first_imgDriven by high demand for housing, developers in Malaysia’s Penang Island are artificially expanding the coastline and planning to construct new islands.Local fishers say building works have already damaged their livelihoods, and fear further construction will destroy their fishing grounds.Mangroves and endangered bird species are also threatened, and the mining and transport of construction materials could spread adverse environmental impacts beyond just Penang. PENANG, Malaysia — Fisherman Liew Hock Choon, 50, cut the outboard engine and explained that we have arrived at the position of one of his fish traps. “No GPS,” he said.Using a method called triangulation, his keen eyes pinpointed natural markers on the shoreline and used these bearings to locate his traps with incredible accuracy. With an anchor thrown down, he snagged his trap and hauled it up. The deck was soon awash with flapping fish. These are grouper — prized in the restaurants of Penang and beyond, they fetch a premium price and can only be caught with hooks or traps, Liew explained. He said customers travel from as far as Hong Kong to buy these prized delicacies.“Look at this mud in the traps,” Liew complained as just two of his four traps contained a catch worth keeping. Still, it was a good day under the circumstances. One phone call later and the 11 kilograms (24 pounds) of grouper were snapped up by a restaurant owner eager to purchase them for over 500 ringgit ($113). They were still alive when Liew delivered and weighed them while hungry customers looked on.“I know this area very well because in my school days I followed one of the fishermen,” said Liew, from Tanjung Bungah a village North of Penang Island’s capital Georgetown. Now the days of his fishing grounds are numbered because of a land reclamation project by a local property developer.“This area is very rich with mud crab, shrimp, snapper, and grouper, but soon it will all be gone,” said Liew.last_img read more

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first_imgArticle published by Mike Gaworecki Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Acoustic, Animals, Archive, Bioacoustics, Bioacoustics and conservation, Biodiversity, Climate Change, Climate Change Policy, Climate Change Politics, Conservation, Corruption, Deforestation, Ecosystems, Endangered Species, Environment, Illegal Logging, Illegal Timber Trade, Impact Of Climate Change, Infrastructure, Interviews, Logging, Podcast, Rainforest Animals, Rainforests, Roads, Tropical Deforestation, Tropical Forests, Wildilfe, Wildlife Conservation center_img We recently heard Bill argue that scientists need to become more comfortable with expressing uncertainty over the future of the planet and to stop “dooming and glooming” when it comes to environmental problems.We wanted to hear more about that, as well as to hear from Bill about the “global road map” he and his team recently released to help mitigate the environmental damage of what he calls an “infrastructure tsunami” breaking across the globe.We also welcome to the program Michelle LaRue, a research ecologist with the University of Minnesota’s Department of Earth Sciences. Her current work is focused on using high-resolution satellite imagery to study the population dynamics of Weddell seals in Antarctica’s Ross Sea.In this Field Notes segment, Michelle will also play for us some of the calls made by adult Weddell seals and their pups, which couldn’t be more different from each other and are really quite remarkable, each in their own way. But you really have to hear them to believe them. In this episode of the Mongabay Newscast, we feature Bill Laurance, a Distinguished Research Professor at James Cook University in Cairns, Australia as well as the founder and director of ALERT (Alliance of Leading Environmental Researchers & Thinkers) and a member of Mongabay’s advisory board.We recently heard Bill argue at the Earth Optimism Summit that scientists need to become more comfortable with expressing uncertainty over the future of the planet and to stop “dooming and glooming” when it comes to environmental problems. We wanted to hear more about that, as well as to hear from Bill about the “global road map” he and his team recently released to help mitigate the environmental damage of what he calls an “infrastructure tsunami” breaking across the globe, the subject of a recent Q&A published here on Mongabay.We also welcome Michelle LaRue to the program. Michelle is a research ecologist with the University of Minnesota’s Department of Earth Sciences, and her current work is focused on using high-resolution satellite imagery to study the population dynamics of Weddell seals in Antarctica’s Ross Sea.In this Field Notes segment, Michelle will also play for us some of the calls made by adult Weddell seals and their pups, which couldn’t be more different from each other and are really quite remarkable, each in their own way. But you really have to hear them to believe them, trust us.Here’s this episode’s top news:Trump failure to lead on climate doesn’t faze UN policymakers in BonnChina flexes its new climate action muscles in Bonn; Trump administration blinksCross River superhighway changes course in NigeriaDelicate Solomon Island ecosystem in danger of heavy loggingTwo new species of tarsier, rumored to be inspiration for Yoda, announced on Star Wars DayStudy finds hundreds of thousands of tropical species at risk of extinction due to deforestationNew report details enormous corruption, illegal logging along Vietnamese border with CambodiaIf you enjoy this podcast, please write a review of the Mongabay Newscast in the Apple Podcasts app, iTunes store, Stitcher page, or wherever you get your podcasts from! Your feedback will help us improve the show and find new listeners. Simply go to the show’s page on whichever platform you get it from and find the ‘review’ or ‘rate’ section: Stitcher, TuneIn, iTunes, Google Play, Android, or RSS.A Weddell seal in Antarctica. Photo by Michelle LaRue.Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

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first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Archive, Conservation, conservation players, Environment, Environmental Heroes, Featured, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Interviews, Protected Areas, public lands A summer spent in Colorado in 1958 prompted Hansjörg Wyss’s life-long commitment to conservation.As his means increased, Wyss became one of the world’s most generous philanthropists, supporting causes ranging from the arts to social justice to science to conservation.Much of Wyss’s support of conservation has focused on creating permanent public access to the rugged landscapes of the American WestIn recent years Wyss has expanded his efforts to other regions, including the Amazon rainforest, African savannas and forests, and in Romania. In the late 1950s, a young graduate student from Switzerland named Hansjörg Wyss took a summer job with the Colorado Highway Department. In his free time, he explored, climbed, and camped in the wilds of the Rocky Mountains.That summer left an indelible impression on Wyss, who later went on to found a medical device company that developed technologies to help people heal from severe injuries. But while Wyss found great success in business, he never lost his passion for nature. As his means increased, Wyss became one of the world’s most generous philanthropists, supporting causes ranging from the arts to social justice to science to conservation. In 2013 he signed The Giving Pledge, committing to donate the majority of his fortune to charitable causes.Much of Wyss’s support of conservation has focused on creating permanent public access to the rugged landscapes of the American West: Wyoming’s Hoback Basin, Atlantic salmon spawning grounds along the Penobscot River in Maine, the San Gabriel Mountains National Monument and Stornetta Public Lands in California, Montana’s Crown of the Continent, and lands along the Hoh River in Washington, to name a few. To date, he has helped permanently protect more than 27 million acres of land in the U.S. and around the world.Hansjörg WyssWhile Wyss’s conservation philanthropy initially targeted rugged landscapes in the U.S., in recent years it has expanded to other regions, including the Amazon rainforest, African savannas and forests, and the Carpathian Mountains in Romania. The overarching strategy abroad is the same as in the United States: protecting wilderness areas as public lands with strong local buy-in.“We are in a race against time to protect the world’s remaining wild areas,” Wyss told Mongabay. “We focus on protecting wild areas that are at risk of development. But we do so with a firm commitment to protecting these places as public lands, and in supporting locally-driven conservation efforts.”“From what I have seen, the most successful land conservation initiatives start with and are led by local communities who want to protect their land, water, wildlife, and way of life.”Wyss spoke about his commitment to conservation, scientific research, and other causes during a September 2017 interview with Mongabay.com.Hansjörg WyssAN INTERVIEW WITH HANSJÖRG WYSSMongabay: We understand that your passion for conservation in the American West began after a visit to the U.S. in the late 1950s. What areas and landscapes particularly inspired you?Hansjörg Wyss: I first came to the United States as a graduate student in 1958 and took a summer job as a surveyor with the Colorado Highway Department. On weekends and in my free time, I would camp, climb, and explore the Rocky Mountains. I vividly remember Longs Peak, for example, where I traveled before returning to Switzerland.The Swiss Alps where I grew up are beautiful, but so much of the American West still seemed so wild and untouched. In Europe, many natural areas are privately owned, developed, or otherwise off limits to the public. But I was struck by the fact that America’s natural wonders are protected as public lands; they are open to everyone to experience. I came to love and admire the conservation ideal that is embodied by America’s national parks, national forests, monuments, and wildlife refuges, and I have spent much of my adult life working to conserve wild places as public lands.Glacier lilies along the Highline Trail, Glacier National Park in Montana. Wyss supported the expansion of Montana’s Crown of the Continent. Photo credit: High Trails / Troy Smith.The Point Arena-Stornetta unit of the California Coastal National Monument is located in California’s Mendocino County. Photo credit: Bureau of Land Management CaliforniaMongabay: In recent years the Wyss Foundation has expanded its efforts internationally, including Africa and oceans. How do you decide what places to prioritize? Are there other geographies you’re currently considering?Hansjörg Wyss: When I launched the Wyss Foundation in 1998, our main focus was on helping protect public lands in the American West. I am proud of the work we have done over the years to protect vast open landscapes, like the Crown of the Continent in Montana and the Wyoming Range in Wyoming. All together in the United States, our support for locally-driven conservation initiatives has led to the protection of more than 20 million acres of public lands for the benefit of current and future generations.Over the past decade we have broadened our efforts to help conserve wild places around the globe, while staying faithful to our conservation principles. Yes, we focus on protecting wild areas that are at risk of development. But we do so with a firm commitment to protecting these places as public lands, and in supporting locally-driven conservation efforts. This has led, us, for example, to provide multi-year support to a non-profit organization, called African Parks, to partner with governments and local communities to proactively manage new parks and protected areas in Rwanda, Malawi, and other African nations. We were proud to help Peruvian communities and leaders establish the 3.3 million acre Sierra del Divisor National Park, which will help safeguard the headwaters of the Amazon in the Andes Mountains. We are helping conserve the Carpathian Mountains in Romania so that one day they can be protected as a national park. And, recognizing that our oceans are a shared resource in declining health, we are providing philanthropic support to help countries and coastal communities establish science-based fishery management policies and protected areas.The Amazon rainforest. The Wyss Foundation is supporting a scaling-up of protected areas in the Peruvian Amazon. Photo credit: Rhett A. ButlerElephant calf in Africa. In February 2017 the Wyss Foundation announced a commitment of up to $65 million to African Parks “to support the protection and management of four existing parks in Rwanda and Malawi and to enable the non-profit organization to conserve up to five new protected areas yet to be identified in other countries.” Photo credit: Rhett A. Butler.Mongabay: At Mongabay, we often report on “conservation effectiveness”; with the goal of providing actionable information for all those involved in the sector. How do you inform your conservation strategies and set goals for effective interventions?Hansjörg Wyss: We are in a race against time to protect the world’s remaining wild areas. It is as simple as that. Our primary measurement of conservation success at the Wyss Foundation is straightforward: how much land have we helped permanently protect for the benefit of current and future generations? When we look at potential conservation initiatives, therefore, we look carefully at the ecological value and threats to the land, but we also want to ensure that they be conserved as public lands and that they be conserved in perpetuity.In 2015 the Wyss Foundation helped The Nature Conservancy purchase 3,184 acres along the Hoh River in Washington state. Photo credit: Rhett A. ButlerThe Grand Tetons in Wyoming. Wyss supported the protection of the Wyoming Range in the state. Photo credit: Rhett A. ButlerMongabay: Beyond conservation, you support a wide range of causes, from the arts to scientific research. Could you tell us more about what led you to establish the Wyss Institute at Harvard University, for example, and about other philanthropic causes you are involved in?Hansjörg Wyss: I spent much of my professional life helping establish and grow a medical company that researched, designed, and produced devices to help patients survive and recover from traumatic injuries. There have been remarkable advances in surgical care in the past fifty years, and I am proud that my company was able to be a part of that progress.Over the course of my career, however, I noticed that there is often a wide gap between the research that is done in universities and labs and the translation of that research to practical applications. What we have done at Harvard – and what we are doing through similar projects with universities in Switzerland – is to bring together brilliant minds from many scientific disciplines and then allow them to be creative and innovative. It is truly extraordinary to see the ideas and breakthroughs that are coming from this interdisciplinary environment. Taking their inspiration from designs in the natural world, researchers at the Wyss Institute at Harvard are fighting cancer, battling pathogens, improving medical imaging, and spinning out new ideas almost every week. It is remarkable.And just as we support creativity and innovation in science, I believe it is equally important that we do so in the arts. I have, for example, been fortunate and proud to support the Boston Philanthropic Orchestra for many years, to help provide scholarships at art schools in Switzerland, and to have helped build the Fondation Beyeler, which is now the most popular art museum in Switzerland.Wildlife ranging from jaguars (above) to barn owls (below) live in habitats that Wyss has helped conserve. Photo credits: Rhett A. ButlerBarn owls live across the public lands Wyss has helped conserve. Photo credit: Rhett A. ButlerMongabay: At the same time that the world added 23 new sites to the UNESCO World Network of Biosphere Reserves program, Donald Trump’s administration removed 17 on U.S. soil. As with the Paris climate treaty, do you think it is possible that private individuals and non-US governments can and should now lead the world in land conservation, too?Hansjörg Wyss: From what I have seen, the most successful land conservation initiatives start with and are led by local communities who want to protect their land, water, wildlife, and way of life. Yes, political winds can shift from time to time, but there is still a groundswell of enthusiasm – around the globe – to save the last, best places before they disappear. And everyone has a role to play. We are seeing local and state governments in the United States establish policies to encourage the protection of open space. National governments in South America and Africa are eagerly working with local communities to create new national parks to protect at-risk areas and to drive tourism and economic development. And more and more private citizens are giving their time and resources to the cause of conservation, whether it is out their back door or on the other side of the world.Where the Andes meet the Amazon is arguably the most biodiverse place in the world. The Wyss Foundation is supporting the protection of public lands in this region. Photo credit: Rhett A. ButlerWyss with TNC staff. Photo courtesy of the Wyss Foundation.Mongabay: Do you have any advice for other people who may wish to create a conservation legacy?Hansjörg Wyss: I have long admired the conservation ideal that led to the creation of America’s national parks and public lands: that in protecting our natural wonders we must ensure that all people have the chance to enjoy them. An act of conservation can be an enduring investment in democracy.Wyss Foundationcenter_img Article published by Rhett Butlerlast_img read more

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first_imgP W D L GF GA GD Pts 1. Leicester City 34 21 10 3 59 33 26 73 2. Tottenham 34 19 11 4 64 25 39 68 3. Man City 34 18 7 9 62 34 28 61 4. Arsenal 33 17 9 7 56 34 22 60 5. Man United 34 17 8 9 42 30 12 59 6. West Ham 34 14 14 6 57 43 14 56 7. Liverpool 33 15 9 9 56 43 13 54 8. Southampton 34 14 9 11 45 35 10 51 9. Stoke City 34 13 8 13 37 47 -10 47 10. Chelsea 33 11 11 11 49 45 4 44 P W D L GF GA GD Pts 11. Everton 34 9 14 11 53 48 5 41 12. Watford 34 11 8 15 33 40 -7 41 13. Bournemouth 34 11 8 15 41 57 -16 41 14. West Brom 33 10 10 13 31 40 -9 40 15. Swansea 34 10 10 14 34 45 -11 40 16. Crystal Palace 35 10 9 16 36 45 -9 39 17. Norwich City 34 8 7 19 35 60 -25 31 18. Sunderland 33 7 9 17 39 57 -18 30 19. Newcastle 34 7 8 19 36 62 -26 29 20. Aston Villa 34 3 7 24 23 65 -42 16last_img read more

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first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Agriculture, Beef, Conservation, Deforestation, Environment, Forests, Logging, Rainforest Deforestation, Threats To Rainforests, Tropical Forests Article published by danielcenter_img The British military sourced beef for ration packs from Brazilian meatpacker JBS despite its history of corruption, poor environmental record and links to human rights abuses.Ration packs supplied to the UK armed forces between 2009 and 2016 were found to be manufactured by JBS and supplied by Vestey Foods.The sources of JBS beef imported by Vestey into the UK could not be confirmed and may not have come from illegally deforested lands or suspect supply chains.Cattle ranching is the largest single driver of deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon and a significant contributor to tropical carbon emissions. A recent wave of forest fires in the region prompted a global outcry and calls for tougher action to curb environmental destruction. The British military has for years sourced beef for soldiers’ ration packs from scandal-plagued Brazilian meatpacker JBS despite its history of corruption, poor environmental record and links to human rights abuses, research by NGO Earthsight has found.Ration packs supplied to the UK armed forces between 2009 and 2016 were found to be manufactured by JBS. By analysing shipping records, Earthsight found that Vestey Foods, a major supplier to the UK Ministry of Defence (MoD), used JBS beef in at least four official ration packs.While JBS was no longer named as the producer of the ration packs from 2016, shipping data showed the firm supplied hundreds of tons of Brazilian beef and chicken worth $4.2 million to Vestey Foods between 2014 and 2019. However, Earthsight notes, the sources of JBS beef imported by Vestey into the UK could not be confirmed.“[A]lthough the army ration packs that have previously contained JBS beef may not have come from illegally deforested lands or suspect supply chains, questions remain about the MoD’s possible continuing relationship with a firm that has such a chequered history,” Earthsight said.Cattle ranching is the largest single driver of deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon and a significant contributor to tropical carbon emissions. A recent wave of forest fires in the region prompted a global outcry and calls for tougher action to curb environmental destruction.JBS is one of three Brazilian firms known to have supplied beef to the UK armed forces, along with Minerva and SulBeef, which supply beef to armed forces personnel stationed in Bahrain, according to Earthsight.Sam Lawson, Earthsight director, said JBS had “flouted environmental standards for years and for the UK government to have been bumping up their profits, even if indirectly, is a major environmental own goal.”The MoD, JBS and Vestey Foods did not respond to a request for comment, but the MoD told Earthsight it was “committed to upholding ethical procurement practices” and was “working with our suppliers to address any concerns surrounding the recent link between sourcing beef from Brazil and deforestation.”In an FOI response to Earthsight the MoD said that 107 products were “deemed available to be ordered” in 2017 and 2018 that contained beef or beef products and that “four contain beef sourced from Brazil using Brazilian meat,” but added that it could not confirm how many of those products were actually supplied.British army ration packs have used JBS meat since 2009. Photo by Earthsight.JBS is the world’s largest meat producer with revenues last year of more than $43 billion. Until 2016, the company sourced beef from notorious rancher Antônio José Junqueira Vilela Filho, who was arrested in 2016 following a two-year criminal investigation that found he led a sophisticated criminal network responsible for illegally clearing over 30,000 hectares of public forests in the Brazilian state of Para.The following year, JBS was fined £6.5 million ($8.1 million) for buying 50,000 cattle from deforested Amazon land. The company denied wrongdoing. Also in 2017, JBS was raided by federal agents after it was discovered to have bribed sanitation inspectors to allow rotten meat to be sold.JBS’ founders, brothers Joesley and Wesley Batista, admitted last year to making about $180 million in illegal campaign donations over a decade to more than 1,800 candidates in return for favorable policy-making as part of Operation Car Wash, one of the largest corruption scandals in Latin American history.“The fact that the Ministry of Defence allowed JBS beef to be used in contracts in the past, and possibly still does, is at best a procurement oversight,” Lawson said. “If the UK government is truly committed to protecting the Amazon and preventing deforestation, then ensuring that none of its departments are using beef from potentially suspect sources in Brazil would be a good place to start.”last_img read more

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first_imgArticle published by Maria Salazar Citations:Moorhouse, T. P., D’Cruze, N. C., & Macdonald, D. W. (2017). The effect of priming, nationality and greenwashing on preferences for wildlife tourist attractions. Global Ecology and Conservation, 12, 188-203. doi: 10.1016/j.gecco.2017.11.007Scheffers, B. R., Oliveira, B. F., Lamb, I., & Edwards, D. P. (2019). Global wildlife trade across the tree of life. Science, 366(6461), 71-76. doi: 10.1126/science.aav5327Challender, D. W., Wu, S. B., Nijman, V., & MacMillan, D. C. (2014). Changing behavior to tackle the wildlife trade. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, 12(4), 203-203. doi: 10.1890/1540-9295-12.4.203 Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored A wide range of illegal wildlife products, from tiger claws to hornbill casques, are used to make baubles known as wénwan that are prized as status symbols among China’s burgeoning middle class.Domestic bans on the trade in elephant ivory and rhino horn have not slowed the growing and underregulated online market for wénwan products, with traders increasingly targeting other species to meet demand for exotic materials.Without understanding the dynamics of the wénwan trade, including the cultural aspect, government and NGO efforts to combat the illegal wildlife trade risk remaining ineffective. What do a helmeted hornbill (Rhinoplax vigil), a narwhal (Monodon monoceros), and a tiger (Panthera tigris) have in common? Find your way to the right message board and you’ll see all their bones strung on the same bracelet. Along with rhino (Rhinocerotidae spp.), elephant (Elephantidae spp.), saiga antelope (Saiga tatarica) and many other species, they are victims of the Chinese market for wénwan.Composed of the characters 文 (culture) and 玩 (play), wénwan refers to an ideal of scholarship and sophistication once represented by the calligraphy tools of the Song dynasty (960–1279 CE). However, its meaning has changed over the past centuries, and it now refers to any number of collectible items that show an owner’s taste, discernment and status, including sculptures, jewelry, paperweights and seals.Most wénwan are crafted from jade, porcelain, olive pits and walnuts, and collecting them is often a harmless hobby. As with any collectibles, there are trends: from 2008 to 2013, the price of walnuts skyrocketed as walnut-shell jewelry became a must-have. Walnut farmers grew rich and businessmen speculated on walnut futures until an abundant harvest in 2014 flooded the market and sent prices crashing.But sometimes wénwan trends are less benign. The average weight of a seizure of pangolin scales has more than tripled from 2014 (208 kilograms, or 458 pounds) to 2018 (723 kilos, or 1,594 pounds). Often used in traditional medicine, the scales are also increasingly crafted to make jewelry, according to the U.K.-based NGO Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA). These numbers have made the pangolin (Manidae spp.) the most trafficked animal in the world, according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).Beads made from illegal Asian elephant skin, bottom, on sale alongside legal wénwan made from walnuts, top, in a shop in Kunming, China. Image by Elephant Family.“There are too many factors that influence trade: e.g. enforcement pressure, source and supply, trade routes and logistics, to accurately predict what the next fads will be,” a researcher into the illegal trade, who asked to remain anonymous, wrote in an email statement. “Elephant skin is non-traditional in many ways, yet it has evidently taken a niche in the wénwan market. Because of this, wildlife trade research remains a passive and reactive process.”The fad for elephant-skin wénwan is fed by a gruesome reality on the ground. The skin comes from elephants in neighboring Myanmar, which are poached and flayed whole. Traders then carve and polish chunks of dried subcutaneous fat, almost like woodworking, to fashion into bracelets and pendants. Capillaries give the beads their color, which can be anything from yellowish amber to a deep ruby red.One red, two black, three whiteSome wildlife products remain perennially popular; on message boards, collectors ask each other how to get their hands on “one red, two black, three white” (一红二黑三白). The expression refers to helmeted hornbill casque (red), rhino horn (black) and elephant ivory (white) — the three most prized illegal wildlife products.After hundreds of years of hunting for their casques, helmeted hornbills were listed as critically endangered in 2015. Known as red ivory and carved in the same way as elephant tusks, casques were first imported to China from Southeast Asia during the reign of Kublai Khan more than 700 years ago. The casques are often combined with other wildlife products: “red ivory” rings and pendants are set with elephant ivory and tiger teeth and claws.The Tang dynasty (618-907) held rhino horn in such high regard that only the emperor and crown prince could wear rhino-horn hairpins. The reverence for rhino horn, which is made of keratin — the same material as pangolin scales and human fingernails — has continued into the present day. China banned the domestic trade in rhino horn in 1993, but in 2018 the government attempted to relax restrictions to allow for the sale of “cultural relics.” Thanks to a public outcry, this was postponed. Even so, said Margaret Kinnaird, a wildlife team leader with WWF, it “seemed to contradict the leadership China has shown recently in tackling the illegal wildlife trade.”Then there’s elephant ivory. Soft and easy to carve, it’s been fashioned into cups and chopsticks since the Shang dynasty, more than 3,000 years ago. Chinese ivory carvers once exported most of their finished pieces, but today the country’s large middle class, created by a booming economy, now buy a huge quantity of carved ivory products. When the trade was made illegal in 2017, research by WWF and the wildlife trade watchdog TRAFFIC indicated that nine out of 10 people agreed with the ban. But despite public support, Chinese citizens make up 90 percent of the customers in Asian markets where the ivory trade is less strictly regulated, such as Thailand and Vietnam.All three wildlife products have long and illustrious histories, and their increasing rarity may only increase their appeal to collectors. Five years ago, an unidentified actor Yang Xiaoxiao sold three ivory wénwan artifacts for 320,000 yuan (nearly $53,000 in 2014) over the course of a single day. In total, they made 1.36 million yuan (nearly $225,000 in 2014) through the sale of illegal wildlife products on the social media platform WeChat before being caught and sentenced to 10 years in jail.Growing online tradeYang’s is a rare case. The harshest penalty most traders face for selling their products online is having their profiles deleted. The online trade in other illegal substances, such as narcotics, is often driven deep underground, facilitated by the Dark Web and cryptocurrency, but this is rarely the case for wildlife parts. Traders of illegal ivory and rhino horn offer their wares on social media platforms like WeChat, Alibaba and Baidu. Sometimes they embed their adverts in short videos or use codenames — XY, jelly, white plastic — to cover their tracks, but often they don’t even bother to go that far.A wénwan trader on Facebook offered to sell individual beads from a collector’s bracelet in September 2018. The beads, labeled by the trader, include helmeted hornbill casque, elephant skin and ivory. Image by Elephant Family.“My impression is that the trade online is proliferating,” said the anonymous researcher. “In terms of the range of platforms used, the modus operandi of traders online, the number of adverts and users, while physical outlets are decreasing in number or visibility. The recent expansion of courier mailing services and online payment systems in China seem to have been a key enabling factor.”A recent TRAFFIC report found that while adverts for illegal wildlife products seem to have declined, more and more of them lacked the keywords that make it possible to track them. And while there have been fewer adverts for elephant ivory since the ban, adverts for rhino horn and other endangered species have increased in response.Combating the wénwan tradeIn an effort to curb the trafficking enabled by their platforms, in 2017 Baidu and Alibaba formed the Alliance on Combating Illegal Wildlife Trade Online with nine other Chinese companies. Adopting a zero-tolerance policy on wildlife trade, they set themselves the ambitious target of reducing trafficking on their services by 80 percent by 2020. Outside China, the big names like Facebook, Instagram, Microsoft, Google and eBay swiftly joined them, bringing the total committed companies to 32. By identifying users and assisting law enforcement in forensic analysis, these companies have the potential to make trading in illegal wildlife products exponentially more difficult.But there’s also a cultural barrier to overcome. A 2017 study found that when participants from the U.S., U.K., Canada and Australia were primed to consider the conservation impact of their choices to visit animal attractions, 42 percent were unwilling to visit attractions detrimental to conservation outcomes, compared to 25 percent of respondents in the control condition. But primed Chinese respondents were more likely to attend detrimental attractions than even unprimed respondents from the other four countries. Questioning showed that although Chinese respondents agreed that animal welfare and conservation were important, they were less likely to question claims that attractions were beneficial, and more likely to believe that a truly damaging attraction wouldn’t be allowed to continue operating. The study concluded that while providing consumers with the information needed to make informed choices is vital to demand reduction, cultural context affects how the information will be interpreted.“Wildlife product consumption is deeply connected to culture, and I feel the conservation community as a whole could benefit from a deeper understanding of the role that cultural context plays in influencing consumption behaviour and patterns,” the anonymous researcher wrote. “Rather than saying to a general audience, ‘You should not be buying elephant ivory carvings,’ another effective message could be ‘There should be no wildlife products in wénwan.’”The wénwan trade as it exists today has grown from long tradition, an influx of disposable income, and an online marketplace that makes distribution easy and low risk. The ivory and rhino horn bans and similar measures are important steps, but any strategy that focuses only on ending the illegal trade in a single species is likely to shift the problem. For example, a new study has identified more than 3,000 species that aren’t currently trafficked but likely will be in the future for their dramatic horns or exotic coloring.“Once one traded species is exhausted, species with similar traits will become the target of trade,” said study author Brett Scheffers, a wildlife expert at the University of Florida.Conservation efforts are hampered by what a 2014 study in Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment calls “a lack of in-depth and culturally sensitive understanding of the demand for many species.” Without this understanding, traders will likely keep targeting new species and developing new products, and even the extinction of hornbills, rhinos and elephants might not be enough to end the trade. Animal Welfare, Animals, Conservation, Endangered Species, Interns, Research, Wildlife, Wildlife Trade last_img read more

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first_imgBanner image of a turtle stuck in a fishing net. Image courtesy of the Bio Conservation Society. Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Environment, Sea Turtles With the main nesting season for olive ridley sea turtles getting underway, the species faces a range of threats in the waters and beaches of Sri Lanka.The country’s navy recently rescued 32 turtles trapped in shrimp fishing nets in the island’s north.Marine turtles in Sri Lankan waters often end up entangled in nets, posing a serious threat to their survival.Sea turtles worldwide are seriously affected by the fisheries industry, with millions killed every year. COLOMBO — The Sri Lankan Navy has rescued 32 sea turtles that were likely being reared for their flesh, highlighting just one of the key threats to turtles migrating through this Indian Ocean island at this time of year.A naval patrol on Nov. 24 in the Gulf of Mannar, which separates Sri Lanka from India, initially identified a turtle trapped in a shrimping net. A team of sailors deployed to rescue the animal discovered more turtles trapped in the net. In all, they rescued 32 sea turtles, among them olive ridley (Lepidochelys olivacea) and green turtles (Chelonia mydas).Removing a fishing hook from a turtle. Image courtesy of the Turtle Conservation Project.Though turtles are frequently trapped by accident in fishing nets, it appears likely these animals had been caught elsewhere and corralled in these shrimp pens, according to navy spokesman Isuru Sooriyabandara. He told Mongabay that a patrol two days earlier, on Nov. 22, had seized 4 kilograms (9 pounds) of turtle flesh from a boat close to the same location, raising the prospect that local fishermen were keeping the turtles for later consumption.Sri Lankan waters are home to five of the seven species of marine turtles: the green turtle, olive ridley, hawksbill (Eretmochelys imbricata), loggerhead (Caretta caretta) and leatherback (Dermochelys coriacea).It’s the first two, however, that account for nearly the entire population of nesting turtles in Sri Lanka: 68 percent are green turtles and 30 percent olive ridley turtles, according to the National Aquatic Resources Research and Development Agency (NARA). While the peak nesting frequency for green turtles in this region runs from February to April, the period between November and March is prime time for olive ridleys, which flock in the hundreds of thousands to beaches around the Bay of Bengal, including parts of Sri Lanka, to nest.A turtle flipper seriously damaged by getting caught in a fishing net. Image courtesy of the Turtle Conservation Project.But the rise in turtle numbers during this time of the year leads to a spike in hunting of the animals by local fishermen — a trend that navy spokesman Sooriyabandara said authorities were vigilant about.Still, fishing nets set in the Gulf of Mannar and elsewhere accidentally catch a lot of turtles, especially in the final quarter of the year as they migrate across Sri Lanka waters to their breeding grounds, according to Thushan Kapurusinghe, the project leader of the Turtle Conservation Project (TCP) in Sri Lanka.Entangled in fishing nets The TCP conducted its first olive ridley rescue program from September 1999 to March 2001, in a bid to save turtles entangled in nets. It hired a boat and followed fishermen as they went fishing at dusk. The nets were checked throughout the night for possible entanglements, and any turtles found were immediately released. Over the two and a half years of the project, a total of 278 olive ridleys were rescued, comprising 157 females, 86 males and 35 whose sex was undetermined.“The monitoring was strenuous, as a fishing net could extend several kilometers and these are laid on considerable distances to prevent turtles from getting entangled. So only a portion of fishing nets could be monitored by the TCP boat each night,” Kapurusinghe said, adding that the real rate of entanglement was likely much higher.The front flippers of this hawksbill turtle found in Kosgoda was badly damaged due to a cut caused by a fishing net, so they had to be amputated. Image courtesy the Turtle Conservation Project.Lalith Ekanayake, the chairman of the Bio Conservation Society (BCSSL), which also focuses on turtle conservation, said that while entangled turtles are able to keep their head up to breathe, the turtles that get caught deeper underwater are at high risk of drowning. Even those saved from the nets don’t always get away clean; many suffer injuries from the nylon mesh of the fishing nets, sometimes so severely that they require amputation of their flippers.The IUCN Species Survival Commission’s Marine Turtles Specialist Group also recognizes the impact of fisheries as the biggest threat to marine turtles, while other threats include hunting, egg extraction and other pressures. “The turtles virtually everywhere are impacted by fisheries, especially longlines, gill nets and trawls. Millions of turtles are killed indirectly by fisheries every year worldwide,” said Roderic Mast, co-chair of IUCN-SSC Marine Turtle Specialist Group. Fishing nets that have been lost, abandoned or discarded at sea, known as ghost nets, pose the worst of fishing threats to turtles, Mast told Mongabay.All marine turtle species found in Sri Lanka are listed as endangered on the country’s National Red List and are legally protected under the Fauna and Flora Protection Ordinance and the Fisheries and Aquatic Resources Act. But laws alone can’t address the threats, Ekanayake said, adding that there needs to be greater awareness among fishing communities about their role in the issue. Both the BCSSL and the TCP run awareness campaigns about the importance of marine turtle conservation.A sailor rescuing a juvenile green turtle from a shrimp net in the Gulf of Mannar, northern Sri Lanka. Image courtesy of the Sri Lankan Navy.Turtle nesting sites abound all around Sri Lanka, with the major nesting beaches on the western, southwestern and southern coasts. There’s a rapid decline of turtles all over the island, Kapurusinghe said, especially the leatherback, hawksbill and loggerhead varieties.“For example, the Rekawa nesting site [in the south] hasn’t seen a leatherback turtle in two years or a hawksbill in four years, which is alarming,” Kapurusinghe said. Article published by dilrukshi Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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first_imgTwo land agency officials have been charged with taking $1.6 million in bribes in exchange for granting oil palm plantation concessions spanning an area of 200 hectares (500 acres) in Indonesian Borneo.Investigators from the KPK, Indonesia’s anti-graft commission, are also investigating the businesspeople allegedly involved in the deal.KPK deputy chairman Laode Muhammad Syarif says the case highlights the dangers of the government’s continued refusal to allow greater transparency in the permit-issuance process.A watchdog group warns that corruption in the palm oil industry could get worse if the KPK is weakened under the purview of a controversial new law. JAKARTA — Anti-corruption investigators in Indonesia have charged two government officials for allegedly taking $1.6 million in bribes to grant permits for oil palm plantations spanning just over half the size of New York’s Central Park.The Corruption Eradication Commission (KPK) announced the charges on Nov. 29 against Gusmin Tuarita, an official at the National Land Agency (BPN), and Siswidodo, from the West Kalimantan provincial land agency.The pair stand accused of taking 22.23 billion rupiah in bribes in exchange for granting plantation concessions spanning an area of 200 hectares (500 acres) in West Kalimantan, Indonesian Borneo.The KPK did not identify the parties that allegedly paid the bribes, but spokesman Febri Diansyah told local media that a number of individuals were being investigated. “There are some businesspeople in the palm oil industry whom we have questioned,” he said as quoted by Beritasatu.The case marks the latest anti-graft bust by the KPK, which has recently focused more of its attention to corruption in Indonesia’s natural resources sector. In 2016, a KPK audit found that the country lacked a credible and accountable system to prevent violations and corruption in the palm oil industry. The commission identified the permit-issuance process for plantations as being particularly rife with corruption.KPK deputy chairman Laode Muhammad Syarif said this was because of the lack of transparency in the process, which often results in permits being issued that overlap with existing land claims or onto forest areas that are off-limits to plantations.The BPN has insisted on keeping the plantation permit data, which include maps and boundaries, out of the public’s reach, in defiance of a 2017 order by the Supreme Court for the agency to make the data publicly available.Sofyan Djalil, the head of the BPN, has refused to follow the order, arguing that the documents are the property of private companies, and that publishing them could reveal confidential financial information.The government has doubled down on that stance, instructing member companies of the country’s powerful palm oil lobby to not share their plantation data with other parties, including external consultants, NGOs, and multilateral and foreign agencies.Some palm oil companies have publicly said they have no problem with publishing their concession maps, though others in the industry have expressed the view that local thugs could use the maps to extort them.The country’s palm oil lobby, known by its Indonesian acronym GAPKI, meanwhile, has repeatedly said that opening up the HGU data would hurt the palm oil industry as the data could be scrutinized by the public, rocking the boat.NGOs say that’s exactly why they need the maps, to monitor companies’ activities and hold them accountable.University students heading towards the Indonesian parliament’s building in Jakarta to protest against several controversial bills, including the recently passed KPK law. Image by Hans Nicholas Jong/Mongabay.‘Naughty’ agenciesThe move away from transparency and toward greater opacity has drawn intense criticism, not only from civil society groups but also from other government agencies.Both the country’s ombudsman and the KPK have recommended the BPN make the plantation permit data available to the public. The agency’s refusal to do so in the interests of preventing corruption prompted Laode to label the BPN one of four “naughty” government agencies. The other three are also involved in regulating the natural resources sector: the Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources, the Ministry of Agriculture, and the Ministry of Environment and Forestry.“To be honest, we’re complaining,” Laode told lawmakers during a parliamentary hearing on Nov. 27. “These four agencies have lots of budget but they have the worst management because they’re always closed off to the KPK.”He cited the West Kalimantan bribery case as an example of the urgency for making the licensing process more transparent.“Specifically for the BPN, we are hoping that the [plantation permit] data is made transparent, [as] the Supreme Court has already ruled that it should be,” Laode said. “Why is there a need to make it transparent? So that there’s no overlapping [permits]. There are even plantations inside forest areas.”Khalisah Khalid, the head of politics at the Indonesian Forum for the Environment (Walhi), the country’s biggest green NGO, said making the permit data publicly available would compel the government to be more stringent about regulating the palm oil industry.“It’s important because the public can scrutinize the data, which will make the government more accountable,” she told Mongabay.A worker takes a chainsaw to an oil palm on an illegal plantation in Tenggulun. Image by Junaidi Hanafiah for Mongabay.Weakening the watchdogKhalisah also stressed the importance of allowing the KPK to retain its far-reaching investigative powers, given the reticence of other government agencies to go after corruption in the natural resources sector.“That’s why we’re worried about the efforts to weaken the KPK,” she said. “Because other than the mining and coal sectors, the KPK also targets the forestry and plantation sectors.”Parliament passed a hugely controversial bill in September that severely curtails the KPK’s ability to carry out investigations. Under the bill, which is being challenged at the country’s Constitutional Court, the KPK is no longer an independent state institution. Instead, it becomes a government agency, staffed by the very civil servants it was originally tasked with monitoring, and overseen by a council handpicked by the president and parliament — a body of legislators who have often been the target of anti-corruption investigations.It has also been stripped of its authority to carry out independent wiretaps of suspects — one of the key weapons in its war on graft that has helped it achieve a near 100 percent conviction rate.The passage of the bill prompted massive protests by university students in Jakarta and other cities across Indonesia, who called on President Joko Widodo to issue an executive order that would quash the new law. But despite having built his career on a reformist image and making the fight against corruption one of his priority agendas during his campaign, Widodo has made it clear that he will not issue the executive order.Laode said these developments contradicted the president’s promise to strengthen the KPK.“We’re still hoping for the president to issue the executive order,” he said. “We’re still very much hoping for that.”Khalisah warned of corruption thriving in the plantation industry if the KPK was weakened.“As an institution committed [to fighting corruption], the KPK mustn’t be weakened,” she said. “A strong KPK is needed to monitor the industry.” Corruption, Environment, Environmental Law, Forests, Law, Law Enforcement, Oil Palm, Palm Oil, Plantations, Rainforests, Transparency Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Banner image: Oil palm plantation in Rawa Singking Wildlife Reserve. Image by Junaidi Hanafiah/Mongabay-Indonesia.center_img Article published by Hans Nicholas Jong FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

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first_imgArticle published by Isabel Esterman Activism, Coal, Energy, Environment, Environmental Law, Indigenous Peoples, Land Rights, Mining, Rainforests, Threats To Rainforests Indonesia’s Supreme Court has ruled that a coal mining firm seeking to operate in South Kalimantan province should have its permit revoked.Indigenous activists, local officials and conservation groups successfully argued that the firm, PT Mantimin Coal Mining, should not have been issued a permit without a full environmental impact assessment.The verdict was issued in October but the parties to the case have still not been officially notified and PT MCM’s permit has yet to be revoked. JAKARTA — Indigenous activists in Indonesian Borneo have scored a big win in a lawsuit against a coal mining firm that sought to operate on their land.After a two-year court battle, Indonesia’s Supreme Court ruled in favor of a lawsuit that claims the permit for the mining firm, Indian-owned PT Mantimin Coal Mining (MCM) should be revoked.The national government granted the firm a permit in December 2017 to operate in the district of Central Hulu Sungai in South Kalimantan province. The issuance of the permit surprised local activists as well as local government officials, who had for decades opposed mining and plantation projects in the district. Central Hulu Sungai is the sole district in the province that remains free of both coal mining and oil palm plantations.With help from Walhi, Indonesia’s largest environmental NGO, local residents took MCM and the minister of energy and mineral resources to court, arguing the permit bypassed a critical step: the environmental impact assessment, which requires local approval.In parallel to the lawsuit, opponents of the mine mobilized a movement, operating online with the hashtag #SaveMeratus in honor of the region’s rainforested Meratus Mountains, and organizing the delivery of more than 1,000 handwritten letters to President Joko Widodo.“The Supreme Court’s ruling in favor of Walhi’s claim is a win for and with the people, and now almost everyone supports the #SaveMeratus movement,” said Kisworo Dwi Cahyono, the head of Walhi’s South Kalimantan chapter.Protest banner and a a cloth full of signatures expressing resistance to PT MCM’s planned mine, photographed in 2018. Image by Tommy Apriando/Mongabay-Indonesia.United local resistanceSimilar land conflicts have occurred throughout Indonesia, but Central Hulu Sungai is unique as local officials have stood alongside indigenous residents in their unwavering opposition to mining projects on their land, Kisworo said.“The people of Central Hulu Sungai have already agreed that government long-term plans should protect forests, so that we can prosper with agriculture and ecotourism and without mines and palm oil,” said the district’s environment office head, Muhammad Yanni.The 51,800-hectare (128,000-acre) Meratus Mountains are home to indigenous villages and forests, but mines and plantations have been making their way up the slopes for decades. Central Hulu Sungai district has refused entry to mines and plantations that have otherwise found concessions elsewhere in Borneo. If the mine project were to go forward, it would help fuel Asia’s coal-power boom while operating next to villages that still lack 24-hour electricity.More than half of the would-be mining area is a forested water catchment area as well as a river surrounded by several karst towers that stretched the length of the mountains and provided sources of livelihood and water for the surrounding 8,000 residents.“The area is vital because it’s the source of water for agriculture, drinking, and fishing,” Kisworo said.Part of the 2,000-ha (5,000-acre) concession area overlaps with village forest that the central government granted autonomy in 2017 and designated for beekeeping, farming, fishing, horticulture, and ecotourism.“If the river is damaged, food security will be, too. If it is mined, as we see from other districts’ mines, the water will turn acidic and fish will die,” said Sunarwiwarni, head of the district office for food and fisheries security.Batutannga village, one of the areas that would be affected if the PT MCM mine were to operate as planned. Image by Tommy Apriando/Mongabay-Indonesia.As a foreign company, PT MCM receives operating permits from Jakarta; local companies get theirs from district and provincial governments. PT MCM was granted its permit in Central Hulu Sungai because of a 2017 mining ministry regulation that allowed the company to advance multiple concessions through the licensing process as if they were one concession.Walhi’s lawsuit argued that this regulation allowed MCM and the ministry to bypass the requirement to provide an environmental impact assessment, which the district government, standing alongside local residents, retained as its shield against unwanted companies.PT MCM has been called a ghost company, as officials in the district, provincial and central governments said they did not meet any of its representatives before the permits were granted.Twice the lawsuit attempting to get PT MCM’s permit revoked was filed with Jakarta courts. The first time, in July 2018, a lower court’s examination of the case included a visit to the proposed mining area. The court refused to hear both the lawsuit and its appeal due to technicalities, so Walhi filed it with the country’s highest court in April 2019. Residents had already begun agreeing to receive compensation for giving their land to PT MCM.The court’s decision came on Oct. 15, 2019, but Walhi only discovered the decision in January, via a post on the court’s website. The group has yet to receive a copy of the court’s decision, in which the judges’ reasoning should be made clear.The court has ordered that PT MCM’s operating permit be rescinded, but the Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources has yet to do so. (In Indonesia’s judicial system, court rulings are not immediately actionable; all parties in a lawsuit must confirm receipt of a written copy of the verdict before being required to act on it.) In its lawsuit, Walhi had also demanded that the ministry and PT MCM cover all legal and court fees related to the lawsuit.Walhi’s win doesn’t mean the #SaveMeratus movement is over, Kisworo said in a press release. The mountain range is the province’s “roof,” he said, and half of the province’s land is covered in oil palm plantations or mines.“The struggle has been long, and it will continue to be long. The Supreme Court’s ruling should be further encouragement in the struggle to save the Meratus Mountains from other mining permits.”Banner image: A river running through Nateh village in Central Hulu Sungai district, by Tommy Apriando/Mongabay-Indonesia.This story was reported by Mongabay’s Indonesia team and was first published on our Indonesian site on Jan. 10, 2020.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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first_img EFFECTS OF – The heart grows larger, its walls gets thicker, blood volume increases. More capillaries grow, fat is burned more readily; lower resting heart rate and larger arteries, leading to lower blood pressure. – Increased fitness of lungs and respiratory system, leading to stronger rib muscles and diaphragm. Therefore the chest gets bigger during inhalation, the lungs expands further, facilitating more air and more oxygen is picked up, preventing easy tiring. – Training at high altitude (eg. in Mexico City) makes the aerobic changes described above happen very quickly and is good for anaerobic events (sprints, jumps, throws). Most training effects that take place in the muscles happen as a result of our muscles having to work without oxygen during anaerobic activities. Therefore, the actual development will include muscle hypertrophy. The muscles become larger as the individual muscle fibres grow thicker, fast-twitch muscle fibres increase in size and become more efficient in coping with lactic acid before becoming tired, the muscle cells store greater amount of ATP creatine phosphate and glycogen, and the chemical reaction in the muscles that produce energy increases in quantity, speed and efficiency. Weight training also causes muscle hypertrophy. Muscle strength increases when very heavy weight is lifted for few repetitions. Muscle power increases when heavy weight is lifted for a number of fast repetitions. Muscle endurance increases when light weights are lifted for many repetitions. Muscle Atrophy will occur when the muscles become inactive. Therefore, they become smaller and weaker. Muscle atrophy usually happens when the athlete is out of training as a result of injury. Be reminded that when lifting weights you should know your onerepetition maximum (1 RM) in order to guide the following: – Maximum strength – at least three sets of six reps at near maximum weight – Muscular power – at least three sets of 10-15, using 60-80 per cent of 1 RM – Muscular endurance – at least three sets of 20-30 reps using 40-60 per cent of 1 RM. When the body starts to do physical activities a number of changes take place. The exact amount of change will depend on the intensity and duration of the activity. As mentioned in earlier topics, regular training will result in adaptation of our bodies. The type of training undertaken determines what adaptations or responses are effected. AEROBIC TRAININGcenter_img ENERGY SYSTEMS Most sports are a mixture of aerobic and anaerobic work. Training makes both energy systems better. However, the training is different for each. Aerobic respiration is the production of energy using oxygen: (C6H12O6 + O2-> CO2 + water +energy). Anaerobic respiration is the production of energy without using oxygen: C6O12O6-> Energy + lactic acid. Exercise will cause the brain to increase the number of brain signals to the heart. This will cause an increase in the heart rate. The heart rate shows how hard you are working and which energy system is being used. The fastest the heart can beat is called your maximum heart rate, and can be calculated using the formula: maximum heart rate = 220 minus your age. If the heart rate is about 60 per cent of your maximum heart rate, you are working aerobically. The actual rate is measured by taking the pulse. How fit an individual wants to be will depend on working within a range of heart rates, which is the target zones. Therefore, you must train above a minimum heart rate of 60 per cent of your maximum to gain fitness. Exercise below this will gain no aerobic benefits. This means, you must exercise below an upper limit. Once the heart rate rises above a certain point you are doing anaerobic work and lactic acid will build up and cause pain. The aerobic range should be anywhere between 70 per cent-85 per cent of the maximum heart rate. You must exercise below this point to gain aerobic benefits. This is called your aerobic training zone. The heart rates at the limits of the zone are called the training thresholds. The lower limit is the aerobic threshold. The upper limit is anaerobic threshold. An unfit person should be working at 60 per cent – 70 per cent of their maximum heart rate, a fitter person at 65-75 per cent, and a fit person at 75-85 per cent. For aerobic training, choose an activity which involves the large muscles of the body, e.g. walking, swimming, jogging, cycling etc. Work for at least 15 to 20 minutes per session at least three times per week. Work at least 60 per cent of the maximum heart rate within your aerobic training zone. Weeks of aerobic training must be done before anaerobic training. Working at, or above, 85 per cent of the maximum heart rate means you are working anaerobically.last_img read more

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