first_imgDeforestation, Environment, Forest People, Forestry, Forests, Rainforests Article published by Genevieve Belmaker Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img DRC’s unstable political situation, security risks, poverty, and weak governance contribute to putting the country’s forests at risk.Africa’s most popular fuel – charcoal – is largely unregulated in DRC and comes at the expense of vast tracts of primary forest.Some DRC residents have a lifelong connection to the forests and rely on it for their livelihood. The Democratic Republic of the Congo, or DRC, is home to a massive amount of forest – in the range of 112 million and 154 million hectares (between 276 to 380 million acres) depending on how it’s defined. That amount of forest means DRC is also home to critical carbon stocks that are key to keeping the global average temperature below a 2-degree Celsius rise – a goal set at the UN climate talks in Paris in 2015. According to Global Forest Watch (GFW), DRC houses over 19.4 million metric tons (over 21 million tons) of carbon stocks in living forest biomass.Most of the north of DRC is home to the Congo Basin, described by the WWF as a “mosaic of rivers, forests, savannas, swamps and flooded forests.” The Congo Basin traverses six countries and is home to endangered wildlife, 10,000 species of tropical plants, and thousands of species of birds, mammals, and fish. Human beings have lived there for over 50,000 years.Despite the massive natural wealth of its forests, the people of DRC benefit surprisingly little from its resources. DRC is plagued by political discord and dysfunction, poverty, lack of education, and violence from armed bandit groups. In a country of over 77 million people, GFW notes that only 16,000 are directly employed by the forestry sector. There are also unknown numbers engaged in the illegal charcoal trade, which is ravaging some forested areas, as well as illegal logging.But there are also many, many examples of those with lifelong connections to the forests in DRC: conservationists, artists, carpenters, and others. Here are a few of their stories, as collected in the forests of DRC in late 2016 by Leonora Baumann and Etienne Maury.Ewing Lopongo: Salonga National Park conservationistEwing Lopongo, conservationist with the Congolese Institute for Nature Conservation (ICCN), in charge of the Monkoto sector of the Salonga National Park, in Monkoto, Tshuapa, DRC, October 2016. Photo by Leonora Baumann for Mongabay.The first time Ewing Lopongo, 36, saw a wild antelope during her training to become a park ranger, known locally as an eco-guard, she recalls screaming with joy. The event strengthened her will to pursue a career in conservation. Twelve years later, Lopongo is now a state-registered conservationist with the Congolese Institute for Nature Conservation (ICCN), in charge of the Monkoto sector of Salonga National Park, the largest tropical rainforest reserve in Africa and a UNESCO World Heritage site. The park is 3.6 million hectares (8.9 million acres) and is described by UNESCO as “one of the most extensive in the world.”Lopongo says the most rewarding part of her work is being out in the field and coming into contact with the animals and people who live in the forest. Whenever she can, she gets into the park and reaches out to communities to emphasize the importance of conservation zones for the future. She explains to villagers how their daily observations – such as unusual rainfall or animal scarcity – could be consequences of over-exploitation, indicating the importance of conservation efforts. She believes the method is more efficient than simply punishing poachers and those who violate the park’s rules.Born and raised in Kinshasa, DRC’s capital city, Lopongo always wanted to work in a field where women were underrepresented. After graduating from high school, she took classes in biology at the University of Kinshasa, but was seduced by ecology and decided to pursue a career at the ICCN. “The obstacles, they are like a barrier preventing you to move forward,” Ewing said. “But if you try to jump over the barriers no matter what, that’s how I became what I am today. If you have the passion, you can adapt.”Lopongo’s husband also works with the ICCN in a different part of the country. The distance between them makes their work even more difficult.“On the marital side, it isn’t easy. It means that you have to be separated from your husband for an unknown [amount of] time,” she said. The couple doesn’t have children yet – an unusual situation for a Congolese woman in her mid-30s – because she put career before family life.It was not easy for Lopongo to reach her current position. She said that in the conservation world and within traditional Congolese society, women are often seen as weak by men, and women’s rights aren’t widespread.“Really, there is no woman in charge in the protected areas,” Lopongo said, and added that she believes she is only one of two female conservationists in DRC. (The assertion is very difficult to verify). She wants to be a model for women in DRC, possibly by writing her memoirs.Wally: artist, activist, and farmerWally, drawing to educate and raise awareness about environmental conservation among his community neighboring the Salonga National Park, Monkoto, Tshuapa, DRC, October 2016. Photo by Leonora Baumann for Mongabay.Wally (he withheld his last name) lives in Monkoto, a small town in the heart of the Congolese jungle that is an administrative district of Salonga National Park. There, on a dirt road that stretches between a decayed monument celebrating former ruler Mobutu Sese Seko and a small pharmacy, stands a wooden billboard where locals regularly stop by to look at pinned-up sheets of paper. Hidden in the trees next to it is Wally’s house, and the sheets of paper are his drawings.A longtime resident of the area, Wally remembers as a child seeing elephants come to the villages from dusk to dawn, and being chased away by locals who made every imaginable noise. Now, he says pointing at his grandchildren sitting nearby, “Perhaps they will never see a live elephant.” After elementary school in Monkoto, Wally moved to Kinshasa and later studied fine arts there for two years at the Academy of Fine Arts. After his studies ended prematurely due to a lack of money, he worked for several companies and finally returned home to farm and worked as a mechanic for the newly created park in the 1970s.Despite all the detours, with encouragement from one of his teachers from the Academy in Kinshasa, Wally never gave up drawing. He watched documentaries about the Krüger National Park in South Africa, read Tarzan-like comics, and observed as officials came to Monkoto to raise awareness about conservation.“Those from the government, they came with blackboards and cameras, but the message didn’t get across,” he said. To Wally, the message must be carried out by locals sitting with community leaders, talking with women, reaching out to children. “The kids, here, they are my main collaborators,” he said with a solid note of hope for the future.Wally describes his drawings in literal terms.“These drawings…they are messages, and the one who sees them can spread them in this village, and this village,” he said. For the next phase of his work, he hopes to get a bicycle – an economical means of transport – to travel from the park to surrounding communities and spread his message. In this way he hopes that future generations will have a chance to see elephants somewhere other than in his drawings.André Kasereka Syangeha: carpenterAndré Kasereka Syangeha, manager of the Father Caracciolo Millwork in Nyamilima, North Kivu, DRC, November 2016. Photo by Leonora Baumann for Mongabay.In a backyard of Nyamilima, a remote community in DRC’s North Kivu province, stands a large warehouse surrounded with planks of wood and drying laundry hung above them. This is the carpentry shop of the Caracciolo Fathers, a Christian congregation that settled in the area in 1985 with enough funds to start various activities. André Kasereka Syangeha, a smiling man in his 50s dressed in red overalls with worn-out suit pants sticking out of the bottom, is in charge of the place. His official title is manager of the Father Caracciolo Carpentry in Nyamilima.Syangeha started to work as a carpenter in 1977 at the other end of the country, later becoming a tutor, and moving to Nyamilima to train young people. Since 2002, he has been running the priest’s carpentry workshop, a remarkably well-equipped structure for the area. But he says that tools aren’t enough to work: The raw material, wood, is often lacking to craft items of quality, forcing his crew to use lower-quality cypress or eucalyptus. Syangeha looks back wistfully on a time when he worked in the Bas-Kongo province, when hardwood was abundant.Bordering Virunga National Park – home of the Eastern gorilla (Gorilla beringei), listed by the IUCN as Critically Endangered – the forests of Nyamilima are for the most part either protected or used for charcoal production. Electricity is also a concern, and carpentry relies on the parish’s generator, as does the rest of the village.Half a dozen carpenters work here, crafting furniture, house framework doors, school desks and church ornaments for the village and its surroundings. Sometimes, thanks to the priests’ truck, they can also deliver orders to Goma, about 60 miles to the south. But in this area where rebel groups are active and kidnappings a common practice, the journey is dangerous. A few weeks after reporters visited the village, a priest from the parish was kidnapped on the road and released a few days later unharmed.Though Syangeha says his salary is “insignificant,” he is happy to work with wood and describes it as a vocation. It has allowed him to care for and provide an education to his 16 children, many of who have now established their own homes. His eldest son did not embrace the career of carpenter, but he hopes to train some of his youngest children to follow in his footsteps.Marie-Médiatrice Shamba: charcoal wholesalerCharcoal wholesaler Marie-Médiatrice Shamba at her charcoal deposit in Goma, Nyamilima, North Kivu, DRC, November 2016. Photo by Leonora Baumann for Mongabay.Marie-Médiatrice Shamba is a charcoal wholesaler in her 40s and lives in DRC’s North Kivu province where several militias are active. Shamba lives in Goma at the foot of the Nyiragongo volcano, which is described by some scientists as “one of the most dangerous volcanoes in the world.” Her region is also at the heart of a volatile area where conflicts have been rampant for the last two decades. Her husband, a soldier in the Armed Forces of the Democratic Republic of Congo, died when she was 22, and since then she has had to be self-sufficient. She never managed to get the pension due to widows of soldiers and has two children to care for.Thanks to micro-finance loans, Shamba has started several small businesses over time. Sometimes, she made very little profit; other times she didn’t get her investment back. Life has been tough on her, she says, but she seems to have never lost her faith, courage, nor her smile and radiant energy. After years of saving, Shamba was recently able to start her current business as a charcoal wholesaler.Shamba travels to surrounding chiefdoms to collect or make “makala” (as charcoal is called in Swahili), and then brings it back to her home in Goma. There, she sells it to locals who mostly rely on it for domestic use in this province where Shamba says that fewer than 5 percent of homes have electricity. Depending on the quality of the wood used to make charcoal by burning it with little access to air, the price of a 50-kg (approximately 110-lb) bag varies between $20 and $25 in the city. Shamba’s profit is around $1 per bag.But the journey from the chiefdoms to the city is rough: Trucks need to be unloaded at the halfway point to pass pools of mud, kidnappings are common, and rangers from the ICCN regularly establish checkpoints to verify the provenance of cargo. Rebel groups hiding in the typically jungle use charcoal illegally produced in Virunga National Park to finance their activities.Marcel Muhima: retired charcoal burnerRetired charcoal burner Marcel Muhima with his relatives in front of his family home in Bushenge, North Kivu, DRC, November 2016. Photo by Leonora Baumann for Mongabay.The hilly landscape of Kisigari, in North Kivu province, is an interwoven green patchwork of small forests and crop fields of manioc and legumes (such as beans and peanuts) dotted with villages. Here and there, a plume of smoke emerges from from charcoal ovens in the woods, where logs are left to slowly burning covered by soil to keep most of the oxygen out.Marcel Muhima, 74, was born and raised in the hamlet of Bushenge and was a charcoal burner for years. A decade ago he passed his business on to his son. In DRC, where the average lifespan is 51, Muhima now feels too old for such a physical job and only helps occasionally. But he says that little has changed since the time he did the work himself. On the plot rented by his family they plant eucalyptus, a fast-growing species, for charcoal production. They sell it in Goma and save some for their own consumption. Like many others in the area, they also farm but don’t produce enough to sell.Charcoal, Muhima says, is life here. People who don’t plant trees for it can’t make a living. He explained through a translator that since the Belgians left (DRC gained its independence from Belgium in 1960), things have gone downhill. Food crop plantations and companies closed down, damaging the local economy and leading to a surge in the charcoal business.While the arrival of electricity in the Virunga region could curb this trend, he says the $200 fee just to get connected is not affordable. “I rarely even see a $20 bill. How could I get that much?” he asks. Among others, the Warren Buffet Foundation is financing a project to electrify the area, and Muhima’s village already has electrical poles in place. But this initiative still has many challenges to face before succeeding.Usually, Muhima’s family can only produce 20 to 30 bags of charcoal each season, enough to buy clothes and pay school tuition for the children while leaving the young trees get older. Sometimes, the family doesn’t make any money for four or five years in a row, waiting for the trees to grow large enough. But this season, he says, things didn’t go well, and they had to burn young trees because they needed money.Banner image: Ewing Lopongo, conservationist with the Congolese Institute for Nature Conservation (ICCN), in charge of the Monkoto sector of the Salonga National Park, in Monkoto, Tshuapa, DRC, October 2016. Photo by Leonora Baumann for Mongabay.Leonora Baumann is a freelance photographer based between France and DRC. Etienne Maury is a visual journalist based in France. You can find him on Instagram at @3tnmaury. Both are distributed by Studio Hans Lucas.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.This photo essay is part of a Mongabay series that includes “The people of Ethiopia’s forests.”last_img read more

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first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Mike Gaworecki The 12-time Grammy-winning singer-songwriter recently announced on Mongabay.com that he is embarking on a 17-date US concert tour, with all proceeds benefitting Half-Earth, an initiative of the E.O. Wilson Biodiversity Foundation.Mongabay contributor Justin Catanoso interviewed Paul Simon about his long-time friendship with E.O. Wilson and why Dr. Wilson’s Half-Earth idea inspired him to get involved in this environmental cause.We also feature another Field Notes segment, this time with Zuzana Burivalova, a conservation scientist at Princeton University who has recorded the soundscapes of over 100 sites in the Indonesian part of Borneo. On this episode of the Mongabay Newscast, we’re thrilled to feature a conversation with the one and only Paul Simon, who’s just announced he’s going to tour in support of the environment. The 12-time Grammy-winning musician recently announced on Mongabay.com that he is embarking on a 17-date US concert tour, with all proceeds benefitting Half-Earth, an initiative of the E.O. Wilson Biodiversity Foundation.Mongabay contributor Justin Catanoso interviewed Paul Simon about his long-time friendship with E.O. Wilson and why Dr. Wilson’s Half-Earth idea inspired him to get involved in this environmental cause. You can find info on Paul Simon’s 17-date tour in support of Half-Earth here.Also on the program, we feature another Field Notes segment, this time with Zuzana Burivalova, a conservation scientist at Princeton University who has recorded the soundscapes of over 100 sites in the Indonesian part of Borneo together with colleagues from The Nature Conservancy. We listen to a variety of those recordings, each made in a different type of habitat, from protected rainforest to an oil palm plantation, and Burivalova explains what we’re hearing — and in some cases, what we’re not hearing.Here’s this episode’s top news:13,000 acres of cloud forest now protected in ColombiaCruise ship wrecks one of Indonesia’s best coral reefs at Raja AmpatInvestigation reveals slave labor conditions in Brazil’s timber industryStepping on their paws: study explores recreation’s unfun impacts on wildlifeRare beaked whale filmed underwater for the first timeIf you enjoy this podcast, please write a review of the Mongabay Newscast in the Apple Podcasts app, iTunes store, Stitcher page, or wherever you get your podcasts from! Your feedback will help us improve the show and find new listeners. Simply go to the show’s page on whichever platform you get it from and find the ‘review’ or ‘rate’ section: Stitcher, TuneIn, iTunes, Google Play, Android, or RSS.Paul Simon performing at a conference sponsored by the E.O. Wilson Biodiversity Foundation. Photo by Chris Sims, E.O. Wilson Biodiversity Foundation.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Acoustic, Animals, Bioacoustics, Bioacoustics and conservation, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Bold And Dangerous Ideas That May Save The World, Conservation, Coral Reefs, Environment, Environmental Heroes, Human Rights, Illegal Logging, Illegal Timber Trade, Interviews, Law Enforcement, Mammals, Marine Mammals, Podcast, Protected Areas, Video, Whales, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation last_img read more

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first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Activism, Clean Energy, Climate Change, Coal, Corruption, Energy, Environment, Karst, Mining, Pollution Article published by Isabel Esterman This story was reported by Mongabay’s Indonesia team and was first published on our Indonesian site on March 25, 2017.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Around 2,000 people, including convoys from communities affected by coal mining and coal-fired power plants, marched in Jakarta on March 23.A delegation from the protest was received by Indonesia’s Corruption Eradication Commission (KPK), where they presented reports on cases of alleged corruption.Demonstrators also rallied in solidarity with farmers from Kendeng, West Java, who have encased their feet in cement and are staging a sit-in to protest the construction of a cement factory in the Kendeng karst mountain area. Around 2,000 people from across the Indonesian archipelago gathered in Jakarta last week to call for investigations into cases of alleged corruption in the coal and mineral industry. Demonstrators visited the office of Indonesia’s Corruption Eradication Commission (KPK), bringing forward cases related to Indonesia’s extractive industries.Junainah, a 36-year-old resident of Rotang, in the Batang district of Central Java, made the eight-hour journey to Jakarta with her husband and children, and 600 other Batang residents. Since 2012, people in Batang have been fighting against the planned construction of a 2,000-megawatt coal-fired power plant.On March 23, at Jakarta’s Istiqlal mosque, the convoy from Batang joined protestors from other regions affected by coal plants or coal mines: Jepara and Cilicap in Central Java; Cirebon, Pelabuhan Ratu and Indramayu in West Java; Labuan in western Java’s Banten province; Bengkulu in southern Sumatra; and various parts of Kalimantan.People gather in front of the Corruption Eradication Commission building during a march in Jakarta, part of the global Break Free 2017 events. Photo by Jurnasyanto Sukarno/Greenpeace.“We continue to fight against the Batang coal-fired power plant,” said Junainah, who like many Indonesians goes by one name. “We have already been fighting for five years. Our fields are already finished. My husband is a fisherman and his fishing grounds are already covered with mud that was dug up during the construction of a dock.”Junainah’s husband, 41-year-old Karnoto, said he used to catch crabs, squid, fish and shrimp about three miles offshore. “Mud was dumped there. Now it is becoming increasingly difficult to find food,” he said.Yanto also traveled to Jakarta from Central Java to fight against a power plant. Along with hundreds of other Jepara residents, he came to urge the government to suspend the expansion of the Tanjung Jati B coal-fired power plant. In operation since 2006, the power plant currently has a capacity of 2,640 megawatts, with two additional 1,000-megawatt units (numbers five and six) planned.“The children are already suffering from air pollution. We want units five and six to be cancelled,” Yanto said.In a 2015 report, Greenpeace calculated the Tanjung Jati B coal plant in Jepara caused an estimated 1,020 premature deaths per year. This figure includes 400 deaths from stroke, 400 from heart disease, 60 from lung cancer, 90 from chronic respiratory ailments and 20 deaths of children due to acute respiratory infections.A protestor lies on the pavement to dramatize the impact of  the extractive industry on Indonesia. Signs refer to both a planned cement factory in West Java and corruption in the coal sector. Photo by Zamzami/Mongabay.The demonstrations last week were part of an international climate campaign, the Break Free from Fossil Fuels movement. Indonesian NGOs supporting the demonstrations include Indonesian Forum for the Environment (WALHI), Mining Advocacy Network (JATAM), the Auriga foundation, Greenpeace Indonesia and 350.org.Last year, demonstrations by Break Free partners in Indonesia focused on the Embassy of Japan — due to the government-owned Japan Bank for International Cooperation (JBIC) and private Japanese banks’ involvement in financing coal projects in the country. This year, demonstrators directed their attention to the office of the KPK.“Coal is dirty energy — not just socially and environmentally. It’s a system that leaves a lot of room for corruption,” said Greenpeace energy campaigner Didit Wicaksono. “Corruption includes any irregularity in the management of natural resources that is financially detrimental to the state.”Dwi Sawung, urban and energy campaigner at Walhi said that stalled corruption cases relating to mining permits and power plants are clear examples of how coal not only pollutes the environment but is also a dirty business.Two performers in a giant file folder of “coal ash” symbolically represent the thousands of Indonesians affected by coal. The performance was part of a demonstration calling on Indonesia’s anti-graft agency to pursue coal-related corruption cases. Photo by Afriadi Hikmal/Greenpeace.A meeting with the KPKA delegation of protestors and NGO members met with KPK Deputy Chairman Laode M. Syarif. During the meeting, citizens and NGOs submitted reports of alleged corruption in the coal sector. These reports were symbolically represented by an enormous, four-meter by three-meter envelope holding two people rolling in coal ash — meant to represent the tens of thousands of people affected by Indonesia’s coal industry.Syarif said the KPK is interested in corruption cases in the mining sector. These cases, he said, “must be carried out in accordance with legal norms and free of corruption, collusion and nepotism.”Based on data from a KPK commission aimed at resolving governance issues in Indonesia’s mining sector (known locally at Korsup Minerba) there were 10,992 locally-issued mining permits in Indonesia as of early 2014. Of these, around 40 percent were judged not to be “clean-and-clear,” or fully in compliance with all legal and financial requirements. As of April 2016, that number reached 10,348 permits, of which 3,982 were not clean-and-clear. Around 41 percent of these non-compliant mining operations lack a taxpayer identification number, indicating they are not fulfilling their financial obligations to the state. In addition, the allotment of these non-clean-and-clear certificates has been connected to corrupt practices by mining companies and in the provincial offices charged with managing natural resources.Thousand of people impacted by the coal industry gathered outside the Presidential Palace in Central Jakarta, standing in solidarity with Kendeng farmers protesting against the construction of a cement factory. Photo by Andy Pranantyo.Solidarity with Kendeng farmersThe demonstration marched on to the Presidential Palace (Istana Merdeka), where they stood in solidarity with a group of farmers from Kendeng in West Java who have been protesting the construction of a cement factory near Kendeng’s karst mountains. Protestors say the factory, built for state-owned Cement Indonesia, will jeopardize their water supply and damage the local karst ecosystem. Since mid-March, around 50 farmers and have encased their feet in cement and staged a sit-in in front of the palace demanding President Joko Widodo shut down the factory.Peoples’ struggles should not be isolated from each other, because these industries are interconnected, said Greenpeace campaigner Hindun Mulaika. She noted that the struggle against cement is closely related to the struggle against coal, because cement factories are huge consumers of coal, which is used as a primary fuel in the cement-production process.last_img read more

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first_imgThe Salamandra robotica I and Salamandra robotica II model the system of neural networks that guides both swimming and walking movements in live salamanders.The Pleurobot takes bio-inspired engineering a step further by modeling salamander skeletal kinematics.Amphibious biobots can be used for a variety of applications, including environmental monitoring animal behavior studies, and search-and- rescue missions. The Salamandra robotica II. Photo credit: Konstantinos Karakasiliotis, courtesy of the Biorobotics Laboratory, EPFLUndulating at the surface, the Salamandra robotica cruises through the water until it reaches the shore, then ambles forward through the sand with a lumbering gait on its four paddle-like, rotating legs. Unlike its amphibian muse, this robot salamander has no brain to dictate its motion, just a simple central pattern generator that controls its movement and a spinal cord that runs along its modular body.  Built to test the limits of engineering through bio-inspired technology, the Salamandra robotica models the neural system that guides locomotion in live salamanders.A team of researchers at Switzerland’s École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) modeled the neural networks of a salamander’s spinal cord in order to better understand how animals that use both swimming and walking gaits move.A salamander’s brain stimulates the animal’s neurobiological networks and creates ‘traveling’ or ‘standing’ waves that generate the movement of its body. ‘Traveling waves’ move along the body, from front to back, and are used to propel the salamander’s swimming body forward. ‘Standing waves’, on the other hand, involve fixed points along the salamander’s body, so that the animal moves its upper and lower body in opposite directions.A fire salamander in Normandy, FrancePhoto credit: William Warby via Creative Commons license“When an animal walks, it actually does this gait in synchrony with the legs,” explains Dr. Alessandro Crespi, a researcher with the EPFL Biorobotics Laboratory. “This is very important, because if the synchronization between the body and the legs is [poor], then the movement is extremely ineffective. That’s actually a point that we tested with the robots, because you cannot really do this kind of testing in the animals. In robots, you can, for example, change the coordination between the legs and the body, and then you can figure out…the effect of changing the coordination on the actual speed of walking [for] the robot.”Building the modelsThe researchers simulated locomotion through the biobots in order to study processes in completely controlled and simple subjects.According to Dr. Crespi, “…it’s extremely difficult to simulate [aspects] like hydrodynamics and contact forces with the ground with friction. It’s actually much easier to create an embodiment like a robot that contains our model and uses the real environment compared to a computation of simulations.”The models, Salamandra robotica I and Salamandra robotica II, don’t take into account the biological complexities of a real animal. Crespi explained that their team “made the hardware model as simple as possible” so that they could isolate and simulate solely the process of locomotion. For example, the differences in vertebra length and weight distribution of the body that scientists would find studying a live salamander were not factors that were included in the creation of the Salamandra robots.The Pleurobot modeling salamander-inspired movements. Photo credit: Konstantinos Karakasiliotis and Robin Thandiackal, courtesy of the Biorobotics Laboratory, EPFLCrespi explained, “The modeling was done in collaboration with neurobiologists from the University of Bordeaux in France, who are studying real salamanders. So we didn’t figure out the structure using the robots, but we used the robots to test that the structure we figured out was explaining the model…we wanted to verify if [the structure] can actually make our robots move in the real environment and not just a simulated model on a PC screen.”The next level of the salamander models, the Pleurobot, more closely resembles the physical structure of a salamander. This model enables the researchers to study the animals’ skeletal kinematics, or how the structural elements of the body guide an animal’s motion capabilities. Using the Pleurobot model, the EPFL team could analyze how the salamander’s body structure aids its swimming and walking movements. Both the Pleurobot and the Salamandra robotica I and II were modeled by studying the movements of live salamanders under an X-ray machine.“We [performed] a lot of manual tracking [of points along the body, shown in the video below] to extract all the [points of the] vertebrae from the cineradiography [X-ray recordings], so that we could see exactly how every vertebra is moving inside the animal while the animal is walking and swimming.”Video Playerhttp://biorob2.epfl.ch/movies/files/pleurobot_xray_tracking-hd.mp400:0000:0000:15Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Video courtesy of the Biorobotics Laboratory, EPFLIn order for the Salamandra robotica models to switch between walking and swimming gaits, the EPFL team programmed the robot’s central pattern generator. This algorithmic model controls the movements of the spinal cord to generate different gaits based on the level of stimulation sensed by the model’s leg oscillators. A lower stimulation level initiates the walking gait, whereas a higher stimulation generates a swimming gait. But since the robots do not have a brain to operate changes in gait, they must externally sense the presence of water. The researchers used an external water leakage sensor that senses if the biobot is partially or fully immersed in water and where the biobot is making contact with the water. A programmed algorithm in the central pattern generator makes the switch between gaits. The switch for the Pleurobot must be manually implemented with a remote controller.Also, the Salamandra robotica models are waterproof, whereas the Pleurobot is not, so it wears a specially-designed neoprene casing that protects it while allowing it to swim freely.Biobots for conservationThe Salamandra robotica models and the Pleurobot can all be adapted for use in conservation research and technology.A variant of the EPFL team’s Pleurobot model, the Crocodile-bot, was created to mimic crocodilian movements. Crocodile-bot used the hardware structure of the Pleurobot to star in the BBC documentary series Spy in the Wild. The Pleurobot’s legs, unlike those of the Salamandra robotica models, move freely. Their lifelike movements were adapted for the Crocodile-bot. The hardware was built at the EPFL and was housed in an external envelope created to look like a real-life crocodile and built especially for the documentary.Researchers from the EPFL, in collaboration with the BBC, developed crocodile and monitor lizard robots for the documentary series Spy in the Wild. Video courtesy of the Biorobotics Laboratory, EPFLYet another model—the Envirobot— will be used for environmental monitoring, such as to test pollution levels in lakes, during which it can swim freely, collect data, and return to the surface. The biobot is equipped with a GPS receiver and long-range communication capabilities. It was modeled closely after the Amphibot, a legless version of the Salamandra robotica I and II.Such an application is fitting: salamanders themselves are highly sensitive to their environments, and the presence of species such as the southern torrent salamanders can signal a healthy ecosystem. Amphibians, Conservation Technology, Monitoring, Research, Robots, Technology, Wildtech Article published by Sue Palmintericenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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first_imgFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.The Ebo forest is home to a mystery population of gorillas, only discovered by scientists in 2002. Two subspecies of gorilla are found in Cameroon, the Western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) and a small population of Cross River gorillas (Gorilla Gorilla diehli). Between these two populations, there is a third isolated Ebo population, completely cut-off from other sub-species, with no other populations found within a 200 kilometer (125 mile) radius. Photo by Rhett A. Butler Cameroon’s Ebo forest is home to key populations of tool-wielding Nigeria-Cameroon chimpanzees, along with an unspecified subspecies of gorilla, drills, Preuss’s Red Colobus, forest elephants, and a great deal more biodiversity.The forest is vulnerable, unprotected due to a drawn-out fight to secure its status as a national park. Logging and hunting threaten Ebo’s biodiversity. The Cameroonian palm oil company Azur recently began planting a 123,000 hectare plantation on its boundary.The Ebo Forest Research Project (EFRP) has been working successfully to change the habits of local people who have long subsisted on the forest’s natural resources — turning hunters into great ape guardians. But without the establishment of the national park and full legal protection and enforcement, everyone’s efforts may be in vain. A gorilla nurses her baby. An important gorilla population is found in Cameroon’s Ebo forest, an area that has long been promised — but not yet given — national park protection. Photo by Rhett A. ButlerEkwoge Abwe’s fight drags on. As the manager of the Ebo Forest Research Centre (EFRP), he’s been part of a long running battle to set-up a national park conserving Cameroon’s Ebo forest. Seven years ago, a World Wildlife Fund Cameroon press release trumpeted the new park, saying that its designation was imminent. A high-level forest fly-over was organized to seal the deal, with the press, government officials and community leaders all joining in.But today, Ebo remains only the Ebo forest; with no government protection, and still seen as critically important habitat renowned for its significant populations of great apes.The Ebo forest covers more than 1,500 square kilometers (386 square miles) in Cameroon’s Littoral region, and it is very rich in biodiversity. A healthy population of Nigeria-Cameroon chimpanzees (Pan troglydtes ellioti), estimated to be around 700 strong, is found within its borders. And among them is the only chimp population east of Ivory Coast known to use tools for nut-cracking. The Ebo chimps use wood and stone hammers and anvils to get at the meat of the coula nut; and they use long, flexible sticks to fish for termites.The forest also boasts Cameroon’s only Preuss’s Red Colobus (Piliocolobus preussi) population outside of Korup National Park, as well as one of Africa’s largest populations of endangered drills, (Mandrillus leucophaeus) and forest elephants.Ebo also harbors a mystery population of gorillas, only discovered by scientists in 2002. Two subspecies of gorilla are found in Cameroon, separated by the Sanaga River; the Western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) is found to the south of the river, and a small population of Cross River gorillas (Gorilla Gorilla diehli) is found to the north. Between them, 100 kilometers (62 miles) north of the Sanaga River, there is a third population, located in Ebo. These gorillas are completely cut-off from other sub-species, with no other populations found within a 200 kilometer (125 mile) radius.“Up until now we’re still uncertain whether they are Western or Cross River gorillas, or, more interestingly, they could be a third sub-species in Cameroon,” Abwe said.The Ebo forest is located in Cameroon’s Littoral region, near the cities of Douala and Yaoundé which both have thriving bushmeat markets. Commercial bushmeat dealers travel to Ebo’s local villages by taxi, motorcycle and on timber trucks to buy bushmeat from hunters. Map by Global Forest Watch.Palm oil on the border Last Spring, Abwe spoke to Mongabay about plans being developed by the Azur palm oil company to clear forest and create a 123,000 hectare (89 square mile) plantation on the western border of the proposed national park. “They’re not out to destroy the forest,” he said then, but was surprised to be reminded of those words nearly a year later.Azur manufactures soap and cooking oils for distribution within Cameroon. As of the end of 2016, forest had been cleared for the plantation, and a palm tree nursery was growing.Abwe now fears that the creation of this oil palm plantation will compound the many problems facing Ebo, making the fledgling national park that much more difficult to manage once it is established. “Because [once you plant the plantation] the next thing [to come] will be a large population of poorly paid workers, who want to complement their income through hunting and farming,” Abwe said. Plantation workers will easily be able to step into the forest, hunt a few monkeys, apes or duikers, and find themselves with some extra cash.Azur’s oil palm plantation on the edge of Ebo forest. Without national park status, it is feared that Ebo will remain vulnerable to economic interests, including palm oil and logging companies, placing its exceptional biodiversity at risk. Photo by Michelle Sonkoue WatioOne chief concern is that the environmental impact assessment (EIA) conducted for the new plantation was done by a firm closely connected with Azur, raising questions about the EIA’s validity. “You can’t really expect anything fair from them,” Abwe said flatly.He also indicated that the terms of the plantation agreement are not being respected. A buffer zone several kilometres wide was originally proposed, meant to create a wide gap between plantation and forest, Abwe explained. But as things stand now, the buffer on the western national park boundary will only be a few hundred meters wide — too narrow to keep people and wildlife separate and prevent conflicts with great apes and other animals.Source of bushmeatEbo already faces high hunting pressure due to its proximity to two major cities — Douala just 50 kilometers (31 miles) away from the forest, and Yaoundé, Cameroon’s capital which is 150 kilometers (93 miles) distant.Bushmeat is in high demand and commands high prices in these urban centers, so commercial hunters are increasingly attracted to nearby wild places to kill, carve up and roast animals to sell as meat.Commercial hunters, Abwe said, focus their attention on the western and southern part of the forest, closest to the city of Douala. Hunters in the northern part of the Ebo are generally local people who spend a few days hunting in a vicinity, then sell whatever they kill to dealers, known locally as “buyum sellums.”These commercial meat dealers travel to the local villages by taxi, motorcycle and on timber trucks and supply thriving bushmeat markets in Douala and Yaoundé. In the markets, Abwe said, you can find almost whatever kind of meat you want.Without national park protection, Ebo’s rich biodiversity will continue ending up on Douala and Yaoundé dinner plates.Although locals claim that hunters do not directly target Ebo’s great apes, poaching remains a problem and is one of the top two threats to the animals’ survival, alongside logging. When a hunter does not find anything else to shoot, explained Abwe, the prospect of bagging a chimp may be too enticing to ignore. And once bushmeat is prepared, most law enforcement officials wouldn’t be able to tell if the meat came from an endangered species or not.Drills photographed at the Limbe Wildlife Centre, Cameroon. Classified as Endangered by the IUCN, drill populations have declined by as much as 50 percent due to hunting and habitat loss. Ebo forest is home to one of Africa’s largest drill populations, and so is an important area for their survival in the wild. Photo by Bernard Dupont, CC ShareAlike 2.0 Generic licenseFrom hunters to forest guardians The Ebo Forest Research Project (EFRP) works with local people in the northern part of the forest to stem the flow of exploited wildlife. When the project began in 2005, its work was mainly biological. But EFRP biologists, going about their research, often came across wire snares or heard gunshots ring out through the forest. It was a problem they couldn’t ignore.As a result, the EFRP began working directly with hunters. The researchers raised ecological awareness by educating local people to the consequences of commercial hunting, which culls vast quantities of wildlife from the forest to feed urban populations. The scientists explained that large-scale hunting leads to the “removal of a trophic level,” and that because of this “you end up having an empty forest,” Abwe said.“We came now to a crucial part,” he added. Even though many hunters understood the importance of conserving the forest and its wildlife, and recognized that the hunting of endangered species was illegal, that awareness wasn’t enough to curtail the practice.That’s because hunting remains an important source of income for the people living in the 19 villages surrounding the Ebo forest. A 2016 study published in International Forestry View suggests that bushmeat may be worth as much to Cameroon’s GDP as its mining sector; that’s around €97 million (US$106 million). So giving up hunting, which can be very lucrative, is often not an easy or financially feasible choice for fiscally strapped families.The EFRP-sponsored Club des Amis des Gorilles manioc grinding mill at Logndeng, a village on the edge of the Ebo forest. Hunting to survive has long been an economic reality here, but the grinding mill helps provide an alternative income for villagers, reducing the need to hunt. Photo by Daniel MfossaA cocoa nursery in Lognanga. Abandoned plantations like this one are being regrown with the help of the Club des Amis des Gorilles to provide an alternate cash income, reducing the need to hunt in Ebo forest. Photo by Daniel MfossaThat’s why it isn’t practical to criminalize hunting without providing viable alternative livelihoods. EFRP realized that finding other sources of income for villagers was absolutely essential if Ebo’s biodiversity was to survive.So Abwe’s team went directly to the hunters to find out what they would rather do than hunt. Their responses were varied, ranging from livestock raising (pig farming), to aquaculture (fish ponds), to agriculture (growing cocoa). The EFRP team next took the hunters on a field trip to Limbe, so they could see these livelihoods in action and talk to people who were practicing them.“Many of the [hunters] went back [to the Ebo forest villages] and started implementing these things,” Abwe said. Cocoa farms that had been abandoned were restarted, and fish ponds were created. Conflicts between hunters and law enforcement were reduced.In 2013, Abwe was awarded the Whitley Award, also known as “The Green Oscars,” for his innovations in conserving the Ebo Forest. The funding that followed allowed EFRP to expand their Club des Amis des Gorilles (Gorilla Guardian Clubs) initiative.A Club des Amis des Gorilles monitoring team examines a field map. The clubs are made up of local community members, many of them ex-poachers, who are recruited to help survey and protect the local fauna. Photo courtesy of EFRP-ZSSDThe 200 members of the clubs recruited to date are former hunters from the villages encircling Ebo. Membership begins with a simple signature and a pledge to conserve the forest and the gorillas within the proposed park’s borders.Members are charged with monitoring local gorillas, and are accompanied on their mission by a member of the EFRP team. Earlier this year Ebo’s ape population was filmed for the first time by camera traps set-up by the Club des Amis de Gorilles.The Gorilla Guardian model has been such a success that EFRP is planning to expand the clubs to other communities, although given the limited range of gorilla populations, the focal species will change. Abwe envisages Club des Amis de Chimpanzees, or even using endangered drills as the face of conservation in the future.Ebo Forest National Park, but when?When asked if he knows when Ebo forest will become Ebo National Park, Abwe laughs. “I would love to have an answer to that,” he said, adding that the national park designation seems stuck in the bureaucratic pipeline“We’ve done a lot, and the traditional [Ebo community] rulers have done a lot. We are just waiting.” Meanwhile, hunters continue killing Ebo’s animals for bushmeat, and trees continue to be felled for Azur’s palm oil plantation or by loggers.Individuals from the EFRP team and the Club des Amis des Gorilles set up camera tracking equipment in gorilla habitat. Camera traps like these captured the first ever photos and video of Ebo’s unknown species of gorilla. Photo courtesy of Daniel Mfossa/ZSSDTrue, Ebo’s problems are hardly new. They began in the late 1960s along with Cameroon’s bid for independence, when violent conflict spread across the country. To sooth some of that tension and improve control over the local populace, the government moved the people who lived inside the borders of the proposed national park to two villages outside.“Much of what is today the Ebo forest was peppered by numerous small villages until the period of civil unrest,” Philip Forboseh, program manager for WWF-Cameroon’s coastal forests program, told mongabay.com.WWF-Cameroon played a key role laying the groundwork for the park, actively supporting its creation for nearly five years, but pulling out in 2013 when progress toward the goal seemed permanently stalled. WWF judged then that it could no longer justify a costly full-blown program in Ebo without assurance of national park status, Forboseh explained.According to Abwe, some of the community’s traditional rulers are now saying that instead of the forest being designated a national park, the people should be allowed to return to their old homes, re-establishing the former villages inside Ebo.But other traditional rulers in surrounding villages are still in favor of the creation of the park, and in May 2014 they petitioned the government to move forward with the plan, though with no success. The opposition from the traditional rulers who wish to return to the forest has ground the process to a halt.“We understand that the files are pending approval at the level of the Presidency, hence there is no official designation of a national park at Ebo as yet,” Forboseh said.So the wait goes on.Avoiding another paper park Even if national park designation is soon forthcoming, that won’t end Ebo’s challenges. Cameroon already has several national parks, but that designation often doesn’t stop poaching and illegal logging. Bushmeat hunted in some parks is still found on sale in urban markets and wood grown on conserved lands is still shipped out to foreign markets.While some parks are well protected, others known as paper parks are protected in name only. Many wonder if Ebo will become one of those .Abwe is confident that the Ebo forest will not go down that route. He believes that the inclusive model that has come to dominate there — involving everyone from government officials to local traditional leaders to farmers, hunters and researchers — will save Ebo from a paper park destiny.It’s not all work and no play. The Club des Amis des Gorilles organize community events, like this Gorilla Cup, a local football tournament, to raise awareness of the need to protect Ebo’s great apes, and to generate pride in the community’s key conservation role. Photo courtesy of Daniel Mfossa“Over the years we have adopted community conservation, whereby the communities get involved in managing their resources,” adding a legal arm, in the form of the national park, would formalize this relationship, he said. “We want a situation where there is ongoing biological research, ongoing community conservation in collaboration with the government to ensure the forest’s protection.”Ebo conservation efforts are already having a significant impact, he asserted. Where before people would see a bird or monkey as little more than food for the pot, they now take pride in the biodiversity that surrounds them. They are looking, conserving, rather than just eating, he said.But these changes in local people’s attitudes may mean little ultimately, if the forest isn’t granted protection soon.“Until we have a national park and all these boundaries are legalized and recognized by everyone, we will continue to have this situation whereby people will be able to come and set up everything based on their economic interests,” Abwe concluded.Whether it is palm oil companies picking away at the edges of the Ebo forest, or commercial bushmeat hunters plundering its diversity, until Ebo is offered proper protection, its ecological riches will remain at risk and up for grabs. That places one of Cameroon’s greatest natural treasures — along with its important populations of great apes — in grave danger. Agriculture, Animals, Apes, Biodiversity, Bushmeat, Chimpanzees, Community Forestry, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Farming, Featured, Forests, Gorillas, Great Apes, Hunting, Indigenous Communities, Indigenous Groups, Industrial Agriculture, Mammals, Over-hunting, Palm Oil, Primates, Protected Areas, Rainforest People, Rainforests, Sustainable Forest Management, Tropical Forests, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Trade Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Glenn Schererlast_img read more

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first_imgAnimals, Biodiversity, Endangered Species, Environment, Mammals, Megafauna, Rainforest Animals, Rhinos, Sumatran Rhino Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Puntung, one of three Critically Endangered Sumatran rhinos known to survive in Malaysia, is suffering from an abscess in her jaw.The rhino’s caretakers feared she would not survive the infection despite receiving round-the-clock veterinary care.Since Saturday, Puntung has shown signs of improvement, although she is “not out of the woods yet.” “After a week of grave concern, we have some positive news,” the Borneo Rhino Alliance (BORA) announced today. “Puntung looks like she’s getting better.”Female Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) Puntung, is suffering from an abscess in her jaw, a condition that could lead to sepsis and eventually death. As recently as Friday, the rhino’s caretakers feared she would not survive the weekend.The life-threatening abscess in Puntung’s jaw. Photo courtesy of the Sabah Wildlife Department.Puntung, estimated to be around 25 years old, is one of three Sumatran rhinos known to survive in Malaysia. All three were born in the wild and are currently cared for at the Borneo Rhino Sanctuary in Tabin Wildlife Reserve in Malaysian Borneo’s Sabah State.Sumatran rhinos were declared extinct in the wild in Malaysia in 2015. Between 50 and 100 of the Critically Endangered species are believed to survive in Indonesia, including seven at the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary in Way Kambas National Park in southern Sumatra.Puntung’s severe illness had raised alarm due to the low overall numbers of Sumatran Rhinos, and to the role BORA hoped she might play in efforts to breed more rhinos using experimental in vitro fertilization (IVF) techniques. Puntung has reproductive pathologies that leave her unable to carry a pregnancy, but is still producing eggs.Deteriorating health, then signs of improvementAccording to the Sabah Wildlife Department, Puntung showed alarming symptoms on Thursday and Friday, including loss of appetite and energy, and bleeding from her left nostril.“She ate very little over those two days, and spent most of the daytime lethargic in her wallow,” Sabah Wildlife Department director Augustine Tuuga said in a press statement.On Saturday, the bleeding stopped and Puntung became more active — an improvement BORA attributes to constant attention, antibiotics, fruit and supplements.The rhino’s caretakers are cautiously optimistic about her condition. “While we are delighted that she is eating once again, she’s not out of the woods yet,” BORA said. “We still have much to do and need to proceed with caution and urgency.”Puntung will continue to receive care at the Borneo Rhino Sanctuary. The facility is also in contact with specialist rhino veterinary surgeons in South Africa, although Puntung has reportedly not cooperated with attempts to get a clear x-ray of her jaw.“We have been trying to take an X-ray for the past four days but she is irritated not only by pain but by our attention, not least the injections,” the sanctuary’s manager and veterinarian Zainal Zainuddin explained in a press statement.Banner Image: Courtesy of the Sabah Wildlife Department.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Article published by Isabel Estermanlast_img read more

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first_imgAnimals, Biodiversity, Black Rhino, Conservation, Critically Endangered Species, Endangered Species, Environment, Mammals, Rhinos, White Rhino, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Crime, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking Article published by Shreya Dasgupta Commercial rhino breeders have welcomed the decision, arguing that an open, legal trade in rhino horns will end the poaching of rhinos and will help pay for their protection.However, several conservationists argue that there is no domestic market for rhino horns within South Africa and that a legal domestic trade would only worsen rhino poaching in the country.The Environment Affairs Minister said that all domestic trade in rhino horn would be subject to obtaining the relevant permits and to applicable provincial legislation being obtained. A top court in South Africa just made it legal to trade in rhino horns within the country.The South African government, in 2009, imposed a moratorium that banned domestic trade in rhino horns. But after years of legal battle between commercial rhino breeders and the government’s Department of Environmental Affairs (DEA), the constitutional court has now issued an order rejecting the government’s appeal to retain the national ban on the trade in rhino horns. The international trade in rhino horns still remains banned.Commercial rhino breeders have welcomed the decision, arguing that an open, legal trade in rhino horns will end the poaching of rhinos and will help pay for their protection.“This judgment is a victory for the concept of sustainable use of natural resources to the benefit of the conservation of rhino as a species, as well as to the benefit of the people protecting such species,” the Private Rhino Owners Association, one of the respondents in the case, said in a statement.A southern white rhinoceros in South Africa. The country is the last remaining stronghold of rhinoceroses, but is facing an unprecedented poaching crisis. Photo by Rhett Butler.However, several conservationists argue that there is no domestic market for rhino horns within South Africa and that a legal domestic trade would only worsen rhino poaching in the country.“Legal trade in rhino horn is not the way to stop rhino poaching,” Susie Watts of WildAid’s Africa Program, said in a statement. “All it does is stimulate demand and provide a cover for illegal trade. Legalizing trade in ivory, for example, did not saturate the market, but encouraged consumption. Elephant poaching skyrocketed as a result.”“There is no domestic demand for rhino horn products and, as the pro-trade lobby very well knows, the reason why the moratorium was implemented in the first place was to prevent domestic trade from being used as a cover for smuggling,” Watts added.Completely irresponsible w/o controls yet n place. Shame on SAfrican court permitting domestic trade in #rhino #horn https://t.co/zpjcIWRma4— IntlRhinoFoundation (@RhinosIRF) April 6, 2017South Africa, home to 70 percent of the world’s 29,500 rhinos, is currently reeling from a poaching crisis. In 2016, an estimated 1,054 rhinos were poached, while 1,175 rhinos were killed in 2015, and another 1,000 were poached in 2014. In February this year, armed poachers broke into a rhino orphanage, took the staff hostage and killed two rhinos.The biggest markets for rhino horns — made of the same material as fingernails and hair — occur in Vietnam and China, where they’re primarily used in traditional medicine as cures for anything ranging from hangovers to cancer.“Whilst we are studying the implications of the order handed down by the Constitutional Court, it should be noted that the court’s decision should not be construed to mean that the domestic trade in rhino horn may take place in an unregulated fashion,” Environmental Affairs Minister Edna Molewa said in a statement.Molewa added that all domestic trade in rhino horn would be subject to “obtaining the relevant permits and to applicable provincial legislation being obtained.”Banner image by Rhett Butler/Mongabay.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Conservation, Environment, Research, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation Calculating a moving average is a common way researchers “smooth” out the irregularities in year-to-year counts produced by the way the counts are actually performed.Yet this method has never been subjected to much scrutiny, according to Brian Gerber of Colorado State University and William Kendall of the U.S. Geological Survey, the authors of a study published late last month in the journal The Condor: Ornithological Applications.Gerber and Kendall used the results of 31 annual surveys of sandhill cranes (Antigone canadensis) in North America’s Rocky Mountains to examine how accurate moving averages really are, then compared those results to the estimates produced by a more advanced statistical approach known as a hierarchical Bayesian time series (HBTS) model. New research that takes a look at the reliability of traditional survey methods finds that there are ways to improve how wildlife populations are estimated.In order to properly design measures for the preservation of a particular species, one fundamental piece of information you need to know is how many individuals are left in the population you’re seeking to protect, of course. Acquiring that data is not simply a matter of going out into the field and counting every single animal in a given population, however, as that would be difficult if not impossible in most cases, as well as costly.Observational surveys done in the field can vary from year to year based on how the animals are actually counted — for instance, the time of year might be different from one count to the next, or the species being studied might migrate at slightly different times of the year, meaning the count could be off because of the number of animals available to be counted, not because of an actual change in the population size.One of the chief ways researchers seek to reduce the variation in their annual counts, known as “smoothing” their data, is by using a three-year moving average, in which the latest three years of counts are averaged together. As another year’s count is added to the dataset, the most current three years are averaged to arrive at the latest “smoothed” population number.There are other ways to account for the limitations of such time-series population data, such as tagging individual animals and doing a capture-recapture estimation. But a moving average is a common tool researchers use to smooth out the irregularities in their year-to-year counts produced by the way the counts are actually performed.Yet this method has never been subjected to much scrutiny, according to Brian Gerber of Colorado State University and William Kendall of the U.S. Geological Survey, the authors of a study published late last month in the journal The Condor: Ornithological Applications.Gerber and Kendall used the results of 31 annual surveys of sandhill cranes (Antigone canadensis) in North America’s Rocky Mountains to examine how accurate moving averages really are, then compared those results to the estimates produced by a more advanced statistical approach known as a hierarchical Bayesian time series (HBTS) model.“We compared the different estimation methods (three-year average and HBTS) by using a mechanistic population model of sandhill cranes (i.e., based on survival, recruitment, and harvest),” Gerber told Mongabay. “We evaluated whether the changes in the population estimates using the count data were realistic, given what we know about sandhill crane population dynamics.”Gerber says that he and Kendall simulated “imperfectly observed” population dynamics and then evaluated which methods produced the more accurate estimates of the sandhill crane population size. “We found the HBTS model produced more realistic population estimates under a wide array of population trajectories (population decline, population increase, population increase and decline),” he said.Using a Bayesian approach allowed Gerber and Kendall to include additional information that they already knew about sandhill crane population dynamics as well as about how sandhill cranes are counted. “Namely, that their population growth is fairly small and the variables that affect how cranes are counted can likely causes changes in population counts to a greater extent than true population changes,” Gerber said. “By including this information we can constrain the model in biological ways to hopefully produce more realistic predictions.”There are a number of other advantages to the HBTS model, according to Gerber. For one thing, the HBTS model offers a measure of uncertainty about population estimates, which isn’t provided by a three-year moving average, he said. The Bayesian approach can even be used to predict a population size in years when a survey can’t be done, “providing information to resource managers who are charged with making complex decisions about animal populations,” Gerber noted.In a statement accompanying the publication of the study, Gerber said that he and Kendall’s findings suggest that collecting long-term population data is not only worthwhile for crane management (goals for maintaining sandhill crane populations in the Rocky Mountains appear to have been met, based on the available evidence), but that the more sophisticated statistical method can be applied to other species, as well.“Looking forward,” he said, “managers may still be interested in adopting our more robust modeling approach due to its flexible framework, which makes implementing any changes relevant to the survey easier.”Sandhill cranes from the Rocky Mountain population have been monitored annually for over thirty years. Photo Credit: T. CacekCITATIONGerber, B. D., & Kendall, W. L. (2017). Evaluating and improving count-based population inference: A case study from 31 years of monitoring Sandhill Cranes. The Condor, 119(2), 191-206. doi:10.1650/CONDOR-16-137.1center_img Article published by Mike Gaworeckilast_img read more

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first_imgArticle published by Glenn Scherer Animals, Apes, Biodiversity, Bushmeat, Chimpanzees, China wildlife trade, Conservation, Corruption, Endangered Species, Environment, Environmental Crime, Environmental Law, Featured, Forests, Great Apes, Hunting, Illegal Trade, Law, Law Enforcement, Mammals, Orangutans, Over-hunting, Pet Trade, Primates, Rainforests, Tropical Forests, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.The Chimelong Safari Park in Guangzhou is one of China’s biggest animal attractions. On its website — the source of this photo — the park claims to be the “largest wild animal theme park in the world” with a collection of more than 20,000 “rare animals.” Asian zoos, circuses and safari parks are mounting large-scale productions with costumed, dancing, roller-skating great apes. Investigations show that nearly all of these trained primates were not bred in captivity, but illegally traded out of Africa and Indonesia, with destinations in China, Thailand and other Asian countries.The United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) estimates that the illegal trade may have removed as many as 22,218 great apes from the wild between 2005-2011. An estimated 64 percent were chimpanzees, whereas 56 percent of great apes seized by authorities were thought to be orangutans.Wild young apes are traumatized by their capture, and many die along the supply chain, or with their final “owners” by whom they are frequently poorly treated. Young great apes trained in captivity become increasingly unmanageable as they age, and many are “retired” to tiny, solitary cages, or simply disappear.Trafficking arrests are rare. UNEP recorded just 27 arrests in Africa and Asia between 2005-2011, over which time more than 1,800 cases of illegally trafficked great apes were documented, with many more undetected. Solutions are in the works, but time is running out for the world’s great apes if they are to be conserved. Boxing orangutans at Safari World in Bangkok, Thailand. Video courtesy of PEGAScenter_img After 146 years of operation, Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey is closing its circus, citing dwindling ticket sales. That decline in business reflects a growing sentiment among Americans that circus-style shows involve inappropriate, if not inhumane, treatment of animals, says Julia Gallucci, a primatologist who works with People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA).That sentiment is not, however, current in many parts of Asia, where certain countries are seeing a rise in circuses and other forms of animal-focused entertainment.A growing number of Asian zoos and safari parks are mounting large-scale productions that feature great apes — with young chimpanzees and orangutans commonly forced to pose with visitors in clownish costumes, or to “ape” human behaviors, dancing and roller skating to entertain audiences. By contrast, Ringling halted its great ape performances in the early 1990s.Training techniques and conditions in captivity at these Asian zoos and parks are raising serious animal welfare concerns, while the illegal trade used to procure endangered great apes for Asian entertainment is a red flag for wildlife conservationists.China’s Shanghai Wild Animal Park. Photo by China-based NGO that asked to remain anonymousWild, not captive-bredIn theory, Asian zoos and wildlife parks should be able to breed great apes in captivity or legally acquire captive-bred animals from abroad for their shows. But, as evidence reported below suggests, many of the animals appearing in Asian performances have been, and continue to be, illegally snatched from the wild as infants.TRAFFIC, the international wildlife trade monitoring network, recently published a report detailing the demand for apes in wildlife attractions in Peninsular Malaysia and Thailand. It shows that a significant proportion of great apes in these attractions come from the wild or are of unknown origin due to sketchy recordkeeping. The authors found, for instance, that while 57 Thai facilities exhibited 51 orangutans, their studbooks only showed records for 21 of the animals.Likewise, a China-based animal welfare group — that prefers anonymity for the sake of ongoing undercover investigations — believes that the majority of great apes in Chinese animal shows originated in the wild; in fact, some shows even publicize that the chimpanzees they feature began their lives in Africa.Although two Chinese ministries ban the use of animals in circus shows, the animal welfare group has recorded 11 Chinese safari parks or zoos using chimpanzees in performances. Of these, at least six have featured wild-caught chimpanzees.Daniel Stiles manages the Project to End Great Ape Slavery (PEGAS), and has been investigating the great ape trade for four years. He’s made several trips to the Middle East, China and Southeast Asia since 2013, where he’s observed an increase in circus-style shows featuring chimpanzees and orangutans.International Circus in Zhuhai, China. Photo by anonymous sourceChina’s circus shows are the most sophisticated and large-scale, says Stiles, and they attract massive crowds. Over the recent Chinese New Year, the Chimelong Group reportedly welcomed 30 million visitors to its parks in a single day.The TRAFFIC study and other undercover investigations in China demonstrate that shows featuring animal performances are indeed widespread, but not necessarily that zoo and circus owners are acting in knowing disregard of international trafficking laws. Chinese importers are probably complicit, but even they could, theoretically, be ignorant of breaking the law because falsification of records has only been proven on the African end of the supply chain. Chinese and Thai officials did not respond to requests for comment for this story.Traumatized “photo props” and performersYoung great apes are initially traumatized when captured in Africa, then again by being trafficked (often without adequate food or care) to Asia. They are subsequently housed at zoos, circuses and animal parks in reportedly appalling conditions — deprived of proper attention, affection, and the company of other apes, something that is required for healthy development among these social species. Severe training regimens only compound the trauma.Great apes taken from the wild as infants are exceptionally vulnerable. And their first year of life is critical to their healthy development, explains Stephen Ross, Director of the Lester E. Fisher Center for the Study and Conservation of Apes at the Lincoln Park Zoo in Chicago.Asian animal attraction trainers typically break-in young chimpanzees and orangutans at just several months of age as photo props, reports Stiles. The animals are made to appear with visitors for a fee. Then, as the primates age, they’re trained to perform in shows that feature unnatural tricks ranging from faux-boxing matches to dance circles.Chimpanzees are social learners, explains Gallucci, so young chimps in captivity often mimic their keepers’ behaviors. However, Gallucci and Ross both believe that the training required for choreographed primate shows almost always requires animal abuse.Stiles agrees: “To train these animals to perform, keepers would almost certainly [need to] beat the animals into submission, rewarding good behavior with food, which means they’re not only traumatized: they’re also likely underfed.”A skating chimp at Yangcheng Safari Park just outside of Changzhou, China. Photo by China-based NGO that asked to remain anonymousRoss has extensively studied captive chimpanzee behavior, comparing that of chimps kept as pets or performers in early years against behaviors exhibited by animals that have had greater exposure to other chimpanzees while young. He found that adult chimps reared by people, and with limited exposure to other apes, are less extroverted as adults — even after years of enjoying improved conditions, like those offered by sanctuaries. This tendency toward introversion disrupts the animal’s ability to properly socialize with other chimpanzees. The resulting loss of wild tendencies means there is zero chance of these primates ever being safely returned to the wild.As importantly, Ross also discovered a major difference between how audiences perceive performance animals and their wild counterparts — with familiarity leading to a diminished belief in the urgency for conservation.In one study, researchers found that audiences who often saw chimps in commercials and on TV automatically assumed that these “common” animals were more numerous and less endangered than other great ape species. It seems likely that if Asian show-goers make the same leap in logic, they will struggle to understand the need for great ape conservation or to perceive the detrimental effects animal attractions have on captive primates.As apes grow older, they become less desirable to their masters. Adult primates are more difficult to control, not to mention stronger, which makes them more dangerous to the public and keepers.Adult chimpanzees are particularly hazardous: in 2009, a pet chimpanzee living in Connecticut attacked a friend of its owner, nearly killing her. (The event helped shift American attitudes away from the desirability of keeping pet chimps).TRAFFIC wonders what happens to Asia’s performing apes once they enter “retirement,” stating in its Apes in Demand Report, “It [is] unclear what happens to animals once they are too old for these activities.” If animal photo opportunities and performances continue to be legal across Asia, TRAFFIC recommends that facilities notify a country’s relevant authority once the animal is being retired, detailing future “care and housing.”Photojournalist and investigator Karl Ammann contends that Asia’s performing apes are often “retired” to tiny, solitary cages; others, he says, simply disappear. The lucky ones spend the remainder of their lives in animal sanctuaries.Traffickers in the Ivory Coast took this video to show potential buyers they had infant chimpanzees for sale, a video which PEGAS secured. Photo courtesy of PEGASThe scale of the tradeGreat ape trafficking is believed to be vastly underreported, and its usually illegal nature makes it difficult to quantify. In a 2013 report, Stolen Apes, the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) identified 1,808 great apes taken from the wild illegally between 2005-2011, but those were only documented cases. Far more surely entered the black market without a trace; likewise, multiple studies show that more animals die during the hunt or in transit than are ever confiscated.In its report, TRAFFIC notes that, “the number of apes that appear in trade is thought to be far smaller than the quantity that die in the process of capture and transit and with the final consumer.” Hard data is difficult to come by, but TRAFFIC asserts that deaths occur at every stage of the chain, from capture to transit to arrival with the ultimate buyer.The UNEP report echoes these points, stating, “It is likely that these numbers are in fact a gross underestimation of the real impact of the illegal trade.” To improve monitoring, UNEP urges governments and NGOs to work together to keep and share records.When it comes to wild-caught chimpanzees, their intimate social organization means that a large number of adults are killed for every infant that is captured. A BBC investigation discovered that 10 adult chimpanzees are typically killed when one infant is snatched from the wild. UNEP concluded that up to 15 great apes die for every individual that enters the illegal trade. Adults are typically shot and processed as bushmeat for local consumption, or their meat is shipped to urban cities, and possibly as far away as Europe. Adult skulls and body parts are also sold and transported via the illicit supply chain.Great ape trafficking is a worsening problem in countries like Cameroon, as human activity expands into great ape habitats via logging roads, and as more forests are converted to oil palm plantations and clear cut for other uses in Africa and Southeast Asia. As opportunities for encountering and taking animals from the wild rise, so does the likelihood that impoverished hunters as well as sophisticated, often heavily armed, poachers will seek out great apes for capture and sale to criminal trafficking networks.A source who elected to remain anonymous for fear of disrupting ongoing covert investigations took this photo of two costume-clad chimpanzees forced to dance for guests at China’s Heifei Wildlife ParkUNEP estimates that the illegal trade may have removed as many as 22,218 great apes from the wild between 2005-2011. An estimated 64 percent were chimpanzees, whereas 56 percent of great apes seized by authorities were orangutans. Chimpanzees, with whom we share 98 percent of our DNA, are Endangered, with a global population as low as 150,000 animals, according to the World Wildlife Fund (WWF). Orangutans are faring worse: they are Critically Endangered, and WWF estimates that just under 120,000 remain in the wild. However, Orangutan Foundation International points out that actual numbers could be considerably lower.Worryingly, UNEP believes that the great ape trade is continuing to grow, to the obvious detriment of wild populations. Some of that growth is fueled by the high demand for young primates as pets (often in the Middle East) or as performing animals in Asia.Traversing the legal landscape The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) is an international treaty that came into effect in 1975 to ensure that trade in wild plants and animals doesn’t negatively impact their survival. Currently, 183 countries are signatories; all are required to enact domestic laws to bring the treaty into effect.In a 2014 report, law firm DLA Piper noted that, although all signatories have passed some type of legislation to meet CITES requirements, these national laws sometimes fall far short of what’s needed, contain legal loopholes, or are poorly enforced.Too often, arrests are few and far between. UNEP found, for example, that only 27 arrests were made in Africa and Asia between 2005-2011, over which time more than 1,800 great apes were documented as being illegally trafficked. Prosecutions are uncommon, and sentences are often insignificant, so fail to deter future criminal activity. As a result, the illegal wildlife trade is flourishing. It is now considered the fourth most valuable form of illicit trade (behind drugs, guns, and human trafficking), per DLA Piper’s report.Keeper and infants in China’s Chimelong Safari Park. Photo by anonymous sourceGreat ape as “photo prop”: A visitor and baby chimp at Bangkok’s Samutprakarn Crocodile Farm and Zoo. Photo by PEGASAs with a range of species, it is important to note that some of the great ape trade occurs legally. Species protected by CITES are listed on three appendices — I, II, and II. Appendix I covers species threatened with extinction, specimens which can’t be traded internationally unless imported for non-commercial purposes. Species that could become extinct in the absence of closely controlled trade are listed on Appendix II. Although all great ape species are listed on Appendix I, they can be legally traded as if they were on Appendix II if they were bred in captivity at facilities registered with CITES.But traders often game the CITES system, sometimes exporting great apes by falsifying permits — claiming the animals they’re selling were captive-bred when they were in fact wild caught. According to Ammann, widespread corruption makes falsification easy.Between 2009-2011, China imported most of its great apes from Guinea, using permits stating that all traded animals were captive-bred. Conservationists knew, however, that Guinea didn’t have any ape breeding facilities, so they asked CITES to intervene. In fact, “CITES has not registered any chimpanzee or orangutan breeding facilities for commercial purposes,” anywhere in the world explains Juan Carlos Vasquez, the chief of the organization’s legal and compliance unit.After conducting an investigation, CITES concluded that Guinea was falsifying permits to illegally export wild-caught apes. As a result, CITES suspended all commercial trade in CITES-listed species with Guinea in 2013, and the head of Guinea’s CITES Management Authority was subsequently arrested for fraudulently issuing permits (he was convicted but subsequently pardoned by the country’s President).China, at the other end of the Guinea chimpanzee supply chain, suffered no consequences for these violations, and authorities there insisted they were unaware that the imported animals were wild-caught. However, both Stiles and Ammann suspect China was complicit. Regardless, any legal action against China could only have been initiated by the Chinese themselves under their domestic laws, since the importation had already occurred.Like China, Thailand is a CITES signatory that has passed domestic conservation legislation, but Thai law doesn’t protect the great majority of non-native species. And when someone is caught possessing a legally protected animal or plant, the burden of proof is on the Thai state rather than the individual to show legal importation. According to TRAFFIC, Thailand is currently drafting new legislation that would, if passed, protect non-native species. During a January 2016 CITES Standing Committee meeting, the international organization encouraged all countries to eliminate loopholes of this kind.Creative solutionsA range of individuals and organizations are developing and utilizing creative tactics to fight wildlife crime. There are new technologies under development — ranging from citizen reporting apps, to DNA testing kits for use in the field, as well as databases that track wildlife trafficking in real-time.New York University is working on an innovative web crawler that mines online web postings for animal and wildlife product sales. Stiles warns, however, that the crawler’s application may be limited since transactions involving live animals typically occur on social media platforms rather than websites. Social media has lately proven to be a prime way of connecting illegal great ape sellers with buyers, especially in the Middle East.In July 2015, the Wildlife Justice Commission (WJC) was quietly launched in The Hague. This non-profit seeks to “activate justice” by supporting national governments as they investigate and prosecute wildlife crime.Keeper and infant great ape at China’s Chimelong Safari Park. Photo courtesy of PEGASWhen dialogue with national governments fails, the WJC can hold hearings in The Hague in which independent, impartial experts review cases of wildlife crime. Unlike other judicial bodies, however, such as the International Courts of Justice, Commission hearings are not legally binding. They do, however, shine a light on wildlife crime and provide recommendations for actions to curb it.“CITES is merely an international treaty, so we must work on the country level,” explains Executive Director Olivia Swaak-Goldman. “Through collaborative investigations and public tribunals, we hope to put an end to wildlife crime. After all, time is running out.”The sobering reality: so long as there is public demand for boxing and dancing chimps, or photo ops available with orangutans in Asia, there will be poachers and traffickers willing to bear the legal risk of providing those animals, importers willing to forge documents to get great apes from abroad, and showmen willing to keep (and mistreat) them.If great apes are to be conserved, then the Asian public will need to come to the same conclusion as Americans — that these primates don’t belong on roller skates or in boxing rings; they belong in the wild. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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first_imgDriven by high demand for housing, developers in Malaysia’s Penang Island are artificially expanding the coastline and planning to construct new islands.Local fishers say building works have already damaged their livelihoods, and fear further construction will destroy their fishing grounds.Mangroves and endangered bird species are also threatened, and the mining and transport of construction materials could spread adverse environmental impacts beyond just Penang. PENANG, Malaysia — Fisherman Liew Hock Choon, 50, cut the outboard engine and explained that we have arrived at the position of one of his fish traps. “No GPS,” he said.Using a method called triangulation, his keen eyes pinpointed natural markers on the shoreline and used these bearings to locate his traps with incredible accuracy. With an anchor thrown down, he snagged his trap and hauled it up. The deck was soon awash with flapping fish. These are grouper — prized in the restaurants of Penang and beyond, they fetch a premium price and can only be caught with hooks or traps, Liew explained. He said customers travel from as far as Hong Kong to buy these prized delicacies.“Look at this mud in the traps,” Liew complained as just two of his four traps contained a catch worth keeping. Still, it was a good day under the circumstances. One phone call later and the 11 kilograms (24 pounds) of grouper were snapped up by a restaurant owner eager to purchase them for over 500 ringgit ($113). They were still alive when Liew delivered and weighed them while hungry customers looked on.“I know this area very well because in my school days I followed one of the fishermen,” said Liew, from Tanjung Bungah a village North of Penang Island’s capital Georgetown. Now the days of his fishing grounds are numbered because of a land reclamation project by a local property developer.“This area is very rich with mud crab, shrimp, snapper, and grouper, but soon it will all be gone,” said Liew.last_img read more

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