first_imgActivism, Agriculture, Community Forestry, Community-based Conservation, Forestry, Forests, Governance, Islands, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Protected Areas, Rainforests, Tropical Forests In 1972, Indonesia’s central government mapped Kalaodi, a village of 454 people, into a protected forest.Locals were upset because the protected status robbed them of the ability to continue their centuries-old tradition of cultivating spice groves.Today, Kalaodi residents are taking the first steps towards restituting past government oversteps. KALAODI, Indonesia  — August through September is clove harvest season here in this corner of the Maluku Islands. The scent of clove flowers pierces the air over the winding, precipitous roads that lead to Kalaodi.From the 1400s well into the 1800s, this hamlet on Tidore island was one of the world’s few sources of nutmeg, mace, vanilla, cinnamon and cloves. British, Dutch and Portuguese merchant ships spent months crossing oceans to buy spices here. The Dutch thought they had a bargain in 1664 when the British traded them Run Island on the south end of the archipelago for a swampy, unknown American colony called New Amsterdam that was later dubbed New York City. Today, the Malukus, and Kalaodi, still feel remote. Locals refer to their township as the community above the clouds. Peering to the east on a clear day, visitors see only the neighboring island of Halmahera. To the west is more water, and Ternate and Maitara islands.Until 1986, houses in Kalaodi were built solely with bamboo. What cement was used had to be piggybacked in from towns three kilometers away. Only in 1992 was a tarmac road into town completed. Indonesia’s Maluku Islands. Image by Morwen/Wikimedia CommonsDecisions from the central government feel arbitrary yet have large consequences. For example, in 1972, bureaucrats in Jakarta mapped the village of 454 people into a protected forest. The 2,513-hectare Tagafura national forest encompasses three subdistricts – Southern, Eastern and Northern Tidore. Kalaodi sits in the middle.Locals were very upset because the protected status robbed them of the ability to continue their centuries-old tradition of cultivating spice groves. It also disregarded local institutions of nature protection. Many Kalaodi people moved to Halmahera. And one wise village headman convinced them to set aside some orchard parcels to be maintained collectively. The harvest from these communal lots was used to build infrastructure, said village elder Yunus Hadi. This was a brave move because it came only five years after the Indonesian mass killings of 1965-6 targeted communists who espoused such land arrangements.Today, with the help of the local branch of the Indonesian Forum for the Environment (Walhi), the country’s largest environmental pressure group, Kalaodi residents are taking the first steps towards restituting past government oversteps. They mapped locally owned groves to bring to future negotiations with the state. “Our measurements showed that the size of the town was different from that measured by the government forestry office,” said Ismet Soelaiman, the director of Walhi-Maluku. His team concluded that the village, including all houses and orchards, spans 2,000 hectares.“Our village has been here for centuries,” chimed in current village secretary Samsudin. “How can the government suddenly arrive and place us within the jurisdiction of a protected forest? Unfortunately, at the time, the people were not wise enough to protest.” Samsudin thinks his village was within its rights to protest. “This was just after independence. Kalaodi has existed for centuries before independence,” he said.Samsudin thinks the designation was political, a gambit aimed at pushing villagers out of the mountains and into Tidore city. “Many also went to Halmahera,” he pointed out. “Three members of every household moved elsewhere to find work,” said Abdurahman, one Kalaodi resident who migrated at that time.Freshly picked cloves on the island of Tidore. The tree from which the aromatic flower buds come is native to the Maluku Islands in eastern Indonesia. Photo by Eko Susanto/FlickrThe spice villageKalaodi residents cultivate a diversity of plants. Primarily, they grow nutmeg and clove. But they also harvest bamboo – as a preventative to soil erosion on the steep local slopes. Clove trees are also grown interspersed with cinnamon, durian, areca nut palm and Javanese or kenari almond trees.“Bamboo roots help us guard against soil erosion. It also offers good building and crafting material,” Abdurahman said. “Nutmeg and clove are our main crops though. Everyone plants them.”At the end of the season, mace, nutmeg and clove crops are dried on large tarps on the side of the road. Local nutmeg and clove harvests come in the hundreds of tons. “We don’t have a proper count,” Abdurahman said. “But it’s likely that we send hundreds of tons to Tidore. This is because hundreds of local hectares are set aside for growing clove.”Today, bamboo is rarely used as a building material and more likely woven into broad tolu hats to be worn in harvest season to keep out the rain and sun; or saloi baskets used in the tree orchards. Some of these crafts get sold at the market.Kalaodi is also famous for its durians. In season, the fruits flood the markets of Tidore and Ternate.The islands of Maitara and Tidore are seen from Ternate Island in Indonesia’s Maluku archipelago. Photo by Fabio Achilli/FlickrForest governanceSince the 1970s, Kalaodi has had a system of community groves in addition to private, individual groves. No new forest has been cleared to make orchards since the village area gained protected forest status.There is a youth grove, which has 200 clove trees. The harvest from this grove gets used for infrastructure projects in the village. For example, there is a 200-meter-long retaining wall in the village that was built with a few years worth of profits from this grove. There is also a village grove and a mosque grove. These groves are planted and maintained communally and during harvest season, the crop is divided communally. Kalaodi has four areas, each two kilometers in size, separate from residents’ groves. Each area has its own land management regulations. Locals only retain land rights year to year. The land is owned communally. Only the harvest is owned individually. This is the system of land management the village has functioned under since 1970, said Hadi, the elder. He played a major part in convincing locals to farm communally. “He instructed local farmers to plant clove seedlings in the 1970s,” according to the current village secretary Samsudin. “We owe the abundance of clove and nutmeg on our lands to Yunus.”This story was reported by Mongabay’s Indonesia team and was first published on our Indonesian site on Oct. 2, 2016. Article published by mongabayauthorcenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

read more

first_imgArticle published by Isabel Esterman Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Mammals, Megafauna, Rainforest Animals, Rhinos, Sumatran Rhino, Wildlife center_img Puntung was one of three Sumatran rhinos known to survive in Malaysia, and one of fewer than 100 representatives of this Critically Endangered species.Her health first raised concern in March, when she was found to suffer from an abscess in her jaw.Dental surgery was successfully performed in April, but she was then found to have squamous cell cancer.Veterinarians determined the disease was fatal and that treatment would only prolong her suffering. Puntung was euthanized just after dawn on Sunday, June 4. Sumatran Rhino Puntung was euthanized early Sunday morning after being diagnosed last month with terminal squamous cell cancer.“Today is one of the saddest days we’ve ever faced,” the Borneo Rhino Alliance (BORA) wrote in a June 4 statement. “As of this morning, Puntung’s suffering has come to an end.”Puntung was one of only three Sumatran rhinos (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) known to survive in Malaysia. A female believed to be around 25 years old, she was captured in the wild in Malaysian Borneo in 2011 and lived the rest of her life at the Tabin Wildlife Reserve in Sabah, a fenced-in facility managed by BORA.Rhino being cared for at the Borneo rhino sanctuary. Photo courtesy of Sabah Wildlife Department.Overall, between 55 and 100 of the Critically Endangered species are believed to remain. Two live at the Tabin facility, with the rest in Indonesia. These rhinos live in small, isolated groups, and experts including BORA Executive Director John Payne point to low birthrates as the single greatest threat to the survival of the species, outweighing the dangers of poaching or habitat loss.Researchers had hoped Puntung might be able to contribute to a captive breeding program to boost the Sumatran rhino’s dwindling population. However, like the other two rhinos at Tabin, she was found to be unable to reproduce naturally. Puntung did still produce eggs, prompting hopes that she could perhaps reproduce via in vitro fertilization, the merging of sperm and eggs in a laboratory.Puntung undergoing dental surgery in April. Photo by Yap Keng Chee.Rapidly deteriorating healthVeterinarians were alerted to Puntung’s cancer after she was found in mid-March 2017 to suffer from an abscess in her upper left jaw, attributed to dental problems. Initially, Puntung’s carers feared she would not survive an infection related to the abscess, but surgery was successfully completed in April.However, the rhino’s carers discovered that the facial swelling that alerted them to the dental problem “had a more serious origin,” BORA announced on May 31. “Puntung is dying of cancer.”A swelling on Puntung’s left jaw alerted veterinarians to deeper health problems. Photo by Zainal Zainuddin.The cancer was found to be spreading and specialists concurred that the disease would be fatal with or without treatment, BORA added. “We have kept in close touch with experts in Europe, South Africa and Thailand, and there is no doubt in our minds that any form of conventional treatment would just prolong her agony.”The government authorized euthanasia, originally scheduled for June 15. Researchers had hoped to keep the rhino comfortable until her eggs or oocytes could be retrieved, a plan aimed to help preserve diverse genetic material for this critically endangered species.However, Puntung’s condition deteriorated rapidly — by the end of May she was in pain, unable to vocalize and could not breathe through her left nostril — and carers made what they described as “the very difficult decision of ending her suffering and giving her peace.”FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

read more

first_imgWith its renewed promotion of what it calls the “Sunshine Industry,” the Philippine government is looking to cultivate another one million hectares of oil palm, 98 percent of which would be on the island of Mindanao.Proponents say increasing palm oil production will alleviate poverty and armed conflict through large investments from Malaysian, Indonesian and Singaporean firms and other foreign and domestic companies, and tout potential revenue brought by palm oil’s increasing demand as a food and cosmetic ingredient and biofuel.But critics worry expansion of the country’s palm oil industry will benefit large companies at the expense of small farmers, forests, and water quality. DAVAO CITY, Philippines – If the street Pedro Arnado was looking down was on the Philippine government’s roadmap for future palm oil development, critics say it would be one highly dangerous to navigate, lined with the hazards of unfair labor practices, land poverty, militarization and environmental degradation.Arnado is the Secretary General of Kilusang Magbubukid ng Pilipinas (Peasant Movement of the Philippines) in Southern Mindanao, or KMP, and a spokesperson for the Farmer’s Association in Davao City. On January 26, 2017, he stood on the edge of a crowded rally of peasants, trade union members and indigenous people at Rizal Park in Davao City, Mindanao, describing how the palm oil industry has affected the farmers and communities in other provinces of Mindanao where plantations have already been operating. He says that the business-oriented development of palm oil “equals corruption and land-grabbing.”While several palm oil plantations had been established on the island by the 1960s, it was what observers describe as an atmosphere of impunity born of the 1972-1981 period of martial law imposed by President Ferdinand Marcos that allowed corporations to increase their land acquisition, allegedly through coercion or force using the military and private armies.Palm oil is produced from the fruit of the oil palm tree. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.During her term as president, which lasted from 2001-2010, Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo continued to facilitate the growth of the palm oil industry, pushing through the Biofuels Act of 2006 and legislation that gave corporations tax holidays and fiscal incentives.Now, with its renewed promotion of what it calls the “Sunshine Industry,” the Philippine government is looking to cultivate another one million hectares of oil palm, 98 percent of which would be on the island of Mindanao. They are promising the alleviation of poverty and armed conflict through large investments from Malaysian, Indonesian and Singaporean firms and other foreign and domestic companies, as well as the revenue brought by palm oil’s increasing demand as a food and cosmetic ingredient and biofuel.‘They fear displacement’In its “Philippine Palm Oil Road Map 2014-2023,” the Philippine Coconut Authority, which is the government body overseeing palm oil production, foresees that 300,000 farmers will receive benefits like jobs, schools, health care and housing due to the cultivation of new oil palm plantations covering 350,000 hectares by 2023.In 2014, Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte, then mayor of Davao City, tried to persuade the communist New People’s Army (NPA) to drop their opposition to the development of a 20,000-hectare oil palm plantation in Paquibato, Davao’s poorest district. He reportedly even offered the insurgents the opportunity at something resembling a joint venture. But due to the continuing conflict in the area, the Malaysian investments were scrapped.“The plan to plant palm oil was absolutely stopped,” Januario Bentain, Officer in Charge of Industrial Crop Coordination for the Davao City Agriculture Office, told Mongabay during a January 2017 interview. “The NPA don’t like that palm oil be implemented in the area.”In their newsletter Ang Bayan, the NPA said they are still fighting the government after 48 years because: “Agrarian revolution is the movement’s key solution to widespread landlessness and land starvation in the country.”But palm oil development in the Paquibato District was stalled for reasons other than peace and order and insurgency.“The people are not receptive to the plan,” says Chibo Tan, Regional Coordinator in the Davao area for the National Federation of Labor Unions (NAFLU), an affiliate of the progressive labor umbrella organization Kilusang Mayo Uno (KMU). “They fear displacement.”A new push for palm oilWith the government holding intermittent peace negotiations with the NPA and their political wings, President Duterte is back pushing for investment in palm oil as an antidote to poverty and violence. After a two-day visit to Malaysia in November 2016, Duterte stated that foreign investors are once again ready to put their money into palm oil plantations in Mindanao, and that the vast quantity of unplanted land in Paquibato is a suitable locale.The oily insides of an oil palm fruit. Photo by Mademoiselle Galorio.The new push for palm oil expansion in Mindanao is coming not only from the national government, but at the local level, with the Vice Mayor of Davao, Duterte’s son Paulo, and a number of City Councilors advocating new operations. It was reported in the local press as recently as March 2017 that the Davao City Chamber of Commerce and Industry has been working with the DENR (Department of Environment and Natural Resources) to establish agribusiness ventures in the districts of Paquibato and Marilog, including palm oil, that have been designated as CBFM (Community Based Forestry Management) lands under the city’s Comprehensive Land Use Plan. The CBFM program was ostensibly created in 1995 to encourage reforestation.The KMP’s Pedro Arnado says there are currently ongoing talks between investors, the city government and the tribal leaders of the local indigenous peoples (called IPs or Lumad).Regionally, economic development has been encouraged under the Davao Integrated Development Plan, a blueprint for the city and four surrounding provinces that “pursues external market-driven development” and established Davao City as the “Southern Gateway” for foreign investment.To create a feasible environment for economic development, the Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP) has maintained a strong presence in the hinterlands of Davao, with combat and civilian-military operations conducted by the 11th Infantry Division. The AFP has also promoted a counter-insurgency strategy based on the U.S. Armed Forces Montangard program in Vietnam, initially through the government agency PANAMIN (Presidential Assistance for National Minorities), where local IPs are recruited, trained and armed to fight the NPA. Tribal issues are now handled by the NCIP (National Commission on Indigenous People), according to Major Medel Aguilar of the 5th Civil Relations Service of the Armed Forces of the Philippines. Aguilar told Mongabay that the AFP designates an officer to run the IP Desk for handling military-Lumad relations, facilitating their “Peace and Development” scheme—where the ancestral domain is “cleansed” of NPA to allow business enterprises to enter and purportedly elevate the economic level of the community.Pro-business tribal leaders have been criticized by progressive IP organizations for being puppets of the military, having armed their followers under the military’s Lumad Cafgu (Civilian Armed Forces Geographical Unit) program. Some of these militia have turned into what are called “Alamara”—private armies that have reportedly run amok and taken to cattle rustling and looting villages. Jun Cajes, Chief Investigator at the government’s Commission on Human Rights, says this has divided native communities; some are joining the Lumad militias, others are opting to fight with the NPA.Some worry the country’s palm oil expansion will result in increased militarization. Photo taken in the Philippines by Brad Miller.In addition to the Davao region, foreign firms are also interested in investing in the provinces of Agusan del Norte, Davao Oriental, North Cotobato, Sultan Kudarat and in the ARMM (Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao). A Malaysian firm, Alif-Agro Industrial Inc., has reportedly made plans for a $1 billion project in Agusan del Sur that would include a 128,000-hectare plantation, refinery and wharf. The Director of the Philippine Economic Zone Authority (PEZA) wants to see the area designated an economic zone so corporations can take advantage of the available fiscal incentives and tax holidays.Farmers are skeptical Plans like this trouble people like Jay Legapa, a member of the NAFLU-KMU and palm oil harvester at Filipinas Palm Oil Plantations, Inc. (FPPI) in Agusan del Sur, whose says his father has been waiting 30 years to receive his plot from the agrarian reform program.“How will we get our land if the dream of the President is funding the palm oil industry?” he asked during an interview with Mongabay in March 2017.But not all government officials are backing the expansion of palm oil plantations. Marissa Salvador-Abella, a Davao City councilor who is also the chairperson of its Agriculture Committee, says she is promoting a strategy that stresses diversified crop development, including the cultivation of organic cacao, coconut and abaca. Salvador-Abella, whose constituency includes the residents of Paquibato, would also like to see more involvement of the local Lumad community in any projects, as well as the construction of more farm-to-market roads.Koronado Apuzen, Executive Director of the Foundation for Agrarian Reform Cooperatives in Mindanao (FARMCOOP) concurs that people will “earn more from a diversified farm.” He says that since palm oil needs a large amount of land, it is the big companies that will benefit.“Palm oil is not good for the farmer,” he told Mongabay in February 2017. “It will impoverish them further.”Palm oil proponents stress the potential for job creation and benefits such as health insurance for the workers. But environmental groups like Panalipdan Southern Mindanao fear that the expansion of palm oil will continue to bring a decline in rice and corn production; they say rice harvests have already fallen by 21 percent in the Davao area. They are also concerned that fertilizers and pesticides applied by the plantations could pollute the watersheds that provide water for Davao City. The International Coalition for Human Rights in the Philippines (ICHRP) has cited that the palm oil industry uses chemicals such as carbofuran, glyphosate and paraquat, which it says pose a threat to the plantation workers applying them and to the communities they live in. The Pesticide Action Network includes paraquat on its list of highly hazardous chemicals, linking it to health problems like skin cancer, Parkinson’s Disease and respiratory and kidney failure.Victor Sanugan, a farmer in Kalabugao, Bukidnon, voiced his concern during a March 2017 interview that the palm oil firm A Brown Energy and Resources Development, Inc. (ABERDI), which was operating in his community under its subsidiary Nakeen Corporation until a suspension of work in the summer of 2016, is using pesticides that are having negative impacts on water, livestock and plantation workers. Mongabay contacted A Brown concerning Nakeen’s use of these chemicals several times by e-mail, but had received no response by press time.Environmental repercussions A number of environmental entities have raised doubts about the benefits of cultivating palm oil to produce biofuel.  A study conducted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency concluded that biodiesel produced from palm oil does not meet the minimum lifecycle greenhouse gas reduction threshold needed to qualify as a renewable fuel, and therefore will not significantly reduce carbon imprints. According to the World Wildlife Fund (WWF), the conversion of forests to agricultural land, especially in the tropical regions of Asia, accounts for approximately 14 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions. Many conservation and scientific organizations, such as WWF, also cite a direct correlation between the expansion of palm oil plantations and deforestation.Deforestation for palm oil in Sabah, Malaysia. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.In 1900, 70 percent of the Philippine archipelago was covered in forests, but the National Mapping and Resource Information Authority (NAMRIA) estimates that only 24 percent remained by the early 21st century. Primary – or old growth – forest cover is lower still; according to the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization, 11 percent of the country’s primary forests remained as of 2015.The consequences of denudation have been the loss of biodiversity, the erosion of topsoil and devastating floods and landslides, which the Haribon Foundation says has caused over 10,000 deaths and the displacement of close to one million people since 1991. The palm oil-producing provinces of Agusan del Sur and Misamis Oriental were hit by a devastating round of floods during the winter of 2017. Since the DENR passed a directive in 2004, oil palm has qualified as a reforestation species, but its effectiveness at mitigating erosion is a source of controversy.“It is better than nothing,” says Januario Bentain of Davao City’s Department of Agriculture. But FARMCOOP’s Koronado Apuzen thinks people would rather be planting trees than crops like oil palm. He says oil palm planted as a mono-crop in mountainous terrain that dominates areas like Paquibato are a leading factor in erosion, cautioning that “if you destroy the forests, you reap the reward—that is disaster.”An uncertain futureShortly before the annual May 1 Labor Day rally in Davao City, the KMP’s Pedro Arnado outlined an alternative path to the palm oil industry’s road map. In what he termed an “agrarian revolution,” the Genuine Agrarian Reform Bill (GARB) would be passed and implemented. The GARB would not just give land back to the tiller, but would require the government to supply them with the technical support, water and fertilizer he says are currently lacking in order to become productive.The KMP stated in an October 2015 press release that if the government continues on its proposed plan to auction off one million hectares of land to local and foreign palm oil corporations, “political unrest and people’s resistance in Mindanao will continue to intensify.”After President Duterte declared Martial Law in Mindanao in May 2017, the KMP’s chairperson Joseph Canlas added in a separate statement that “the militarist path taken by the government will never address the root causes of the worsening social and economic turmoil, armed conflicts and unrest in the countryside” and that “farmers will continue to assert and defend their democratic, civil and political rights even under Martial Law.”FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davis Agriculture, Agrochemicals, Biofuels, Climate Change, Conflict, Deforestation, Drinking Water, Environment, Featured, Fertilizers, Forests, Global Warming, Habitat Degradation, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Industrial Agriculture, Land Grabbing, Military, Monocultures, Oil Palm, Palm Oil, Pesticides, Plantations, Resource Conflict, Water, Water Pollution center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

read more

first_imgArticle published by terna gyuse Animals, Biodiversity, Birds, Conflict, Conservation, Critically Endangered Species, Deserts, Development, Ecology, Elephants, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Human Migration, Hunting, Mammals, Oil, Over-hunting, Poaching, Research, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img The Termit and Tin Touma National Nature Reserve in Niger was Africa’s largest when it was established in 2012.Just seven years on, however, the government is considering redrawing its boundaries and slashing its size by nearly half.The move comes in response to a push by the China National Petroleum Corporation (CNPC), which has exploration rights in a small section of the reserve, to expand its operations significantly.Conservation groups, including the NGO that manages the reserve, say the move would impact areas of high biodiversity, threatening species such as the critically endangered addax and dama gazelle. Created in 2012, Niger’s Termit and Tin Toumma National Nature Reserve is the last region of the Sahara relatively undisturbed by human activity. But expanding oil exploration threatens this sanctuary for 130 bird and 17 mammal species, including the critically endangered addax (Addax nasomaculatus).The Termit and Tin Toumma National Nature Reserve (Réserve Naturelle Nationale de Termit et Tin-Toumma) covers nearly 100,000 square kilometers (38,600 square miles) of desert and low mountains in the southern Sahara, an area three times the size of Belgium and as large as the U.S. State of Maine. A UNESCO World Heritage Site, it is internationally recognized for the biodiversity it hosts within a landscape ranging from mountains and valleys to grassy plains, open desert and sand seas.But on June 26 this year, seven years after the reserve was established, the Council of Ministers of Niger announced that its boundaries would be modified, removing nearly 45,000 square kilometers (17,300 square miles) from the protected area.“We were shocked to learn this,” said Sébastien Pinchon, parks manager at the French NGO Noé that manages the reserve on behalf of the government. The final agreement entrusting management of the reserve to Noé was signed just a few months ago, on Nov. 5, 2018.“We are just getting started, constructing buildings, buying vehicles and hiring people to properly manage the area,” Pinchon told Mongabay. The size and remoteness of the area mean it will take one or two years for the reserve to be fully operational, he said.China National Petroleum Corporation (CNPC), one of the world’s largest oil companies, has exploration rights in a small region inside the reserve, but suddenly pushed for a major expansion, Pinchon said. Ten years ago, Niger announced that in exchange for a $5 billion investment, the Chinese government-owned CNPC would build a number of wells, a 20,000-barrel-per-day refinery, and a pipeline out of the nation for exports.The 45,000 square kilometers the government wants to remove from the reserve also happens to be where most of the wildlife is found, including the addax–  of which fewer than 100 individuals remain in the wild – and another critically endangered species, the dama gazelle (Nanger dama). “The government proposes to add a similar amount of land to reserve on its western boundary, but it has little ecological value,” Pinchon said.It took decades of surveys, wildlife monitoring, education, and meetings to mobilize support at all levels from the local people living in the area to the president of Niger so the reserve could be created in the first place, said John Newby, senior adviser at the Sahara Conservation Fund, a conservation NGO.“The reserve is unique in the entire Sahara-Sahel Region because its rich wildlife community is still intact,” said Newby, who has worked in the region for more than 30 years.However, since CNPC oil operations began in 2010, the addax population has crashed, he told Mongabay. “It’s not the drilling, but poaching by Niger’s military units protecting the CNPC camps that has brought the addax to the verge of extinction.”Armed conflict across the Sahara and Sahel region is devastating the region’s wildlife. Photo: University of Granada.The poaching appears to be for meat. Bloodied military clothing has been found buried with addax remains. “I’ve run into these military patrols. No one is going to stop them out in the desert,” Newby said.Government and military officials have done little about this despite pleas from conservationists. The Chinese could stop it but they are uninterested in even talking about it, Newby said. “They don’t seem to care what’s happening.”Noé has made many attempts over the years to meet with CNPC officials, without any success, Pinchon said. This disinterest is in sharp contrast to China’s expressed interest in becoming a global leader in biodiversity, he said. The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), under Chinese presidency, is organizing the World Congress for Nature in France next year. China will also host what’s expected to be a landmark meeting of the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity in November 2020.“Oil and wildlife can co-exist, if it’s done to international standards or how it is done in China,” Pinchon said. Instead, observers and locals report poisoned livestock near leaking pipelines, dead birds in oil drilling waste ponds, waste dumping in the desert, cutting of trees, and collection of special tubers that are the addax’s main source of water, he said.Oil extraction doesn’t have to have a big impact if it’s designed well, said Fabien Quétier of Biotope, an ecological science consulting group based in France.Oil extraction in Gabon by Shell Oil, working with conservation partners including the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, has benefited wildlife and reduced poaching in and around Loango National Park on the country’s Atlantic coast, he said.If China wants to do business in other countries with important ecological areas, it could show that it’s capable of operating without any negative impacts in Niger, Quétier told Mongabay.Map courtesy Noé“Niger is rightly proud of the amount of protected areas they have. They’re one of the world leaders,” Newby said. However, it’s also one of the poorest countries in the world. That’s why Noé is managing the reserve, bringing technical knowledge, training, and millions in funding from the European Union, he said.Nature reserve management by nonprofit organizations on behalf of governments is becoming common in Africa and elsewhere Newby noted. Funding for the reserve will have to continue since the security situation is too risky to generate any revenue from tourism. Niger has been involved in the regional fight to counter Boko Haram, and is also a waypoint for the human trafficking of migrants trying to get to Libya and on to Europe.Niger needs the oil revenue, and oil extraction can be done without destroying the environment or removing lands from the Reserve, Newby said.“The proposed land swap isn’t the solution.”Banner image: Fewer than 100 addax remain in the wild: Photo: Thomas Rabeil/Sahara Conservation FundFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

read more

first_imgLast June, North Konawe, a land of hills and valleys on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi, was struck by devastating floods, displacing thousands of people.In the wake of the disaster, a public debate has ensued over the cause. Some government agencies have concluded that deforestation by plantation and mining companies exacerbated the floods.Some villages, including the riverside community of Tapuwatu, were almost completely washed away. TAPUWATU, Indonesia — Muhammad Arfa says he thinks a miracle saved his home.A wave of mud that swept through this riverside village on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi when floods ravaged the area last June razed dozens of his neighbors’ houses down to the foundations. Today there’s little left but upturned trees, scattered roofing material, and muddy marks high up the trunks of the coconut trees, a reminder of the height of the water.“It was the very end of Idul Fitri, the rain didn’t stop,” the 46-year-old said from his porch, referring to the holiday that marks the end of the Islamic fasting month of Ramadan. At first, the 2-meter-high (6-foot) stilts holding up his house kept the water from entering. But as the waters rose and fell, the rain persisted for three days.“Then the water starting rising again, so I told my family to grab their clothes and get in a boat.” When Arfa returned a week later, after the floods had receded, the mud line had reached the ceiling of his home, some 4 meters above the ground. Most of the other houses in the village lay in ruins.Almost 20,000 people were affected by the floods that struck North Konawe, a hilly district in Southeast Sulawesi province, according to government figures. No one is known to have died, but thousands were displaced. When Mongabay visited the area with the national disaster agency last month, refugees living in makeshift tarpaulin shelters were salvaging what they could from the wreckage on the banks of the Lasolo River. Officials have proposed to create entirely new villages for the approximately 700 families who need new homes.In the wake of the disaster, a public debate has ensued over its causes. Many are pointing the finger at the agribusiness and extractive companies clearing rainforest in North Konawe.Trees hold the soil in place, preventing erosion that clogs up rivers with earthy material, a process known as silting. A river polluted by excess sediment is more likely to overflow, so damaging the forest in a river’s headwaters can increase the risk of flooding downstream.LAPAN, the Indonesian space agency, has released satellite imagery showing that 370 square kilometers (140 square miles) of forest in North Konawe, an area bigger than Philadelphia, was cleared from 2013 to 2018. Much of this deforestation occurred upstream of Tapuwatu, and nearly all of it was due to plantation development, according to Rokhis Khomarudin, the head of the agency’s remote-sensing division.Deforestation in North Konawe. Source: Hansen/UMD/Google/USGS/NASA, accessed through Global Forest Watch.Satellite images of Tapuwatu before and after the floods. Source: Planet Labs, Inc.While Rokhis was reluctant to say conclusively whether the deforestation exacerbated the flooding, a report being prepared by the ombudsman of Southeast Sulawesi province, seen by Mongabay, says that “generally the cause [of the flooding] was land conversion for plantations, mining and illegal logging.” The assertion reflects the views of groups like Walhi, Indonesia’s biggest environmental NGO, which also believes the disaster was “caused by the extractive industries,” says campaign manager Dwi Sawung.An analysis of the floods in June by the Ministry of Environment and Forestry names “river silting” and “oil palm plantations” as among the causes of the disaster.Extensive mining along North Konawe’s coast may also be a factor. The mining has fueled silting near the mouth of the Lasolo River, resulting in a “backwater effect” that further exacerbated the floods, the ministry’s report says.“If someone says that the mine doesn’t damage the environment, it’s wrong,” Laode Syarif, a deputy head of the nation’s anti-corruption agency, said at an event in Kendari, the provincial capital, in June. “Environmental damage occurs from upstream to downstream as a result of mining.”Others have been more hesitant to attribute the floods to widespread land-use change. At the event in Kendari, Southeast Sulawesi Governor Ali Mazi declined to assign blame for the disaster (other than to attribute it to “God’s will”), promising instead to form a team to look into the causes.Ruksamin, the head of North Konawe district, similarly warned against jumping to conclusions, though he acknowledged that silting in the rivers had become serious.“What we know for certain is that there was a lot of rain during those three days,” he told Mongabay in Tapuwatu, as disaster recovery teams worked to clear mud from people’s homes. “If the rivers are not deep enough, we can dredge them.”Ruksamin, the district chief, in Tapuwatu. Image by Ian Morse for Mongabay.Medi Herlianto, director of emergency services at the national disaster agency, compared the flooding in North Konawe to the floods that struck Bengkulu, on the island of Sumatra, in May, killing 30 people and displacing thousands. Environmental groups there blamed the disaster on coal mining upstream.“We have to learn from the incident [in Bengkulu],” Medi told Mongabay. “There the environment was damaged, so we had to focus on reducing the vulnerability of areas to the impacts of disaster. But in Indonesia, the local government is the most responsible. The local government has to be the one to prohibit land conversion.”Tapuwatu sits right across the river from a giant oil palm estate owned by PT Sultra Prima Lestari, which belongs to members of Indonesia’s billionaire Widjaja family, corporate records show. The ombudsman’s report names the firm as among those that have contributed to silting in the rivers. The company could not be reached for comment.An oil palm estate belonging to PT Sultra Prima Lestari, across the river from Tapuwatu. Image by Ian Morse for Mongabay.Farther upstream, in the village of Asemi Nunulai, residents have been protesting against a sugar plantation company they say is clearing forest without the required permits. A company spokesman identified as Ardi denied it had begun operating in any capacity because it didn’t have an environmental permit. The company, PT Aman Fortuna Nusantara, is thought to be an arm of the Jhonlin Group, a conglomerate owned by the Indonesian tycoon Andi Syamsuddin Arsyad, better known as Haji Isam.“We anticipated that the flooding was going to occur before it did, because we see so much timber being taken from the highland forests,” Asemi Nunulai resident Husni Ibrahim, 37, told Mongabay by phone from the village. “I have never seen flooding like this in the 37 years I’ve lived here.”Many companies operating in North Konawe received permits from the district’s former chief, Aswad Sulaiman, who is now in prison for corruption related to a construction project. Two years ago, Aswad was charged by the nation’s anti-graft agency with accepting bribes in exchange for issuing permits to mine nickel. That case is still ongoing.One problem, says Henri Subagiyo, executive director of the Indonesian Center for Environmental Law, is that the government lacks a system for assessing the collective impact of many companies on the environment. A company that wants to mine or build a plantation must carry out an environmental impact assessment. But those studies are considered individually, with no holistic overview of the combined impacts of several companies operating in a given area.“For example, the floods can’t be said to have been caused by only one company,” Henri said at his office in Jakarta. “In Indonesia, the weakness is making a policy that’s macro-level.”A man in Tapuwatu stands by a coconut tree where the mud line marks the height of the floods. Image by Ian Morse for Mongabay.Displaced people in Tapuwatu have been receiving food from the disaster agency as they wait for new housing, but some whose homes were consumed by mud still go without electricity, phone service and showers. Rather than fixing the land destroyed by flooding, district chief Ruksamin said, the government will resettle those impacted, even if houses can be rebuilt. More flooding may only be another heavy rain away.If more companies that have already received permits start operating, the floods could get even worse, said Mastri Susilo, the province’s ombudsman.“We’ve urged the local government offices to do more research into this, because we need to know how to prevent this,” Mastri said in an interview at his office. “It might be that we need more mining reclamation projects [to rehabilitate land no longer mined] or that we don’t give out anymore plantation permits.”Masriyani, a 38-year-old mother of three who found her home in Tapuwatu filled to the windows with mud, says she doesn’t know how her family can earn a living now.“We need heavy-duty equipment to fix the rice fields,” she said. “It’s all sand mixed with dirt now. We can’t plant rice there.” She’s cleaned out the mud from her house, but the destroyed furniture means it’s still far from becoming a home again.Masriyani and her daughter outside their house. Image by Ian Morse for Mongabay.Some in Tapuwatu are not opposed to leaving it behind. It’s a young village, built only 15 years ago to support the oil palm plantation nearby.“I think it’s true that people are clearing land recklessly in North Konawe,” Arfa said. “But there will be no one sad to leave this place.”Follow Ian Morse on Twitter: @ianjmorseFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Agriculture, Corruption, Deforestation, Disasters, Environment, Environmental Law, Environmental Policy, Environmental Politics, Environmental Refugees, Featured, Flooding, Forestry, Forests, Governance, Green, Logging, Mining, Palm Oil, Plantations, Rainforests, Remote Sensing, Satellite Imagery, Tropical Forests Article published by mongabayauthorcenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

read more

first_imgJAMAICA’S REGGAE BOYZ and the team they will tackle today, Haiti, are under pressure to rebound with a victory, when they clash in their second Group B match of the CONCACAF Semi-final World Cup Qualifying competition in Port-au-Prince, beginning at 6 p.m.Both countries lost their opening match when the qualifiers got under way on Friday, Haiti 0-1 in Costa Rica and Jamaica worse off through the 0-2 margin of defeat, and the fact that it was their home fixture, which they surrendered at the National Stadium to Panama.Only two will qualify from this round-robin phase of six matches, three at home and three away, and by virtue of Friday’s results, Panama and Costa Rica lead jointly with three points, while Jamaica and Haiti are yet to get off the mark.”… Going to Haiti, we know that it’s a must-win,” said assistant coach Miguel Coley who led the team in the absence of head coach Winfried Sch‰fer last Friday. “It’s a tough group, and we have to do good and win.”Sch‰fer will return to the bench, having served a one-match FIFA ban owing to a verbal spat with match officials after the 2-0 win in Nicaragua, and his strong and measured guidance will be necessary.His players must improve big time on Friday’s non-performance if they are to win. They were very stagnant in the first half and could not build offensives from the back to get the ball to the forwards for practically the entire 45 minutes. Thus, Darren Mattocks, the team’s number-one striker, who had scored four goals in the previous four matches, and his striker partner, Giles Barnes, were starved.Mattocks actually got the ball in the net once, only to be flagged for offside. Given his excellent form, it was surprising that he was the first player substituted by the Jamaica coaching staff, early in the second half.Another big surprise was the non-selection of Simon Dawkins, who scored a last-minute goal against Nicaragua to save Jamaica from WCQ elimination in the last round.Dawkins has been playing as a starting player or first-change for every match at the prep tournaments for the WCQ – Copa America and the CONCACAF Gold Cup – and even before. Additionally, he is one of the best link-up players in the Jamaica squad, apart from Joel Grant, whose talent has not been rewarded with playing time and even selection for these first two WCQs.SUBSTITUTESUSEDTwo players who haven’t been part of the Jamaica squad, Dever Orgill for years, and Clayton Donaldson for the first time ever, were among three substitutes used. The other was defender Alvas Powell, in an attacking role.Dawkins reportedly left the Jamaica squad ahead of the squad game and headed back to his club in Britain.Haiti is almost on a similar playing level as Panama. The big difference is their finishing, as the French-speaking Caribbean country’s players are not good at scoring. But they are very skilful, full of running and combination plays and will prove to be a handful for Jamaica, especially as they are playing at home and also desperate.Jamaica must show some fight, which was lacking on Friday night, and defend well if they are to win this tough game.It has also been reported that captain Rodolph Austin and Barnes will not play on the artificial surface in Port-au-Prince as a medical precaution, given their knee issues, making the task that much more difficult for the Jamaicans.The goalkeeper has a role to play, too. Duwayne Kerr was at fault for one Panama goal. Andre Blake and Ryan Thompson are at hand.last_img read more

read more

first_imgMOST READ Hotdog’s Dennis Garcia dies Bishop Baylon encourages faithful in Albay to help Taal evacuees LATEST STORIES Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles02:11SEA GAMES 2019: PH’s Nesthy Petecio boxing featherweight final (HIGHLIGHTS)08:07Athletes treated to a spectacle as SEA Games 2019 officially ends06:27SEA Games 2019: No surprises as Gilas Pilipinas cruises to basketball gold05:02SEA Games 2019: Philippines clinches historic gold in women’s basketball05:21Drama in karate: Tsukii ‘very sad’ over coach’s bullying, cold shoulder03:24PH’s James Palicte boxing light welterweight final (HIGHLIGHTS) Police seize P68-M worth of ‘shabu’ in Pasay Search on for 5 Indonesians snatched anew in Lahad Datu Britain’s Prince Harry and Meghan Markle to give up royal titles National Historical team rescues Amorsolos, artifacts from Taal Playing their best, PH gals falter vs world-class Thaiscenter_img OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Marcosian mode: Duterte threatens to arrest water execs ‘one night’ What’s in store for your animal sign this year The Philippines scored its fourth lawn bowl medal in the 2017 Southeast Asian Games after taking the silver medal in the men’s pairs events Saturday in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.Angelo Morales and Pancho Marcelito lost in the final against Malaysian duo Hizlee and Fairul Izwan, 20-13, in the gold medal match. ADVERTISEMENT The Philippines won a gold in the men’s fours and a couple of silvers in the women’s fours and women’s triples. Thailand came in third in the men’s pairs to complete the podium. FEATURED STORIESSPORTSEnd of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legendSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’ View commentslast_img read more

read more

first_imgCarpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award The sophomore sensation endured a roller-coaster of emotions and was a near goner before playing a huge role in La Salle’s mighty comeback over fierce rival Ateneo at Smart Araneta Coliseum that sent the UAAP Season 80 finals series into a deciding game.Both sides of Ricci’s performance book-ended a scene caught on camera in the sidelines, as the athletic wingman headed to the bench in tears after picking up his fourth foul in the second quarter: Prince cupping Ricci’s head and shaking it while he delivered an urgent message.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’SPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folk“At that point, I was frustrated because I couldn’t help the team despite my willingness to win,” said 19-year-old Ricci in Filipino. “But Kuya (Prince) told me that it’s a positive thing because even if I can’t be on the court, I can still cheer for my teammates. He told me to stay positive.”The day started out gloriously for Rivero, who picked up his first Mythical Five award before Game 2. And then, it went wrong horribly before ending in glory. Petron drubs Cocolife for top spot View comments “I saw Brendan staring into space because his friend, David, was in a coma. Then he passed away last Tuesday night,” Ricci recalled. “I told Brendan that he has to overcome the negativities and I’ll offer the game to David.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Coco’s house rules on ‘Probinsyano’ set Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ LATEST STORIES MOST READ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Margot Robbie talks about filming ‘Bombshell’s’ disturbing sexual harassment scene Prince Rivero gives his brother Ricci a congratulatory hug after the Game 2 victory.—AUGUST DELA CRUZPrince Rivero’s numbers may pale in comparison to the stats his other teammates submitted in Game 2 of the UAAP Season 80 Finals Wednesday.But his one “play” may have saved La Salle’s season—and the Archers’ title defense: He literally shook brother Ricci Rivero out of an emotional meltdown.ADVERTISEMENT And much like in Game 1 when Ateneo’s Mike Nieto drew inspiration from the incident involving his brother Matt to lead the Blue Eagles to a 76-70 win, it was the Rivero brothers’ turn to take the spotlight in the emotionally-charged series.“Kuya (Prince) told me to cry and let my emotions out,” said Ricci. “As soon as I’m done, he told me I’m going to be fine in the second half.”True enough, Ricci came out of the dugout with newfound confidence, taking charge of the offense in crucial stretches as the Archers completed a stunning turnaround for a 92-83 victory.It turned out, too, that Ricci was already saddled with emotions going into the game.Ricci said he dedicated his performance to the late best friend of Brendan Paraiso, who is the younger brother of fellow Archer, Brent Paraiso, Ricci’s closest friend in the team.ADVERTISEMENT Coco’s house rules on ‘Probinsyano’ set It’s too early to present Duterte’s ‘legacy’ – Lacson OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ Jo Koy: My brain always wants to think funny Kiss-and-tell matinee idol’s conquests: True stories or tall tales?last_img read more

read more

first_imgIn fight vs corruption, Duterte now points to Ayala, MVP companies as ‘big fish’ Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Dave Chappelle donates P1 million to Taal relief operations China population now over 1.4 billion as birthrate falls LiAngelo Ball works out for Lakers with Lonzo looking on Serena Williams of the U.S. clenches her fist after scoring a point against Krystina Pliskova of the Czech Republic during their first round match of the French Open tennis tournament at the Roland Garros stadium in Paris, France, Tuesday, May 29, 2018. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)PARIS — For all that has changed in the 16 months since Serena Williams last played in a Grand Slam tournament — she is now married and a mother — so much was familiar about her at the French Open on Tuesday.The fashion statement, this time in the form of a black bodysuit with a red belt that she said made her feel like a “warrior princess.” The cries of “Come on!” The big serves that provided 13 aces. The returns that eventually produced three consecutive breaks of serve.ADVERTISEMENT Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil “She’s a genuine champion,” Barty said. “What she’s done to be able to get back … is a pretty amazing thing.”Tuesday’s return was striking, from Williams’ powerful shots to her outfit, which called to mind the “catsuit” she wore at the 2002 U.S. Open.It was by far the most significant event of Day 3 at Roland Garros, even though there were so many other Grand Slam champions in action. Rafael Nadal finished off a rain-interrupted victory as he begins his try for a record-extending 11th French Open title. Maria Sharapova, a two-time champ in Paris, was pushed to three sets in a win. Garbine Muguruza, who beat Williams in the 2016 final at Roland Garros, beat another past champion, Svetlana Kuznetsova.All eyes were on Williams, though. On the fifth point, she delivered an ace at 112 mph (181 kph). Moments later, the chair umpire intoned, “Jeu, Madame Williams,” — French for “Game, Mrs. Williams,” a change from the “Mademoiselle” used for unmarried female players.Pliskova, a lefty whose twin sister upset Williams in the 2016 U.S. Open semifinals, actually hit more aces, 15. That’s the most anyone has hit against Williams since at least 2008, according to the WTA.Indeed, Williams appeared to have trouble reading Pliskova’s serves early on. There were other blips, of the sort to be expected from someone who hasn’t played lately. Williams double-faulted seven times. She had nearly as many unforced errors, 25, as winners, 29.But she is not simply skilled. She is smart, too, and she figured things out.After trailing 3-0 in the tiebreaker, she reeled off six points in a row. After falling behind 2-0 in the second set, Williams came up with a trio of service breaks.All was not perfect, of course. In the final game, Williams’ right foot gave way as she sprinted toward the net and she landed on her backside. At least she was able to laugh at that as she went to the sideline to towel off. A spectator yelled: “That’s all right, Serena! You still look great!”After months of worrying more about diapers than drop shots, of breastfeeding for what she called “a really, really, really long time,” of organizing her practice schedule around her newborn’s nap schedule, Williams was back to doing what she’s most famous for, in an arena where she earned trophies in 2002, 2013 and 2015. On Tuesday, she noted that she showed up at her news conference more promptly than she used to, so she could have more time to spend with Olympia.“I don’t want her to ever feel like I’m not around. I’m a super hands-on mom,” Williams said. “Maybe too much.”A reporter wanted to know whether Williams believes she can win the title again.“I’m definitely here to compete and do the best that I can do, obviously. I’m not putting any pressure on myself as I normally do,” Williams began.Then, perhaps questioning her own words as she heard them, she paused, before adding with a laugh: “I think deep down, we all know the answer to that.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next LATEST STORIEScenter_img Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Jury of 7 men, 5 women selected for Weinstein rape trial Winfrey details her decision to withdraw from Simmons film Steam emission over Taal’s main crater ‘steady’ for past 24 hours Williams, the world found out later, was pregnant at the time. Her baby was born Sept. 1; Williams married Reddit co-founder Alexis Ohanian in November.Williams eventually revealed that she had an emergency cesarean section, then encountered trouble breathing afterward because of a pulmonary embolism and needed a follow-up operation.“Just literally not sure if I was going to make it or not at several different times,” Williams said. “A lot of people have really reached out, because they have so many similar stories, too. I feel like a lot of people don’t talk about it. They talk about the baby and how happy they are. But it’s a lot that goes into it with the pregnancy and with giving birth, and it’s called a ‘miracle’ for a reason.”The first match of her comeback was in doubles alongside her older sister, Venus, for the U.S. Fed Cup team in February. She entered two tournaments in singles the next month, going 2-2. An absence of more than two months followed, until Tuesday in Paris.So a woman who has spent hundreds of weeks ranked No. 1 is currently No. 451 and unseeded at the French Open, a subject of some debate: Should her past success accord her the protection a seeding offers? Williams faces 17th-seeded Ash Barty of Australia next.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew And, yes, the victory. Competing as a mom for the first time at a major, and only about nine months since giving birth to her daughter, Alexis Olympia, then dealing with postpartum complications, Williams edged 70th-ranked Kristyna Pliskova of the Czech Republic 7-6 (4), 6-4 at Roland Garros.Already a transcendent sports star and cultural icon, Williams now carries a new title: working mother.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crown“Well, my priority is Olympia. No matter what, that’s my priority. I have given tennis so much, and tennis has actually given me a lot, and I couldn’t be more grateful,” Williams said. “She’s my priority, and I work everything around her.”The 36-year-old American had not played in one of tennis’s biggest tournaments since winning the Australian Open in January 2017 for her 23rd Grand Slam title, breaking a tie with Steffi Graf for the most in the professional era. View commentslast_img read more

read more

first_imgIt comes a time in the life of a people or an organization that compels someone to act for the common good of all. If that opinion is correct, which I have no doubt about, then I need someone at the Liberia National Olympic Committee and the Ministry of Youth & Sports to act.The headline to this commentary suggests that Liberian basketball deserves an urgent rescue, and followers of the game can agree that since the partial end of the Ebola virus disease that has encouraged other sporting organizations, including the LFA to restart their programs, Liberian Basketball Federation seemed to have no way forward.True, for at least four occasions, a congress and its attendant scheduled elections could not be held due to disagreements on administrative issues.LNOC President Phillibert Brown and Deputy Minister for Sports, Hon. Henry Yonton paid considerable attention to burning issues raised by several club presidents but ended in failure.At one point, LNOC’s Brown was compelled to remark openly that Rufus Anderson’s administration failed to do those little things that could have earned the confidence of those who were calling for his head, and therefore because Anderson did not do them, he lost the authority to lead the organization.As painful as those remarks were, Mr. Brown, who held the leadership of the Liberia Basketball Federation for many years, could not be wrong. Then of course, he is the president of the Liberia National Olympic Committee.The LNOC has been one of the major sponsors of basketball and therefore if Brown does not see an individual as capable to lead an association that he has to provide financial and logistical support to, then of course there could be a problem in the future.But it is important to accept the fact that Mr. Rufus Anderson deserves some credit. This is because he loves basketball and he has served as president for the last four years. Sadly, while he could not boast of major achievements, that he supervised the successful hosting of an FIBA Zone 11 Tournament in Liberia demands a great amount of respect.But at the same time, not everyone will appreciate your contribution and it is therefore important to understand that there are times one must let things go and move on.Admittedly, those who have been at logger heads with Anderson’s administration are stakeholders who spend their resources to develop basketball and as a result their opinion must not be overlooked.This is where the Ministry of Youth & Sports comes in. Interestingly, Minister Eugene Nagbe recently resolved a long standing conflict among members of the Federation of Liberian Youths, and therefore I request his intervention to resolve the impasse in basketball.There must be compromises and give and take offers. Someone must be able to look at the future of basketball and take some decisions and the Ministry of Youth & Sports, in collaboration with the Liberia National Olympic Committee must agree to take a concerted but rescue decision to end the frustration of those who love the game and cannot stomach its degradation.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

read more