first_img5PREMIER LEAGUE players are using a WhatsApp group to express fears over Project Restart.The Government have given the go ahead for the Premier League to resume behind closed doors from June 1 but some of the top flight’s biggest stars are worried about returning to work.⚠️ Read our coronavirus in sport live blog for the latest news & updates5 Aston Villa defender Tyrone Mings recently expressed concerns about the situation5 Man City star Raheem Sterling has also spoken about the issueThe welfare of players is still one of the biggest issues facing the prospective return of matches on June 12 – even though no fans will be in attendance.And a WhatsApp group containing some of the League’s biggest stars is full of concerned messages over the return while coronavirus continues to kill hundreds of people every day in the UK.Some players reportedly feel their worries are being overlooked so the Government can make political gains by “boosting the nation’s morale”, according to the Mail.Prem clubs will consult their players on the latest plans over the next 48 hours and the stars’ concerns will be relayed back to team chiefs during those calls.Aston Villa’s Tyrone Mings has been particularly vocal online with one recent tweet suggesting players lower down the league are being ignored because people think they are just worried about relegation.5He wrote: “Player at the top of the league raises concerns about playing again: Yeah he’s probably right, that’s sensible.”Player near the bottom raises the same concern: Yeah well you just don’t want to be relegated.”Manchester City star Raheem Sterling also said: “We need to make sure it’s safe not just for us footballers, but for the medical staff, the referees.”Until then, I am reserved and thinking what the worst outcome could be.”MOST READ IN FOOTBALLTHROUGH ITRobbie Keane reveals Claudine’s father was ’50-50′ in coronavirus battleTOP SELLERGavin Whelan has gone from League of Ireland to David Beckham’s InstagramPicturedAN EYEFULMeet Playboy model and football agent Anamaria Prodan bidding to buy her own clubI SAW ROORodallega saw Rooney ‘drinking like madman’ & Gerrard ‘on bar dancing shirtless’ExclusiveRIYAD RAIDMan City’s Riyad Mahrez has three luxury watches stolen in £500,000 raidNEXT STEPJonny Hayes set to move to English Championship having been let go by CelticREF RELEASEDChampions League ref Vincic released by cops after arrest in prostitution raidKEANE DEALEx Man United youth ace David Jones says Roy Keane negotiated a contract for himDanny Rose slated the decision to bring back football as he said: “It’s a f****** joke, I’m not even going to lie.”The Government is saying bring football back because it’s going to boost the nation’s morale, I don’t give a f*** about the nation’s morale.”People’s lives are at risk, you know what I mean?”Player at the top of the league raises concerns about playing again: Yeah he’s probably right, that’s sensible. Player near the bottom raises the same concern:Yeah well you just don’t want to be relegated 😂🤷🏽‍♂️— Tyrone Mings (@OfficialTM_3) May 11, 2020 5 And Newcastle’s Danny Rose said he ‘doesn’t give a f*** about the nation’s morale’Danny Rose slams ‘f—ing joke’ plans to bring Premier League back and says ‘lives are at risk’last_img read more

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first_imgAfter laying a 700-meter plastic-tar road at a university campus in Bali, Indonesian officials announced plans to use the material on roads in Jakarta and other cities.So-called plastic roads, which incorporate melted plastic into road tar, are promoted as a novel waste-disposal method that also produces cheaper and more durable roads than conventional materials.Some environmentalists are concerned about the potential for plastic roads to leach hazardous chemicals and shed micro-plastics into the ecosystem. Indonesia has a serious plastic waste problem.According to the country’s environment ministry, Indonesians consume a million plastic bags per minute, and rank second in the world (behind China) for dumping plastic into the sea.Plastic waste lines roadsides and river banks, and has devastating effects on marine life. The unsightly mess also threatens to “ruin” Indonesia’s tourism industry, Coordinating Minister for Maritime Affairs Luhut Binsar Pandjaitan told reporters earlier this year.In response, the government has pledged to devote $1 billion per year to reducing plastic and other marine waste by 70 percent, a commitment reiterated by President Joko Widodo at the recent G-20 meeting.In addition to public education campaigns and a pilot program introducing charges for plastic bags, the government is rolling out a new waste management strategy: turning discarded plastic into road-building material.So-called plastic roads — which add shredded, melted plastic waste to the road-tar mix — are touted as being stronger, cheaper and more durable than conventional roads, while also providing a solution for disposing of tons of plastic that would otherwise sit in landfills or clog waterways.Some environmentalists, however, are skeptical, claiming that the environmental benefits of such roads are overstated, while the overall approach fails to deal with the root problem of over-consumption of single-use plastic.Plastic waste litters a Balinese beach. Photo by John Rawlinson via Flickr.Seeking solutionsIndonesia has already carried out its first plastic-road trial, at Udayana University in Bali, where a 700-meter (0.43-mile) stretch of plastic road was laid on July 29.Now, officials plan to use the material on roads in the Javanese cities of Jakarta, Bekasi and Surabaya, with preparations scheduled to start within weeks.The plastic-road project is a joint effort of the Coordinating Ministry for Maritime Affairs and the Ministry of Public Works and Housing. According to Safri Burhannudin, a deputy minister at the coordinating maritime ministry, these two agencies will be working with the Indonesian Plastic Recycling Association (Adupi) to collect and sort waste in 16 large cities.“In this waste reduction effort, the first stage is public education, then we ask for the support of the Ministry of Public Works. We hope the use of plastic waste for asphalt will become an appropriate solution for the problem of waste in Indonesia,” Burhanuddin said in a press release.“Every kilometer of road, with a width of seven meters, requires between 2.5 to 5 tonnes (2.75-5.5 tons) of mixed plastic waste. So you can imagine if the results of this study are implemented across Indonesia, which has thousands of kilometers of roads,” said Danis Hidayat Sumadilaga, head of the ministry of public works’ Agency for Research and Development.Plastic waste in Indonesia is estimated to reach 9.52 million tonnes by 2019, or 14 percent of the country’s total waste. With each kilometer of road requiring 2.5 to 5 tonnes of plastic, plastic waste could be used to pave 190,000 kilometers of road.In addition, the resulting material is stickier than traditional asphalt. This, Sumadilaga explained, means stronger and more stable roads: “Stability increases by around 40 percent. This makes the performance even better.”Workers lay a plastic-tar road at Udayana University in Jimbaran, Bali on July 29. Photo courtesy of the Ministry of Public Works and Housing.The downsideBuilding roads with plastic isn’t a new idea. The process was developed around 15 years ago in India, where there are already more than 21,000 miles of plastic-tar roads.These roads, which have proven remarkably durable in the face of floods and heat, have many fans. They also have detractors among the conservation community.Since Indonesia announced plans to follow in India’s footsteps, local researchers and activists like David Sutasurya, director of the Bioscience and Biotechnology Development Foundation (YPBB) have gotten in touch with their counterparts in India, such as Dharmesh Shah of Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives (GAIA).According to Sutasurya, these India-based activists highlighted a number of shortcomings in the actual implementation of road-building plans. For example, while plastic tar was initially proposed as a solution for plastic that would otherwise be wasted, India’s road quality standards actually require the use of plastic types — LDPE and HDPE — that are already sought-after for recycling. Meanwhile, other materials such as the laminated plastics commonly used for packaging still accumulate as waste.Some efforts have been made to develop techniques for incorporating layered and laminating packaging into road tar, but again, Indian authorities only allow limited amounts of very thin laminated plastic to go into the mix.Another potential problem with this technology is micro-plastic pollution. Plastics are melted to form a sticky coating over bitumen, but don’t actually break down. Thus, weathering of the road over time can degrade plastic into micro-particles that enter the ecosystem.Activists in India have also raised concerns about the possibility that such roads could introduce hazardous chemicals into the environment, since the tar is processed at a maximum temperature of 160 degrees Celsius — hot enough to melt plastic but not enough to ensure various toxins are degraded. Thus, when exposed to light, heat and water, the plastic in such roads has the potential to leach chemicals into the surrounding ecosystem in the same way that any plastic waste does.Officials from the ministry of public works review the specifications for plastic-tar roads. Photo courtesy of the Ministry of Public Works and Housing.Sutasurya of YPBB, who is also a member of Alliance for Zero Waste Indonesia (AZWI) said that while there is not yet firm evidence that plastic roads leach hazardous materials, that does not necessarily mean they are safe. It simply means that research has not yet been done on the subject. “In accordance with the principle of precaution, a technology that has not been adequately studied should not be applied widely, but used on a laboratory scale,” he said.Catur Yudha Hariani, activist with Bali’s Environmental Education Center for (PPLH) agreed that plastic tar must be approached carefully if the plan is to use it for big projects. She also warned that while plastic roads may prove to be a novel solution for disposing of used plastic, they won’t solve the problem of over-consumption.“The point is that if you want to reduce plastic, this must be done by changing mindsets and behavior patterns,” said Hariani, emphasizing the importance of raising awareness about waste as well as the need for policies that make plastic expensive and require companies accept back the plastic waste their products create.This story was reported by Mongabay’s Indonesia team and was first published on our Indonesian site on Aug. 2, 2017.Banner image courtesy of the Ministry of Public Works and Housing.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Conservation, Environment, Green, Infrastructure, Microplastics, Plastic, Pollution, Roads, Technology, Technology And Conservation center_img Article published by Isabel Estermanlast_img read more

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first_imgConservation, Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Law, Forestry, Forests, Governance, Industry, Logging, Plantations, Protected Areas, Pulp And Paper, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Threats To Rainforests, Timber, Tropical Forests The article above been adjusted to emphasize that RAPP has not yet agreed to retire any specific lands, just to revise its work plans in accordance with the new ministerial regulation (which, if carried out to completion, would necessitate the retirement of much of its plantation land). An APRIL spokesperson said in a message, “We haven’t ‘agreed’ to retire anything at this point….No solution has been finalised as yet because the work plan is being revised and resubmitted and then needs to be agreed by the Ministry. The legal aspect is also complex given the Supreme Court’s decision to revoke 17/2017, so this is a factor too.” He added, “the government is still working through the details of land swaps with all companies, including the largest, involving several hundred thousand hectares of new plantation area to be created.”A previous version of this article mistakenly referred to RAPP as Indonesia’s second-largest paper company. That title belongs to its parent company, APRIL.A confusing reference to the cause of the annual peat fires has been amended. Article published by Hans Nicholas Jong Banner image: Deforested peatland and peat forest at sunset in Riau, Indonesia. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.center_img A subsidiary of paper giant APRIL has agreed in principle to retire a large part of its plantations in eastern Sumatra for conservation purposes, following government orders.The company initially refused to comply with what it saw as an illegal order, and warned of a 50 percent reduction in supply from its concessions.In giving up part of its concessions, RAPP is demanding to be compensated with new land — something the government has agreed to do in stages. JAKARTA — Under pressure from President Joko Widodo’s administration, Indonesia’s second-largest pulp and paper company has agreed in principle to retire plantation land in eastern Sumatra, in line with a new regulation meant to prevent wildfires.PT Riau Andalan Pulp and Paper (RAPP), a unit of the APRIL conglomerate, initially refused to follow the government’s orders, calling them illegal, but acquiesced after the Ministry of Environment and Forestry invalidated its work plans.The ministry justified its order based on a presidential regulation issued in the wake of the disastrous 2015 fires. Smoke from the conflagration blanketed Indonesia and neighboring countries in a choking haze, sickening half a million people, according to government figures. At the height of the disaster, the daily emissions of carbon dioxide as a result of the burning exceeded those from all U.S. economic activity.The burning of Indonesia’s vast peat swamp zones is an almost yearly occurrence, as companies drain the land and clear it for plantations, rendering it highly flammable.“We will try to perfect our work plans by continuing to consult [with the ministry] if there are things that are still unclear,” RAPP representative Irsan Syarief told reporters on Tuesday after a meeting with ministry officials in Jakarta.The 2016 regulation was President Jokowi’s signature piece of anti-haze legislation. It stipulated the conservation of at least 30 percent of all peat domes — landscapes where the peat is so deep that the center is topographically higher than the edges. It also required the conservation of areas where the peat is deeper than 3 meters (9.8 feet) and which contain high biodiversity.RAPP’s concessions overlap with one of Indonesia’s deepest peat landscapes, the Kampar Peninsula. In May, the ministry asked RAPP and other companies to revise their work plans so that areas zoned for conservation under the 2016 regulation would be taken out of contention for development and rewetted to prevent future fires.If RAPP has already planted a conservation zone with timber trees, it can see its crops through to the end of the harvest cycle, at which point it must restore the peatlands by blocking drainage canals, maintaining the water level and planting native vegetation. These areas will remain part of RAPP’s concessions.“Right now, it’s OK to harvest crops that already exist, even in protected areas,” Ida Bagus Putera Parthama, the ministry’s director-general for sustainable forest management, said after the meeting.On the other hand, burned areas will revert to state control, though RAPP is still responsible for restoring them, according to a 2017 ministerial guideline.Peat swamp in Riau, Indonesia. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.Before it assented to the ministry’s demands, RAPP insisted it should be allowed to operate in the rezoned areas until its licenses expired. The company based its argument on a 2014 regulation on peatland protection, which is amended by the president’s more recent decree.RAPP also warned that retiring a significant swath of its plantations would force it to lay off thousands of workers. The company has demanded that the government provide it with new lands to develop, in exchange for the concessions it is surrendering.“If there’s no land swap and we have to revise our working plans, then our main supply from our concessions and our business partners’ will be reduced by 50 percent,” APRIL said in a press statement.The ministry rejected RAPP’s request to provide compensation in kind, pending the company’s actions to set aside some of its concessions for conservation purposes.Bambang Hendroyono, the ministry’s secretary-general, said there was no way for the government to provide land substitution for RAPP beforehand if it was still unclear how much land would be converted into protected areas.But now that RAPP has agreed to revise its work plans, Hendroyono said the ministry would provide land substitution in stages every year, at a maximum of 150 square kilometers (58 square miles) per year.It remains unclear where the government will find new lands for RAPP to develop, but the ministry insists the country still has enough vacant land.According to the ministry, there are some concessions that have been left idle because of land rights conflicts with residents. The ministry said it would try to resolve these conflicts so that the land could be put to use.Aerial view of acacia harvesting on a plantation in Riau. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.While some local media reported that RAPP’s operational permit had been canceled, Forestry Minister Siti Nurbaya Bakar confirmed at her office on Monday that only its work plans had been invalidated.Both RAPP and the ministry said there had been misunderstanding and lack of communication between both sides throughout the whole process.As a result, RAPP temporarily ceased operation in its concessions beginning Oct. 18 because it thought that by invalidating its work plans, the ministry had banned the company from operating.After that, RAPP decided to furlough 4,600 workers, resulting in a massive protest by workers outside the Riau governor’s office on Monday.Hendroyono said RAPP misunderstood the situation because the ministry only ordered the company to revise its work plans and stop planting in protected areas, not to stop operating.Now that the ministry has clarified what it expects of RAPP, the company has resumed its operations and said it would try to submit its new work plans before the Oct. 30 deadline. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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first_imgArticle published by Basten Gokkon The number of fire hotspots in Indonesian Borneo and Sumatra has increased nearly sevenfold in a four-day period in early September.The surge has prompted calls from Malaysia, which has historically been affected by haze from fires in Indonesia, for its Southeast Asian neighbor to get the burning under control.The Indonesian government has refuted complaints that the recent increase in hotspots has resulted in transboundary haze.Indonesia faces what could be the worst fire season since 2015, fanned by an El Niño weather pattern. Hotspots signaling fires in Indonesian Borneo and Sumatra have increased nearly sevenfold over a four-day period in September, according to official reports.The national disaster management agency on Sept. 2 detected a combined 914 hotspots in the Sumatran provinces of Riau, Jambi and South Sumatra and the Bornean provinces of West, Central and South Kalimantan. On Sept. 6, it reported 6,312 hotspots in those same regions.Fires are typically used across Indonesia to clear land, often carbon-rich peat forests, to make way for oil palm or pulpwood plantations. The resultant haze can travel as far as neighboring Malaysia and Singapore. This year’s fires are expected to be particularly harsh, aggravated by an intense dry season and El Niño weather pattern, following milder conditions the past three years.As of the end of August, fires had burned through 42,740 hectares (105,600 acres) of land across the archipelago — double the amount of land burned at this same point last year, and spanning an area two-thirds the size of Singapore.In the wake of surge in fires and subsequent smoke, and amid fears of another episode of transboundary haze, the Malaysian government has called on Indonesia to take immediate actions to fight the disaster.Malaysia’s ministry of science, technology and innovation said it would “send a diplomatic note to Indonesia, so immediate action will be taken to put out the fires and prevent repeated burning,” Reuters reported on Sept. 6.Haze from West Kalimantan was detected crossing into the Malaysian Borneo on Sept. 5, according to Indonesia’s weather agency. In August, haze from fires in Sumatra were detected billowing across the Malacca Strait to Malaysia. Affected regions there included Kuala Lumpur, Selangor, Putrajaya, Negri Sembilan and Penang, according to the Malaysian Meteorological Department.Oil palm saplings sprout from recently burned peat forest near the Nyaru Menteng Orangutan Sanctuary in Central Kalimantan province in 2015. Image courtesy of Greenpeace.But the Indonesian government has refuted claims that the recent uptick in hotspots in Indonesia has resulted in transboundary haze. Environment and Forestry Minister Siti Nurbaya Bakar told local media that Malaysia’s latest complaint about the haze was incorrect and “without any substance,” and therefore “unacceptable.”She also said she had confirmed with the disaster mitigation agency and weather agency that no haze from fires in Indonesia had crossed to Malaysia in the past week. Siti called on the Malaysian government to deal with fires in its Bornean state of Sarawak instead.Indonesia has deployed more than 9,000 personnel from the military, police and disaster mitigation agency to fight the fires, and has declared a state of emergency in six provinces in Sumatra and Borneo.The haze from the 2015 fires stoked a diplomatic row between Indonesia and its neighbors, with Vice President Jusuf Kalla criticizing Singapore and Malaysia for complaining about the haze and asking them to be grateful instead for the clean air they enjoyed the rest of the year.But the burning also prompted a raft of policies from President Widodo aimed at preventing future fires, in particular the establishment of an agency to restore and conserve peat forests. The draining of these forests’ carbon-rich soil is one of the first steps to clearing the land for planting, but it also renders the peat layer highly combustible.The agency overseeing these efforts has focused on blocking drainage canals and rewetting peatlands. It has also drilled nearly 12,000 wells as of 2018 to provide easily accessible water for firefighting efforts.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Deforestation, Dry Forests, Fires, forest degradation, Forest Destruction, Forest Fires, Forests, Haze, Peatlands, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Southeast Asia Haze, Southeast Asian Haze center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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first_imgActivism, Climate, Climate Activism, Climate Change, Environmental Activism, Global Environmental Crisis, Governance, Government, United Nations World leaders gathered on Sept. 23 to address the climate crisis, but activists say they still aren’t doing enough.Although nearly 70 countries committed themselves to net-zero carbon emissions by 2050, aside from the European Union most were relatively small and largely incidental to the global economy.The urgency of the summit was underscored by leaked details of a U.N. report set to be released this week, which suggests sea ice is melting much faster than expected and that irreversible tipping points have already been reached. NEW YORK — Against the fitting backdrop of a hotter-than-average late September day in New York City, world leaders gathered at the United Nations yesterday to share what they were doing to tackle climate change. “We have had enough talk,” said U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres in his opening remarks. “This is not a negotiation summit, because we don’t negotiate with nature. This is a climate action summit.”But dozens of speeches and announcements later, there was little to suggest that the scale of change needed to avert catastrophe is on its way. Although nearly 70 countries committed themselves to net-zero carbon emissions by 2050, aside from the EU most were relatively small and largely incidental to the global economy.The urgency of the summit was underscored by leaked details of a U.N. report set to be released this week, which suggests sea ice is melting much faster than expected and that irreversible tipping points have already been reached.Inside the darkened, cavernous hall of the U.N. General Assembly, a procession of prime ministers, presidents, kings, and business titans touted their individual efforts while warning of imminent danger to the planet. As they spoke, images of coral reefs and forests were projected onto the walls above them to remind the audience of what they stand to lose.“Time is running out to respond to the climate crisis and its effect on the survival of species,” said Costa Rican President Carlos Quesada.The day featured some notable announcements that pointed toward measured progress. Chancellor Angela Merkel, fresh off the release of a climate plan for Germany that’s drawn criticism from environmental groups, said her government would double funding for global climate protection to 4 billion euros ($4.4 billion). A coalition of large investment and insurance firms committed to making their portfolios carbon-neutral by 2050. And Prime Minister Boris Johnson said the United Kingdom was set to earmark 11.6 billion pounds ($14.5 billion) in aid for developing countries to combat climate change between 2021 and 2025.Russia announced that after a lengthy holdout it would ratify the Paris Agreement, although researchers at Climate Action Tracker rated its emissions reduction target as “critically insufficient.”UN Climate Week-related rally. Photo courtesy Imelda Abano.But China, the world’s largest emitter of greenhouse gases, declined to make any new commitments. And notably absent from the speakers’ list was the United States, which announced in 2017 that it planned to withdraw from the Paris Agreement.Numerous leaders took veiled shots at the U.S. for its refusal to cooperate with the rest of the world on addressing climate change. French President Emmanuel Macron said it would be “deeply hypocritical” to negotiate trade deals with countries that are “running counter to the Paris Agreement.” And China’s special representative, Wang Yi, promised that the “withdrawal of certain parties would not shake the collective will of the international community.”But overall, the mostly subdued mood inside the hall stood in stark contrast to the fury and frustration of millions of protesters who poured onto streets across the world last week. Teenage activist Greta Thunberg channeled those demonstrations in the summit’s opening session, as she excoriated the assembled leaders in a fiery speech that quickly traversed social media.“People are suffering. People are dying. Entire ecosystems are collapsing,” she said. “We are in the beginning of a mass extinction, and all you can talk about is money and fairytales of eternal economic growth.”Thunberg’s outrage was shared by delegates on a panel of small island developing states, who could see their countries washed away by rising sea levels and increasingly destructive storms in the absence of robust action.“Make no mistake, there will be mass migration by climate refugees that will destabilize the countries of the world that are not on the front line of this climate crisis,” said Prime Minister Mia Mottley of Barbados.Representatives of the 47 Least Developed Countries (LDCs) called for more funds to be allocated to climate resilience and adaptation programs for the world’s poorest nations.“When we talk about LDCs, you’re basically talking about Africa,” said Akinwumi Adesina, president of the African Development Bank. The continent has been “shortchanged,” he added, pointing out that despite contributing only 4 percent of global emissions, it’s already suffering some of the worst effects of climate change.According to a press release handed out by LDC representatives, 69 percent of people killed by climate-related disasters over the past 50 years were from an LDC.The Climate Action Summit was a precursor to next year’s U.N. Climate Change Conference. Known as COP26, the conference is set to be held in Glasgow and will be the first major check-in on how well countries are living up to the promises they made in 2015’s Paris Agreement. Yesterday’s summit was a signal that the conference is likely to be contentious, with climate activists walking away frustrated by what they see as inadequate progress in addressing the threat.“We need far greater national leadership on climate action — and we need it now,” said Andrew Steer, president of the World Resources Institute.Secretary-General Guterres sounded a more hopeful note in his closing speech, thanking “young people from around the world for leading the charge and holding my generation accountable.”“We have been losing the race against the climate crisis,” he added. “But the world is waking up.”Banner image: Child protesters during Climate Week. Photo courtesy Imelda Abano.Ashoka Mukpo is a freelance journalist with expertise in international development policy, human rights, and environmental issues. His work has been featured in Al-Jazeera, Vice News, The Nation, The Guardian, and elsewhere. Follow him on Twitter at @unkyoka.This story is part of Covering Climate Now, a global collaboration of more than 300 outlets worldwide to strengthen coverage of the climate story.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Genevieve Belmakerlast_img read more

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first_imgAnimals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Forests, Green, Mammals, Rainforests, Wildlife The Okapi Wildlife Reserve in northeastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) will now be run under a new management partnership agreement between the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and the DRC government’s Nature Conservation Agency (ICCN).Through the new management partnership agreement, WCS and ICCN hope to restore stability in the reserve and surrounding forests, improve the welfare and operations of its rangers, and enhance the social well-being of its resident communities.The local communities are not part of the official agreement structure, but they will be consulted as management details become clearer, John Lukas of the Okapi Conservation Project said. The Okapi Wildlife Reserve in northeastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), created to protect the secretive okapi (Okapia johnstoni), will now be run under a new management partnership agreement between the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and the DRC government’s Nature Conservation Agency (ICCN), according to a press release by WCS.“ICCN does not have the funds or expertise to effectively manage their protected areas and are entering into Private Public Partnerships for most of their protected areas,” John Lukas, co-founder of the Okapi Conservation Project, managed by the nonprofit Wildlife Conservation Global, told Mongabay. “The co-management structure for the Okapi Wildlife Reserve should bring in much needed financial resources and greater efficiencies in operation and attract leadership with expertise in law enforcement.”The reserve, spread across some 13,700 square kilometers (5,290 square miles) of the Ituri rainforest, is home to not only the okapi, the closest living relative of the giraffe, but more than 100 mammal species, including large populations of forest elephants and chimpanzees, and nearly 400 species of recorded birds. The reserve is a UNESCO World Heritage Site as well, and inhabited by the Efe and Mbuti peoples.The Ituri River in the Okapi Wildlife Reserve. Image by Emma Stokes/WCS.But the reserve has also been hit by illegal hunting, logging and mining, and encroached upon by settlers and bands of armed rebel groups. In 2012, for example, a brutal attack by armed groups at the headquarters of the Okapi Wildlife Reserve killed six people and 14 captive okapis kept there as the species’ ambassadors to the local community. In the last 25 years, okapi numbers are thought to have declined by nearly 50 percent, earning the species a listing of endangered on the IUCN Red List.Through the new management partnership agreement, WCS and ICCN and their partners hope to restore the reserve to its “former world class status,” WCS said in its statement. They plan to bring greater stability to the reserve and surrounding forests, improve the welfare and operations of its rangers, and enhance the social well-being of resident communities.The Okapi Conservation Project (OCP) will continue to support WCS and ICCN, Lukas said, and the organization has entered into agreements with both ICCN and WCS to collaborate.“We will be responsible for conservation education, community relations and assistance, women’s groups, agroforestry, okapi management and camera trapping to foster interest in the wildlife of the OWR,” he said. “We have been supporting the rangers and their patrol efforts to date and will be transitioning that responsible to WCS as funds become available.”The local communities are not part of the official agreement structure, Lukas said, but they will be consulted as management details become clearer. “Our educators are based around the Reserve and interact with the communities regularly and will represent their concerns to the Reserve Management Unit,” he added.Threats to the reserve have multiplied over the recent years, but one of the immediate threats the management teams hope to tackle is illegal gold mining.“Mines draw in desperate people, depend on bush meat to feed the miners and are subject to extortion by rogue militias and the military,” Lukas said. “Secondly, clearing of forest by immigrants is an increasing threat along with logging in certain areas. Elephant poaching is declining but still a threat because the poachers are armed. Training of the rangers which is going on now is needed to properly deal with the threats.”The road ahead, however, is extremely challenging. The teams are currently dealing with an Ebola outbreak in Mambasa, 70 kilometers (44 miles) from Epulu, where the reserve’s headquarters is stationed. This has made it difficult for the staff to move around the region, Lukas said.Despite the challenges, conserving the Okapi Wildlife Reserve is crucial, conservationists say.“The OWR still contains a remarkable level of biological diversity which supports a viable population of okapi. Protecting the forest and rallying communities to value okapi is the goal of our brave staff which is supported by our donors from around the world,” Lukas said. “We are celebrating World Okapi Day on Oct. 18th in 5 villages around the Reserve and hope to reach about 20,000 people living in and around the Reserve with a conservation message to protect okapi ‘the Pride of DRC.’”Okapi. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.Banner image of a wild okapi caught on a camera trap in the Okapi Wildlife Reserve by the Okapi Conservation Project. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Shreya Dasguptalast_img read more

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first_imgFifteen years ago, Martha Valencia relied on the nearby river for water and for food. But then oil palm crops arrived in the area and polluted the river, say Martha and her neighbors. The community took the oil palm grower to court, which ultimately resulted in a ruling in their favor.“It is determined that there had been serious environmental effects in the territory of the communities … which should have been prevented by the Ecuadorian government,” the ruling read, and a judge ordered compensation for those affected.That was two years ago. And Martha and her neighbors say they are still waiting for things to change.No clean waterThe river and the community, both named La Chiquita, are located within the municipality of San Lorenzo in the Esmeraldas province of Ecuador. Logging and oil palm plantations, in addition to its proximity to the Colombian border where drug trafficking and armed conflict is rife, contribute to the area’s dubious honor of having the highest levels of poverty and violence in the country.Every eight to 15 days, the municipality sends a water truck to La Chiquita. The tank fills a 1,500-liter blue plastic tank “but not even that water is clean. We were told by the Municipality to put chlorine before drinking it,” says Olga, another community member.Residents of La Chiquita say they don’t have adequate access to safe drinking water. Photo by David Silva.When a new truck does not arrive in town before their tank runs dry, residents say they can buy 20-liter water canisters in San Lorenzo, which last three or four days. However, this option often proves too expensive for community members who must subsist off meager profits from small farms. They say that in that case, they are forced to walk great distances to other rivers.There’s little in the way of alternatives for people living in the area. According to the National Statistical System and the National Statistics and Census Institute (INEC), 16% of San Lorenzo residents are illiterate, which is more than double the national rate of 6.8%.  Almost half of its population is engaged in agriculture and fishing due to a lack of industrial development in the area.Two years have passed since the Jan. 2017 ruling of Esmeraldas’ Provincial Court of Justice, and those affected in La Chiquita are still waiting for the judge to order the provision of drinking water, among other compensations. The ruling also requires the construction of a health center and a school.La Chiquita lies in the the Chocó-Darién, an ecosystem that extends from Panama to northwest Ecuador and is known for its unique forests and vast biological wealth – both of which are disappearing at a fast clip due to agribusiness and other human pressures.Oil palm companies are required to have a buffer zone between planted fields and water sources. They must remove any crops that are located less than ten meters (33 feet) from community water sources and replace them with endemic species such as guadua bamboo. According to former environment ministers, a fine is applied “for obvious negligence in the performance of their duties.”“It is a historic ruling, although it has objections and inaccuracies that must be corrected in its execution,” says Manolo Morales, a lawyer and representative of the Corporation of Management and Environmental Law (Ecolex) that sponsored the lawsuit.Oil palm cultivation is one of the primary drivers of deforestation in the province of Esmeraldas. Photo by Eduardo Rebolledo.The ruling also calls for the Ministry of Environment, together with affected communities, to reforest 500 hectares of degraded land with native species. However, La Chiquita resident Isaha Ezequiel says this is absurd. “Companies are the ones that have polluted and killed the forest but they want us to reforest,” he told Mongabay.Violence is common in the region. The murder rate in San Lorenzo in 2018 was 96 per 100,000 inhabitants – almost ten times the national rate. The area gained further notoriety that year when a reporting team from the El Comercio newspaper was kidnapped and then killed by FARC dissident groups. The incident occurred in Mataje, a border town near Guadalito, Colombia.Although four companies were referenced during the trial, two were included in the ruling: Palmera de los Andes and Palmar de los Esteros (Palesema). Only Palmera de los Andes agreed to comment for this story.Never-ending battleOil palm plantations in Ecuador cover about 250,000 hectares (617,763 acres) and are distributed among several provinces. Due to its suitable growing conditions, Esmeraldas has the lion’s share.Palm oil companies arrived in San Lorenzo in the late 1990s and early 2000s, settling in an area of ​​around 30,000 hectares (74,131 acres) that was later expanded to 50,000 (123,552 acres). The inhabitants of La Chiquita, who are mostly the descendants of enslaved people of African ancestry, say local children began to develop stomach diseases and that they noticed oil and pesticide residue in a river that was their primary water source.When La Chiquita residents went into the forest to investigate the cause of this pollution, they discovered that one of the oil palm growers had installed a palm oil mill less than three kilometers upriver that was dumping liquid waste into the water. The same thing was reported by members of the Awá Guadalito indigenous community, who also joined the demand for change and reparations.Aerial view of a young oil palm plantation in Esmeraldas. Photo: Eduardo RebolledoHowever, a representative of Palmera de los Andes contends claims of pollution.“We have 11 processing pools with strict environmental controls,” said Fabián Miño, a lawyer and director of the company’s legal department. “It is false that we are the cause of any contamination.” He explained that, after the palm oil refinement process, wastewater is treated in each pool until it is decontaminated. “To confirm that the liquid comes out clean from our building, in the last two pools we have fish and seaweed,” he said.Miño says communities have been manipulated by NGOs with ulterior motives. He claims Ecolex is an environmental organization that receives funds from abroad, and that the organization attacks oil palm growers to justify its activities and budget regardless of the employment and development opportunities plantations create.Manolo Morales, of Ecolex, says Miño’s accusations are absurd. He says the organization has worked in the area since 1998 helping local communities gain legal rights to their ancestral territories. He claims that in the intervening years the government promoted and encouraged the cultivation of oil palm and that many inhabitants were persuaded to sell their territories to agroindustry companies. He said he made the decision to advise La Chiquita and Guadalito when he learned of the problems they face.In 2005, a water quality study by the Al Tropic environmental foundation detected the presence of endosulfan and terbufos in the tributaries that provide water for these two communities. Commonly used as pesticides, these compounds can cause severe illness and death in humans, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency classifies both as Category 1 toxins – a designation reserved for the most dangerous substances. This information was included in a report from the Ministry of Environment (MAE) in 2009 and served as the basis for initiating the trial. However, subsequent water studies were not decisive enough to directly hold oil palm companies accountable. Therefore, the judge only partially accepted the claim, ordering the government to fulfill some of the requested reparations to affected communities.Ecolex reported that oil palm grower companies were alerted by government authorities before officials went to take water samples looking for the presence of toxins. Meanwhile, Fabián Miño, from Palmera de los Andes, claims that the organization was trying to obtain samples of stagnant water.“They went out of their way to find pollution,” Miño said. “We have all the environmental certifications, national and international.”Satellite image of oil palm plantations in San Lorenzo. Image courtesy of Rodrigo Sierra.Isaha Ezequiel and his neighbors say two years have passed and they have seen no progress towards court-mandated reparations. According to Nathalia Bonilla, an environmental engineer and coordinator with the NGO Ecological Action in Ecuador, this is because the judge did not report the verdict to the ministries responsible for carrying them out.Because there is a mountain between the towns of Guadalito and La Chiquita, the judge ordered the building of a school in each. However, Bonilla says the Ministry of Education was also not made aware of this ruling.Palmera de los Andes reports that it has already begun fulfilling the reparations required by the ruling. However, company representatives say it is doing so because such activities are within its environmental responsibilities and protocols, not because it considers the ruling to be right.“We are reforesting as required by the ruling,” says lawyer Fabián Miño. He adds that the company has a 1200-hectare (2,965-acre) forest reserve, which was not requested in the reparations, and that the company has an environmental license and provides upwards of 700 jobs to local residents. “They should applaud us and not judge us,” he said.A refuge for many speciesDeforestation in northern Esmeraldas began well before oil palm moved in. In the 1960s, the government implemented its Northwest Forestry Development project that established 14 forest concessions. According to project data, more than 400,000 hectares (988,421 acres) of dense forest was cleared between 1966 and 1975. Five more concessions were subsequently created.“This is how the primary forests of Esmeraldas were cut down,” says Walter Palacios, a forest engineer and associate researcher at the National Institute of Biodiversity (Inabio). He explains that the primary forests of northwestern Ecuador are home to around 4,000 species of plants, and says many may have disappeared due to habitat loss without biologists ever knowing them.Oil palm plantations in San Lorenzo, Ecuador. Photo by Eduardo Rebolledo.The region’s protected areas preserve what has been lost to agriculture elsewhere: reserves, rich in orchids and giant ferns, extend to the paramos of the Ecuadorian highlands, providing vital habitat for a multitude of species including jaguars and ocelots. A microcosm of the biodiversity of the Chocó-Darién can be seen in just one of its massive trees. A Sande tree, for example, can be covered by as many as 60 species of ferns, orchids and other plants, its fruit important food for birds and insects.According to Walter Palacios, when the palm plantations first appeared in the area, the secondary forests that had regenerated after the mass clearing of the 1960s were cleared once again.“A secondary forest no longer has the same species density, it has less wildlife,” Palacios said. “However, it is better to preserve them than to turn them into monocultures.”Of the region’s remaining primary forest, Palacios says he hopes that the government spares these areas from the expansion of the agricultural frontier.Oil palm crops near the town of San Lorenzo. Photo by Eduardo Rebolledo.Residents say conversion of forest to plantations has affected their lives.“I used to make with my mother wicker baskets out of Piquigua – an endemic plant,” Martha Valencia said. “We used the baskets to transport fish, or the meat of guanta, deer and other animals that we hunted. The forest and the river gave us everything, now we have to go to San Lorenzo to buy the food that was taken from us.”Residents like Valencia say they know everything they had before will not return in their lifetimes, but that they should still be able to expect clean water. “That is why we need the reparations promised by the ruling,” says Wilberto Valencia, another community member.The current Minister of Environment in Ecuador is Raúl Ledesma, who assumed the position four months ago. In an appearance before the National Assembly, together with the affected community members, Ledesma offered to further investigate the situation in La Chiquita to verify the damage that Wilberto Valencia and others say is affecting their ability to live. At that same meeting, Ledesma said he was aware that Energy Palma is breaking environmental standards.Inhabitants of La Chiquita are fighting against the pollution of their water sources. Photo by David Silva.What does the future hold?Large-scale plantations aren’t the only places where oil palm is grown in Ecuador, and advocates of the crop say stricter regulations on its cultivation could hurt small farmers.“If there are infractions, justice must act,” says Wilfredo Acosta, executive director of the National Association of Palm Oil Growers (Ancupa). “But 89% are small producers and for us, it is an agricultural activity, like any other, that encourages the development of the country.”In recent years oil palm crops have been beset with “bud rot.” As of October 2019, the fungal disease had wiped out 15,000 hectares (37,065 acres) of plantations, according to Acosta. His proposed solution: support farmers with credits and provide, through the Ministry of Agriculture, new seeds that are resistant to this disease.Assemblyman Lenin Plaza, a native of Esmeraldas and president of the Committee on Food Sovereignty, together with Ancupa, is promoting a bill in the National Assembly, which has already passed the first debate. One of its objectives is to double palm oil yields for biofuel production, but Plaza says that does not necessarily mean expanding the agricultural frontier with new plantations. “This will depend on the country’s demand,” Plasa said. “The important thing now is to help the producers.”Assemblyman Lenin Plaza has proposed a law to increase palm oil production. He says it is necessary to help small producers. Photo by Cecilia Puebla.Acosta says oil palm expansion could take advantage of underutilized land once used for agriculture but which has since been abandoned.“It’s not necessary to expand, it’s about optimizing crops,” Acosta said. “With that, we take the pressure off the forests.”However, even if the majority of producers may be small, environmental organizations say large companies control around 80% of land used for oil palm cultivation.“The big companies are the ones that benefit,” said Nathalia Bonilla of Ecological Action. “What they say about small producers is just a story. [Oil] palm is an activity that uses chemicals that seep into the earth [and] needs large areas, and working conditions are precarious.” Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davis This story was first reported by Mongabay’s Latam team and published here on our Latam site on October 7, 2019.Banner image: Residents of La Chiquita say their river is polluted. Phot by: David Silva. Agriculture, Animals, Deforestation, Environment, Forests, Green, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Industrial Agriculture, Oil Palm, Old Growth Forests, Palm Oil, Plantations, Primary Forests, Protected Areas, Rainforests, Tropical Forests, Wildlife center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Residents of the communities of La Chiquita and Awá Guadalito say their drinking water has been contaminated by pollution from oil palm plantations.A court ruling ordered two oil palm companies and the state to pay reparations for social and environmental impacts caused by the oil palm cultivation.However, in the two years since the ruling was issued, two communities in San Lorenzo say they have yet to see any changes. This story is a journalistic collaboration between Revista Vistazo and Mongabay Latam.last_img read more

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first_imgJames Allen was on Friday remanded to prison when he appeared before a city magistrate to answer to a robbery under arms charge.Allen denied that on March 14, 2019, while in the vicinity of Waterloo Street, Georgetown, and while being armed with a knife, he robbed Timothy Broach of his cellphone and a gold chain valued $33,000.The court heard that the matter was reported to the police by the victim and as they were attempting to arrest Allen, he allegedly used the same weapon to inflict wounds on an officer.As a result, he was shot once to his left foot by the officer.In court on Friday, the prosecution opposed bail on the grounds of the serious nature of the offence and the fact that a dangerous weapon was used during the ordeal.Further, the prosecutor cited the fact that the 25-year-old man was also charged and convicted in 2018 for a matter of similar nature.The court was also informed that on the day of the alleged robbery, a search was carried out on the person of the defendant and the virtual complainant’s cellphone was found in his pocket.In Allen’s defence, he told Magistrate Leron Daly that on the day in question, he was only carrying his key ring when he was shot by the police.“The only thing I had pun me was me key ring and it contain a flick knife and de police shoot me in me foot boy,” Allen stated. The case will continue on April 12, 2019.last_img read more

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first_img“I knew I had it going early on,” said Braxton. “Usually I come in to play tough defense, but tonight I was an offensive player.” Antelope Valley hung close through the first 10 minutes of the game. The Marauders trailed 21-17 midway through the first half following two scores on consecutive possessions by Juliet Masei. Masei had a team-high 18 points. The Mounties followed Masei’s score with a 25-4 run from which Antelope Valley would not recover. Leading 29-17, sopohomore Sam Cardeno stole the ball near midcourt and hit a 3-pointer. Tay Hester added another 3-pointer on the next possession. After a hook shot by Antelope Valley’s Tracey Wittebolle ended a 14-point run, Braxton found herself open behing the arc on four consecutive possessions. She hit three of the four shots to open a 46-21 lead. “When she’s got the hot hand and they aren’t getting in her face, she’s unstoppable,” said Mt. SAC coach Laura Beeman. The top-ranked Mt. SAC women’s basketball team proved there’s no defense for hot shooting, hitting 11 of 21 3-pointers en route to an 89-54 victory over eighth-seeded Antelope Valley on Saturday. Freshman Tanisa Braxton scored a game-high 20 points coming off the bench for the Mounties. She made 5 of 7 3-point attempts. center_img Fullerton 77, SBVC 69 The San Bernardino Valley College women’s basketball team had already gone farther than it ever had before. But the Wolverines fell short of their much larger goal. Fullerton denied SBVC its first-ever trip to the State Tournament, with a 77-69 victory on Saturday at the Hornet’s Nest in a Southern California Regional game. Fullerton (27-8), seeded No. 5 in the South, advances to Fresno for the state quarterfinals for the first time since 1998. The 13th-seeded Wolverines, who recorded the first playoff win in the program’s history last week in an upset of Orange Coast, finished 20-10. “The game was very physical, and in the first half I think the officials got caught up with the fans,” SBVC second-year coach Sue Crebbin said. “They have a homecourt advantage. I think they (officials) settled down in the second half.” MEN Saddleback 72, SBVC 68 The San Bernardino Valley College men’s basketball team endured difficult times this season, and Saturday night’s 72-68 loss to Saddleback in the Southern California junior college playoffs was another example of how the team shared strength through the hardships. Saddleback (25-7) overcame Valley’s pressure defense to advance to the eight-team state tournament that begins Thursday in Fresno. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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first_img 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! FRESNO – Less than a mile from spinach fields growing in a valley along California’s coastal mountain range, investigators isolated a deadly strain of E. coli that is responsible for last year’s outbreak that killed three people and sickened more than 200, state and federal officials said Friday. Though investigators still couldn’t say how the spinach became contaminated as they concluded their analysis, for the first time they announced bacterial samples from the outbreak strain were found in river water and animal feces on Paicines Ranch, a small grass-fed cattle operation that leased land to spinach grower Mission Organics. The report released Friday by the California Department of Health Services and U.S. Food and Drug Administration tracked the deadly strain from its victims to the San Benito County spinach fields where the bacteria likely originated. Officials did not recommend widespread mandatory guidelines to prevent future outbreaks, angering victims and their families.last_img read more

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