first_imgWith a view to providing a map of forest philanthropy, the Environmental Funders Network’s Forest Funders Group – an affinity group for foundations focused on forest conservation – has developed a methodology for describing forest grants by geography, focal issue, and approach.The mapping has been piloted on grants data submitted by five European-based foundations that made 652 grants between them in the study period (2011 to 2015), averaging £3.1m per year.Although this captures just a fraction of the forest grants made worldwide, it yields tantalising points for reflection.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. “If you don’t know where you’re going, you’ll end up someplace else.” So said US baseball legend Yogi Berra, on the importance of having a goal in sight and a map for getting there. Those of us engaged in forest philanthropy — the investment of grants with the aim of protecting and replenishing the world’s forests — have well-formed ideas about the best places in which to seek change. Some funders focus on policy reform, others on shifting commodity supply chains, empowering communities, or direct conservation.All of these approaches are valid. They and others besides will be needed to roll back deforestation. But if we accept it is possible to do too much of one thing and too little of another, or that some change-making activities are simply more reliant on philanthropic finance (adversarial campaigns or anything ‘too political’ being a case in point), we see that grant-makers would be wise to reference their strategies against choices made by other donors.What is the flow of grant finance around specific issues, forest regions, and theories of change? Where do gaps and opportunities lie? How do forest programmes operated by foundations and governments compare? The total dollar value of forest philanthropy is much smaller than that associated with government-backed climate and development funds. But foundation grants can pack good bang for the buck — get it right and you maximise philanthropy’s potential for taking risks, building movements and pioneering change; get it less right and you could end up subsidising work that is already well-funded elsewhere.A working knowledge of the grants market seems important if we are to lean towards effective philanthropy. But as it stands, forest grants are poorly mapped compared to the forest-related spending of government donors (including REDD+ pledges tracked at Climate Funds Updates) or the voluntary carbon market (tracked by Forest Trends).With a view to providing a map of forest philanthropy, the Environmental Funders Network’s Forest Funders Group — an affinity group for foundations focused on forest conservation — has developed a methodology for describing forest grants by geography, focal issue, and approach. The mapping has been piloted on grants data submitted by five European-based foundations that made 652 grants between them during the study period (2011 to 2015), averaging £3.1m per year. (Full disclosure: I am a grants manager at JMG Foundation, one of the foundations included in the forest philanthropy mapping, and a committee member of the Environmental Funders Network.) Although this captures just a fraction of the forest grants made worldwide, it yields tantalising points for reflection, and we aim to run the mapping on a larger group of foundations this year.The picture that emerges shows great variability between foundations, in terms of spending, investment priorities, and grantees. Overall spend is dominated by a small number of large grants (in this case, including four £1m+ awards), followed by a goodly chunk of funds in the £20,000 to £200,000 bracket, with a long tail of smaller grants (including 470 of less than £5,000 within this sample).The five foundations dispersed funding to grantees based in 67 countries in total. More than half of these countries received less than one grant per year of the study period, via organisations based there (not counting grants directed to these countries but made via organisations headquartered elsewhere). By far the most grant spend (£12.4m, or 80 percent) accrued to large organisations headquartered in the UK and US, the majority of it geared towards protecting forests in tropical countries. This included work directly in those countries (such as training conservation leaders or developing sustainable livelihoods) and work geared towards international policy and markets (such as reforming the supply chain of forest-risk commodities).FIG 1: GRANTEE HQ – TOP 10UK- and US-based groups received a lower proportion in terms of grant numbers (172 grants, 25 percent of the total), with the sub-£5,000 grants in particular tending to go directly to groups based in forest countries. India, Papua New Guinea, Russia, and Cameroon are among the countries in which there appears to be high demand for grants among local organisations, but relatively little funding available, at least among the set of foundations analysed here.Again, these results pose interesting questions. Is the concentration of forest philanthropy upon a relatively small set of Western-based organisations problematic? What is the scale of re-granting going on from these international groups to their in-country partners? Should funders look to make more grants directly to NGOs based in forest countries? What are the barriers to doing so?Turning to the forest regions prioritised by grantees, we see that one-third of grant spend (£5.2m) was directed towards South and Central America, one-fifth (£3m) to Asia and one-sixth (£2.4m) to Africa — of which less than £1m focused on the Congo Basin countries.FIG 2: WORK LOCATIONS (CONTINENTAL REGION)Grants were assigned to six issue categories: Landscape Change (including forest restoration, park management, REDD+, and climate adaptation work), Agricultural Conversion (where four out of five grants were related to palm oil), Forestry (grants to counter industrial and illegal logging, and reform the wood pulp sector), Local Use (sustainable farming and income generation), Energy & Extractives (mining, hydropower, oil), and Other Infrastructure (roads, ports, etc). Figure 3, below, shows the breakdown of grants between these categories, and Figure 4, below that, the average grant size per category.FIG 3: FOCAL FOREST ISSUESFIG 4: FOCAL ISSUES BY AVERAGE GRANT SIZEAs we see, Landscape Change, Forestry, and Agricultural Conversion grants are relatively large and Local Use, Energy & Extractives, and Infrastructure grants much smaller — begging the question of what is a ‘useful’ scale for grant finance. On the surface of it, £11,000 may be enough to deliver a Local Use project, for instance a community forestry scheme (though probably not enough to scale that up at regional level). Equally, £7,000 might pay for some activism against mining or oil projects, but does not seem much to set against the powerful interests who tend to want Energy & Extractives projects delivered. Of course, some individual grants are larger than the average grant size, but in general the lowly sums available to counter damaging infrastructure schemes is striking.Figure 5 starts to tell the story of these issues at regional level. We see a large number of Agricultural Conversion and Forestry grants focused upon Southeast Asia, reflecting major campaigns to reform Indonesia’s palm oil and pulp sectors. South America received by far the largest number of grants on Energy & Extractives (though spending attached to the Landscape Change category was much higher), while Landscape Change and Local Use featured strongly in East Africa (including projects to promote sustainable land cultivation and reduce dependency on fuel wood).FIG 5: ISSUES BY REGIONThis analysis invites the question of how well forest grant allocation maps onto the real-world distribution of threats and opportunities. Take-home points from this dataset include the relative lack of funding directed towards the Congo rainforests, the dominance of palm oil among grants geared towards forest-risk commodities (far ahead of pulp, rubber, cattle, and soy), and a near-complete absence of grants targeted on non-energy infrastructure such as roads and ports.Are philanthropies doing too much of some things and too little of others? The answer is for individual foundations to interpret and decide, but grants mapping exercises at least help to orient the discussion.Rainforest at Tampolo on the Masoala Peninsula in Madagascar. Photo by Rhett Butler.Harriet Williams is a grants manager at the JMG Foundation, where she heads up a program on tropical forests. She is a committee member of the Environmental Funders Network, whose mission is to increase the effectiveness of environmental philanthropy as well as the total funding directed to environmental causes. The JMG Foundation is a member of EFN’s Forest Funders Group, which carried out the grants mapping reported here. Follow EFN on Twitter: @greenfunders.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Mike Gaworecki Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Activism, Cattle, Climate Change, Commentary, Conservation, Conservation Finance, Editorials, Energy, Environment, Forestry, Hydroelectric Power, Hydropower, Illegal Logging, Infrastructure, Land Use Change, Mining, Oil, Palm Oil, Pulp And Paper, Redd, Reforestation, Research, Researcher Perspectives Series, Roads, Rubber, Soy last_img read more

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first_imgAcoustic, Animals, Bats, Bioacoustics, Bioacoustics and conservation, Biodiversity, Conservation, Deforestation, Environment, Forests, International Trade, Ivory, Mammals, Marine Mammals, New Species, Payments For Ecosystem Services, Podcast, Rainforests, Sharks, Species Discovery, Tropical Forests, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Trade Article published by Mike Gaworecki Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img This episode of the Mongabay Newscast takes a look at the first installment of our new investigative series, “Indonesia for Sale,” and features the sounds of Amazonian bats.Mongabay’s Indonesia-based editor Phil Jacobson joins the Newscast to tell us all about “Indonesia for Sale” and the first piece in the series, “The palm oil fiefdom.”We also speak with Adrià López-Baucells, a PhD student in bat ecology who has conducted acoustic studies of bats in the central Amazon for the past several years. In this Field Notes segment, López-Baucells plays some of the recordings he used to study the effects of Amazon forest fragmentation on bat foraging behavior. This episode of the Mongabay Newscast takes a look at our new investigative series, “Indonesia for Sale,” and also features a new acoustic study of Amazonian bats.We recently published the first installment of a new investigative series Mongabay is doing in collaboration with The Gecko Project. The series is called “Indonesia For Sale,” and the first article looks at the land deals — and the powerful politicians and businessmen behind them — that paved the way for the explosion of industrial agriculture Indonesia has seen in recent decades.Mongabay’s Indonesia-based editor Phil Jacobson joined the Newscast in our Brooklyn-based studio to tell us all about this important reporting project — last year he appeared on the Newscast to discuss the impacts of climate change on the Mekong Delta.Then we speak with Adrià López-Baucells, a PhD student in bat ecology and conservation whose acoustic studies of bats in the central Amazon document the effects of forest fragmentation on bat foraging behavior. In this Field Notes segment, López-Baucells plays some of the recordings and explains how these recordings have led to new species being found in the central Amazon for the first time.Cash for conservation: Do payments for ecosystem services work?Mexico takes ‘unprecedented’ action to save vaquitaFirst-ever population estimate of the mysterious marbled cat from continental Asia revealedRecord Amazon fires stun scientists; sign of sick, degraded forestsTrade in silky and thresher sharks now to be strictly regulatedIvory is out in the UK, as government moves to shutter legal tradeMyanmar caves yield up 19 new gecko speciesYou can read more about all of these top news items here on Mongabay. And if you’d like to request email alerts when we publish new stories on specific topics that you care about most, from forests and oceans to indigenous people’s rights and more, visit alerts.mongabay.com and sign up!Mongabay is a nonprofit news provider and relies on the support of its readers and listeners, so if you value what you learn at the website and on this podcast, please visit impactfund.mongabay.org to help make what we do possible. You can even choose the kinds of reporting your donation supports — decide what issues or areas you’d like to support at impactfund.mongabay.org.You can subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast on Android, Google Play, iTunes, Stitcher, TuneIn, or RSS.Indonesia’s Tanjung Puting National Park contains one of the the largest and most concentrated populations of orangutans left in the wild, but the area has been heavily targeted for its ramin and ironwood trees. Photo courtesy of Tom Johnson for The Gecko Project.Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001last_img read more

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first_imgArticle published by Glenn Scherer Brazil is committed to cutting carbon emissions by 37 percent from 2005 levels by 2025, to ending illegal deforestation, and restoring 120,000 square kilometers of forest by 2030. Scientists warn these Paris commitments are at risk due to a flood of anti-environmental and anti-indigenous measures forwarded by President Michel Temer.“If these initiatives succeed, Temer will go down in history with the ruralistas as the ones who put a stake in the beating heart of the Amazon.” — Thomas Lovejoy, conservation biologist and director of the Center for Biodiversity and Sustainability at George Mason University.“The Temer government’s reckless behavior flies in the face of Brazil’s commitments to the Paris Agreement.” — Christian Poirier, program director at Amazon Watch.“There was, or maybe there still is, a very slim chance we can avoid a catastrophic desertification of South America. No doubt, there will be horrific damage if the Brazilian government initiatives move forward in the region.” — Antonio Donato Nobre, scientist at INPA, the Institute for Amazonian Research. President Michel Temer’s initiatives will promote development in the Amazon, with agribusiness, mines, dams, railways and roads fueling widespread deforestation. Not only will this mean a loss of habitat for threatened species within the biome, but also the release of significant amounts of carbon, jeopardizing Brazil’s commitments to the Paris Agreement, while contributing significantly to global climate change. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / MongabayIn 2012, Brazil celebrated a dramatic reduction in its deforestation rate. A sharp annual decline took forest loss to a record low, down 76 percent from 1990. Accomplishing this milestone — achieved alongside GDP growth and a major financial incentive scheme for reducing deforestation in collaboration with Norway — Brazil was hailed as an example for other nations to aspire to, especially during the landmark 2015 climate summit in Paris.Today, that situation is largely reversed. Deforestation in Brazil rose rapidly and alarmingly in 2015-16, while Brazil’s greenhouse gas emissions shot up by 8.9 percent in 2016. And though deforestation saw a measured decline in 2016-17, policymakers remain worried by an “exceedingly dangerous” suite of initiatives pushed forward over the last 12 months by President Michel Temer. They are so worried, in fact, that in June Norway threatened to withdraw financial support for Brazil’s deforestation effort if the nation didn’t reverse its flood of anti-environmental measures.A major point of concern: will Donald Trump’s U.S. withdrawal from the Paris Agreement provide Temer with political cover to disregard Brazil’s voluntary carbon reduction and deforestation commitments? This is a question that will likely be on negotiators’ minds this week and next as the world’s Paris signatories gather for the COP23 summit in Bonn, Germany, from Nov. 6-17.Taken all together, Temer’s anti-environmental measures pose a serious threat to the Amazon biome, Brazil’s commitments to the Paris Agreement, and to the global climate, according to the scientists interviewed for this story.Brazil’s president, Michel Temer, is pushing forward an “exceedingly dangerous” suite of initiatives that, if successful, will change the face of the Amazon. Photo by Diego DEAA used under a CC BY-SA 4.0 licenseTemer targets the environmentPresident Temer came to power in May 2016, having helped engineer the impeachment of President Dilma Rousseff. Since then, he has issued a rush of decrees aimed at facilitating large-scale agricultural and industrial development in the Amazon, something the agribusiness lobby that dominates Congress — and whose support Temer needs to sustain him as he comes under increasing scrutiny for corruption — is eager to promote.Temer’s administration includes the influential minister of agriculture, Blairo Maggi, once known as the “Soy King” and famed for his management of the family company, the Amaggi Group, the largest private producer of soybeans in the world. Maggi is part of the bancada ruralista (the ruralist lobby), whose supporters include 40 percent of the Brazilian Congress.Temer’s initiatives are “a disaster in the making for the Amazon,” said Christian Poirier, program director at Amazon Watch, an NGO. “If Temer’s agenda moves forward it will change the face of this life-giving forest, with major repercussions for climate stability and our collective well-being.”William Laurance, of James Cook University, Australia, agreed, and told Mongabay that the president’s measures are “exceedingly dangerous” and “essentially an assault on the Amazon and its indigenous peoples.” (Disclosure: Laurance serves on Mongabay’s advisory board.)Carlos Nobre, a climate scientist and member of the Brazilian Academy of Sciences, sees a clear link between the corruption charges against Temer and the promotion of initiatives to buy him time and favor with big business and the legislature. “If not countered by a strong reaction by civil society, these initiatives will open the door for a large increase in the pace of exploration for natural resources in the following decades.”Thomas Lovejoy, a conservation biologist and director of the Center for Biodiversity and Sustainability at George Mason University, concluded that “[i]f these initiatives succeed, Temer will go down in history with the ruralistas as the ones who put a stake in the beating heart of the Amazon.”Looking up into the rainforest canopy. Temer’s measures, often carried out by presidential decree, are widely seen as a means to buy favor with the bancada ruralista, or agricultural lobby, that dominates Congress — and whose support the president needs as he faces ongoing corruption charges. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / MongabayTemer’s Amazon measuresFears for the Amazon biome have grown under Temer as he pursues numerous schemes to legitimize land-grabbing, illegal logging and mining, and to weaken environmental protection. Although these recent measures vary in scope, all share the same consequence: deforestation. Many of these initiatives began life under previous administrations, and a few have been held in check by public outrage and court intervention — for now.Among these initiatives are attempts to open up for mining vast areas such as the Renca preserve — which covers 46,000 square kilometers (17,760 square miles) and includes nine conservation and indigenous areas — and to reduce the size and protected status of Jamanxim National Park and National Forest, where illegal mining and logging on more than 6,000 square kilometers (2,317 square miles) of formerly conserved forest would become legal.Indigenous reserves and indigenous land claims — effective bulwarks against deforestation as well as a constitutional right — have also come under attack. Under Temer, the fast-tracking of infrastructure projects such as dams is becoming easier, and indigenous land titles are becoming much more difficult to defend. An artificial marco temporal, or qualification date, has been approved for both indigenous and quilombo (Afro-Brazilian) land tenure, making legitimate ancestral land claims often impossible to prove.At the same time, Temer’s expansion of the Terra Legal program, which was established to allow the rural poor to claim ownership of the land they occupy, exacerbates deforestation risks. The changes made to the program effectively offer an amnesty for illegal land grabbers, and could allow a further 200,000 square kilometers (77,200 square miles) of the Amazon — an area the size of Nebraska — to be legally cleared.Amazon logs ready for the sawmill. Deforestation and forest degradation could keep Brazil from meeting its Paris Agreement commitments. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / Mongabay“As the president makes it easy for land grabbers to get a land title (paying less than 11 percent of the land price established by the market), he makes it hard for indigenous [people] and quilombolas to have their territories recognized; he denies them their land,” said Elis Araújo of Imazon, a research institute focusing on sustainable development in the Amazon.Temer’s land policy changes are all proceeding against a backdrop of major hydropower development, with dozens of dams slated for construction across the Amazon basin and in the Andes headwaters – projects that go hand in hand with mining expansion. Likewise, roads, railways and industrial waterways are being promoted to reduce shipping costs of Amazonian agricultural and industrial commodities, with significant international investment coming from countries including China and Canada. Changes to the environmental licensing process are also on the verge of being enacted, which will make environmental approval for major infrastructure developments a foregone conclusion.Meanwhile, funding cuts to the National Indian Foundation FUNAI, and the Brazilian Ministry of the Environment IBAMA send “a clear signal that this government seeks to undercut the socio-environmental protections and governance that are critical to the rainforest’s integrity,” said Amazon Watch’s Poirier.Jos Barlow, of Lancaster University, UK, said environmental governance has been further weakened by “the decentralization of environmental enforcement from established federal agencies to unprepared state authorities,” along with more general cuts to scientific funding, which threaten the research that underpins sustainable development in the Amazon. Those in government who resist Temer often find themselves pushed out.A blue and yellow macaw. Researchers warn that Temer’s anti-environmental policies threaten biodiversity and habitat. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / MongabayAmazon biome at tipping pointThese measures pose direct, immediate threats to Amazonian habitat and endangered species. But many scientists and researchers warn of far-reaching and long-term consequences for the region if current policies move ahead.Scientist Philip Fearnside, an expert on Amazonian development and deforestation, said the initiatives “will cause grave damage to the forests and rivers of the Amazon biome” now and in the future “by putting infrastructure, procedures and processes in place that will drive damaging developments for many decades to come.” By opening access to previously inaccessible areas, roads become major drivers of further deforestation. Human migration follows dam, mine and road construction, heavily impacting forest resources.As forest is lost and degraded, the Amazon’s “ability to maintain the hydrological cycle that maintains the forest [and] furnishes important moisture to agriculture and reservoirs south of Brazil” is being compromised, said Lovejoy. Laurance agreed that this is a “key fear.”Scientists are concerned that beyond a certain deforestation “tipping point,” the Amazon rainforest will no longer survive in its current form. Climate scientist Nobre explained that such a tipping point is anticipated when deforestation exceeds 40 percent. Then, “a large transition would entail rapid savannization of more than 50 percent of the forest.”This would result in “massive droughts, fires, smoke pollution and carbon emissions,” Laurance added.Fires on the Xingu River. Forest fires, often started deliberately to clear land, can easily burn out of control when conditions are dry. Historic Amazonian droughts have been seen several times in recent years, causing forest dieback and increasing the likelihood of record forest fires — an instant hit of carbon release. Scientists warn that after a certain deforestation tipping point is reached, the Amazon will undergo rapid savannization and turn from carbon sink to carbon source. Photo by the Expedition 29 Crew courtesy of NASA via Wikimedia CommonsLovejoy thinks the “tipping point to Amazon dieback is very much at hand — as evidenced by the historic droughts of 2005 and 2010.” He calls these droughts the “first flickerings” of what is to come. Record drought was seen again in 2015-16, while 2017 is shaping up to be the worst yet for forest fires.“[G]iven this dire picture, we should not only be protecting the last forests that still stand, but urgently restor[ing] the forests that have been destroyed,” argues Antonio Donato Nobre, a scientist at INPA, the Institute for Amazonian Research. “There was, or maybe there still is, a very slim chance we can avoid a catastrophic desertification of South America. No doubt, there will be horrific damage if the Brazilian government initiatives move forward in the region.”Brazil’s Paris Agreement commitments at riskBrazil ranks seventh in the world for greenhouse gas emissions (China, the United States, and the European Union take the top three spots). In September 2016, Brazil ratified the Paris Agreement, committing to reduce emissions by 37 percent (from 2005 levels) by 2025. This was accompanied by commitments to end illegal deforestation and restore 120,000 square kilometers (46,332 square miles) of forest by 2030, as well as increase renewable energy use.Achieving this goal while also implementing Temer’s anti-environmental agenda clearly puts the nation at cross-purposes, according to scientists.Mother and child at the Munduruku occupation of the São Manoel dam on the Teles Pires River in the Amazon. Some Temer initiatives focus on legitimizing land-grabbing and reducing the constitutional land rights of indigenous and traditional communities. Protected areas and indigenous reserves are effective bulwarks against deforestation and climate change, and these are being undermined by the president’s policies. Photo by International Rivers via Visual Hunt / CC BY-NC-SAThe Brazilian Amazon is a globally crucial carbon sink, but the carbon it stores is released when trees are felled to make way for soy, livestock, mines, dams, transmission lines and other infrastructure. Deforestation, forest degradation and land-use conversion are major contributors to Brazil’s overall greenhouse gas emissions, which in 2016 amounted to the equivalent of 2.278 billion gross tons of CO2; newly-released data from Brazil’s Climate Observatory indicates that emissions rose 8.9 percent in 2016, the highest in 13 years. The country’s Paris commitments “rightfully aim to tackle [emissions] by stemming deforestation and restoring deforested and degraded lands,” said Poirier.However, national and international policymakers, including Brazil’s own Environment Minister José Sarney Filho and Norwegian Prime Minister Erna Solberg, have warned that Temer’s policies threaten Brazil’s ability to meet its Paris objectives, and researchers agree. “Given the initiatives for the Amazon invasion by destructive capital, all international commitments assumed by Brazil for the protection of our forests are moot, false and unattainable,” said INPA’s Antonio Nobre.Protected areas play a vital role in conserving carbon. Analysis by IPAM, the Institute for Amazon Environmental Research, estimated that the reduced protection for Jamanxim National Forest alone could result in deforestation amounting to the release of 140 million tons of CO2 by 2030.“As such, the Temer government’s reckless behavior flies in the face of Brazil’s commitments to the Paris Agreement,” Poirier said.A margay (Leopardus wiedii). The large scale conversion of forests to soy plantations and cattle ranches not only adds carbon to the atmosphere, it threatens Brazil’s wild cats and other wildlife by leaving them without habitat. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / MongabayBut as Fearnside points out, Brazil’s initial commitments made in Paris — for which Temer may come up short — already suffer from a lack of ambition, being weaker than some think. “They start from a baseline in [2005, during] a period with high deforestation, and the rate of clearing had already gone down before the commitments were made,” he said.“The commitment is also only to end ‘illegal’ deforestation by 2030, and this can be done not only by reducing the amount of forest cleared each year but also by changing the rule to make the clearing legal,” Fearnside added.“The message sent so far [by the Temer government] is that it pays off to illegally settle in, or simply deforest protected areas, because you can push for a legal change later,” said Imazon’s Araújo.The Santo Antônio dam on the Madeira River in Brazil, part of the Madeira Hydroelectric Complex. Hydropower development is booming in the Amazon, and although touted as a green, renewable energy supply, dams contribute to global warming as methane is released from reservoirs. This major source of greenhouse gas is not currently accounted for in national or international emissions budgets. Photo by the Brazil Growth Acceleration Program (Programa de Aceleração do Crescimento (PAC) on flickr, used under a CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 licenseGlobal climate impactsA failure to meet voluntary Paris Agreement commitments could have ramifications far beyond Brazilian borders. The tipping point that would spell Amazonian ecological disaster is also a threat to the global climate. “We are beginning to see extensive release of carbon from climate-related forest dieback,” Antonio Nobre said. “So, from a precious net sink of carbon, the green ocean Amazon might very soon become a nightmarish carbon source.”Direct impacts, such as deforestation, are coupled with indirect drivers of carbon release, said Fearnside, such as warming soils and forest fires — the latter becoming more likely, and more destructive, as a result of increased human settlements and drier, degraded forest. “The changing climate itself has a role in increased emissions,” meaning that “someone has to mitigate all of these emissions too,” he said.In addition, there are emissions that aren’t even being counted in national and international budgets, Fearnside warned, such as the methane emitted by hydroelectric dams. “This is an especially important contribution in the case of Brazil’s massive plans for dams in Amazonia, which would have their impact exactly in the time window when global warming needs to be controlled.”Laurance said it was imperative to begin thinking beyond emissions, “because the Amazon is also a major driver of the global climate, by cycling moisture and heat across the planet. There’s growing evidence that Amazon deforestation could produce ‘teleconnections’ that disrupt rainfall elsewhere, such as in southern South America and parts of North America.”An indigenous man paddles a dugout canoe. President Temer has launched decrees rewarding ruralists while undermining indigenous land rights assured to them under Brazil’s 1988 constitution. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / MongabayPriorities to prevent harmAverting the catastrophic social and environmental damage threatened by Temer’s initiatives will require major changes to both the political process and to the overall development agenda in the Amazon, scientists say.“More important than halting each damaging proposed project is the task of changing the underlying decision-making system such that environmental and social impacts are assessed and given proper weight before the real decisions are made on development projects and policies,” Fearnside said.Carlos Nobre, of the Brazilian Academy of Sciences, sees a need to “conceptualize a novel sustainable development paradigm” for the Amazon, based on the economic value of standing forests.Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon. The Amazon is a globally important carbon store, and deforestation sees significant quantities of carbon being emitted into the atmosphere. Deforestation also has consequences for other aspects of the global climate, as the Amazon plays a key role in the movement of moisture across the globe, with remote “teleconnections,” meaning Amazonian deforestation may be felt in changing weather patterns as far away as North America. Photo by CIAT International Center for Tropical Agriculture via Visual Hunt / CC BY-SAAmazon rainforest canopy. Scientists urge Brazil to ensure the governance and protected status of existing reserves, and point to the upcoming general election, in 2018, as an opportunity for a change in political direction. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / MongabayEnsuring the protected status and governance of existing reserves, and creating new ones, is another priority. Araújo fears that the Terra Legal expansion — referred to by some as the “land-grabbing law” — will generate a rush into the 700,000 square kilometers (270,271 square miles) of the Amazon that is currently undesignated. It’s here that land needs to be urgently assigned “to conservation and to traditional, indigenous and quilombola communities,” she said. “They offer a great opportunity to create new protected areas. And that may be the solution to secure the land rights of traditional, indigenous and quilombola communities rapidly, as [conservation areas] are easier or faster to create.”Others argue that the key priority needs to be fundamental political change, and fast.“[T]he most urgent, and possibly only effective action to minimize the harm to the Amazon and to the Paris accord is to immediately hold general elections in Brazil,” said Antonio Nobre. Failing that, next year’s general election offers some promise.“The 2018 general election is the opportunity to change the course of action, by electing a new, more ethical and honest political leadership,” Carlos Nobre said.Lancaster University’s Barlow also concurs that to “a large extent, what happens next will depend on next year’s elections.” But even with a change in leadership and policy, “global carbon emissions and Brazil’s commitment to the Paris Agreement could still be undermined by passive inaction.”“Developing a climate-safe future for the Amazon requires long-term investment in existing institutions and new policies,” Barlow said. “To be effective, these policies need to be co-developed with Amazonian citizens to ensure they will be implemented, and [the government] needs to consider the rights of some of the most marginalized people in Brazil.”FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Scientists warn that what happens in the Amazon does not stay there: massive deforestation and forest degradation could destabilize the regional climate, leading to drought intensification and the release of vast amounts of carbon to the atmosphere with potentially catastrophic results for humanity. As negotiators meet at COP23 in Bonn, Germany, the future of the Brazilian Amazon hangs in the balance. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / Mongabay Agriculture, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Dams, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Logging, Amazon Mining, Amazon Soy, carbon, Carbon Conservation, Carbon Dioxide, Carbon Emissions, Carbon Sequestration, Cattle Ranching, Climate Change, Climate Change And Forests, Climate Change Negotiations, Climate Change Policy, Climate Change Politics, Climate Modeling, Controversial, Corruption, Dams, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Energy, Energy Politics, Environment, Environmental Crime, Environmental Politics, Featured, Forest Carbon, forest degradation, Forest Destruction, Forest Loss, Forests, Global Environmental Crisis, Global Warming, Green, Hydroelectric Power, Hydropower, Illegal Logging, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Industrial Agriculture, Infrastructure, Land Conflict, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Mining, Monitoring, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Logging, Rainforest Mining, Rainforests, Ranching, Roads, Saving The Amazon, Soy, Threats To The Amazon, Traditional People, Tropical Deforestation center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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first_imgThe Mentawai district legislature last month passed a regulation that recognizes the region’s indigenous communities.The regulation is the latest in a series of district-level policy moves in the wake of a landmark 2013 Constitutional Court ruling that ended state control over customary lands.The move has been hailed as a positive development by advocates for indigenous empowerment, although the pace of progress at the national level remains sluggish. The indigenous inhabitants of Indonesia’s Mentawai district, a cluster of islands off the southwestern coast of Sumatra, are a step closer to reclaiming their ancestral rights to their land from the state, a development that has been years in the making.The Mentawai district legislature last month passed a regulation that recognizes the region’s indigenous communities. It is the latest in a series of local regulations issued throughout Indonesia in the wake of a landmark 2013 Constitutional Court ruling that ended state control of indigenous peoples’ customary forests.That ruling, though, has not been followed up by national legislation to define who qualifies as indigenous and their rights. The lack of legal certainty has left indigenous groups — including, until recently, those of Mentawai — vulnerable to abuse and loss of land to more powerful parties, such as the government and mining and plantation companies.With the passage of the district regulation, which the Mentawai tribes had campaigned for since 2015, Indonesia has taken another step forward, albeit at the local level, to restore to its indigenous peoples the right to manage their lands and forests.A forest stream in Indonesia’s Mentawai district. Photo by Vinolia Ahmad/Mongabay-Indonesia.“We have a rich culture,” said Saibi Samukop Surkino Sanenek, an indigenous Mentawai elder, in response to the passage of the regulation. “We believe that with the regulation we can have a better future and our economy will grow.”While the district regulation stops short of defining any specific rights or identifying boundaries on customary lands, it has been hailed as a positive development by advocates for indigenous empowerment.“Related policies at both the national and regional levels must go in line with this regulation,” said Rifai Lubis, a director at the Citra Mandiri Mentawai Foundation, an indigenous people’s advocacy group.Rifai also called on Mentawai’s 15 indigenous groups — perhaps best-known for their tattooing and teeth-sharpening traditions — to start submitting applications to the government to obtain state recognition of their communities and their rights to customary lands.The tribes of Mentawai make up a fraction of Indonesia’s indigenous groups, who choose to practice and preserve ancient ways of life that, for the most part, center on the sustainable use of natural resources.A conservative estimate puts indigenous groups, legally referred to as masyarakat adat, at some 30 million out of Indonesia’s total population of 250 million. The lands to which they have traditionally claimed rights span one-fifth of the country’s total territory of 1.9 million square kilometers (733,600 square miles), according to Indonesia’s main indigenous alliance, AMAN.President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo, who vowed in his 2014 election campaign to protect the rights of indigenous Indonesians, became the first candidate to ever bag the endorsement of AMAN. But the administration has done little to deliver on the lofty promises since.It took until December 2016, more than two years into Jokowi’s first term in office, before the president recognized for the first time the rights of nine indigenous communities to their forests. The move came as AMAN was considering rescinding its support of the president, and was followed nearly a year later, in October this year, with the recognition of land rights for nine more tribes.Indigenous Indonesians of Mentawai district depend on resources from the forests for their livelihoods. Photo by Vinolia Ahmad/Mongabay-Indonesia.To date, the administration has restored the rights to just 164 square kilometers (63 square miles) of land to indigenous communities, drawing criticism over the glacial pace of progress on the issue. AMAN is campaigning alongside 55 indigenous communities across the country to reclaim rights from the state to more than 6,600 square kilometers (2,548 square miles) of customary lands.On the legislative side, AMAN and others are lobbying lawmakers in Jakarta to pass a long-awaited national bill on indigenous rights, but progress here, too, is slow.In the meantime, advocates have focused on advancing indigenous rights recognition at the regional level, district by district, as in the case of Mentawai.Since the 2013 Constitutional Court ruling, 78 regional regulations on indigenous communities have been passed, according to AMAN. But the group argues that only 44 of these regulations actually help advance the movement to secure land rights for indigenous communities, while the rest may in fact benefit other groups with vested interests.“For the indigenous communities, these regional regulations are part of a transition process toward the passing of the indigenous rights bill” at the national level, said Arman Mohammed, a legal researcher with AMAN.“Recognizing the rights of indigenous communities is [part of the] progress in maintaining diversity and unity in Indonesia,” he added.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Basten Gokkon Activism, Community Development, Community-based Conservation, Conservation, Environment, Environmental Politics, Forestry, Forests, Governance, Human Rights, Indigenous Communities, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Land Grabbing, Land Rights center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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first_imgAFC BOURNEMOUTH 0CRYSTAL PALACE 0Crystal Palace ended Bournemouth’s three-match winning streak with a battling goalless draw at the Vitality Stadium. Alan Pardew’s side started brightly, and Simon Francis cleared Damien Delaney’s goal-bound volley off the line. But Bournemouth recovered well and Matt Ritchie headed wide before Eunan O’Kane’s shot was tipped over.GOALS:- NONE.ASTON VILLA 1WEST HAM UNITED 1A Jordan Ayew penalty helped bottom team Aston Villa come from behind to earn a draw against West Ham. In an evenly contested game, Villa twice went close in the first half through Rudy Gestede before Aaron Cresswell scored with a low strike. The spirited hosts levelled through Ayew after Gestede was clumsily felled by Angelo Ogbonna.GOALS:- VILLA: AYEW PEN 62. WEST HAM: CRESSWELL 45.CHELSEA 2 WATFORD 2Guus Hiddink’s first game back as interim coach ended in stalemate with Chelsea coming from behind, thanks to Diego Costa’s second of the game. The Blues would have won had Oscar not missed a late penalty. Costa claimed the opener before Nemanja Matic’s handball allowed Troy Deeney to level from the penalty spot. Odion Ighalo’s deflected shot gave the visitors the lead, only for Costa to fire in and earn Chelsea a point.GOALS:- CHELSEA: COSTA 32, 64. WATFORD: DEENEY PEN 42; IGHALO 56.LIVERPOOL 1LEICESTER CITY 0Leicester saw their nine-match unbeaten Premier League run ended by Liverpool substitute Christian Benteke. The Reds were rewarded when Roberto Firmino’s pull-back from the left was steered in by a stretching Benteke. Leicester offered little threat, Nathan Dyer going closest as they failed to score for the first time this season.GOALS:- LIVERPOOL:BENTEKE 63.MANCHESTER CITY 4SUNDERLAND 1Manchester City put pressure on the leaders when enjoying a convincing win over Sunderland. Raheem Sterling opened the scoring and the lead was doubled through Yaya Toure’s 20-yard drive before Wilfried Bony headed in. The Belgian calmly scored before Fabio Borini’s consolation, as Bony skied a penalty later on.GOALS:- CITY: STERLING 12; Y TOURE 17; BONY 22; DE BRUYNE 54. SUNDERLAND: BORINI 59.NEWCASTLE UNITED 0EVERTON 1Tom Cleverley scored at the death as Everton secured a first Barclays Premier League win in five games at Newcastle The midfielder headed home after Rob Elliot – who had made several saves throughout – raced off his line to punch away a corner. Georginio Wijnaldum went closest for Newcastle, but his powerful header was saved by Tim Howard. The win moves Everton up to ninth while Newcastle drop back into the relegation zone.GOAL:- EVERTON:CLEVERLEY 90.SOUTHAMPTON 4ARSENAL 0Arsenal missed the chance to go top of the Premier League as they were thrashed by Southampton at St Mary’s. Saints full-back Cuco Martina marked his first league start with a stunning goal, curling in from 30 yards out. Arsenal’s Olivier Giroud and Theo Walcott missed free headers, before Shane Long slotted from close range and Jose Fonte headed in the third. Long struck the post with three minutes remaining, but managed to add a fourth through the legs of Petr Cech.It could have been even worse for the visitors. Virgil van Dijk had a header ruled out for offside, while Dusan Tadic’s dipping strike was pushed away by Cech.GOAL:- SOUTHAMPTON: MARTINA 19; LONG 55,; 90’FONTE 69′.STOKE CITY 2MANCHESTER UNITED 0Manchester United suffered a fourth straight defeat – for the first time since 1961 – to increase the pressure on manager Louis van Gaal. Bojan Krkic broke opened the scoring following a poor header back to David de Gea from Memphis Depay allowed Glen Johnson to play it back to the Spanish forward. Stoke went 2-0 ahead through Marko Arnautovic.GOALS:- STOKE: BOJAN 19; ARNAUTOVIC 26.SWANSEA CITY 1WEST BROMWICH ALBION 0Swansea overcame West Brom to secure their first win in more than two months and climb out of the relegation zone. Ki Sung-yeung stabbed in the only goal of the game after goalkeeper Boaz Myhill failed to hold a loose ball from Angel Rangel’s shot. West Brom rarely threatened in the first half, but pressed forward more after the interval.GOAL:- SWANSEA: KI 9.TOTTENHAM HOTSPUR 3 NORWICH CITY 0Tottenham recorded a convincing win over Norwich, thanks to two goals from Harry Kane and one from Tom Carroll. Norwich had the better chances early on, but faded away after conceding a penalty that Kane scored. The England striker doubled Spurs’ lead before the break after being set up by the impressive Dele Alli.GOALS:- TOTTENHAM: KANE PEN 26, 42; CARROLL 80.last_img read more

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first_imgMember states of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), including some of the biggest producers of the plastic waste in the oceans, have declared their commitment to addressing the trash crisis.Together with China, the ASEAN members Indonesia, the Philippines, Vietnam and Thailand account for half of the 8 million tons of plastic waste that ends up in the oceans each year.Any meaningful action to tackle the problem should focus on reducing the production of plastic to begin with, rather than dealing with the waste after the fact, an environmental activist says.A growing refusal by Southeast Asian countries to take in plastic waste from developed countries for processing could provide the impetus for action by the global community to cut back on plastic production. Some of the countries most responsible for the plastic waste that ends up in the oceans have pledged to tackle the problem together, but activists say they’re focusing on the wrong end of the production chain.The 10-member Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) adopted a declaration at the close of its twice-yearly summit on June 24 to “prevent and significantly reduce marine debris, particularly from land-based activities.” The commitment, the first of its kind in the region, is expected to complement policies and actions already being taken by individual member states to manage their plastic waste.More than half of the 8 million tons of plastic waste that ends up in the oceans every year comes from five Asian countries. Four of them are ASEAN members — Indonesia, the Philippines, Vietnam and Thailand — according to a 2017 report by the nonprofit NGO Ocean Conservancy. China, not an ASEAN member, tops the list as the largest polluter.At the regional summit in Bangkok over the weekend, ASEAN also published a framework of actions to address the problem, including policy planning, conducting research, raising public awareness and engaging the private sector.“Marine debris is a transboundary issue which requires integrated regional cooperation,” the bloc said in a statement. “Without immediate action, marine debris pollution may negatively impact marine biodiversity, environment, health, society and economy.”Leaders of ASEAN member states gathered in Bangkok for the bloc’s biannual meeting to address a range of issues affecting the region. Image courtesy of ASEAN.But environmental activists in Southeast Asia say the declaration and accompanying framework of actions fall short of addressing the plastic crisis. They say the suggested efforts have a misplaced focus on managing waste, when they should instead go further up the production chain and focus on reducing the production of plastics, particularly single-use packaging.“Plastics is a pollution problem, not a litter problem, and must be addressed throughout its life cycle, from production to end of life,” Tara Buakamsri, the country director for Greenpeace Thailand, said in a statement.“The issue is not how to manage plastic waste so they don’t end up as marine debris, but how all nations must focus upstream, and drastically reduce plastic production,” he added.Buakamsari also noted that ASEAN had failed to set any target or timeline for the actions, or to address the problem of waste imports.In the past two years, imports of plastic waste into Southeast Asia from developed countries, including Canada and the U.S., increased by 171 percent. This has far outpaced the countries’ capacity to handle the waste, much of which has wound up in unlicensed dumps and incinerators in places like Malaysia, resulting in environmental problems and a growing public outcry.The ongoing crisis is largely due to a 2018 ban on waste imports by China, which had previously taken in the most foreign waste. While many Southeast Asian countries also imported waste prior to the ban, they did so at a much smaller scale. With the trickle of waste turning into a torrent, the affected countries have begun to restrict imports, culminating in May and June this year with announcements by the Philippines, Malaysia and Indonesia that they would start sending waste shipments back where they came from.“The framework doesn’t mention [a] ban on single-use plastic simply because it is up to circumstances (and political will) of each member state,” Buakamsri told Mongabay in an email. “It doesn’t include plastic waste imports because of [the] issue around trade.”Single-use consumer product packaging comprised the bulk of the waste collected during a garbage audit at Freedom Island in Metro Manila last year. Image courtesy of Greenpeace.Though ASEAN’s framework to deal with plastic waste is well-intentioned, Buakamsri said, a harder-line approach that builds on the growing refusal to take in other countries’ waste may be the more effective path.“In fact, by stopping waste imports and implementing strong plastic reduction policies, the ASEAN region is in an ideal position to help spur a transformation of the global economy, forcing the West to rethink their waste generation and end all waste exports,” Buakamsri.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Basten Gokkon Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Conservation, Environment, Environmental Policy, Government, Marine Conservation, Ocean Crisis, Oceans, Plastic, Pollution, Sustainability, Waste, Water Pollution last_img read more

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first_imgFor years, Japan exploited a loophole in international rules to continue hunting whales despite being a member of the International Whaling Commission (IWC) bound by the commercial whaling moratorium that went into effect in 1986. The country has now quit the IWC altogether and resumed commercial whaling.The first minke whale caught under the country’s new commercial whaling program was landed yesterday at Kushiro port in northern Japan, according to the Environmental Investigation Agency, a London-based NGO.IWC members Norway and Iceland are the only other countries on Earth that currently hunt whales commercially. But Iceland’s two whaling companies have announced that they’ll be sitting out the summer 2019 whaling season, meaning that, for the first time in 17 years, no whales will be caught in Iceland’s waters. For years, Japan exploited a loophole in international rules to continue hunting whales despite being a member of the International Whaling Commission (IWC) bound by the commercial whaling moratorium that went into effect in 1986.The country has now quit the IWC altogether and resumed commercial whaling.IWC members are allowed to issue whaling permits for scientific purposes. Of the nearly 18,000 fin, sperm, sei, Bryde’s, and minke whales that have been taken under these special permits since 1986, the vast majority were caught by Japan’s whaling fleet in Antarctic, Northwest Pacific, or Japanese waters. Japan’s whaling industry was known to frequently disregard the international commercial ban on whaling, selling the whale meat harvested in the name of scientific research in Japanese markets.After the legitimacy of Japan’s whaling industry suffered a number of setbacks — including a 2014 ruling by the International Court of Justice that the country’s Antarctic hunts had no scientific basis, the 2015 rejection by the IWC of an amended proposal submitted by Japan for scientific research, and a 2018 finding that Japan had broken the rules of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) by taking sei whale meat from international waters — Japan left the IWC late last year and announced it would resume commercial whale hunting.The first minke whale caught under the country’s new commercial whaling program was landed yesterday at Kushiro port in northern Japan, according to the Environmental Investigation Agency, a London-based NGO. Japan’s Fisheries Agency has set 2019 commercial catch quotas of 52 minke whales, 150 Bryde’s whales, and 25 sei whales.The first whale, a minke, killed in Japan’s first commercial whaling hunt in 30 years. Photo © EIAimage.“It’s a profoundly depressing spectacle to see the first victim of Japan’s first openly commercial whaling hunt in 30 years — landed for sale in restaurants and markets, despite an almost total lack of demand,” Juliet Phillips, an ocean campaigner with EIA who witnessed the landing of the minke whale firsthand, said in a statement. The whale hunt is targeting internationally protected species and is being carried out without the expert oversight of the International Whaling Commission (IWC) — the only international body with the mandate to manage whaling.”The New York Times reports that there is reason to doubt that whaling will ultimately be a commercial success. The Japanese government is looking to reduce the $46 million in annual subsidies it supplies to prop up its whaling industry, but the appetite for whale meat, even in Japan, might not be able to sustain the hunts: “For the whaling industry to stand on its own two feet without government subsidies, it will have to find more lucrative markets for its product. But Japanese consumers’ interest in the meat has dwindled.”IWC members Norway and Iceland are the only other countries on Earth that currently hunt whales commercially, which they do “either under objection to the moratorium decision, or under reservation to it,” according to the IWC. The countries therefore establish their own hunting quotas, but are required to provide information on their catches to the IWC. To date, more than 26,300 whales have been caught under objection or reservation. (Russia has also registered its objection to the moratorium, but so far does not hunt whales commercially under that objection.)Iceland takes North Atlantic common minke whales and North Atlantic fin whales within the waters that make up its exclusive economic zone. But Iceland’s two whaling companies have announced that they’ll be sitting out the summer 2019 whaling season, meaning that, for the first time in 17 years, no whales will be caught in Iceland’s waters.Whaling vessel number CB2 85220, the Sumitomo Maru, owned by Gaibo Hogei Ltd, based in Chiba prefecture, lands the first whale, a minke, killed in Japan’s first commercial whaling hunt in 30 years. Photo © EIAimage.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Animals, Environment, Fishing, Hunting, Mammals, Marine Animals, Marine Mammals, Oceans, Whales, Whaling, Wildlife Article published by Mike Gaworeckicenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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first_imgDeforestation patches detected inside the Buen Jardín community territories. Video by: Rainforest Foundation.In 2014, the Corah Special Project, a government initiative to eradicate illegal coca crops throughout the country, began to operate in Mariscal Ramón Castilla, inside the region known as Bajo Amazonas, or the Lower Amazon. That raid and the one in 2015 succeeded in reducing the area of illegal coca cultivation in Bajo Amazonas to 370 hectares (914 acres), according to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC). However, in 2017 there was a significant replanting effort, and the cultivated area expanded to 1,823 hectares (4,500 acres). More acreage has since been added.Coca production here feeds the Colombian market thanks to the proximity of the border and the lack of drying equipment in this part of Peru, which suggests the coca leaf is processed “green,” as is customary in Colombia, according to the UNODC.Police in Peru told Mongabay Latam that Colombian individuals pay Peruvian communities in this border region to plant coca, and then buy all their harvest from them.The prosecutor’s arrivalFed up with the threats, the residents of Buen Jardín decided to take the evidence they had gathered — GPS coordinates, photographs and videos — to the authorities. The Regional Organization of Indigenous Peoples of the East (ORPIO) helped them file their complaint, which reached Alberto Yusen Caraza, the provincial prosecutor for the Loreto branch of FEMA, the office of the Special Attorney for Environmental Matters (FEMA).In an interview with Mongabay Latam, Caraza confirmed the deforestation that was occurring and the presence of illegal coca crops, and attributed both to the security situation in the region.“It is a coca-growing area that is always guarded by armed people,” Caraza said, adding that this wasn’t the only complaint his office had received this year.The residents of Buen Jardín, at a loss for what to do, now have to deal with a newly discovered patch of deforestation, spanning 30 hectares of the 1,771 hectares (74 acres out of 4,376 acres) that belongs to the community. “Before, there was no coca; now it’s full of it,” Pablo says of the deforested area.“Here we can’t talk openly about what the mafia is,” he adds. “If we go report them to the police, the police sell us out. In what way? They go and warn them. You go to make a deal in Tabatinga (in Brazil), and you disappear.”The mood of impunity in Bellavista is a far cry from the climate of fear that reigns in Buen Jardín. The town’s small port is full of motorboats, well-stocked restaurants and stores — different from any of the other Tikuna communities in the region. Witnesses indicated to Mongabay Latam that people arrive from different areas of Colombia and Peru every day to work as raspachines, coca harvesters, or to operate processing laboratories that have popped up within the community, on the outskirts of town. Deforestation, Endangered Environmentalists, Forests, GPS tracking, Indigenous Communities, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Logging, Rainforest People, Rainforests, Tropical Forests Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Patrolling activities in Buen Jardín. Video by: Alexa Vélez.The area underwent the same coca eradication campaign as the rest of the region under the Corah Special Project, followed by the same spurt in replanting, as alternative crops promoted by the government failed to catch on. “Around here, the majority of the people are dedicated to [growing coca] because there is no alternative,” says Teodoro Ayde Lozano, Bellavista’s apu, referring to the indigenous community members. “We plant coca to survive, because if we waited for the cacao [to mature], how long would it take?”The Rainforest Foundation US’s Peru program has equipped 36 indigenous communities in Loreto, including in Buen Jardín, with technology to monitor deforestation. But the community members who serve as monitors are vulnerable because of the work they do, says program director Tom Bewick.“The important thing for us is that the government takes action to protect the indigenous environmental advocates who put themselves on the front lines to protect the forests,” he says.‘You’re a snitch’Every three days, Isaac Witancor and Leidi Valentín patrol their territory, guided by the deforestation alerts they receive on their phones. They live in the Tikuna community of Nueva Galilea, and they face an enormous challenge: the protection of 2,787 hectares (6,887 acres) of forest.Between 2001 and 2017, according to the Rainforest Foundation US, the community lost more than 682 hectares (1,685 acres) of forest to invaders who cleared the jungle.Valentín, the only female monitor in the community, says the loss of forest is regrettable, primarily because the birds, peccaries and tapirs have been driven out. Now, she says, her only chance to hear the animals’ calls is when she goes on patrol in the mountains.Being a forest monitor in an area gripped by drug trafficking can be risky, but 19-year-old Valentín, who says she’s obsessed with protecting Nueva Galilea’s forests, isn’t daunted by the risks.Darwin Isuiza is the oldest of all of Nueva Galilea’s forest monitors, and he’s fully aware of the dangers that they all face during patrols.“Sometimes they say that someone is a ‘snitch’ — you’re a snitch because you use GPS, because we can spread the word. That is what they’re telling me,” Isuiza says. He adds he’s considering abandoning his work as a monitor: “They can do something to me there.”The residents of Nueva Galilea are inevitably moving into a gray area: even though they want to conserve their forest and make a legitimate living, they haven’t been able to find a stable market for the cacao that they produce. There’s nowhere for them to take the crop and no one to buy it. A large portion of it usually ends up rotting because, according to the residents, the government only assisted them at the start of their transition away from cultivating coca.Community leaders say this has compelled the residents to continue working as coca leaf harvesters, at least twice a month. Even then, they invest some of the money they earn into their own cacao crops.Isaac Witancor is one of the Bellavista environmental monitors who has seen the deforestation patches. Photo by: Alexa Vélez.The forgotten people on the borderA Tikuna woman who asked to be identified by the pseudonym Sara, citing security reasons, says she clearly remembers the day the coca eradication campaign came to Cushillococha.“There were not many people injured, but there were lots of confrontations, fights, and arguments. We told them that it is not fair to do these things to us, and that we live from that,” Sara says, adding that she vividly remembers the look of desperation on the people’s faces.She also recalls that DEVIDA, the government institution in charge of national anti-drug strategies, and PEDICP, a Ministry of Agriculture initiative to develop the Putumayo River Basin, arrived a year later.Both agencies, according to those interviewed, proposed the same projects to all the communities in the area: planting cacao or cassava, known locally as yuca and used to produce fariña flour. Most people remember the intervention in the same way: the arrival of the campaign workers in the communities, training sessions, large amounts of fertilizer left for the communities — and a lack of food.Mongabay Latam attempted to ask DEVIDA about how the organization plans to meet the needs of the indigenous communities, but it refused to grant us an interview.Its official website, however, indicates that its strategy has made progress in at least 15 indigenous communities in Bajo Amazonas. It has announced the development of fariña production chains, community development, leadership training, capacity strengthening, technical advice, and more. It also mentions the three indigenous communities highlighted in this article. But members of these communities tell Mongabay Latam that there has been barely any progress; nor were any improvements evident when we visited the region.In Buen Jardín de Callarú, Nueva Galilea and other indigenous Tikuna communities, the neglect is manifested in the details: a lack of medical clinics, or clinics without enough medicine; single-room schools with three teachers for five different grades; basic needs that go unmet; a dependence on an illegal crop to survive poverty; a lack of confidence in the authorities; drug trafficking; and many lives hanging by a thread.With everything seemingly against them — no near-term opportunities, and threats coming from all directions — the forest monitors nevertheless persevere in conserving their forest, even as the constant sound of the coca growers’ chainsaws endures.Banner image: Pablo García, surrounded by coca crops. Photo by: Alexa Vélez.This article was first published by Mongabay Latam. Edits by Erik Hoffner. center_img Article published by Maria Salazar Members of the Tikuna indigenous people in Peru’s border region with Colombia and Brazil have chosen to guard their forests against the rapid expansion of illegal coca crops, the plant from which cocaine is derived.Equipped with GPS-enabled cellphones and satellite maps, they confront loggers and drug traffickers who have threatened them with death.The community wants the government to do more to help them, including assisting in their transition to growing food crops from which they can make a legitimate living. The last time the Peruvian government swooped in to eradicate coca crops in its northern Amazonian border region near Colombia and Brazil was in 2015. For the indigenous people of this area, who made a living harvesting the leaves, there was a sense of despair at the prospect of having to start all over again.The affected areas included the indigenous Tikuna communities of Buen Jardín de Callarú, Nueva Galilea and Cushillococha, among others, here in Mariscal Ramón Castilla province, in Peru’s Loreto department. But for Pablo García, a community leader in Buen Jardín, that 2015 raid presented an opportunity to turn a new leaf: to abandon an illicit livelihood and, along with three of his friends, to become a forest monitor. Since then, equipped with a GPS-enabled cellphone and a satellite map, he follows deforestation alerts whenever they appear on his screen.Yet since that 2015 raid, illegal coca cultivation has resumed, sprouting up in Buen Jardín and the other Tikuna communities. The problem Pablo now faces is that he has to confront the loggers and drug traffickers who invade his territory from the other side of the river. He knows that it’s not just his livelihood that’s at stake, but his very life itself. For Pablo and the others like him, the question they face is, what’s at stake when you want to take care of the forest?Deforestation patch detected by environmental monitors with the use of a drone. Image by: Buen Jardín monitors.‘He said he would kill us’The deforestation that takes place on their indigenous territory doesn’t go unnoticed by Pablo or the other forest monitors. They know very well the limits of their territory, not only because they patrol it, but because they’ve been able to see, for the first time, its full extent on a satellite map.During a visit by Mongabay Latam to Buen Jardín, the monitors took us to one of the patches of most concern. They took out a drone, which they’ve learned to use with the help of the Rainforest Foundation US, a New York-based NGO that has trained them in the use of this and other technologies, and turned it on to show the deforestation. Almost 300 square meters (3,200 square feet) of forest had been lost.When they received their first alert, in mid-2018, they immediately went to investigate the area.“We went to the boundary and we found an invader from Bellavista,” Pablo says. He says the monitors confronted him and told him they would call in the authorities, but the invader “kept threatening us, saying he would kill us.”Because he didn’t leave and continued threatening them, Pablo and Jorge Guerrero, the apu, or spiritual leader, of Buen Jardín, went to talk with the apu of the Tikuna community of Bellavista de Callarú, whose territory borders theirs. But they returned to Buen Jardín with very little hope, especially because before going into the meeting they were threatened again: “We are going to hang you.”last_img read more

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first_imgA recent report by the environmental group Greenpeace highlights harrowing testimonies from Indonesian migrant workers about dire conditions on board foreign distant-water fishing vessels.The workers told of being overworked, having their wages withheld, being forced into debt bondage, and experiencing physical and sexual violence.Experts say slavery on board fishing vessels is strongly linked to illegal fishing activities.Greepeace has called on governments and boat operators to resolve human rights issues at sea as part of efforts to achieve sustainable fisheries. KUTA, Indonesia — D, 28-year-old Indonesian man, was witness to a deadly assault on a fellow boat crew member by the captain when they worked aboard the Taiwanese fishing vessel Da Wang a few years ago. The captain hit his friend in the head, then forced them to continue working.“In the morning when we woke up for breakfast, we found him dead in his room. The captain wrapped up my dead friend’s body with a blanket and then stored him in the freezer,” D said in an interview in July 2019.D is one of 34 Indonesian sailors featured in an investigative report by the environmental group Greenpeace and the Indonesian Migrant Workers’ Union (SBMI) published on Dec. 9. The organizations looked into their complaints of forced labor during their employment on 13 fishing vessels registered in China, Taiwan, Fiji and Vanuatu.The crews’ statements described conditions in which they experienced overwork, withholding of wages, debt bondage, and physical and sexual violence. These conditions eventually forced them to cut short their working contracts, which typically run about two years, and forfeit the deposits they were typically required to pay to get the jobs.Indonesian migrants on board foreign fishing boats describe conditions in which they experience overwork, withholding of wages, debt bondage, and physical and sexual violence. Image courtesy of Greenpeace.“There’s a strong interrelation between illegal fishing and forced labor of crews aboard fishing boats — it’s two sides of the same coin,” Arifsyah Nasution, oceans campaigner at Greenpeace Southeast Asia, told Mongabay.With coastal fisheries being depleted due to overfishing, vessels are heading farther out into open waters and high seas, in turn racking up higher operating costs. Companies look for cheap labor to reduce costs and stay profitable — and much of that cheap labor comes from Southeast Asia.“The way for [companies] to survive is by doing illegal activities: unreported catch, shark finning, transshipment so they can stay out in the seas longer, and sacrificing standards for salary and life on board,” Arifsyah said.Citing the Taiwan Fisheries Agency, the report says 21,994 Indonesian fishers were working on Taiwanese coastal and distant-water fishing vessels as of June 2019. Migrant boat crews from Indonesia and the Philippines make up a large component of Taiwan’s distant-water fleets, one of the top five in the world and responsible for an industry valued at $2 billion a year, according to Greenpeace.While the abuse mostly occurs once the crews are aboard the vessel, exploitative working arrangements begin with recruitment by fly-by-night hiring agents, the report says.Many Indonesian migrant fishers are reportedly given false seafarers’ papers by the hiring agencies, which in most cases aren’t even licensed to send workers overseas; only two of 124 registered manning agencies had permission from the Indonesian Transportation Ministry to recruit and place migrant fishers aboard foreign vessels, according to government records cited in the report.The migrant fishers also have to agree to a payment scheme in which their salaries are deducted to pay “guarantee deposits” and processing fees for the first six to eight months of their employment, forcing them to work long hours for little or no pay, the report says. And when a crew member fails to complete their contract, they will lose the deposit, it adds.“The clauses in the contract are already unfair,” Arifsyah said. “There’s an indication that [working conditions] are designed to be inconvenient [for the boat crews], and it’s being used to benefit the local recruiters and agencies abroad.”A flyer advertising factory and fishing jobs in South Korea by LPK Nakdong, a migrant worker placement agency that also provides Korean language training in the city of Tegal, Central Java. Image courtesy of Greenpeace.Despite the onerous conditions, many Indonesians still seize on the opportunity to break free from poverty, the report says. Some even consider it a “prestigious” first work experience because of the overseas placement, Arifsyah said.According to Arifsyah, most of the migrant fishers come from Indonesia’s most populous island, Java, with hiring agencies concentrated in the province of Central Java and the cities of Jakarta and Bekasi. There’s also been an increase in the number of candidates coming from eastern Indonesia and the Sumatran provinces of Lampung, North Sumatra and Aceh, Arifsyah said.“It’s likely that [recruiters] are looking for new pockets to source the boat crews,” he said. “It seems that there’s a network that consolidates them all so that people from outside Java can register to the agencies in Java.”Greenpeace and SBMI, the migrant workers’ union, reached out to the companies and individuals operating the respective fishing vessels. All of them denied accusations of withholding or deducting salaries paid through the recruitment agencies. Some of the boat operators also promised to investigate the allegations and to improve efforts in upholding the human rights of their migrant boat crews.Arifsyah said some key aspects of the trade still needed to be exposed, such as finding out where the fish caught by these vessels end up, and also identifying the middlemen involved in the recruitment process.“But that should be a concern of the law enforcers as this is a cross-country issue and involves multi stakeholders. Law enforcers should up their game, for instance, by involving Interpol,” Arifsyah said.In response to the report, the Indonesian fisheries ministry said it would compile a comprehensive database of Indonesian migrant fishers and hiring agencies in the country. It also vowed to improve coordination with other government institutions — including the ministries of labor, transportation and foreign affairs, and the national agency for migrant worker protection — to set up clear jurisdictional authority for resolving these issues.“Protecting our boat crews is an absolute [necessity] — not only for our fishermen or businesses, but also boat crews,” Zulficar Mochtar, the ministry’s head of capture fisheries, told Mongabay on the sidelines of a recent event in Kuta, Bali.Greenpeace is calling on governments across Southeast Asia to resolve slavery at sea as part of efforts to achieve sustainability for fisheries and marine protection. This includes ratifying and implementing the International Labour Organization’s Work in Fishing Convention to protect their citizens from human rights abuses on fishing vessels, Greenpeace said.“We can’t continue to ignore both environmental and social issues [in global fisheries], and only resolve one of them,” Arifsyah said. “It has to be both.”Many Indonesian migrants experience life-threatening challenges when they work on foreign vessels fishing in distant waters. Image courtesy of Greenpeace.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Environment, Environmental Crime, Environmental Law, Fish, Fishing, Forced labor, Governance, Human Rights, Illegal Fishing, Law Enforcement, Oceans center_img Article published by Basten Gokkonlast_img read more

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first_imgArticle published by Genevieve Belmaker Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Economics, Forests, Mining, Rainforests, Tropical Forests, Water For its size, Ecuador has the highest annual deforestation rate of any country in the Western Hemisphere.Experts say they believe that slowing the spread of deforestation and improving water management systems should be national priorities in 2020.In addition to oil exploitation, Ecuador is also facing the expansion of large-scale mining operations in high-biodiversity areas with large numbers of endemic species and in indigenous territories.The country’s ongoing economic crisis and a dependence on fossil fuels will likely continue to fuel clashes with communities protecting their territories. Looking back, 2019 was a year of mixed outcomes for Ecuador’s environmental agenda. The country’s ongoing economic crisis fossil fuel dependence will likely continue to fuel clashes with communities protecting their territories. Experts are now saying that national priorities in 2020 should center on limiting deforestation and improving water management systems.Mongabay Latam has highlighted five issues that will be central to the sector in 2020.Ecuador’s most deforested areasAlthough deforestation is a top environmental concern for 2020, Ecuador does not officially publish deforestation data at periodic intervals like other Latin American countries. According to data from the Ministry of the Environment, Ecuador had 12.6 million hectares (31.2 million acres) of native forest in 2016; by 2018 it had lost 116,857 ha (288,760 acres). Between 1990 and 2018— just over 2 million ha (4.9 million acres) of forest were lost in Ecuador.“The most recent data that I have knowledge of showed a deforestation rate of more than 70,000 hectares [about 173,000 acres], which is a very high figure for a country the size of Ecuador,” says Santiago Ron, an Ecuadoran biologist and professor at the Pontifical Catholic University of Ecuador (PUCE).Ron says that for its size, Ecuador has the highest annual deforestation rate of any country in the Western Hemisphere, “which is disgraceful.” He adds that “changing that tendency should be the main challenge for this year. When forests are destroyed, it affects all organisms. We are talking about thousands, or hundreds of thousands, of species that could be affected.”Manuel Bayón, a founding member of the Critical Geography collective, says that projects with a major impact on nature are promoted by the Ministry of the Environment, and that environmental education regarding Ecuador’s primary forests is very important. “The only policies that are established are restrictive — there are not only deforestation challenges, but also the abandonment of the populations that live in the most intact ecosystems,” Bayón says.An aerial view of deforestation due to oil palm cultivation in Esmeraldas, a province in northern Ecuador. Image by Eduardo Rebolledo.Carmen Josse, the scientific director of the EcoCiencia Foundation, says she believes deforestation will cause alarm in 2020. Although lower deforestation rates were achieved after a period of very high forest loss between 2000 and 2008, the rates are rising once again.In addition to deforestation, Josse says she is also concerned about forest degradation, or the deterioration of a forested area in terms of soil function and the loss of plant and animal species. “There is a significant loss of forest biomass that does not necessarily end up being registered as deforestation, which can be degradation through selective logging. It is an issue that we want to focus on more,” Josse says.Another issue is the continued weakening of the Socio Bosque program due to Ecuador’s economic crisis. Socio Bosque, which began in 2008, focuses on the conservation of forests and native páramos (alpine tundras) by providing economic incentives to villagers and indigenous communities who choose to make a commitment to conservation.PUCE’s Ron says there are mixed opinions about the efficiency of Socio Bosque. Although some people received funding from the government to maintain certain forested areas, “the monitoring system is difficult because they were not monitoring remotely with satellite technology. Instead, they were monitoring in person using personnel from the Ministry of the Environment, and in some cases that did not work very well,” he says. However, he says he recognizes that some reserves have benefited from the program and that it has been an effective way of showing support for those who voluntarily protect their forests. “It is sad to see that the program has less and less funding, and that is not going to facilitate a reduction in the deforestation rate,” Ron says.Extractive activities and large-scale agroindustryAnother ongoing environmental issue in Ecuador is the expansion of extractive activities. Oil extraction has been going on for decades, but the large-scale mining industry has been growing in recent years and will likely be discussed widely in Ecuador in 2020.Esperanza Martínez, the founder of the environmental organization Acción Ecológica (Ecological Action), says that “although [Ecuador] has improved regarding the rights of nature, and environmental discussions have permeated government entities, the intention to accelerate extraction is entirely present.”According to Martínez, the problem with the oil and mining industries is that they are still present in vulnerable areas like Yasuní National Park and other places with páramos or indigenous territories. “What is at stake is the expansion of the [extractive activities] toward places where logic and laws prohibit them,” Martínez says. The palm oil industry is also growing in Ecuador, especially in the north.Water used for mining pours back into a river while children from the Shuar community swim. Image by Carlos Medina.Experts say they believe extractive and large-scale agricultural projects will continue to grow this year. Many Ecuadorans say they feel there have been obvious shortcomings in several environmental studies presented by the companies that want to exploit natural resources, according to Andrea Encalada, an aquatic ecologist and director of the Biosphere Institute at San Francisco University in Quito. To Encalada, the mining boom in Ecuador seems more urgent than oil extraction. “In Ecuador, the oil tanker moved into the background, but what’s coming are large-scale mining projects in the south. It is highly concerning to see mining concessions in southern Ecuador, because we know that many of those projects received poor environmental assessment reports,” Encalada says.Southern Ecuador is extremely biodiverse, but not many studies have been conducted there.“The destruction of an entire mountain or an entire river cannot be environmentally friendly from any point of view,” Encalada says. She adds it seems as though the reason the Ecuadoran government does little to stop these extractive projects is because most of its attention is focused on the country’s economic crisis.Bayón adds that miners working at the Mirador, a large open-pit mining project in the province of Zamora-Chinchipe, have already begun to extract copper, but the area has no roads or ports to transport it.The Mirador mining project. Image courtesy of EcoCiencia.Josse, from EcoCiencia, says that mining leaves “tremendous” environmental liabilities. Mining concessions are scattered throughout Ecuador, and “there were cities that had most of their territory covered by mining [concessions],” she says. One of these cities is Zamora, the capital of Zamora-Chinchipe province. “The government has proposed a mining map, but it is not available yet,” Josse says.Pressure on Yasuní National ParkA popular consultation regarding Yasuní National Park remains a pending issue in 2020. Two years ago this month, Ecuadorans were asked if they agreed to increase the area of the intangible zone of Yasuní for indigenous peoples in isolation by at least 50,000 ha (about 123,600 acres) and reduce the area of oil exploitation authorized by parliament from 1,030 ha to 300 ha (about 2,550 to 740 acres). The citizens were in favor.The issue is still unfolding because the decree that President Lenín Moreno followed up with to comply with the referendum result has several problems, according to social and environmental organizations. First, the decree would allow oil exploitation in the buffer zone of the park’s intangible zone. The second problem is that such an expansion would be made within the Waorani indigenous community’s territory. A response to the proposed decree is expected this year.Organizations like YASunidos and Acción Ecológica insist that a new consultation should be conducted, such as the one they intended to do before the government held its referendum in 2018. They want to explicitly ask Ecuadorans if they want oil to be exploited in Yasuní or if they prefer that it stays underground.The National Electoral Council (CNE) has not pursued this proposal because, according to Martínez from Acción Ecológica, the lawyer who signed off on the proposal, Julio César Trujillo, died last year. “[A]nd that is why the CNE states that there is no right to consultation. We argue in a complaint that this process is backed by more than 600,000 signatures, not just by a lawyer,” Martínez says. A decision on this matter is also expected later this year.A view of the forest in Yasuní National Park, located in the provinces of Pastaza and Orellana. Image by José Schreckinger.There is a third issue awaiting a government response. The projected rate of deforestation within the park if Moreno’s decree passes in its current form would exceed the 300 ha approved during the referendum, according to reports from several entities, including the Critical Geography collective and the Monitoring of the Andean Amazon Project (MAAP).While the government must respect the decision of Ecuadorans to not exceed 300 ha of deforestation by the oil industry, Ron, the biologist, says he believes the most serious issue lies elsewhere: “The impact of oil expansion will come later, after the [completion of the] roads that are currently being opened. There is a good precedent for what could happen, and it is the same as what is happening today inside the park with a road that opened in the 1990s for the extraction of what was produced in the northern blocks,” he says. “The road of more than 100 kilometers [60 miles] was said to be environmentally friendly, as it would not allow colonization or deforestation, but that was not the case.”Ron says he is convinced that the most serious impacts will be seen in the future and that they will be linked not only to deforestation, but also to the risk of oil spills. That risk “is something that cannot be quantified for now. These are medium- and long-term impacts,” he says.A focus on waterEcuador, a megadiverse country, not only has the challenge of conserving its water sources, but also of reducing pollution by treating its wastewater. Encalada, the aquatic ecologist, says she believes a lot of work must be done on this issue. “How can a country that, until recently, boasted that it was very good at every economic issue not have wastewater treatment plants in its main cities?” she says.Ecuador’s capital, Quito, dumps all of its wastewater into the Machángara River, which flows into the Guayllabamba River. According to Encalada, only 2% of the water is treated at the Quitumbe plant.Near the cities of Lago Agrio and Coca, the tributaries of the Napo River basin are in a critical state. Image by Pierre Lesage.This triggers a domino effect, since the wastewater from some cities ends up in the Esmeraldas River, which thousands of people, who live in areas with very poor access to water treatment plants, rely on as a source of water. “In Quito, we are lucky because we get our water from the páramo, which has excellent quality, and then we filter it through excellent water treatment plants,” Encalada says. “But from then on, the rest of the chain is disastrous. We are lacking a national initiative to care for our rivers.”Encalada says that another issue threatening Ecuador is the plastic pollution found in the country’s rivers, which eventually ends up in the ocean. She says river pollution is the reason behind about 80% of the garbage in the world’s oceans.Climate change and how it affects rainfall and the hydrological cycle is another concern. Encalada points to studies that indicate that much more rain will fall in the Ecuadoran Amazon, which will bring important economic changes. “For example, a road that was built less than five years ago — which goes from Quito to Tena and had a large investment — is already destroyed by the high amount of rain we received in the area last year. We are not prepared, and we are not investing in understanding how we are going to adapt. Our agriculture and our way of life depend on that,” Encalada says.Making territorial decisions based on popular consultationIn March 2019, Ecuador held its first popular consultation regarding a mining issue in the canton of Girón, in the southern province of Azuay. Residents of Girón had rejected the Loma Larga project, a gold-mining venture in the Quimsacocha páramo. The site sits at an elevation of 3,600 to 3,900 meters (11,800 to 12,800 feet), only 35 km (22 mi) from Cuenca, the third most important city in Ecuador. Loma Larga was close to the mining stage; the third exploratory phase had already been completed and the operators were only waiting for an environmental license.However, these citizen participation initiatives, in which people decide on the future of extractive activities in their territories, have a long and difficult way to go. Bayón, from the Critical Geography collective, says the government publicly questioned the popular decision.Members of different communities in the canton of Girón hold a protest in opposition to mining in Quimsacocha. Image by Bolívar Quezada.“The government was trying to delegitimize the consultation, but they cannot do that because it has all its legal procedures in check,” he says. “It started as a popular initiative but soon reached the level of the National Electoral Council, which authorized it, and then the consultation was carried out with massive participation. Even though the government does not like the ruling, it is very difficult for them to legally delegitimize it.”Banner image of an open-pit mine that is part of the Mirador project, courtesy of the residents of Tundayme, Ecuador.This article was first published in Spanish by Mongabay Latam on January 16, 2020.  center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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