway, the research team suggests performing a detailed analysis of the most threatened animals in an area and decide which species to target in the roadway management plan.Banner image is of a Sandhill crane crossing a road. Photo credit: Adam Buzzo, Creative Commons.CitationsClark, L. L. (2015). Wildlife Vehicle Collisions Improved Information to Monitor and Mitigate Collision Risks and Enhance Conservation Management. Master’s Capstone Theses. Paper 28.Mastro, L. L., Conover, M. R., and Frey, N. S. (2009). Deer–vehicle collision prevention techniques. Human–Wildlife Interactions. Paper 75.Rytwinski, T., Soanes, K., Jaeger, J. A. G., Fahrig, L., Findlay, C. S., Houlahan, J., … Van Der Grift, E. A. (2016). How effective is road mitigation at reducing road-kill? A meta-analysis. PLoS ONE, 11(11). Analysis, data, Human-wildlife Conflict, low-tech, Research, Technology, Wildtech Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by dbettermannlast_img read more

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first_imgArticle published by Sue Palminteri Artificial Intelligence, data, Fisheries, Forests, Illegal Fishing, Illegal Logging, Technology, Wildtech A recent tech-based event offered the extensive experience of three panelists on the frontlines of applying technology to conserve a key ecosystem.Directors of Global Forest Watch, Rainforest Connection, and Protected Seas discussed how technology’s role expands, as its precision, reach, and cost-effectiveness continue to improve.Panelists stressed the need for technology to connect people to each other and to the species and ecosystems in need of conservation support.Nevertheless, the panelists agreed, information is not enough; achieving conservation outcomes requires “accounting for the human factor” in maintaining transparency and good governance. Can technology drive conservation?That was the question Mongabay founder Rhett Butler recently posed to a panel of three specialists on the frontlines of applying technology to conserve key species and ecosystems.On September 27, 2017, Mongabay and the Commonwealth Club of California hosted the panel, who discussed with a full-house audience in San Francisco the possibilities for advanced technology to aid conservation efforts worldwide.Butler moderated the panel, which consisted of Crystal Davis, director of Global Forest Watch, Topher White, founder and CEO of Rainforest Connection, and Virgil Zetterlind, director of Protected Seas and Chief Technology Officer for Conserve I.O.The panelists provided an overview of technology’s potential to support conservation efforts, some of the conditions that enable technology to play this role effectively, and other factors that may affect its application to conservation action. Watch the full event video here:Tech continues to be importantThe panelists agreed that technology will likely play an increasingly larger role in conserving biodiversity.Global Forest Watch, for example, compiles and regularly updates tree cover data for the whole world using satellite imagery made freely available by the U.S. space agency NASA, combined with novel processing algorithms and online analysis tools.Davis highlighted the ever-increasing potential of technology to improve conservation outcomes, remarking, “The algorithms are getting smarter, the satellite imagery is becoming more precise, and more and more people around the world are getting connected and so are able to access this information.”Zetterlind’s NGO, Protected Seas, applies technology to practical ocean conservation, such as contributing to Whale Alert, NOAA’s program for reducing ship strikes of right whales, and developing an interactive mapping app of marine protected areas, mpa.protectedseas.net.In some cases, such as with right whales, said Zetterlind, for technology to make a conservation impact, it must help us “first understand the basics [of] how many right whales are there, where do they live, how do they use the habitats where they live, so that we can learn how to minimize our human impact on their mortality.” The Whale Alert app allows anyone to log whale sightings, providing whale managers with real-time information on the distribution of whale populations that can improve management.A north Atlantic right whale surfaces. Their populations have not yet recovered from the whaling era. Photo credit: Moira Brown and New England Aquarium.Tech needs to connectWhite agreed that, in today’s ever-more connected world, technology must help bring together people and key conservation issues. His Rainforest Connection startup repurposes used mobile phones, paired with solar panels and placed high in trees, to record sounds of wildlife and human activity (e.g. chainsaws) in protected rainforest sites. Specifically, White pointed out, technology helps link on-the-ground forest guardians with the rest of the world, where  people are more concerned with what’s happening right now than long-term effects of human actions, even those that harm the world around us.“If we can take what’s happening in these really remote places and turn it into a real-time connection to people around the world,” he said, “there’s a chance of making them feel like it’s not so abstract and really try to garner their interest around it. And that interest, in and of itself, can have a really big effect on the morale and the effectiveness, and, honestly, the longevity, of these people out there protecting these areas.”All three panelists’ organizations promote their technologies primarily through local partners, including indigenous groups, fishing communities, protected areas, and NGOs. The speakers agreed that making technology easy to use—through free access, low cost, and intuitive interfaces—was critical to putting it in the hands of the public, specifically people in the field who can combine it with direct experience.Huge buttress of a rainforest tree in Taman Negara National Park, Malaysia. Photo credit: Sue PalminteriInformation is not enoughNevertheless, the panelists agreed, generating more information does not necessarily translate to effective conservation. They emphasized the importance of transparency and good governance in ensuring that the adoption of any technology does, indeed, help to conserve the target resource, whether that be forests or fish.“Even if you have perfect information and perfect technology, you still need humans to take an action that will be positive for forests,” said Davis.She explained that some government users of Global Forest Watch face corruption challenges that prevent them from directly confronting logging or agricultural firms that are harvesting illegally.Zetterlind mentioned that transparency and proper incentives in implementing technology are particularly important where enforcers are carrying out some of the illegal fishing. Even with surveillance technology, he added, “a key to technology success is accounting for the human factor from the beginning…and to make sure we’re providing a tool that really addresses the local need.”His group’s Marine Monitor, a radar-plus-software system designed to monitor boats around marine protected areas, must address, “the negative perception of this radar as it’s, you know, tattletaling on my friends who are doing illegal fishing, but can this radar also provide safety to these boaters and bad weather or other circumstances…are there other tangible benefits [of our technologies] to a community?”The panelists also answered questions about data availability, collaboration, and ways tech developers can help. You can hear the entire discussion via the full event video here.Forest in Nyungwe National Park, Rwanda. Photo credit: Sue Palmintericenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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first_imgThe people of Indonesia’s Aru Islands fended off a land grab that would have led to the destruction of a vast area of rainforest, through a sophisticated grassroots campaign that held power to account.The campaign holds lessons for rural communities facing similar threats, but their prospects have been diminished by new legislation that strengthens the hand of the powerful and corrupt.The legislation has provoked mass street protests in the capital city, Jakarta. As in Aru, it now comes down to civil society to ensure that democracy prevails. This article was produced in partnership with The Gecko Project.When Mika Ganobal, a 35-year-old civil servant, mounted the top of a van in the ramshackle town of Dobo to rouse a crowd of protesters, in 2013, it was an act that said much about how Indonesia had changed in its first 15 years of democracy.Two decades earlier, the form of mass demonstration he helped organize, with thousands of people flooding the streets to protests against the government and a private company, would have been unthinkable. The tight grip of the authoritarian Suharto regime, and the constant threat of state violence, would have suppressed the very idea.The act said just as much about how Indonesia had not changed. Almost a decade after they had elected their own district head, for the first time, the people of Aru discovered that that district head had sought to lease the majority of their land to investors, to be cleared for a giant sugar plantation.The most immediate failing in democracy was apparent: a politician, elected by these people, had taken a decision so manifestly against their wishes, and entirely without their consent. Direct elections, at least in Aru, had delivered a leader taking decisions in the interests of a private investor above those of his constituents.The 28 licenses issued by Theddy Tengko to the Menara Group covered two thirds of the Aru Islands.In most cases where community land is granted to private corporations in Indonesia, whether for mining or plantations, a deeper malaise usually sets in. District and provincial parliaments, police and ministries all act to support the transfer of land to investors, without the consent of the people. With thousands of conflicts over land across the country, many communities that push back fail to break through the noise and attract the attention of the media or influential institutions in the capital, Jakarta.The breakdown in democratic accountability begins with local officials who exercise direct control over land. But almost all of the bodies that should subsequently act as a check on power, in a functioning democracy, fail too.In Aru something different happened. Eight months after the movement was born, through a sophisticated campaign chronicled in-depth in “Saving Aru,” a recent article by The Gecko Project and Mongabay, the Aruese forced the government to cancel the project. They protested, gained media attention, deployed the new potential of social media, obtained the backing of district and provincial politicians, secured parliamentary hearings, and forced influential institutions to look into the case, before the project was finally killed by a government minister.Protesters in Aru, 2013.The obvious question is whether the methods the Aruese deployed could be replicated in other localized social movements to defend land rights in Indonesia. It’s a question that arises at an important inflection point in the nation’s political history, as the government embarks on an assault on the very things that helped save Aru. As Indonesia moves into its third decade of democracy, then, does it become more or less likely that other movements like it will win?Saving AruFrom the very beginning, the sugar plantation project should have sounded alarm bells. The first permits for the project were issued by the district head, Theddy Tengko, just one month before he was charged with corruption for embezzling millions of dollars from the state budget. They were issued less than a week before he stood for re-election, in a campaign in which he was accused of illegally distributing money to voters.Theddy was later convicted of corruption over his raids on the district budget, but there was no scrutiny of his decision to grant licenses across two-thirds of the entire district. The Aruese activists would later discover he had issued them illegally, without a legally required, public assessment of how the project would impact the people and environment of the district.The project, the brainchild of a corrupt politician, ran roughshod over the rule of law and any safeguards the Aruese might have hoped would protect them.A woman sells vegetables at the market in Dobo, in 2017. Aru is one of the least economically developed areas in Indonesia, but the elected district head embezzled millions of dollars from the district budget. By Leo Plunkett/The Gecko Project.The Save Aru activists unearthed and repeatedly exposed the illegalities, the flawed science underpinning the project, and the groundswell of opposition to it. They broke through into the public consciousness by using social media platforms that buzzed with news, photos and graphics, generating attention across Indonesia and abroad.They cleverly marshaled this attention to secure the backing of scientists, the biggest university in the provincial capital, the Protestant Church of Maluku, a provincial legislator named Mercy Barends, two national NGOs, and a famous R&B artist. Before long these individuals and institutions, and not just the activists, were all loudly outing the improprieties.This helped them catch the attention of government watchdogs in Jakarta, notably an influential presidential agency, known as UKP4, and the Corruption Eradication Commission, or KPK. These wielded influence and, more importantly, teeth; the KPK’s record in arresting officials from the upper echelons of the state has earned it fear and respect in equal measure.The Aru activists attracted the attention from across Indonesia and the world through social media. Their supporters set messages of support via Twitter, through photos in which they held up the hashtag #SaveAru.In the end, it was Zulkifli Hasan, then the minister of forestry, who canceled the project, just as he was signing off on the destruction of vast areas of forest and indigenous lands elsewhere in Indonesia.That they were able to win depended in large part on the attention of powerful agencies. But it was this ecosystem of other actions — protest, media attention, online petitions, the support of politicians and “softer” institutions —  that brought that pressure to bear. In that respect, no one thing killed the project. It was a groundswell of public opposition, filtered through multiple principles that can only thrive in a democratic society.The methods used by the Aruese (outlined in more detail in a separate article by The Gecko Project and Mongabay) may hold lessons for any community facing the same challenge. Few campaigns are likely to generate the same level of attention that Save Aru did. But the principles of gathering and ruthlessly exposing evidence, intelligent use of social media, and of seeking support wherever it can be found, could still have an effect.Yet Aru is also a cautionary tale. The lengths the activists had to go to, to secure the cancellation of a project so demonstrably flawed, exposed a political system functioning largely in the interests of the powerful.What happened next, on the national stage, tells us that the political establishment in Indonesia were fully aware that was the case. And events in the past few weeks show how the fight to change this system is as vital now as it ever has been.Saving democracyThe project was cancelled just months before President Joko Widodo took office in 2014. He was the first president to come from outside the military or political elite, elected on a wave of belief that he would re-inject energy into reformasi, the transition to democracy.Millions of indigenous people believed a campaign promise that he would recognize and protect 12.7 million hectares of customary land, safeguarding them from precisely the kind of top-down project that threatened Aru. In the nine priorities for his administration he promised “clean, effective, democratic and reliable governance,” restoring faith in democratic institutions, and a reform of the “system and law enforcement” to rid them of corruption.Joko Widodo in October 2014, when many rural Indonesians held out hope he would end the hegemony of oligarchs and land grabbers. Photo by Uyeah.The statements were clear. Jokowi, as he is known, would redress the balance of power through the infrastructure of government, making both politicians and the oligarchs who controlled land, plantations and mines accountable to the disempowered. It was made clear in particular that he would strengthen the hand of the KPK, the nation’s most trusted institution, which had done more than any other to blunt the worst instincts of the political elite.But neither the promised land rights reform nor the rebalancing of power through institutions ever arrived. Communities continued to lose their land, and land rights conflicts simmered unresolved through Jokowi’s first term. As it drew to a close he finally froze new permits for palm oil plantations, a particularly virulent driver of human rights abuses. But that measure is a sticking plaster that doesn’t address the systemic problems the Aruese and so many others have fought against.In the past few weeks, on the cusp of Jokowi’s second term, that balance of power has lurched further in the wrong direction. The national parliament launched an assault on the very laws and institutions they needed to reinforce. Representatives have pursued a broad and swift legislative agenda that, critics in civil society say, will ease the transfer of rights and resources from the poor and increase the prospects that those who push back will face criminalization at the hands of the police.Above all, an amendment to the KPK Law threatens to “destroy” the agency, attacking “the very institutional features and powers” the KPK deployed against the powerful. As recently as March this year, the KPK itself had proposed a quite different set of reforms, one that would criminalize the corrupt sell-off of land by politicians through influence trading and force courts to take the social and environmental impact of corruption into account.This government assault on the state only diminishes the prospect that other campaigns like Save Aru can succeed, by eroding the few features of the system that worked in favor of the Aruese. But there are parallels between the response to the government actions in Aru, in 2013, and across the country today. Just as the people of Aru once flooded the streets of Dobo, tens of thousands of students took to the streets across the country to object to the assault on democracy.Student protesters in the streets of Jakarta, in front of the parliament building, in September 2019.The measures the students are demonstrating against almost all entrench the power of elite interests, by diminishing civil liberties and the capacity of ordinary citizens to defend the disempowered. They also emerged in part because of a disaffection with Jokowi, the “good” leader who was supposed to defend those principles. His actions are a profound illustration that democratic health cannot be invested in the executive branch, but must rest in the institutions that pull against any powerful leader, amplifying their good instincts and taking the sting out of their worst.Indeed, the students have articulated a broad and considered set of demands, aimed at balancing the power of the government, stemming the environmental destruction it has overseen, and preventing the criminalization of communities who stand up against it. The fight for rural communities in Aru, and places like it, is now at the heart of the national consciousness. Their actions reveal that a deep belief in the same principles is coursing across Indonesian society.In both cases the protests captured the attention of a global audience. In 2014, international attention helped push agencies in Jakarta to focus their attention on the fate of Aru. Today it may help focus the thoughts of the new Jokowi administration, to recognize that corruption and human rights violations could hamper its vision for economic development. A coalition of almost 100 organizations from across the world has urged the government to uphold anti-corruption principles agreed in international forums.Ultimately, the Save Aru campaign is a reminder that even in the most unlikely circumstances, social movements can hold government to account, even when the levers of power are gripped firmly by the powerful.Since the fall of Suharto, Indonesia has been held up as a successful democracy in large part due to its free and fair presidential elections. The actions of Theddy Tengko a decade ago, and Jokowi today, reveal the limitations of elections as a tool of accountability. They show that democracy doesn’t reside in an elected leader, but in the people and institutions who could hold them to account.Read Saving Aru, the story of how the Aruese people organized to successfully defend their forested islands from a massive plantation proposal, here.Banner image: Mika Ganobal in the forest near his home village of Lorang, central Aru. By Leo Plunkett/The Gecko Project. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Erik Hoffnercenter_img Activism, Conservation, Corruption, Environment, Environmental Activism, Featured, Forests, Governance, Palm Oil, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforests, Tropical Forests last_img read more

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first_imgFILE – Spain’s Rafael Nadal celebrates after defeating Bulgaria’s Gregor Dimitrov in their semifinal singles match of the Monte Carlo Tennis Masters tournament in Monaco, Saturday, April 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)Spain’s world number one Rafael Nadal heads what organizers say is the most formidable line-up for Queen’s, the historic grass tournament in London that is a key warm-up event for Wimbledon.Aside from Nadal and five others from the present top 10, the tournament is likely to see Britain’s two-time Wimbledon champion Andy Murray — a five-time winner of the Queen’s title — play as he makes a comeback after hip surgery.ADVERTISEMENT Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding Jo Koy draws ire for cutting through Cebu City traffic with ‘wang-wang’ LATEST STORIES Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Scientists seek rare species survivors amid Australia flames P16.5-M worth of aid provided for Taal Volcano eruption victims — NDRRMC Wenger in demand as he prepares for life after Arsenal In fight vs corruption, Duterte now points to Ayala, MVP companies as ‘big fish’ Green group flags ‘overkill’ use of plastic banderitas in Manila Sto. Niño feastcenter_img MOST READ View comments Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Other stars who are presently outside the top 10 such as Australian firebrand Nick Kyrgios and Switzerland’s Stan Wawrinka — who needs the Wimbledon title to complete a sweep of Grand Slam titles — have also confirmed they will play as will last year’s champion Feliciano Lopez.“To see six of the world’s top 10 players on our entry list before you even get to the names Andy Murray, Stan Wawrinka, Milos Raonic, Feliciano Lopez, Nick Kyrgios and the British number one Kyle Edmund really whets the appetite for a fantastic week of tennis,” said tournament director Stephen Farrow.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crown“We can’t wait to get started.”The tournament runs from June 18-24. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Truck driver killed in Davao del Sur road accident Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew ‘Stop romanticizing Pinoy resilience’last_img read more

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first_imgA report released today by UNFPA, the United Nations Population Fund together with the International Confederation of Midwives (ICM), the World Health Organization (WHO) and partners reveals that major deficits in the midwifery workforce occur in 73 countries where these services are most desperately needed. The report recommends new strategies to address these deficits and save millions of lives of women and newborns.The 73 African, Asian and Latin American countries represented in the State of the World’s Midwifery 2014: A Universal Pathway – A Woman’s Right to Health suffer 96 percent of the global burden of maternal deaths, 91 percent of stillbirths and 93 percent of newborn deaths, but have only 42 percent of the world’s midwives, nurses and doctors. The report urges countries to invest in midwifery education and training to contribute to closing the glaring gaps that exist. Investments in midwifery education and training at agreed international standards can yield – as a study from Bangladesh shows – a 1,600 percent return on investment.”Midwives make enormous contributions to the health of mothers and newborns and the well-being of entire communities. Access to quality health care is a basic human right. Greater investment in midwifery is key to making this right a reality for women everywhere,” said Dr. Babatunde Osotimehin, UNFPA Executive Director.Midwives have a crucial role to play in the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) 4 (decrease child death) and 5 (increase maternal health). When educated to international standards and within a fully functional health system, they can provide about 90 percent of the essential care to women and newborns and can potentially reduce maternal and newborn deaths by two thirds. Despite a steady decline in maternal deaths in the 73 countries that are covered in the report – dropping yearly by 3 percent since 1990 – and newborn deaths – decreasing by 1.9 percent per year since 1990 – there is more these countries need to do to address the severe shortage of midwifery care.“Midwives are central to midwifery care and the lives of women and newborn babies. The report precedes the Lancet Special Series on Midwifery, which together with the report will provide the evidence to guide all policy-makers in their quest to end preventable maternal and newborn deaths,” said ICM President Frances Day-Stirk.The report, launched at the 30th ICM Triennial Congress in Prague, Czech Republic highlights the progress made since the inaugural 2011 report and solutions to the barriers outlined in four key areas: availability, accessibility, acceptability and quality of midwifery services: A number of countries have effectively strengthened midwifery and improved access: Nearly half (45 percent) of the 73 countries have implemented measures to retain midwives in remote areas and 28 percent are increasing the recruitment and deployment of midwives, while 20 percent have implemented new codes of practice and 71 percent have improved information collection enabling countries to address shortages and education standards.Despite progress, inequities such as lack of access to services and poverty have increased within and among countries. There are still not enough adequately educated midwives to support the health of women and newborns, and this contributes to hundreds of thousands of preventable deaths annually.Today, only 22 percent of countries have potentially enough midwives to provide life-saving interventions to meet the needs of women and newborns, which leaves over three-fourths (78 percent) of the countries with severe shortages in proper care. As the population grows, so does the gap in critical resources and infrastructure, unless urgent action is taken.The 2014 report includes recommendations to close these gaps and to ensure all women have access to sexual, reproductive, maternal and newborn services. These includes issues such as preventive and supportive care from a collaborative midwifery team, immediate access to emergency services when needed, and completing post-secondary education. From a broader perspective, women should delay marriage, have access to healthy nutrition and receive four pre-birth care visits.“This report, like the Every Newborn Action Plan recently adopted by the World Health Assembly, sets a clear way forward. Both aim to encourage governments to allocate adequate resources for maternal and newborn health services within national health sector plans. This should include funds for the education and retention of midwives. We will continue to support countries to develop and strengthen their midwifery services as a critical intervention to save the lives of women and newborns,” said Dr. Flavia Bustreo, WHO Assistant Director-General for Family, Women’s and Children’s Health.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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first_img…as concerns raised over ailing health, poor performanceAmid concerns over the health condition of Public Service Minister, Dr Rupert Roopnaraine and whether he can effectively carry out his function as a Government Minister, the man himself has come out to defend the state of his health, explaining that he is in good shape to continue on the job.Public Service Minister, Dr Rupert RoopnaraineDr Roopnaraine’s statement comes in light of a recent letter written by Rohit Kanhai; a member of the overseas chapter of the Working People’s Alliance (WPA) and published in Guyana Times. Kanhai claimed Roopnaraine’s health is a cause for concern as well as the recent political issues that has been brought to the fore.The Minister who happens to be the leader of the WPA told sections of the media that while he does have some health related issues, it has never made him incapable of carrying out his daily functions as a Minister of Government, and he has no difficulty performing his duties.He said, “I don’t believe my health affects anything. Yes, I had some issues and was hospitalised for a few days but those issues have been fully dealt with and I am fully capable of fulfilling all duties.”Kanhai had said in his letter, “…Dr Roopnaraine’s health, which has dramatically complicated these matters. The volatile mix of political and health issues has led to an intolerable situation in which one cannot be discerned from the other. It is now obvious that Dr Roopnaraine’s health issues are being manipulated for political purposes. While there is a genuine concern by the President for the welfare of Dr Roopnaraine, it obscures the fact that it has also allowed for the manipulation of Roopnaraine to the disadvantage of the WPA. This state of affairs has now reached a breaking point.”In July 2017, the Minister had tendered his resignation with Government citing health reasons. His resignation came one month after he was removed as the substantive minister of the Education Ministry and placed as head of the newly created Public Service Department under the Ministry of the Presidency.However, after a meeting with President David Granger, the WPA leader withdrew his resignation and agreed to take up the post as Minister to head a department within the Ministry headed by Joseph Harmon.With close to one year in that position, there has been little said or done by that specific department. However, Dr Roopnaraine said he is still trying to get his feet wet and plans to hold meetings with all senior members within various departments that fall directly under the Public Service Department. He promised to provide a report that will speak to the accomplishments made since his take over.Dr Roopnarine who has been relatively quiet ever since being demoted also commented on the ongoing broil between WPA and People’s National Congress (PNC) members. He told sections of the media that the concerns raised by his own colleagues, Tacuma Ogunseye and Dr David Hinds – that the WPA has little to no influence in the coalition – does not warrant a withdrawal from the A Partnership for National Unity (APNU).He did however acknowledge the need for a meeting with WPA executives to “seriously discuss” the issue of Dr Hinds and Lincoln Lewis being removed as columnists with the State-owned Guyana Chronicle and other important matters of concerns, particularly as it relates to the WPA’s role in the coalition.“The issue I believe is that the leadership of the APNU of which the WPA is a part has not met recently. I don’t think the party has been disrespected. I believe this issue is best laid at the leadership of APNU; it is definitely something to be addressed,” the WPA explained.There have been growing concerns that the People’s National Congress continues to show disregard and disdain for the spirit and letter of agreements it signed with key coalition partners, with Dr Hinds stating that the PNC must recogniSe that it cannot win a free and fair election on its own at this juncture in Guyana’s history, as its core support group is no longer emotionally attached to the party.last_img read more

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first_img…22 petty offenders granted bailBY ASHRAF DABIE & RAMONA LUTHIIn light of the decision to relocate the inmates previously held at the now gutted Camp Street Prison, ranks attached to the Lusignan penitentiary were on Monday forced to open warning fire as a detainee attempted to escape the East Coast Demerara institution.This was due to a commotion which continued following the transfer of theHeavy Joint Services presence at the Lusignan Prisonhundreds of accused and convicted criminal offenders to the unfavourable detention centre in Lusignan.When Guyana Times visited the prison around midday on Monday, the incident had just broken out during which one of the inmates attempted to scale the high concrete fence that surrounded the facility. Based on information reaching this publication, his efforts were foiled by the ranks firing warning shots so as to avert his escape.Meanwhile, as a result of the incident, several measures were subsequently put in place to ensure that there was no reoccurrence. This included efforts to better cater for the detainees such as the setting up of tents, providing water and installing portable disposal systems.While these reinforcements were being transported to the prison, disgruntled family members of the imprisoned individuals began gathering outside of the facility, appealing for information regarding the wellbeing of their loved ones.The relatives were calling for information regarding the safety and whereabouts ofScores of family members of the prisoners gathered outside the Lusignan penitentiaryindividual prisoners, highlighting that they are still in the dark as it relates to their family members.Some hours after standing in the blazing sun, several persons began to lash out due to their frustration of not being properly informed.As such, it was not long after that some were given a chance to send in food for their detained relatives. However, the aggrieved family members were unable to send in water and clothing and still remained unapprised of the details.“My brother in there naked. He ain’t got no clothes… everything bun up. Why we can’t send in clothes and water?” an irate woman was heard questioning the officers.Furthermore, another woman relayed that ever since new broke of the fire, she has not been able to eat. Even with the passing of hours since the incident at the Camp Street Prison, she continues to search assiduously for information on her brother, all of which has been to no avail.Similar sentiments were expressed by the majority of those who were among the gathering with the hostile atmosphere being lifted only with the news of possible bail for some.Petty offenders granted bailIn an announcement on Monday, C Division (East Coast Demerara) Commander Calvin Brutus confirmed that Magistrates will preside over hearings at the Lusignan penitentiary where many prisoners are being held under tents.These revelations followed a meeting between the Director of Public Prosecutions, Shalimar Ali-Hack and acting Chief Justice Roxanne George at the High Court on Monday morning. Guyana Times understands that 22 petty offenders were released on bail.Additionally, this action was indicated by Public Security Minister Khemraj Ramjattan who pointed out during a press briefing on Sunday, that offenders who would have committed “petty” crime would be granted reduced bail.“We will have to do a couple of things that might be extraordinary in the circumstances that will see to it at least we make as much space as possible,” relayed the Minister amid the chaos.Ramjattan went on to say that, “A lot of them are there for possession of narcotics and trafficking of narcotics and they have served some time and they were of good behaviour.” As such, he noted that those detainees will therefore qualify for bail at a reduced amount.Stemming from that, several Magistrates were on Monday afternoon seen entering the premises, as media operatives and family members of the prisoners were staked out outside the Lusignan Prison. Among the judicial team was Magistrate Peter Hugh who presided over hearings which allowed for the release of a number of inmates who were convicted of minor, non-violent offences, as well as the granting of self-bail for several on remand for non-violent, minor offences.This granting of bail to a number of petty offended is in according with measures to reduce prison overcrowding. This was recommended in a $13 million Camp Street prison inquiry following the deaths of 17 inmates in a fire last year.Moreover, of the 1000-plus detainees previously held at the Camp Street Prison, about 100 of the inmates were transferred to the Timehri Prison, while approximately 900 remained in Lusignan. Despite indications, reports are yet to be made of the prisoners being sent to the Mazaruni Prison.Meanwhile, the Joint Services is continuing its reinforcement efforts to secure the Lusignan institution, now that the Camp Street Prison was almost entirely destroyed in Sunday’s prison break fire.last_img read more

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first_imgRyan Bjorklund was probably the best Flyer in the game, as the team continued to struggle.  They will gget a chance to return to their scoring ways, when they host the high Prairie Regals on Saturday nnight at the NPA. Listen to a highlights package from Thursday’s game.  [asset|aid=869|format=mp3player|formatter=asset_bonus|title=3f8dcaf52e6ebde86fcaa751a7ef7510-Flyers Lose 3-2 to Grande Prairie Athletics_1_Pub.mp3] Flyers lose 3-2 in overtime to the Grande Prairie AthleticsThe Flyers’ winning streak ended at 21 games, after the only team to beat them this season managed to do it one more time.The Flyers would get the only goal of the first period, when an Ian Munro slapshot went well-wide, but rebounded off the end-boards, and onto the stick of Todd Alexander, who fired it past a hapless David Larson. – Advertisement -But, the Flyers again seemed unable to find their top gear, playing a lacklustre second period, in which the Athletics’ Scott Taje would score the only goal, tying the game 1-1.Dustin Kersey put Fort St. John back in front, when he fired home a powerplay goal, on a gorgeous feed from Brett Loney.  But late in the frame, G.P. would tie it up, on a Kevin Poston point shot that got around Kip Noble, and into the top corner, past a screened Ryan Bjorklund. It didn’t take long for the Athetics to win it.  Off the opening face off, the Flyers rushed the puck into the GP zone, but couldn’t get the puck deep.  Kip Noble was trapped, as Mark Menzied spotted Rod Bowers all alone in the neutral zone.  Bowers took the pass, and on a breakaway from his own zone, he beat Bjorklund with a snap-shot to the far side, to give GP the win, and a split of the season series. Advertisementlast_img read more

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first_imgTir Chonaill Gaels GAA News: London Vs Mayo Well done to London who faced an impressive Mayo team at Ruislip at the weekend. In particular to our own players Mark Gottsche, Liam Gavaghan, Phil & Killian Butler, Gavin McEvoy & Brian McBrearty. Even Vince McCarthy got in on the act by showing off some fancy football by shimmying his way through the Mayo defence to collect a stray ball! The team will now wait to see who they face when the qualifiers draw takes place.Our own senior team are back in action this coming Saturday, 4th June at Ruislip against The Kingdom with throw-in at 6pm.Francie O’Donnell Memorial CupFive teams took part in the nine-a-side tournament in glorious conditions in Greenford at the weekend. Francie O’Donnell was a great servant to the Gaels throughout his time in London and the tournament is a fitting tribute to him. TCG Seniors, TCG Juniors, Kingdom of Kerry Gaels, St. Kiernan’s and the Round Towers contested the cup with our own senior team coming out on top after meeting the Round Towers in the final. Club secretary Michael Mullen rolled back the years and played a blinder in the goals that he had just expertly fitted the nets on earlier in the morning for the Juniors, a true all-rounder! A huge thanks to Maurice Carr and his bunch of merry men for getting everything ready for the Mens and Ladies tournaments on the day. Finally to referees Beano Collins, Conor Kineally & Hughie McGarvey for overseeing affairs. Good luckThe club would like to wish good luck to former player Benny Reilly who is moving back to Ireland and wish Benny all the best for the future.TCG UnderageWell done to all the TCG Minor Board on their successful trip back to Donegal at the weekend. A great weekend was had by all and a huge thanks for all for organising the trip and the sponsors as well.LotteryNo draw on 26th May. The number selection is being extended from 1-28 with the first draw taking place this Thursday, 2nd June.Play online at www.tirchonaillgaels.comThank you for your support!GAA NEWS: TIR CHONAILL GAELS WIN FRANCIE O’DONNELL MEMORIAL CUP was last modified: May 30th, 2016 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:GAASportTir Chonaill Gaelslast_img read more

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