first_imgDeforestation, Environment, Forest People, Forestry, Forests, Rainforests Article published by Genevieve Belmaker Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img DRC’s unstable political situation, security risks, poverty, and weak governance contribute to putting the country’s forests at risk.Africa’s most popular fuel – charcoal – is largely unregulated in DRC and comes at the expense of vast tracts of primary forest.Some DRC residents have a lifelong connection to the forests and rely on it for their livelihood. The Democratic Republic of the Congo, or DRC, is home to a massive amount of forest – in the range of 112 million and 154 million hectares (between 276 to 380 million acres) depending on how it’s defined. That amount of forest means DRC is also home to critical carbon stocks that are key to keeping the global average temperature below a 2-degree Celsius rise – a goal set at the UN climate talks in Paris in 2015. According to Global Forest Watch (GFW), DRC houses over 19.4 million metric tons (over 21 million tons) of carbon stocks in living forest biomass.Most of the north of DRC is home to the Congo Basin, described by the WWF as a “mosaic of rivers, forests, savannas, swamps and flooded forests.” The Congo Basin traverses six countries and is home to endangered wildlife, 10,000 species of tropical plants, and thousands of species of birds, mammals, and fish. Human beings have lived there for over 50,000 years.Despite the massive natural wealth of its forests, the people of DRC benefit surprisingly little from its resources. DRC is plagued by political discord and dysfunction, poverty, lack of education, and violence from armed bandit groups. In a country of over 77 million people, GFW notes that only 16,000 are directly employed by the forestry sector. There are also unknown numbers engaged in the illegal charcoal trade, which is ravaging some forested areas, as well as illegal logging.But there are also many, many examples of those with lifelong connections to the forests in DRC: conservationists, artists, carpenters, and others. Here are a few of their stories, as collected in the forests of DRC in late 2016 by Leonora Baumann and Etienne Maury.Ewing Lopongo: Salonga National Park conservationistEwing Lopongo, conservationist with the Congolese Institute for Nature Conservation (ICCN), in charge of the Monkoto sector of the Salonga National Park, in Monkoto, Tshuapa, DRC, October 2016. Photo by Leonora Baumann for Mongabay.The first time Ewing Lopongo, 36, saw a wild antelope during her training to become a park ranger, known locally as an eco-guard, she recalls screaming with joy. The event strengthened her will to pursue a career in conservation. Twelve years later, Lopongo is now a state-registered conservationist with the Congolese Institute for Nature Conservation (ICCN), in charge of the Monkoto sector of Salonga National Park, the largest tropical rainforest reserve in Africa and a UNESCO World Heritage site. The park is 3.6 million hectares (8.9 million acres) and is described by UNESCO as “one of the most extensive in the world.”Lopongo says the most rewarding part of her work is being out in the field and coming into contact with the animals and people who live in the forest. Whenever she can, she gets into the park and reaches out to communities to emphasize the importance of conservation zones for the future. She explains to villagers how their daily observations – such as unusual rainfall or animal scarcity – could be consequences of over-exploitation, indicating the importance of conservation efforts. She believes the method is more efficient than simply punishing poachers and those who violate the park’s rules.Born and raised in Kinshasa, DRC’s capital city, Lopongo always wanted to work in a field where women were underrepresented. After graduating from high school, she took classes in biology at the University of Kinshasa, but was seduced by ecology and decided to pursue a career at the ICCN. “The obstacles, they are like a barrier preventing you to move forward,” Ewing said. “But if you try to jump over the barriers no matter what, that’s how I became what I am today. If you have the passion, you can adapt.”Lopongo’s husband also works with the ICCN in a different part of the country. The distance between them makes their work even more difficult.“On the marital side, it isn’t easy. It means that you have to be separated from your husband for an unknown [amount of] time,” she said. The couple doesn’t have children yet – an unusual situation for a Congolese woman in her mid-30s – because she put career before family life.It was not easy for Lopongo to reach her current position. She said that in the conservation world and within traditional Congolese society, women are often seen as weak by men, and women’s rights aren’t widespread.“Really, there is no woman in charge in the protected areas,” Lopongo said, and added that she believes she is only one of two female conservationists in DRC. (The assertion is very difficult to verify). She wants to be a model for women in DRC, possibly by writing her memoirs.Wally: artist, activist, and farmerWally, drawing to educate and raise awareness about environmental conservation among his community neighboring the Salonga National Park, Monkoto, Tshuapa, DRC, October 2016. Photo by Leonora Baumann for Mongabay.Wally (he withheld his last name) lives in Monkoto, a small town in the heart of the Congolese jungle that is an administrative district of Salonga National Park. There, on a dirt road that stretches between a decayed monument celebrating former ruler Mobutu Sese Seko and a small pharmacy, stands a wooden billboard where locals regularly stop by to look at pinned-up sheets of paper. Hidden in the trees next to it is Wally’s house, and the sheets of paper are his drawings.A longtime resident of the area, Wally remembers as a child seeing elephants come to the villages from dusk to dawn, and being chased away by locals who made every imaginable noise. Now, he says pointing at his grandchildren sitting nearby, “Perhaps they will never see a live elephant.” After elementary school in Monkoto, Wally moved to Kinshasa and later studied fine arts there for two years at the Academy of Fine Arts. After his studies ended prematurely due to a lack of money, he worked for several companies and finally returned home to farm and worked as a mechanic for the newly created park in the 1970s.Despite all the detours, with encouragement from one of his teachers from the Academy in Kinshasa, Wally never gave up drawing. He watched documentaries about the Krüger National Park in South Africa, read Tarzan-like comics, and observed as officials came to Monkoto to raise awareness about conservation.“Those from the government, they came with blackboards and cameras, but the message didn’t get across,” he said. To Wally, the message must be carried out by locals sitting with community leaders, talking with women, reaching out to children. “The kids, here, they are my main collaborators,” he said with a solid note of hope for the future.Wally describes his drawings in literal terms.“These drawings…they are messages, and the one who sees them can spread them in this village, and this village,” he said. For the next phase of his work, he hopes to get a bicycle – an economical means of transport – to travel from the park to surrounding communities and spread his message. In this way he hopes that future generations will have a chance to see elephants somewhere other than in his drawings.André Kasereka Syangeha: carpenterAndré Kasereka Syangeha, manager of the Father Caracciolo Millwork in Nyamilima, North Kivu, DRC, November 2016. Photo by Leonora Baumann for Mongabay.In a backyard of Nyamilima, a remote community in DRC’s North Kivu province, stands a large warehouse surrounded with planks of wood and drying laundry hung above them. This is the carpentry shop of the Caracciolo Fathers, a Christian congregation that settled in the area in 1985 with enough funds to start various activities. André Kasereka Syangeha, a smiling man in his 50s dressed in red overalls with worn-out suit pants sticking out of the bottom, is in charge of the place. His official title is manager of the Father Caracciolo Carpentry in Nyamilima.Syangeha started to work as a carpenter in 1977 at the other end of the country, later becoming a tutor, and moving to Nyamilima to train young people. Since 2002, he has been running the priest’s carpentry workshop, a remarkably well-equipped structure for the area. But he says that tools aren’t enough to work: The raw material, wood, is often lacking to craft items of quality, forcing his crew to use lower-quality cypress or eucalyptus. Syangeha looks back wistfully on a time when he worked in the Bas-Kongo province, when hardwood was abundant.Bordering Virunga National Park – home of the Eastern gorilla (Gorilla beringei), listed by the IUCN as Critically Endangered – the forests of Nyamilima are for the most part either protected or used for charcoal production. Electricity is also a concern, and carpentry relies on the parish’s generator, as does the rest of the village.Half a dozen carpenters work here, crafting furniture, house framework doors, school desks and church ornaments for the village and its surroundings. Sometimes, thanks to the priests’ truck, they can also deliver orders to Goma, about 60 miles to the south. But in this area where rebel groups are active and kidnappings a common practice, the journey is dangerous. A few weeks after reporters visited the village, a priest from the parish was kidnapped on the road and released a few days later unharmed.Though Syangeha says his salary is “insignificant,” he is happy to work with wood and describes it as a vocation. It has allowed him to care for and provide an education to his 16 children, many of who have now established their own homes. His eldest son did not embrace the career of carpenter, but he hopes to train some of his youngest children to follow in his footsteps.Marie-Médiatrice Shamba: charcoal wholesalerCharcoal wholesaler Marie-Médiatrice Shamba at her charcoal deposit in Goma, Nyamilima, North Kivu, DRC, November 2016. Photo by Leonora Baumann for Mongabay.Marie-Médiatrice Shamba is a charcoal wholesaler in her 40s and lives in DRC’s North Kivu province where several militias are active. Shamba lives in Goma at the foot of the Nyiragongo volcano, which is described by some scientists as “one of the most dangerous volcanoes in the world.” Her region is also at the heart of a volatile area where conflicts have been rampant for the last two decades. Her husband, a soldier in the Armed Forces of the Democratic Republic of Congo, died when she was 22, and since then she has had to be self-sufficient. She never managed to get the pension due to widows of soldiers and has two children to care for.Thanks to micro-finance loans, Shamba has started several small businesses over time. Sometimes, she made very little profit; other times she didn’t get her investment back. Life has been tough on her, she says, but she seems to have never lost her faith, courage, nor her smile and radiant energy. After years of saving, Shamba was recently able to start her current business as a charcoal wholesaler.Shamba travels to surrounding chiefdoms to collect or make “makala” (as charcoal is called in Swahili), and then brings it back to her home in Goma. There, she sells it to locals who mostly rely on it for domestic use in this province where Shamba says that fewer than 5 percent of homes have electricity. Depending on the quality of the wood used to make charcoal by burning it with little access to air, the price of a 50-kg (approximately 110-lb) bag varies between $20 and $25 in the city. Shamba’s profit is around $1 per bag.But the journey from the chiefdoms to the city is rough: Trucks need to be unloaded at the halfway point to pass pools of mud, kidnappings are common, and rangers from the ICCN regularly establish checkpoints to verify the provenance of cargo. Rebel groups hiding in the typically jungle use charcoal illegally produced in Virunga National Park to finance their activities.Marcel Muhima: retired charcoal burnerRetired charcoal burner Marcel Muhima with his relatives in front of his family home in Bushenge, North Kivu, DRC, November 2016. Photo by Leonora Baumann for Mongabay.The hilly landscape of Kisigari, in North Kivu province, is an interwoven green patchwork of small forests and crop fields of manioc and legumes (such as beans and peanuts) dotted with villages. Here and there, a plume of smoke emerges from from charcoal ovens in the woods, where logs are left to slowly burning covered by soil to keep most of the oxygen out.Marcel Muhima, 74, was born and raised in the hamlet of Bushenge and was a charcoal burner for years. A decade ago he passed his business on to his son. In DRC, where the average lifespan is 51, Muhima now feels too old for such a physical job and only helps occasionally. But he says that little has changed since the time he did the work himself. On the plot rented by his family they plant eucalyptus, a fast-growing species, for charcoal production. They sell it in Goma and save some for their own consumption. Like many others in the area, they also farm but don’t produce enough to sell.Charcoal, Muhima says, is life here. People who don’t plant trees for it can’t make a living. He explained through a translator that since the Belgians left (DRC gained its independence from Belgium in 1960), things have gone downhill. Food crop plantations and companies closed down, damaging the local economy and leading to a surge in the charcoal business.While the arrival of electricity in the Virunga region could curb this trend, he says the $200 fee just to get connected is not affordable. “I rarely even see a $20 bill. How could I get that much?” he asks. Among others, the Warren Buffet Foundation is financing a project to electrify the area, and Muhima’s village already has electrical poles in place. But this initiative still has many challenges to face before succeeding.Usually, Muhima’s family can only produce 20 to 30 bags of charcoal each season, enough to buy clothes and pay school tuition for the children while leaving the young trees get older. Sometimes, the family doesn’t make any money for four or five years in a row, waiting for the trees to grow large enough. But this season, he says, things didn’t go well, and they had to burn young trees because they needed money.Banner image: Ewing Lopongo, conservationist with the Congolese Institute for Nature Conservation (ICCN), in charge of the Monkoto sector of the Salonga National Park, in Monkoto, Tshuapa, DRC, October 2016. Photo by Leonora Baumann for Mongabay.Leonora Baumann is a freelance photographer based between France and DRC. Etienne Maury is a visual journalist based in France. You can find him on Instagram at @3tnmaury. Both are distributed by Studio Hans Lucas.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.This photo essay is part of a Mongabay series that includes “The people of Ethiopia’s forests.”last_img read more

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first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by John Cannon The trade in rhino horn has only recently become legal in South Africa again, after an April 2017 decision reversed a 2009 moratorium.Since the ban went into effect, rhino deaths at the hands of poachers in South Africa are nearly 10 times what they were, leading some private rhino breeders to argue that international trade should be legalized to meet the demand for horn sustainably.Conservation groups are concerned that a legal trade would neither satisfy the market’s demand for rhino horn nor stem poaching. South Africa’s first “legal auction rhino horn auction” opened Monday online, amid a global rhino poaching crisis.The auction tests the ramifications of an April 2017 court decision to lift a 2009 moratorium on the country’s domestic rhino horn trade. The sale of rhino horn across international borders has been banned under the Convention on International Trade of Endangered Species, or CITES, since 1977.John Hume, a businessman-turned-game rancher, plans to sell 264 rhino horns. His ranch in the province of Mpumalanga in eastern South Africa is home to some 1,500 white (Ceratotherium simum) and black (Diceros bicornis) rhinos.Fewer than 5,000 black rhinos (pictured here) remain in Africa. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / MongabayHume and other proponents of the auction say it will provide valuable funding to protect the animals. Others, including conservation NGOs, worry that legal trade only perpetuates demand and could result in further escalations in poaching.A 2016 study in the journal Current Biology predicted that a similar legalization of the international ivory trade wouldn’t quell poaching because of the issues that governments would likely have in keeping the legal and illegal supplies separate.The immediate concern is that “horn from this sale will leak into the illegal market and be transported to end-user countries, primarily Vietnam and China,” said Cathy Dean, CEO of the London-based NGO Save the Rhino.China is the world’s biggest market for rhino horn, where it’s used in traditional medicine. A recent investigation by the Elephant Action League found that Vietnam, in addition to hosting its own market for rhino horn, is also a waypoint in the illicit international trade, from which the horn is then shuttled across the border into southern China.The number of rhinos poached in South Africa has risen dramatically since 2008. Data source: Stop Rhino PoachingThe auction’s website was live on Monday, allowing prospective buyers can view the wares online, according to auction officials. But after a delay in the delivery of the seller’s permit, bidding was postponed until Aug. 23. Hume plans to hold a subsequent live auction in September.In previous statements, he has said that proceeds from the auction will allow him to continue to protect the white and black rhinos living on his 8,000-hectare (9,768-acre) ranch. Security alone for the rhinos on Hume’s ranch costs $170,000 a month, according to the auction website. The site also claims that South Africa’s private rhino owners, who control one-third of the country’s rhinos, have collectively paid more than $100 million in security costs over the last eight years.As Hume sees it, the moratorium has driven demand — and prices — for rhino horn skyward. He said the number of rhinos poached on his ranch has surged. More than 1,200 rhinos were killed by poachers in 2014, according to data from South Africa’s Department of Environmental Affairs, nearly 10 times the number lost in 2009. Though poaching appears to have slowed, 2016 still had the third-highest total this century, with 1,054 rhinos poached.Fewer than 25,000 rhinos are thought to live in Africa, according to WWF South Africa. South Africa is home to roughly three-quarters of them. The IUCN lists black rhinos as Critically Endangered and white rhinos as Near Threatened.Hume argues that poaching became a serious problem in South Africa only after the domestic trade was banned in 2009.“Up until 2008, we had no rhinos being poached in South Africa because demand was being supplied by legal sales from live rhino,” he said, according to a 2016 article in the Telegraph newspaper. “Then they banned that trade and those sales were mirrored by rhino poaching deaths in Kruger National Park.”However, rhinos in several other countries, including Kenya and India, have also faced heightened poaching threats in the past decade.Rhino horn for sale in Asia. Photo courtesy of EALOne of Hume’s stated goals is to increase the numbers of African rhinos through breeding on his ranch. Since poaching has become a problem — he has lost several dozen of his rhinos in recent years — he now has veterinarians remove the horns of the 1,500 rhinos on his ranch.He challenges the notion that he’s cutting the horns only to enrich himself. He told the Telegraph that he would stop the expensive procedure if “his horns were worth nothing and my rhinos won’t be poached.”“I have no problem with demand reduction,” he said.His view is that the sale of the rhino horn, which he told the website Job Shadow he expected could fetch $10,000 to $15,000 per kilogram ($4,545 to $6,818 per pound). The recent investigation in Asia found that prices for raw rhino horn in China were as high as $60,000 per kilogram ($27,272 per pound).“I have a way here, which, if we could spread to all the rhinos in private ownership, will supply a bloodless horn to the market,” Hume said in the video on the auction site.But organizations like Save the Rhino are concerned about the ultimate destination of the horns. The auction website is available in Chinese and Vietnamese, in addition to English, perhaps indicating who will be buying the horns.If the rhino horn sold at auction can only be sold within South Africa, “Is it going to be Chinese or Vietnamese with South Africa residency who are primarily buying these horns?” Dean asked.She said it was also disconcerting that early reports in the press referred to “anonymous” online bidding on the lots for sale.White rhinos, pictured here in South Africa’s Kruger National Park, are more numerous than black rhinos, but are still listed as Near Threatened by the IUCN. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / MongabayThe office of Edna Molewa, the Minister of Environmental Affairs, issued a statement Monday morning that addressed that issue.“The Department [of Environmental Affairs] must be granted access to the online auction to do the necessary compliance monitoring,” it read.“I think that statement is absolutely true,” Dean said, “because if you’re doing to track these horns to make sure they are only sold domestically and not exported illegally, then surely in order to do that, you must know who the buyers are.”Similarly, it’s uncertain how the release of this much rhino horn onto the market — reported to be 500 kilograms (1,100 pounds) —will do to the price of poached rhino horn.Dean said that her colleagues have found that buyers in Vietnam have a distinct preference for horns from wild rhinos. They argue that the horns from wild rhinos have a higher mineral content from a more varied plant diet than animals that have been living on farms, like Hume’s.And other questions exist. For example, “Is there a premium for a horn that was harvested from a dead rhino as opposed to a living animal?” Dean said.She is sympathetic to Hume’s need to finance the protection of his rhinos, and she said his goal of increasing the number of rhinos is “laudable.”Still, at this point, we don’t know what the repercussions will be of holding such an auction, she said.“You have to take an evidence-based approach to this,” Dean said. “These are all the great gaps in the research and the knowledge, which is why we feel it’s incredibly dangerous to go ahead with this live auction now without knowing the answers to these questions.”CITATIONLusseau, D., & Lee, P. C. (2016). Can we sustainably harvest ivory? Current Biology, 26(21), 2951-2956.Banner image of a white rhino by Rhett A. Butler / Mongabay.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Follow John Cannon on Twitter: @johnccannoncenter_img Animals, Biodiversity, Black Rhino, China wildlife trade, Conservation, Critically Endangered Species, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Illegal Trade, Mammals, Poachers, Poaching, Rhinos, Traditional Chinese Medicine, White Rhino, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking last_img read more

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first_imgCommentary, Endangered Environmentalists, Environment, environmental justice, Illegal Logging, Indigenous Communities, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Land Rights, Rainforests, Threats To Rainforests, Threats To The Amazon Three years ago this month, my friends Edwin Chota and Jorge Ríos were assassinated along with Francisco Pinedo and Leoncio Quintícima as they hiked through their homelands in the Peruvian Amazon rainforest along the border with Brazil.This summer I returned to their community of Saweto and hiked the path where they died. The community now holds legal title to their homelands, but their situation is far from secure. Illegal loggers continue to operate in their territory.If the most famous titled community in Peru has neither territorial security nor sustainability two years after receiving title, how will the scores of other recently titled communities fare?This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. Three years ago this month, my friends Edwin Chota and Jorge Ríos were assassinated along with Francisco Pinedo and Leoncio Quintícima as they hiked through their homelands in the Peruvian Amazon rainforest along the border with Brazil.This summer I returned to their community of Saweto and hiked the path where they died. The community now holds legal title to their homelands, but their situation is far from secure. Illegal loggers continue to operate in their territory. Nobody is being held or charged for the assassinations.The Peruvian state established a police post across the river to protect Saweto, but when Jorge’s widow, now Saweto’s chief, requested an armed escort to accompany her to the path her husband died on, the police asked for a boat and gasoline. How can the people and forests of Saweto be protected when the police depend on the indigenous community for gas? In Saweto, seven days by river from the nearest city, gasoline is worth gold.After the assassinations, Peru’s prime minister traveled to Saweto by helicopter and promised Saweto the community land title the four men died for. A year later, Saweto obtained the title, after more than a decade of struggle. The state also made many more promises: a safe trail, improved health support, solar electricity for each family, new employment opportunities, new houses, a secondary school, a frontier development post, grief counseling for the widows, and a special commission that would stop illegal logging.Only a few of these promises have been realized. The trail was only safe when I visited because their Ashéninka cousins in Brazil sent a party of warriors to accompany Saweto’s delegation. The health campaigns never fulfilled their promise and the community continues to depend on a technical nurse and part-time logger operating out of a decaying health post in the neighboring town. The community has a handful of portable solar panels, but the residents have no means of plugging their radios, cellphones, or other devices into them. Sustainable job opportunities have not materialized in Saweto, forcing families interested in buying soap, school supplies, clothes, and medicines to be dependent on illegal loggers for meager wages and the accompanying brutal labor conditions. Houses have been built, but the majority are not slept in because their inappropriate design leaks water during the rainy season and magnifies the tropical heat in the dry season.Saweto now has a secondary school, but the previous two teams of teachers abandoned their post so frequently that some students migrate to find work and leave their education unfinished. During my visit, the half-constructed frontier development building was also on its third cycle of workers, the first two construction crews having deserted the project due to lack of pay. I recently heard that the third group had headed downriver as well.Edwin Chota, leader of Saweto, was assassinated on September 1, 2014. Three years after his death, his community is now titled, but loggers continue to threaten his people and forests. Photo Credit: Emory Richey.The women of Saweto are incredibly resilient and received counseling for two years. I worry more about their fatherless children, who grow up surrounded by danger. The anti-logging high commission has failed Saweto. The community needs consistent local level support, not occasional high profile interventions posted on YouTube. Illegal loggers continue to plunder the forests in and around the community.There are a few bright spots, but even these flicker. The solar-powered cellular mini-tower functioned well until last month, when it became inoperative. Who will fix it and how soon?This summer in Saweto I met a young extension agent training the residents to raise chickens and build sustainable stoves, but he was just getting started, more than two years after the tragedy.The Ministry of the Environment has also begun its Saweto project, and thankfully hired the community’s closest ally to ensure some success in strengthening Saweto’s internal dynamics, developing sustainable food security, and supporting the community to monitor their forests and rivers. Unfortunately, the Ministry’s budget for Saweto will dry up in December, potentially leaving the community abandoned once again on the border.The death of Saweto’s leaders sparked a surge of initiatives to title indigenous territories in the Peruvian Amazon. In the last three years, millions of dollars from the World Bank, Interamerican Development Bank, Norway, and Germany have flooded into Peru to title Indigenous lands throughout the rainforest. This investment is long overdue, given the more than 500 years of territorial expropriation in the region, not to mention recent research demonstrating inhabited indigenous territories to be a most effective deterrent to deforestation in the Amazon (see Nolte et al. (2013), and Blackman et al. (2017), for instance).Unfortunately, the current frenzy to title territories has not been matched by the same financial support, training, and enthusiasm necessary to ensure the sustainability of indigenous territories after title. A newly titled indigenous territory is likely to be taken advantage of by illegal loggers and other powerful extractive interests if the community members and leaders do not have an alternative means of generating at least a modest income. All too frequently, loggers entice a titled community into signing a contract and then plunder their forests. The companies usually do not stop there, but also launder other timber with the community’s permits, before deserting the indigenous residents, who are then held responsible by the authorities.To date Saweto has avoided this fate, but the threat remains. Remember, three years after the assassinations, the illegal loggers continue to operate around Saweto with impunity.The World Bank named a 5.5 million dollar titling project the Saweto Dedicated Grant Mechanism: Living Memory, but Saweto receives no benefits from the bank: no job opportunities, no education initiatives, no justice…If the most famous titled community in Peru has neither territorial security nor sustainability two years after receiving title, how will the scores of other recently titled communities fare? Titling is just and absolutely necessary, but territorial security, environmental justice, and sustainability require participatory planning and long-term commitments, not just a title. Just ask the survivors in Saweto.Jorge Ríos, assassinated in September 2014, fishes on Mashansho Creek. Saweto community members no longer fish or hunt as far from the village for fear of ambush. Photo Credit: Carlos Pérez.CITATIONSBlackman, A., Corral, L., Lima, E. S., & Asner, G. P. (2017). Titling indigenous communities protects forests in the Peruvian Amazon. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 201603290. doi:10.1073/pnas.1603290114Nolte, C., Agrawal, A., Silvius, K. M., & Soares-Filho, B. S. (2013). Governance regime and location influence avoided deforestation success of protected areas in the Brazilian Amazon. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 110(13), 4956-4961. doi:10.1073/pnas.1214786110Dr. David S. Salisbury, Associate Professor of Geography at the University of Richmond, has researched resource conflict, indigenous rights, conservation, and development in the Amazon borderlands for fifteen years. He is currently finishing a book based on his thirteen years of collaboration with the community of Saweto. Article published by Mike Gaworeckicenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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first_imgMore than 22 million kilometers of new roads are projected to be built in highly biodiverse tropical and developing countries by 2050.Direct habitat loss, illegal logging, increased poaching and encroachment and animal road kill are some of the environmental risks associated with road development.Last week, a conference of experts, officials and activists from the Asia-Pacific region discussed ways to maximize the socio-economic benefits of infrastructure development while mitigating the environmental risks. KUALA LUMPUR — “We are currently living in the most explosive era of infrastructure expansion in human history,” said biologist and conservation advocate William Laurance in a speech kicking off a forum on infrastructure development in the Asia-Pacific region.Academics, activists and officials from countries in the region last week gathered in Malaysia’s capital to explore ways to boost the socio-economic advantages of road projects without severely impacting the environment.The conference, “Infrastructure in the Asia-Pacific: Promoting Benefits & Limiting Environmental Risks,” was hosted by the Centre for Tropical Environmental and Sustainability Science of Australia’s James Cook University. In focus was infrastructure development in Indonesia, Malaysia and Papua New Guinea.Laurance cited an estimate from the International Energy Agency that an additional 25 million kilometers (15.5 million miles) of paved roads would be built across the world by 2050, nine-tenths of them in developing nations and tropical regions.Whether built as turnkey developments or as supporting infrastructure, roads are crucial in providing access to health care, education and jobs, he said.However, these countries “sustain some of Earth’s most environmentally critical ecosystems and highest biodiversity,” Laurance noted.Direct habitat loss, increased poaching and encroachment, animal road kill and stolen revenues from illegal logging are some of the risks associated with road development, Laurance said.William Laurance gives the keynote speech. Photo courtesy of Centre for Tropical Environmental and Sustainability Science.Through interactive presentations and discussions, the two-day symposium of experts, government officials and activists sought ways to reduce the environmental impacts of road construction.Noviar Andayani, country director of the Indonesia program at the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), described infrastructure development as a “strategic necessity” in Southeast Asia’s largest economy.Indonesia, however, currently has multiple road projects in the pipeline that threaten national parks in Sumatra, which is home to one of the last and largest remnants of tropical rainforest in Asia.“Infrastructure opens up forests and wildlife to loggers and poachers,” Andayani said.She highlighted the importance of beefing up security in protected areas by increasing funding to deploy more park rangers and through improving efficiency in budget use.“Road development is a matter of priorities,” said Sean Sloan, a researcher at James Cook University, who currently leads an analysis of spatial planning reform in Indonesia’s Aceh and North Sumatra provinces.Poor planning of road projects gives rise to conflicts between development and environmental protection, Sloan noted.“Roads are both necessary but also problematic for tropical rainforests’ future,” he said.Sloan called for improving spatial planning – which measures the environmental values and development effectiveness of an area targeted for an infrastructure project – and improving the enforcement of spatial planning laws to “dramatically reduce conflicts between development and environmental protection.”Planners should also be transparent with civil society in order to mitigate controversies over infrastructure projects, said Nathan Whitmore, a zoologist with WCS in Papua New Guinea.“Roading issues are symptomatic of wider planning issues in Papua New Guinea,” Whitmore said.Group discussions between experts, government officials and activists on efforts to mitigate the environmental risks of road development. Photo courtesy of Centre for Tropical Environmental and Sustainability Science.Other experts argued that ongoing or completed road projects that cut through zones with high biodiversity must take measures to reduce fatal accidents involving wildlife, such as introducing additional traffic regulations and improving habitat management.Malaysia, where plans are afoot for road expansion in wildlife habitats, recently reported two accidents, in June and August, in which a baby elephant and a 10-year-old elephant were killed along the same highway.“[There should be] no road expansion, because if we make roads bigger, then traffic follows, so it increases risks for animal loss,” said Ahimsa Campos-Arceiz, an elephant expert with the University of Nottingham’s Malaysia campus.“We must [enforce] strict speed limits as people drive too fast on these kinds of roads,” he added.Experts at the conference also stressed that the financial backers of infrastructure projects should be a key driving force when it comes to supporting the future of sustainable development.The demand for infrastructure across Asia and the Pacific far exceeds the current supply, according to a recent Asian Development Bank (ADB) report. It said that from 2016-2030, more than $26 trillion – or $1.17 trillion a year – would be required to deliver infrastructure that both supports robust growth and is resilient to climate change. The figure is double the amount spent annually at present.“We have to engage with and talk to them,” Laurance said of backers like the ADB. “They really want to know how to avoid disasters because they don’t want to lose their money.”Laurance said financiers must consider a list of risks – environmental, social, financial and reputational – when agreeing to fund a proposal for an infrastructure project.“If you’re investing in bad projects, then we need to tell them that. These kinds of risks must be on … the table during the talks,” he said. Article published by Isabel Esterman Activism, Biodiversity, Conservation, Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Politics, Forests, Fragmentation, Governance, Infrastructure, Rainforests, Roads Banner image: a mining road cuts through the forests of West Kalimantan in Indonesian Borneo. Photo by Rhett Butler/Mongabay.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Editors note: William Laurance is a member of Mongabay’s advisory board. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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first_imgRhett Butler for Mongabay: So you’re off to Japan next?Jane Goodall: Yes.Mongabay: And then home again?Jane Goodall: No, then it’s Los Angeles, New York, DC, Argentina, five European countries, and Malaysia.Mongabay: Wow, so when do you get home again?Jane Goodall: The 20th of December.Mongabay: Wow, okay. I don’t know how you do it, it’s truly amazing.Jane Goodall: I haven’t done it yet.Mongabay: (LAUGHS) That’s true! So when you were working in Gombe you attributed personalities to chimps, which at the time was pretty controversial. But then last month a study came out that basically vindicated all your research, finding that chimps in the wild had personalities that were very similar to chimps in captivity. So I’m just curious, is that a little bit frustrating that it takes so long to confirm something that was obvious to you after you’d spent time in the wild with these chimps?Jane Goodall: Quite honestly I think almost everybody recognized that animals have personalities whether they were in the wild or whether they weren’t. And it was just science saying, ‘Well we can’t prove it, therefore it’s better we don’t accept it.’ And it was the same with emotions. It was the same with ‘mind.’ All of those things were absolutely taboo. I went to Cambridge in 1961 and I wasn’t supposed to have given the chimpanzees names, even. That was supposed [to] compromise the validity of the research, ‘It would be better if they have numbers.’ And I find this is not actually a logical way of thinking. It would have been far better for the scientists to say, ‘Well yes, we absolutely agree. Of course animals have personalities. But we don’t know how to study it, so we can’t talk about it’ – but they didn’t say that. They just said ‘No, they don’t have personalities, because only humans have personalities.’Dr. Jane Goodall and field staff observe chimpanzees at Gombe National Park, Tanzania.Mongabay: And so when we’re talking about individual animals versus individual species, [your] research and a growing body of research confirmed that individual animals have individual personalities. So how does that play into issues like trophy hunting for you?Jane Goodall: Well for me it plays into it in many, many different ways. First of all, in conservation. So if you’re conserving a species, that’s very different from conserving the individuals within a species, in order to conserve the species. And with trophy hunting – I mean any hunting – every single individual animal has a life that’s playing an important role in its society, I’m sure. Especially with trophy hunting, because the hunters go after the lions with the biggest manes, the elephants with the biggest tusks. And of course they are very important in that particular society. That’s why they’ve evolved that way. And so by picking out always the animals with the most magnificent appearance you’re bound to be changing the nature of the future, aren’t you I think?Mongabay: I think what’s been interesting is we have gone from looking at an entire species to looking at populations. And now that we understand that the individuals within these populations [are] important, taking out an individual may have a critical role within its own community. So when you lose that animal it changes the structure of the whole community.Jane Goodall: Yeah, I’m sure it does. Like I remember when somebody paid a huge amount of money to go and shoot a very old male rhino. You must remember that? It was a huge controversy. And everyone said, well he doesn’t play any important role in the genetic survival of his species. He’s too old. But on the other hand people are finding out that rhinos have more of a complex social life than anybody ever thought. And they’ve been seen congregating – even black rhinos. So nobody really understands the social system – probably never will know, because it’s been so disrupted by us.Mongabay: And so when some folks claim that hunting – trophy hunting – is an indispensable way to fund conservation, do you have an opinion on that argument?Jane Goodall: Yeah, I think it’s rubbish. First of all nobody’s ever proved that the money from trophy hunting actually does go back to conserve the species. And there’s this recent exposé, really, of the group in Oxford that had been working with those lions, where Cecil was shot by the dentist. And the outpouring of anger because Cecil was shot – he was a collared lion, he had a name. In fact on the one hand every single lion – just because he doesn’t have a name – is just as much of a personality as Cecil. It’s just that nobody’s bothered to study him. And when people became so outraged because Cecil was killed, then they began giving money to this research group at Oxford. I can’t remember the amount but it was quite a large amount of money. And that wasn’t used to help conserve those particular lions because the group continued to sit on the fence and not to defend even their own lions being killed, the ones that they tagged, as long as they got their collar back. And I just find it ethically very, very disturbing.It’s something people have to try and face up to, and it’s very difficult. Take domestic animals, for one, I was reading the other day about a woman who wrote a book called The Secret Life of Cows. And she loved her cows, and she talks about their personalities. And she talks about one white calf that was born, and a second white calf was born. And the second one was an object of wonder to the one who had been born just about a month before, they were totally inseparable. They slept together, they never left each others side, they were firm friends. But when they were two she happily drove them off to the abattoir. And I find it – I don’t know how you sort this out in your mind ethically. I couldn’t.Coquerel’s sifaka lemurs kissing. Photo by Rhett Butler for MongabayMongabay: So do you feel that there’s growing awareness generally about animals in terms of them being individuals?Jane Goodall: Absolutely, I mean I’ve noticed every lecture – when I talk of or say something about [this] kind of thing, there’s applause from at least half the audience, standing up for individual animals and their lives. Their lives matter to them.Mongabay: You’ve been in the conservation field for quite a long time. What would you say has changed the most since you started your career?Jane Goodall: Well, I think the thing that’s changed most is the need for conservation of species! Because of course you know when I first went to the Serengeti and Ngorongoro, there were animals everywhere. It was completely different from today. You’d drive through Nairobi, and you get just to the outskirts, [you’d find] the animals weren’t confined to Nairobi National Park, they were just wandering along, near the road. You’d see a giraffe. So that’s one major change, is the number of animals who’ve disappeared, thus emphasizing the need for conservation. And the habitat destruction. The human population growth. All of these things. Meaning that conservation has become something very important if we care about the future.And then the conservation methods – I don’t know, I’d like to say they’ve changed. But there’s still what I consider too much of trying to conserve animals by… I don’t know, killing off lots of them to examine their stomach contents. To find what they feed [on] so that you can conserve them better, that sort of research. That was done on vultures I think.Mongabay: What about mechanisms like protected areas versus working with communities or using technology?Jane Goodall: I think technology can be absolutely fantastic. We use it a lot. There’s the use of drones to protect elephants and rhinos, [when] animals are seen to be congregating in certain areas, there’s a suspicion that the poachers will go to those areas, and so the rangers move in to be better able to protect the animals. So that’s a terrific use of some technology. And also GIS, GPS, mapping. But the first part of your question – I feel like conservation will never work unless you work with local communities.Park rangers in Garama National Park. Photo by Thomas Nicolon for MongabayMongabay: Could you speak a little bit about how JGI is using technology? I think what you’re doing with the rangers is really interesting.Jane Goodall: Yes. The fact is that in Tanzania there’s only about 2,500 chimps maximum left now. And most of those are actually not in protected areas – the two protected areas are Gombe and Mahale national parks. But most of the chimps are in village/forest reserves. And so the TACARE program, which is improving the lives of the villagers in very holistic ways, working with them so that they become our partners in conservation – 52 villages we now work with around Gombe and down south towards the remaining forests where the remaining chimps are not protected. Each of these 52 villages provides one to two, depending on the size, forest monitors. And we do workshops that train them how to use smart phones. And they’re very proud. They go into their forest and they record like an illegally cut tree, or an animal trap, or a [bullet] cartridge. On the other hand they report sightings of different animals there. And they collectively chose what they would record. We didn’t tell them what to record, they chose it. And they’re very passionate about it. And that gets uploaded onto a platform, Global Forest Watch. So that everything is transparent and the village leaders can have no excuse not to know what’s going on in their forests. And JGI can download it. And the government can download it, too. So it’s making a huge difference.Mongabay: So taking a broader look would you say that you’ve become more or less hopeful that we can reverse some of the trends that we are seeing?Jane Goodall: Well, I’m absolutely sure we can reverse some of it. Not all of it. I can’t imagine we can reverse all of it. We’re still losing the battle overall with the chimps, in spite of everything that’s being done in all of these big plans, and the chimpanzee action plans for East Africa, Central Africa, West Africa. They’re great plans. But the bush meat trade is still going on. There’s still trade in live animals, particularly to Asia, chimpanzees. As well as other animals of course. And then disease. And still habitat destruction continues. So you know you have to be prepared to go on fighting, and fighting, and fighting. And I don’t know what the end is. If we give up, it would be the end.Mongabay: Are there conservation issues that you feel are particularly overlooked right now?Jane Goodall: Well, something like population numbers, family planning and such. That has been very deliberately not talked about. It’s beginning to get better now. But you know the size of the population is so absolutely crucial for conservation. It is. As populations grow, and populations of cattle grow, you have forests being absolutely decimated. And poverty is another one which I think is being more addressed these days. Because if you’re very poor, no matter what the laws are, you’re going to go and cut the last trees down because you’re desperate to grow food for your family. Or get some money from charcoal. But it’s not sustainable. It definitely is not sustainable. And you notice the animals disappearing. You know, I’ve been through forests in Congo which had been teeming with wildlife, and now there’s nothing left. And the same’s happening in South America, too.Mongabay: Yeah in Indonesia you’ll go in the forest, that’s pretty remote, it’s maybe a day from a road. And there are no birds because they’ve all been collected for the bird trade.Jane Goodall: Yes, that’s right indeed. And places where there’s no butterflies. And then some of the reptiles are vanishing for the same reason. The live animal trade is a disaster. And that means we need to work much harder on persuading people not to buy these exotic animals – parrots for example. They’re vanishing from so many places.Mongabay: Did you see the new study that came out recently that documented the decline in insects across Europe?Jane Goodall: Yes, I did. That’s mostly from farming.Mongabay: Yeah, exactly. But that has knock-on effects for birds and species that need insects.Jane Goodall: Yeah. The birds go too.Gremlin carries her son Grendel in Gombe National ParkMongabay: When we met a couple weeks ago in San Francisco you mentioned a few positive signs out of China.Jane Goodall: I think so. Everybody says, ‘Oh well you know there’s all this live animal trade and it’s all going to China, and the ivory’s going to China, and the pangolins’ scales are going to China, and other Asian countries.’ And if you really step back and look at it, China isn’t doing any worse than America or Europe. It’s just they’re rather good at what they do, and I think it was very impressive that the president announced that all ivory trading would be banned by the end of this year. A lot of people say it won’t make any difference and the illegal trade will continue. But you know one of the advantages of it being a dictatorship is if the president really means it, it’ll really happen. Because the punishments will be swift and complete – if he really means it – I think he probably does. And China’s way ahead with clean, green energy. Way ahead. And they’re building the most extraordinary, enormous wetland for migrating birds on what used to be a gigantic landfill. And it’s the most amazing exercise that you can imagine. And I keep reading about all the different things China is doing to try and clean up the air. They’ve changed. They’ve completely changed. Because when I first went in the mid 90’s they weren’t even talking about the environment. And then came those massive floods due to the – I can’t remember exactly where it was but there was a lot of deforestation. A lot of erosion. Lots of flooding. A lot of damage done. So suddenly it becomes okay to start talking about protecting the environment. People woke up. And the change since those days has been absolutely tremendous. I’ve seen it. And the attitude towards animals as well. In fact I was just looking at a lovely sequence of some people doing rescue work after the recent earthquake. And spending a lot of time rescuing a little dog that was trapped in the rubble.Mongabay: You mentioned The Ivory Game and the impact that [film] has had in raising awareness in certain communities. It sounds like both in China but also among Chinese people outside of China.Jane Goodall: Yes. Absolutely. The young Chinese man goes undercover in the movie and pretends that he’s a buyer, [he] goes into this ivory dealer – or a dealer who deals in all kinds of wildlife, and is almost caught, a very dramatic scene in the movie. And he actually told me that when he was a little boy he used to go past the meat markets, and there were all these wild animals still alive ready to be sold for food. And he felt so sorry for them. And he promised to help them when he grew up. So he became a journalist. And then he said that he basically risked his life in this film because he wants to be the voice of the millions and millions who feel about animals and nature just as we do. He’s now started his own not for profit. And he takes Chinese business leaders out to Africa and shows them the effect of bad conservation practices of the Chinese logging companies, mining companies, in Africa, so that they change their ways. And I remember several years ago thinking about all these Chinese laborers who are shipped out to build roads, who are treated very badly. And how very often they take a little piece of ivory back with them. And nobody talks to them, nobody tells them this isn’t a good thing to do. Nobody speaks to them about conservation. And so we’re working together with him and our Roots and Shoots programs to educate the Chinese workers, to tell them what’s happening. And it’s quite extraordinary when you do that, how people change.Dr. Jane Goodall with a group of Roots & Shoots members in Salzburg, AustriaMongabay: So how significant do you think it is for figures like celebrities within China, but also people like Leonardo DiCaprio, to get the average person interested in, and engaged with, these environmental and conservation issues?Jane Goodall: I think it’s very important. And I think a lot of those movies that are made are waking people up. Definitely. It’s much more difficult in the developing countries because they don’t have the same access to movies as we do. We have to step up, you know, the reduction in demand for something like rhino horn. And explain to people that rhino horn actually is just like fingernails. And it actually isn’t medicinally good for you at all. And now of course South Africa has really hit that a big blow by allowing the farming of rhinos and the cutting off of the horns for legal sale. Which means, a.) that illegal sales can go on much more easily, and b.), it’s basically kind of saying, ‘Well we think it’s fine. Rhino horn? Yes, sure, maybe it is medicinally good. So, here you are, we’ll breed it for you, farm it for you.’ I’m shocked, to be honest, that conservationists feel that way.Mongabay: Do you think engaging people on the personalities of individual animals is a good way to get them interested in these issues?Jane Goodall: Yes it’s certainly one way, for sure. I got involved a little bit with the waldrapp (northern bald ibis). They were taught to follow an ultralight [to migrate]. And they had to cross the Alps. And they went from Austria to southern Italy to breed. And the first one who actually came back all on her own, and left again, and raised two chicks, they named her after me. And she was shot by a hunter. And that was absolutely in the news, everywhere, all over Italy and Austria. People were shocked and horrified and I’m sure it made more difference that she had a name.Mongabay: It’s kind of like Cecil…Jane Goodall: Exactly, yes. It’s exactly the same. And I gather from reading this article about the Oxford group that Cecil’s son was also shot. And also that although the trophy hunting is supposed to hunt post-reproductive [lions], that they’re saying that lions of – what was it, six, eight? I can’t remember. But obviously not post-reproductive. And yet they’re not saying anything about it. And that the numbers they quoted in this article about the number of lions existing in Zimbabwe, and the number that were shot by trophy hunters, was totally, totally not sustainable.Lions in Kruger Park, South Africa. Photo by Rhett Butler for MongabayMongabay: You mentioned your program Roots and Shoots, that encourages youths to become leaders for a better future for people, animals, and the environment, it would be great to hear an update.Jane Goodall: Well it’s in 100 countries. And I think one of the most exciting impacts that I know about is in China. Going back to China again! Because of the number of people who have come up to me and said, ‘Well of course we care about the environment. We did your Roots and Shoots program in primary school.’ So we not only have about 150,000 active groups worldwide, from kindergarten through university, and some adults too, by the way, but in addition we’ve got what I call the alumni. Those are the people who have been through the program. And Tanzania – just this last time I was in Tanzania – there were four Tanzanians: one was in government, one was a cab driver, one was a customs official, and one was a government photographer. So they were all quite separate. They’d all been through Roots and Shoots. The photographer said that’s why he was photographing, because he wanted to photograph wildlife. And the others just said, ‘Well, we make sure that our children belong to Roots and Shoots. And we do understand about the environment and the need to conserve trees and things like that, and to plant trees.’ So it definitely has an impact.Mongabay: Just to confirm, you said 150,000 groups?Jane Goodall: Yes. Something like that.Mongabay: That’s incredible. That must be one of the biggest movements in the environmental or conservation space in the world, I would think.Jane Goodall: I think it must be, when you add it all up together, yes. I mean just in little England there’s 1,700 groups. And Burundi, in spite of all the problems it’s going through with its terrible government and all the ethnic violence, and the killings, and the violence, they’ve got Roots and Shoots in every single province. And they’ve done it with basically no money. That’s what’s so impressive in these countries. They get the idea, somebody says this is really good, and they become totally passionate. So a primary school kid goes to a secondary school where there isn’t any Roots and Shoots, and they start it. And they don’t require money. They just do it. And they clean up the beaches, and they plant trees, and take part in campaigns, and fly giant peace doves on the International Day of Peace, and all these things. And I find it very inspiring. And so it’s all over Tanzania. And it’s growing fast in South Africa. It’s absolutely everywhere in Burundi. We’ve got some really good groups growing in the DRC, and Congo, Brazzaville, and Senegal, and just all over the place.Mongabay: So Roots and Shoots has probably been inspiring multiple generations of conservationists, I would think.Jane Goodall: I think it definitely is. Conservationists and humanitarians, and people who have the right values, you know – respect for life.Dr. Jane Goodall speaking in Los Angeles, CA 2006.Mongabay: So on that young conservationist front, do you have any advice that you’d give to young conservationists that are just getting started in their careers?Jane Goodall: Well, I’d warn them that it’s going to be tough. That there’s a lot of competition getting into good jobs in conservation. That they’ve really got to be passionate about it if they want to get involved. Because it’s not easy. But they shouldn’t give up.Mongabay: Do you have any particular advice for young women who are starting conservation? Because it feels like historically conservation biology has been more of a male-dominated field, but it’s changing now.Jane Goodall: I think it’s definitely changing. And certainly the people I meet and talk with, there are so many women. And they’ll say, ‘Oh I read about you when I was at school, and I determined that I could do it, too. And you taught me, you did, so I can do it.’ And that’s what got them into conservation. Men, too, by the way.Mongabay: Is there anything that you would like to see more reporting on, here or elsewhere?Jane Goodall: I think Mongabay does a super job. I really do. And now you’re growing all over the world. I really do, I think you do an absolutely super job.Mongabay: That’s much appreciated.Jane Goodall: A very recent thing, I heard just yesterday from Burundi from this extraordinary young man. He was a child soldier in the genocide of Burundi. And he put together a group of four people. I think there were four women who had been raped during that time. And another child soldier. So they’d all suffered a lot. And they worked their way through the suffering by working with children, and starting Roots and Shoots. This young man also started TACARE-like programs. tk Very, very little money. And [in this email] he says, “Roots and Shoots in Burundi, since 2006, we now have 29,736 members from seven provinces. We have 76 clubs from different schools, where chimps and other species live. Since the crisis of Burundi touched the wildlife a lot, we decided to…” It’s half French and half English, anyway, they’re protecting trees, they’re planting trees all over the place, quite a few trees. And they’ve got all kinds of ways of living in harmony with nature, and it’s so impressive that they’ve done this all on their…they did it, I didn’t even know they were doing it. Because he learned about Roots and Shoots when he escaped [in] Tanzania.Mongabay: That is remarkable…and Burundi so needs its forests restored, so programs like this are so important.Jane Goodall: Yes. It does – it seems that at the very high part of the rift in Tanzania, our village monitors are having a lot of bad luck, because people aren’t up there very much, it’s very difficult to get to. So apparently what they think [is] the chimps are moving from Tanzania into Burundi, where we’re protecting forests better (LAUGHS).Roots & Shoots members celebrate the 2015 Day of Peace by flying a giant Peace Dove and planting trees at the JGI Tchimpounga Chimpanzee Rehabilitation Center in the Congo.Mongabay: That’s good news. Are there others things you’d like to talk about?Jane Goodall: Well going back to our TACARE program, our village monitors – for the first time since the early 90’s forests are coming back around Gombe. The trees are coming back. And two years ago we had – no the beginning of last year, where am I? Where are we?… We’re now in November…the end of last year, two females appeared in Gombe and we knew the genetics of everybody by collecting fecal samples. So these were two completely new females from outside bringing much needed genetic diversity to the few chimps left in Gombe. So it was very good news.Mongabay: Yeah, that is great news.Jane Goodall: It shows that our corridors are beginning to work. But you know it needs constant vigilance, because of this wretched human population growth. And poverty. And cattle…Mongabay: Cattle are the bane of our existence everywhere.Jane Goodall: Cattle are absolutely a huge problem in Tanzania. All coming from Somalia. People are very afraid of the Somalis that come with them because they’re quite war-like. And so they’re allowed to go into Tanzanian forests, and Kenyan forests. And of course, climate change isn’t helping. A lot of these cattle herders are having to leave their old pasture lands because of drought. So the problems are huge. We have to fight harder. That’s why I love what Mongabay’s doing because it’s sharing information – one of the things that’s so important is sharing the good news. Because if there isn’t any good news, people will give up altogether. And there’s a lot of good news. There’s so many stories about people bringing back animals from the brink of extinction. And people restoring places that we’ve destroyed. Roots and Shoots is working in Tanzania with a huge cement factory and the quarries that they make – it’s an offshoot of Heidelberg Cement in Germany – it’s called Twiga. They are restoring [land], they’re putting the soil back, and our Roots and Shoots kids are planting trees, and the animals have come back. And I went there just recently and saw a lot of different birds, and butterflies, and lizards that weren’t there, nothing was there ten years ago. Nothing at all, just bare dust. So those good stories I think are really good things to publish. Yeah and Heidelberg, by the way, they have a competition. I think it’s every year, for the best restoration of quarries.Mongabay: I guess if there were one thing that gives you hope what would that be?Jane Goodall: It would be the Roots and Shoots kids. Because they are so full of energy, and determination, and they haven’t yet been filled with despair. And if enough of them have the right attitude, and the right philosophy, and the right respect for life, and understand about size of families and that sort of thing…you know, that’s the hope for the future isn’t it?Mongabay: So you have 100 countries, 150,000 groups, and do you know how many people are participating in those groups?Jane Goodall: No, we don’t. We’re not even sure of the number of groups. Because there are so many groups that we keep learning about that we didn’t even know existed.Mongabay: So it’s really gone viral.Jane Goodall: It’s gone very viral. It’s probably safer to say 100,000 groups. Nobody really knows. We’re desperately trying to find out. And as for the number of participants it’s almost impossible to figure out because they’re changing all the time. I mean constantly changing, you know, as kids grow up and leave. So I don’t know, but we are working with Esri and making a map. And eventually it will chart every single group and what they’re doing. Tapestry of Hope, it’s called.Mongabay: Well that will be quite a project, given how many people are involved.Jane Goodall: I know. Well it’s been started, but you know – I think we need more money than we have to do it. But Esri’s plugging on with it and our people are contributing. I don’t ever see it being finished, personally, but even so it gives you a pretty good idea. And from my point of view, it’s enough just to show where the groups are and not worry about what they’re all doing. I just don’t think we can ever do that.Villager uses a tablet to record forest health.Mongabay: What would be the best way for people to help you with what you’re trying to achieve?Jane Goodall: Well I think the best way is to spread the news and get more people involved in Roots and Shoots. And more partnerships. Because you know we partner with 4-H and other youth groups that are doing more or less the same thing, but none of them are doing animals, people, and environment. We’re the only one doing all three. And that comes from my passion about the interconnectedness of life that I developed in the rainforest. You know we were told when we began our TACARE program, ‘Well you can’t do it all, you’ve got to choose. You can’t do women’s projects, and food, and health, and education. You’ve got to choose.’ And we, being me and George Strunden, we said, ‘But there’s no point in just doing education if you don’t do health. So you educate people who get sick and die. What’s the point of that?’ And anyway, we managed eventually to get the money to do it the way we wanted to do it, starting small and getting bigger. So in Roots and Shoots, let’s say you have 10 people – it’s very often a whole school, but let’s say it’s 10. And you might have five of them passionate about animals. You might have two who care about people. And the others who care about the environment. So they don’t all have to do the same thing.But they all have to get together and hear about what each other is doing so that they get this understanding that they’re part of a complex ecosystem, and a complex society, and one thing won’t work unless it’s in harmony with everything else. So if we join up with an environmental group, if they want to join Roots and Shoots, they will gather in some who care about animal welfare, and some who care about helping poor children, or raising money for earthquake victims, hurricane victims.As for poor old Puerto Rico, mentioning hurricanes, you know they’ve got nothing left. How would it be to wake up and find that everything’s gone? The trees have gone. The forests have gone. It’s dreadful. And there was Trump throwing out paper towels. I mean honestly. Yeah, we have friends in Puerto Rico. And we have Roots and Shoots who are rushing around helping everybody, helping distribute food. Oh yes, and I tell you, please tell anybody you know who has anything to do with seeds. What we’re trying to do is to collect up seeds of vegetables and then get them to JGI. And then JGI will send them out to our contact in Puerto Rico and they’re going to give lessons to people in how to grow vegetables in their gardens. This is a splendid project. It’s a splendid idea. And thank the man who started it and his wife, they helped start Roots and Shoots in America way back in 1994. And his wife is from Puerto Rico and so he always told her, when I retire we’ll go and live in your country again. And of course, they just got their house built and everything, and along came these two ghastly hurricanes. They lost the house.Mongabay: That’s really a tragedy. And unfortunately there’s just more and more of these things. I mean here in California, when you were here we had the fires.Jane Goodall: Oh, the fires, oh they were so awful. And think how many millions of animals must have died if you include the insects. Millions.Mongabay: Yeah, and it’s not getting better.Jane Goodall: No. And the man who provided all the sound for the movie, Jane, all the Gombe sound. He came out to Gombe. Have you heard of him, Bernie Krause?Mongabay: I have, yes.Jane Goodall: Well did you know he lost everything except the shirt on his back and his wife? And his wife had just had knee surgery. And suddenly the wind changed and he said this fire came – you couldn’t imagine. One moment everything’s fine, and the next minute there’s this huge wall of flame. And they couldn’t even get their cats. They just had to run, and he had to half carry her. And they had to drive through the fire. And so they have nothing except the clothes they were wearing. Everything was burned. All his precious equipment. And he said, luckily the sounds were backed up. But he lost his guitar, his house, everything.Chimpanzees Bahati and her baby Baroza at Gombe National Park, Tanzania.Mongabay: Any other projects you’d like to call out?Jane Goodall: I suppose you could mention the MasterClass, do you know about that?Mongabay: I don’t think so.Jane Goodall: I was interviewed for two days. They wanted me for three. But we managed actually to do it in one and a half. And they interview you on everything, and then they divide it up into classes. And people buy it online and take it online. And I was completely staggered at their professionalism. They’ve done this with about six other people so far. The lighting, the setting, the quality of the sounds. I’ve only seen the trailer of it, but people are already buying it, 29 classes. And it’s not just about the chimps. It’s also about how you give a good lecture and that sort of thing as well. And a lot about conservation. It’s about Roots and Shoots, it’s about individual animals, and all of these things. The effect on the environment of meat-eating. That’s something that conservation doesn’t think about enough, although it’s beginning to. Not just the cruelty, but the effect on the environment as well.Mongabay: I really appreciate all the time you gave me, it’s always wonderful chatting with you.Jane Goodall: It was good chatting with you too. My brain isn’t working at its best right now, I’ve been sleep deprived for days, and days, and days.Mongabay: Well you sound great, you’re doing really well with the lack of sleep. I hope you’re able to get some rest soon before you go to Japan. Article published by Erik Hoffner Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Celebrated conservationist and Mongabay advisor Jane Goodall spoke with Mongabay founder and CEO Rhett A. Butler for the podcast just before departing for her latest speaking tour (she travels 300 days a year raising conservation awareness). Here we supply the full transcript.This wide-ranging conversation begins with reaction to the science community’s recent acceptance of her six decade contention that animals are individuals with personalities, and moves on to discuss trends in conservation, and she then provides an update on the Jane Goodall Institute (JGI)’s global projects.She also challenges trophy hunting as an effective tool for funding conservation (“It’s rubbish,” she says), shares her positive view of China’s quickly growing environmental movement, talks about the key role of technology in conservation, and discusses a range of good news, which she states is always so important to share.Amazingly, Dr. Goodall reports that JGI’s youth program Roots & Shoots now has perhaps as many as 150,000 chapters worldwide, making it probably the largest conservation movement in the world, with many millions having been part of the program. An effort is now underway to document them all. This week’s podcast featured a discussion between Mongabay’s founder and CEO Rhett A. Butler and Jane Goodall, the world’s most recognizable conservationist and one of this media outlet’s esteemed advisory board members (listen to excerpts of it here). Rhett and Jane check in regularly, but given the recent research vindicating her long (six decade) contention that animals – from the chimps she studied to the everyday animals we are all surrounded by – are individuals with personalities, just like humans, we decided to record and share the conversation. Listen here or read the transcript below:In this context they discuss the idea that trophy hunting is an important component of funding the conservation of species like lions and rhinos (Dr. Goodall calls that “rubbish” for multiple reasons, including the loss of accumulated wisdom and experience held by elder animals). Also discussed is China’s increasing environmental awareness; the importance of conservation groups working with communities on multiple levels like health and education, and not just the environment; the recent disasters like in Puerto Rico and northern California; news that the Jane Goodall Institute (JGI)’s youth program Roots and Shoots now has perhaps 150,000 chapters worldwide; and an update on JGI’s network of village-level volunteers, which in combination with tech tools like remote sensing, is able to provide the latest observations of what’s happening all over the world, as in the examples she shares from Tanzania and Burundi. The two spoke just before Dr. Goodall set off on her latest speaking tour: at 83 she travels 300 days a year to inspire the next generation of conservationists.In her early days at Gombe, Jane Goodall spent many hours sitting on a high peak with binoculars or a telescope, searching the forest below for chimpanzees.AN INTERVIEW WITH JANE GOODALLcenter_img This conversation was edited for length and clarity, and originally appeared on this week’s episode of the Mongabay Newscast, listen to Jane and Rhett speak here. Next week’s featured guest is bestselling author Margaret Atwood.Banner image of Dr. Goodall with orphan chimpanzee Uruhara at the Sweetwaters Sanctuary in Kenya by Michael Neugebauer. Archive, Chimpanzees, Climate Change, Conservation, conservation players, Disasters, Featured, Great Apes, Interviews, Lions, Rainforests, Rhinos, Technology, Technology And Conservation last_img read more

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first_imgTrack: Good Weather: FineDYE JOB SPRINTRace 1 1200 M (Purse $850,000) NB&IMP2-Y-O RESTRICTED STAKES1. BUBBLING KITTEN WHenry*2. BLUE DIXIE OWalker 53.0 6 1/2L3. KIMMY’S TRAIN OWhite 50.0 2 1/2L4. RALLY BABY PFrancis 50.0 1 1/4LWIN: $217.00PLACE: $50.00.50.00, $%0.00Final Time : 1:13.1Winner : 2yo dk b/br filly – BLUE PEPSI LODGE – SHANDA DTrainer : PHILIP FEANNY Owner : HAMARK FARMSQu $165.00 Ex: $686.00Trifecta: $413.00Race 2 1820 M (Purse $560,000) 3-Y-O & UP CLM($350,0-$300,0)/NB5YO(NW3)ANTHONY FERGUSON1. ABOVE THE RADAR AChatrie 53.0 5/12. LEGENDARY PLEASURE LSteadman3 53.0 6 1/2L3. BATIDOR DE MUNDO AOPowell4 53.0 1 1/2L4. SHADE OF BEAUTY MWard4 48.0 1 1/2LWIN: $303.00PLACE: $86.00, $115.00, $74.00Final Time : 2:00.3Winner : 6yo ch horse – TRACKING – SUZIE’S GIFTTrainer : VICTOR WILLIAMS, Owner : VICTOR G WILLIAMSQu: $929.00 Ex: $2,694.00D/E: $2,640.00Superfecta : (6-8-4-2) $10,293.00Race 3 1500 M (Purse $555,000) 3-Y-O MAIDEN CLAIMING($500,0-$450,0)PILOT FRANCIS1. DREAM ADMIRAL RMitchell 52.0*2. LAZZA SMuir 52.0 5L3. MINY LEE RHalledeen 52.5 Neck4. ARTHUR JJackson 54.0 9LWIN: $253.00PLACE: $58.00, $54.00, $55.00Final Time: 1:36.3Winner : 3yo ch colt – SEEKING THE GLORY – PURE MUDTrainer : HARRY PARSARD Owner : P. J. K TEAMQu: $247.00 Ex: $566.00D/E: $2,718.00Superfecta: $1,723.00Rolling Triple: $35,149.00Race 4 1000 M (S) (Purse $620,000) 3-Y-O & UP CLM($550,0-$500,0)/NB4YO(NW4)COLIN FERGUSON1. DIFERENTGENERATION DDawkins4 50.02. SUNLIGHT EXPRESS LSteadman3 53.0 1L*3. FORCE DE JOUR HLewis 57.0 2 1/2L4. HOLOGRAM SHADOW AChatrie 54.0 1L5. AGAKHAN RLunan 54.0 3/4LWIN: $202.00PLACE: $69.00, $73.00, $67.00Final Time : 0:58.2 Splits : 22.3, 45.0Winner : 6yo b horse – CONGAREE – COTTA’S JEWELTrainer :PHILLIIP LEE Owner : INTEL DIPLOBred by Y.S. (1955) LTD.Qu: $674.00 Ex: $1,292.00D/E: $1,472.00Trifecta: $881.00Hi-5: $6,187.00Rolling Triple: $15,185.00ANDREW H.B. AGUILAR MEMORIAL CUPRace 5 1600 M (Purse $800,000) NB2-Y-O MAIDEN SPECIAL WEIGHT*1. BIGDADDYKOOL SEllis 53.0 70.00 54.002. GOLDEN GLORY AChatrie 52.0 3/1 4 60.003. MISTER BONES RWilson 53.5 7/1 3 69.004. THE PROMISE LAND WHenry 53.0 9/2 2WIN: $70.00PLACE: $54.00, $60.00, $69.00Final Time : 1:41.4 Splits : 24.2, 48.0, 1:14.3,Winner : 2yo b colt – SORRENTINO – BEWARE BABYTrainer :ANTHONY NUNES Owner : STEPHAN A NARINESINGHQu: $130.00 Ex: $181.00D/E: $220.00Superfecta: $304.00Rolling Triple: $2,925.00Race 6 1500 M (Purse $560,000) NB4-Y-O & UP RESTRICTED ALLOWANCE IV(NW3)CLIFFORD ATKINSON SR.1. STAN ROY DaneNelson 54.02. NATASHADONTPLAY LSteadman3 52.0 1 1/4L*3. NO MONEY FRIEND WHenry 55.0 1 1/2L4. CHEERS AndrePowell4 56.0 2 3/4L5. SUPER HERITAGE RMitchell 54.0 2L6. ROVING STAR OEdwards3 48.5 1 1/4LWIN: $256.00PLACE: $116.00, $95.00, $88.00Final Time : 1:35.4 Splits : 24.1, 47.4, 1:14.4,Winner : 4yo b colt – REGION OF MERIT – TOUCH THE LIGHTTrainer : SPENCER CHUNG, Owner : FREDERICK FOOTE & KENT LYNQu: $1,313.00 Ex: $2,066.00D/E: $477.00Trifecta: $2,315.00Hit-6 carry-over : $44,226.00Rolling Triple: $3,068.00Pick-4: $18,176.00Super-6: $638,905.20 (6 OF 6)Race 7 1400 M (Purse $500,000) NB4-Y-O & UP MAIDEN CONDITION RACEENOS BROWN*1. TWILIGHT ROCKET LSteadman3 54.02. HE’S A DIAMOND RMitchell 55.0 2 3/4L3. QUEEN OF THE TOWN JErwin 54.0 Neck4. PERFECT GIRL RoshJohnson4 51.0 1/2LLate scratch : #10 HOPSCOTCHWIN: $111.00PLACE: $78.00, $151.00, $111.00Final Time : 1:32.3 Splits : 25.1, 50.0, 1:17.2,Winner : 4yo dk b/br colt – TWILIGHT TIME – CLASSIC TUDORTrainer : ANTHONY NUNES Owner : LJM STABLESQu: $802.00 Ex: $1,079.00D/E: $1,209.00 (1-10) $353.00Superfecta: $22,494.00Rolling Triple: $1,311.00Race 8 1700 M (Purse $500,000) 3YO&UP CLM($180,0)-NOT FINISHED 1-2 SINCE AUGUST 12DALTON SIRJUE1. SIRMANDI SMuir 56.02. CUTTER RWilson 54.0 4L3. WINIT OEdwards3 54.0 Sh.Head4. FLAGRANS AChatrie 54.0 1 1/4L5. THE GUMMER PParchment 54.0 NeckLate scratch : #3 RAJ KAPOOR, #4 PREMATUREEWIN: $140.00PLACE: $91.00, $214.00, $264.00Final Time : 1:51.1 Splits : 24.2, 48.2, 1:15.0, 1:43.3Winner : 6yo b horse – GHOST RANSOM – DAME O’ MANDYTrainer : MICHAEL BEECHAM, Owner : OSCAR A BLAIRQu: $712.00 Ex: $1,124.00D/E: $274.00 (3-3) $200.00 (3-4) $87.00Trifecta: $3,987.00Hi-5 carry-over : $59,618.00Rolling Triple: $3,616.00SEYMOUR “FOGGY” MULLINGS MEMORIAL TROPHYRace 9 1600 M (Purse $768,000) IMP3YO&UP(NW3&MDN)/NB3YO-REST.STAKES1. ORIGINAL TRAIN DaneNelson 53.52. SOUTHERN CRUISE JErwin 53.0 1 1/2L*3. BRAWN AChatrie 56.0 2 1/2L4. SHINING LIGHT RMitchell 53.5 3LWIN: $139.00 PLACE: $56.00, $59.00, $61.00Final Time : 1:38.1 Splits : 23.2, 46.0, 1:11.1,Winner : 3yo b colt – IMAGE MAKER – REGINA ROYALETrainer :HARRY PARSARD Owner : HARRY PARSARDQu: $275.00 Ex: $442.00D/E: $436.00Superfecta: $1,441.00Rolling Triple: $991.00JAMAICA RACEHORSE TRAINERS’ ASSOCIATION TROPHYRace 10 1200 M (Purse $768,000) NB3-Y-O RESTRICTED ALLOWANCE II(NW2)1. LITTLEMISSEMMY DDawkins4 49.02. KING WITHIN PFrancis 54.5 6 1/4L3. SWEET DIMENSION SMuir 53.0 1/4L4. FIRE ALARM WHenry 53.0 1/4L5. TROJAN LSteadman3 53.0 NoseWIN: $1,175.00PLACE: $426.00, $350.00, $212.00Final Time : 1:14.1 Splits : 23.1, 47.2, ,Winner : 3yo b filly – WEEKEND CRUISE – GAYE’S EMBLEMTrainer : ANTHONY NUNES Owner : HYDE VALLEY FARMSBred by KARL SAMUDAQu: $16,292.00 Ex: $16,131.00D/E: $7,283.00Trifecta: $59,706.00Hi-5 Carry-over : $291,809.70Rolling Triple : (13-4-3) $45,520.00Pick-4 : (3-13-4-3) $53,444.00 (4 OF 4)Super-6 : (2-1-3-13-4-3) $932,633.00 (6 OF 6)Pick-9: $63,514.50 (8 OF 9); $2,027.00 (7 OF 9) Carry-over : $3,436,668.06PlacePot 8 : Carry-over : $1,041,052.50last_img read more

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first_imgArticle published by Isabel Esterman Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Archive, Biodiversity, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Ex-situ Conservation, Governance, Mammals, Protected Areas, Rhinos, Saving Species From Extinction, Sumatran Rhino, Wildlife center_img A new partnership called Sumatran Rhino Rescue aims to capture critically endangered Sumatran rhinoceroses to reinvigorate a captive-breeding program.Most experts agree that captive breeding is necessary to prevent extinction; with wild populations small and fragmented, too few baby rhinos are being born to keep the species alive.The current plan approved by the Indonesian government focuses on capturing “doomed” or “isolated” animals in populations too small to survive in the long term.However, female Sumatran rhinos living in isolation are particularly susceptible to reproductive problems, leading some experts to argue that it makes more sense to focus on capturing rhinos from healthier populations where rhinos are known to be breeding successfully — perhaps at the risk of harming the survival prospects of those populations. In November 2018, a small female Sumatran rhino plunged into a pit trap in Kalimantan, the Indonesian part of the island of Borneo. Pahu, as she came to be called, was the first of what is hoped to be a number of captive animals for a new partnership called Sumatran Rhino Rescue. The partnership’s plan is to capture enough wild Sumatran rhinos (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) to build a sustainable captive-breeding program, one that could finally ensure the species’ survival. But the question now is, where to start? With four distinct populations, some almost totally obliterated, the question of which rhinos to catch takes on a terrible weight.Currently, the plan, with approval from the Indonesian government, is to first target the so-called isolated or doomed animals. These are animals like Pahu, stuck in small fragments of forests in groups too small to survive in the near term, let alone the long term.“We are currently focusing on finding and capturing the small, isolated populations,” says Barney Long, the senior director of species conservation at Global Wildlife Conservation, one of the partners of Sumatran Rhino Rescue. But he adds that capturing isolated animals “has never been stated as the only thing the alliance and project will focus on.”He points to the expert advisory board that will counsel the Indonesian government on where to target rhinos for capture. The board is part of Sumatran Rhino Rescue and made up of 13 voting experts from around the world. A board meeting is currently scheduled for July 29 to Aug. 1 in Jakarta.“The project will adapt based on the recommendations made by this group,” Long notes.Nan Schaffer, the founder of SOS Rhino and a veterinary expert on Sumatran rhinos, says that going after animals simply because they’re isolated is the wrong course of action. Instead of focusing on doomed animals, she says there should be one goal in mind: capturing animals that are proven breeders. The current course of action would largely focus captures in Indonesian Borneo and in southwestern Sumatra’s Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park, if there are any rhinos left there. Captures may also begin in some areas of Aceh in northern Sumatra if rhinos there are found to be separated from the main population. But Schaffer, who is also a member of the expert advisory board, says she believes the first course of action should be capturing females from Way Kambas National Park, in southeastern Sumatra, and Aceh, both areas where camera traps actually have footage of baby rhinos.The priority, according to Schaffer, is to “produce as many babies as fast as possible.”Officially there are fewer than 100 wild Sumatran rhinos left on the planet; the actual number probably ranges anywhere from 30 to 80 animals, though no one really knows for certain. There are nine Sumatran rhinos currently in captivity, but only one pair of proven breeders. Six of the captive rhinos are female, but only one has borne children (Ratu); three appear incapable of breeding (Iman, Rosa, and Bina); one has yet to be tried (Pahu); while the last is still too young (Delilah).“This is an emergency,” Schaffer says, adding, “we have to be efficient and effective.”Female Sumatran rhino with calf at the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary in Indonesia’s Way Kambas National Parl. Following two successful rhino births, the facility is home to seven rhinos. Image by Rhett A. Butler for Mongabay.com.A plague of infertile femalesSchaffer’s argument for catching proven breeders rests on history.In 1984, conservationists began catching Sumatran rhinos in the wild for captive breeding. The program, for decades, was a disaster. While the project at first suffered from a lack of knowledge about the species, the biggest hurdle was that many of the females already had or quickly developed severe reproductive pathologies, including tumors, cysts, cystic endometrial hyperplasia (abnormally thick lining of the uterus), and a propensity to lose fetuses even when able to get pregnant. It took the program 17 years and dozens of rhinos to finally produce a baby, in 2001.While there is still some debate as to the exact causes of these fertility problems, experts generally believe that if a female rhino doesn’t get pregnant and bear young frequently, she will eventually lose the ability to do so.“We think that the repeated exposure to fluctuating hormone concentrations that occur in females who cycle regularly but never get pregnant cause or exacerbate the development of [a reproductive] pathology,” says Terri Roth, the head of CREW, a research facility at Cincinnati Zoo and the scientist who finally figured out how to breed Sumatran rhinos in captivity. “In a healthy wild population, the female would rarely cycle because she would always be pregnant or lactating.”Upon reaching maturity, a steady exposure to hormones such as estrogen may turn females nearly infertile within a few years.Schaffer, who was the first to ultrasound a female rhino, discovered the various pathologies in 1991, and has been studying them ever since. In a still-unpublished paper, Schaffer describes how most of the females captured over the last 35 years developed reproductive problems.“What I discovered over subsequent years was that almost all the females had the same pathology in their uterus,” Schaffer says.And this isn’t an issue that only develops in captivity: it’s happening in the wild too. The first Indonesian female caught in 1986 had tumors in her uterus, according to Schaffer, and necropsies on rhinos killed by poachers have shown them to suffer from similar reproductive problems.In many ways, these reproductive problems explain why wild populations have collapsed over the last four decades: when a population falls to a certain size, or becomes too disconnected, females simply don’t have enough children to stave off major fertility problems. Eventually they become incapable of breeding, and the number of deaths in the rhino population begins to eclipse births.“After ten years and survey after survey the only information we had about the Malaysian Borneo population was that the population had not rebounded, the estimates just continued to decline,” Schaffer says. “The remnant population was not viable and we needed to bring them into captivity. Just a few years later, this ghost population was gone. The same thing is happening across each of the remaining populations in Indonesia.”Schaffer says the problem isn’t limited to older females, but can even show up in young rhinos.“Rosa had tumors five years after she reached maturity,” she says of one of the females residing at the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary in Way Kambas National Park, in southern Sumatra. “The quick progression of fertility loss makes immediate action critical.“Doomed [or isolated] animals are likely infertile,” Schaffer adds. “This policy [of catching doomed rhinos] has set the program back since the 80s.  We focused capture efforts on areas that contained [reproductively] compromised rhinos, but didn’t know it. At this point we should know better.”For Schaffer, rhinos stuck in isolated, or doomed, forests should be put on the backburner to make way for animals that she says will be much more likely to successfully produce offspring.In addition, Indonesia’s hesitance so far to attempt advanced breeding technologies, which can come with their own challenges and dangers, has meant that infertile rhinos are not utilized. For example, Schaffer says Rosa could still be useful to the larger population if here eggs were collected.Schaffer’s views are supported by a number of other experts.John Payne, the head of the Borneo Rhino Alliance, says the focus on catching isolated animals “failed spectacularly” because isolated animals tended to be older, less healthy, and came into captivity with pre-existing reproductive issues.Payne has been desperately trying to breed females with reproductive problems for decades, with no success to date. Now, the last known male rhino in Borneo, Tam, has died.“After 35 years we should know not to keep on doing the same thing and expecting a different result,” he says. “The focus must now be on locating those rhinos that are most likely to be fertile.”Two of the remaining Sumatran rhino habitats, Way Kambas and Bukit Barisan National Parks, lie on opposite coasts at the south of Sumatra Island.Location, location, locationFor those who support Schaffer’s views, the first targets for capture should be the rhinos of Way Kambas National Park and Aceh, not Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park. (Capture efforts could still go ahead in Kalimantan given the rhinos there, if any indeed survive, are a distinct subspecies.)Payne says it should be “easy” to get five reproductively healthy female rhinos out of Way Kambas, given the flat terrain and the fact that experts believe the park is home to 20 to 30 animals. But he also warns the population will be “severely inbred” — a reality at this point potentially for all surviving animals, except perhaps in Aceh.Petra Kretzschmar, an expert on rhinos and advanced reproductive techniques with the Berlin-based Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research, believes Aceh to hold the only “healthy population” left and therefore the best place to begin captures.Officials are currently considering building a new captive breeding facility in Aceh.The challenge with Aceh is that the mountainous and remote terrain may make captures difficult, according to Payne.“And in some locations practically almost impossible,” he adds.The focus should also be on younger rhinos, even juveniles. Payne also advocates targeting mothers and babies using a surface trap designed in Malaysian Borneo to catch rhinos without relying on them falling into a pit.Still, some point out that there is a downside to catching very young rhinos: they would have to spend years in captivity before mating could be attempted.Some rhino experts, however, don’t view the issue as quite so black-and-white.Both Roth of Cincinnati Zoo and Margaret Kinnaird, global wildlife leader with WWF International, say that while the best way to find breeding females is to go into areas where babies are known to be present, there is still value in capturing isolated animals.“The isolated animals are probably doomed if we do not do anything, so it seems worthwhile to at least capture them and see what they look like,” Roth says.Kinnaird agrees, noting that some of these animals have only become isolated “recently,” meaning they still could be reproductively healthy.Removing animals from Way Kambas and Aceh also comes with risks. Not only could animals be injured or killed during capture, as happened with Najaq a female in Borneo, but the efforts could harm the chances for survival of the two wild populations.“That is a hard decision to make,” Roth says. “If populations are reproducing well in the forest, the tendency is to leave them there and protect them.  After all, that is ultimately what we are striving for with this species.”Of course, the question then becomes, are any of these populations actually viable in the long term? Do births actually outnumber deaths anywhere? And are rhinos, even in remote Aceh, actually protected from the threats of poaching and snaring? Rhinos in captivity are safer from those threats, yet that only assumes they can be successfully and safely captured, which isn’t guaranteed.“Many feel that giving this option of [catching isolated rhinos] is worth the risk of leaving the two known breeding populations in the wild for a couple more years until we have captured some isolated rhinos and assessed their reproductive potential,” says Long, who declines to take a side on the issue.This debate isn’t new. It’s been going on for decades, but since Indonesia has now agreed to new captures for the first time since the 1990s, it has gone from a hypothetical to the need to make tough decisions.“I don’t think there is a clear right or wrong here, but opinions behind each option are strong,” Long says.The challenges of the decision are highlighted by the most recent animal caught, Pahu.Ratu with her firstborn, Andatu, four days after his birth in June 2012. Ratu is currently the only female Sumatran rhino in captivity known to be capable of bearing live calves. Image courtesy of the International Rhino FoundationThe Pahu puzzlePahu was an isolated rhino and is believed to be quite old, around 25 years. But experts say they’ve found no obvious reproductive problems or tumors with Pahu. So far, Pahu may have bucked the trend and arguably provides support for the idea that catching isolated rhinos may bear some fruit.“If we had abandoned Pahu, she would have very likely died in a snare. There was no chance of her remaining in her forest fragment, which was rapidly being encroached by logging, mining and other activities,” Kinnaird says. “Although other females captured in Bornean Malaysia have shown reproductive problems, Pahu does not at this point.”But there are other problems with mating Pahu. She’s small — very small: she weighs around 360 kilograms (790 pounds), and while this may sound large, the average weight of a Sumatran rhino is more than double that. Schaffer says she may even be suffering from dwarfism. And some fear that attempting to mate her with a male could lead to injury or even death; Sumatran rhino mating is a violent, raucous affair. Others fear that, given her size, she would be unable to safely birth a regular-sized baby. Breeding success with her remains untested and unknown.Currently, Pahu sits in a facility in Kalimantan while experts decide the next course of action.But the rhinos of Kalimantan provide another last-ditch opportunity. They are distinct representatives of a nearly extinct subspecies. Tam, who recently died, may have been the last male Bornean rhino. Capturing more animals in Kalimantan, assuming any are there, could maintain at least some of the subspecies’ distinct genetics, even if it means mating them with the Sumatran line.For her part, Kinnaird says a strategy of catching both isolated animals and some from core populations is the best way forward.She notes that isolated animals include males, which don’t suffer from the same reproductive pathologies. New males are needed almost as desperately today as females, given that all three males currently in captivity are directly related.A rhino calf, photographed in 2016 at the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary in Way Kambas. The park that hosts the sanctuary is also home to a population of wild rhinos. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.No easy way forwardAlthough there’s finally a plan to capture wild rhinos, it doesn’t mean the way forward is clear or easy.“Each of the last seven animals that have come into captivity have had fertility problems — abortions, cysts and tumors.  How many more will it take before we shift our focus?” Schaffer says.But there are other considerations here. Long says that Sumatran Rhino Rescue has only secured political will from Indonesia to catch isolated rhinos, but not yet rhinos from the core populations.“This does not mean this support can’t be secured or that we would not try to secure it,” he adds, but notes that getting the support of the government would require “more work.”It took years to convince Indonesia to move forward with captures at all.Time, space, resources and money are running out. Catching infertile females will mean spending limited resources on animals that will very likely not carry the population forward. Already there are three females in captivity that are unlikely to contribute to future generations, unless Indonesia finally agrees to go ahead with utilizing advanced technologies and success is swift. These females all require funding, space, and employee time.“If we have limited time, limited capture teams, limited resources and limited space in our sanctuary, we have to take the most efficient route toward the goal of increasing birthrates,” Schaffer says. “Given that the emergency is the need for production of babies as soon as possible, the rescue of isolated animals is secondary.“We are at the final crossroad,” she adds: “It truly is now or never.”A Sumatran rhino at the Way Kambas sanctuary. Image by Tiffany Roufs for Mongabay.Correction: this article has been updated to correct the name of one of the female rhinos, Iman, that is likely to be infertile.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. 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first_imgFormer heavyweight champion of the world, Oliver ‘Atomic Bull’ McCall, visited Jamaica for five days recently, a visit, he said, designed “to see what Jamaica’s boxing pool is like and what I can do to help it to grow” .McCall was invited to Jamaica by Chris Joy, an American boxing promoter who assisted in getting boxers for the Wray and Nephew Contender Show last year and who has plans to promote shows in Jamaica this year.McCall told The Sunday Gleaner that he was impressed with what he saw and that he is prepared “to come back to Jamaica soon to run some clinics and to assist with the development of boxing in Jamaica”. An animated McCall, who scored victories in world title fights over other former champions – Lennox Lewis in 1994 and Larry Holmes in 1995 – when he was at the peak of his career, said he had seen some promising young boxers who with the right training, could become world beaters.”I was at your National Amateur Championships and saw a lot of raw talent. Those guys showed a lot of spunk, and throughout the night, one could see there was no backing down.”A couple of the ladies showed promise, too, and I could not believe it when I was told that the little bantamweight Tenesha James was having her first fight. With the proper training, she can become a really good boxer.”Joy, meanwhile, said he did not want to just promote, but to help to develop the sport.”I want to help with the amateurs and get them into the pro ranks. That is what I want Oliver to assist me in doing. He has had a great career and can be an inspiration to young boxers,” he told The Sunday Gleaner.GOOD RECORDBacking this up, McCall said, “My record in boxing is a good one. I made some mistakes that affected my earning power, but I am at peace with myself now and I am trying to give back to a sport that gave me a lot.”When asked by The Sunday Gleaner about his meltdown in his second world title fight against Lewis on February 7, 1997, McCall said that he should not have taken the fight at that time as he was going through a lot of personal problems.”I was having lots of problems. I was getting counselling. I was a mess, but I got the offer and took it. The WBC (World Boxing Council) title was vacant, Lewis was ranked No. 1 and I was No. 2, and the fight was made by my promoter, Don King.There was talk of a postponement, but that did not happen and I made the mistake of going into the ring that night, and you know what happened.”What happened was that in round four, McCall stopped fighting and walked around the ring, only defending himself when Lewis attacked. He did the same thing at the start of round five, eventually started crying, and referee Mills Lane stepped in after 55 seconds, stopped the fight, and called it a loss by technical knockout.last_img read more

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first_imgAn evacuation alert is in effect for oil and gas infrastructure that may be impacted by the fire. For more information on the evacuation, click here.This fire is currently a modified response fire and is being actively monitored but not actively suppressed. Personnel are flying the fire daily and assessing growth. A structural protection unit has been set up on structures at a compressor station.If you have any pictures you can share of this fire, email news@moosefm.ca- Advertisement –last_img read more

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first_imgA Donegal woman has scooped $10,000 and a trip to the US on tonight’s Late Late Show.Grace Kelly from Lifford didn’t think she had much of a chance when she texted her entry into the live competition on the popular RTE Show.But she got the shock of her life when she was telephoned by Ryan Tubridy’s team to say she had won. The chatshow host wasted no time in remarking on Grace’s famous name saying “I have always wanted to say this live on air – good evening Grace Kelly.”Grace revealed she was at home on the sofa with her mum Kitty as she received the good news in front of the nation.A delighted Grace said she would love the prize when asked by the RTE star if she really wanted it.She’s now off to Los Angeles and Hollywood – with 10k spending money.   DONEGAL WOMAN WINS $10,000 ON LATE LATE SHOW was last modified: February 11th, 2012 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:GRace KellyLate Late ShowLiffordlast_img read more

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