first_imgArticle published by Glenn Scherer Carbon Dioxide, Carbon Emissions, Climate Activism, Climate Change, Climate Change Denial, Climate Change Negotiations, Climate Change Policy, Climate Change Politics, Coal, electricity, Energy, Energy Politics, Environment, Global Environmental Crisis, Global Warming, Global Warming Mitigation, Green, Green Energy, Renewable Energy As COP23 comes to a close in Bonn, 19 nations including Canada and the United Kingdom agreed to stop using coal to generate power by 2030.Major coal producing and using nations, including Australia, India, Germany and the United States, did not join in the new Global Alliance to Power Past Coal.Participants in COP23 find it to have largely been a disappointment, with developed nations failing to promise to ramp up their Paris carbon emission reduction targets – vital if the world is to stop a catastrophic rise in temperatures above 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit).Likewise, efforts to find clear pathways by which developed nations will raise the tens of billions needed for vulnerable developing nations to deal with climate change were blocked – primarily by the United States. Now, policymakers are putting their hopes on COP24 in Katowice, Poland, in December 2018. A full-house greeted the Powering Past Coal event, a positive highlight of COP23. Photo by Justin CatanosoBONN, Germany – This United Nations climate summit, short on big news or significant steps forward to curb climate change, achieved something to cheer about Thursday, 16 November, when nineteen nations – led by Canada and the United Kingdom – announced plans to phase out coal burning by 2030.“To keep our Paris Agreement goal of staying well below 2 degrees Celsius [3.6 degrees Fahrenheit] by 2100 we need to phase our coal,” said Catherine McKenna, Canada’s minister of the environment and climate change. “There is also an immediate urgency. Coal is literally choking our cities and our people.”Claire Perry, the United Kingdom’s minister of state for climate change and industry, added “In the UK, a country that iconically started our industrial revolution on the back using the coal under our island, has now in a very short number of years reduced our reliance on coal almost entirely. In July 2012, we still had 40 percent of coal in our [energy] generation profile. In July of this year, it was down to 2 percent. And in April of this year, we had our first full day of energy without coal since 1882.”McKenna and Perry, talking side-by-side to a standing-room-only COP23 press conference, pulled together what they called the Global Alliance to Power Past Coal in just the last couple weeks. Other key members include France, Finland, Italy, Mexico, Austria, Switzerland, Belgium and Costa Rica – many of whom were already well on the way to phasing out coal for power generation.Collectively, those nineteen nations – McKenna and Perry are recruiting more – account for only about 3 percent of coal use worldwide. But there was still an air of triumph in the announcement, as ministers of alliance nations proclaimed the age of coal being at an end.Catherine McKenna, Canada’s minister of the environment, speaks during the one-hour Powering Past Coal Alliance presentation at COP23.“Solar power is more than 80 percent cheaper than it was in 2009, and wind is more than 60 percent cheaper,” McKenna said. “Clean power is outcompeting fossil fuels in a growing number of jurisdictions. And that is a game changer for the world. The market has moved; the world has moved. Coal is not coming back.”Of course, it’s not exactly going away yet, either.Coal isn’t king, but hangs onSome 40 percent of the world’s energy generation still comes from coal, and generates massive amounts of greenhouse gases annually. Developing nations, particularly Asian countries such as India, Vietnam and Bangladesh, have plans for new coal-fired power plants, and coal-producing nations like Australia and the United States are committed to providing it. While China has peaked its coal demand early, it still emits one-third of all global carbon emissions, largely as a result of burning coal.Noticeably missing from the alliance is Germany, which had pledged in the Paris Agreement to phase out coal by 2030. Prime Minister Angela Merkel told UN delegates on Wednesday, 15 November, that her country would likely not meet its Paris carbon emissions reduction goal of 40 percent by 2030 and is struggling with a broader transition to renewable power.As if to illustrate Germany’s plight, this reporter traveled past a huge coal-fired power plant in the center of Bonn on the way to the climate talks, and ironically, enormous barges ferrying coal could be seen daily passing the UN negotiating site on the Rhine River.Ohio coal train. Some 40 percent of the world’s energy generation still comes from coal. Photo by Decumanus licensed under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2The United States also is not in the alliance. That’s no surprise given the Trump administration’s determination to revive the domestic coal industry. However, Washington state and Oregon are in the alliance, and hundreds of outdated U.S. coal-fired plants have already been shut down, with dozens more regularly decommissioned each year. Coal has tanked as part of the U.S. energy mix, plummeting from one half to one third of its energy profile in just the past 10 years.Michael Liebreich, founder of Bloomberg New Energy Finance who moderated the COP press conference, explained that renewables will scale up faster once more polluting forms of energy generation decline. Nearly all coal-fired plants must come offline by 2050 if the Paris goal is to be met, experts believe.“If you’re following the energy markets, what you’ve been doing up to now is promoting clean energy and adding incentives to build more clean energy,” Liebreich said. “The problem is, that is creating excess [energy] capacity and pushing down the wholesale price. There hasn’t been the same focus on removing the dirty. You just can’t promote the clean. Particularly in the developed world. You have to demote the dirty. Otherwise you ruin your wholesale market.”One thing that’s been stressed repeatedly at COP23 is that a shift to renewables is not only good for a nation’s air quality and climate mitigation, but for its economy, too. This so-called decoupling – shifting to renewables is not a job killer – has taken hold over the past five years.“Since 1990, Britain has cut its [carbon] emissions by 42 percent,” Perry said. “And our economy has grown by 67 percent. I believe that is the best performance in the G-7. It’s a win-win situation. We have more than 430,000 jobs in, or connected to, renewables; that’s more than our aerospace industry.”While large, developed countries tend to grab the most attention at climate summits, the fate of small, vulnerable nations hangs in the balance as decisions are made. Fiji, which hosted COP23, is in the Powering Past Coal Alliance, as is the Marshall Islands. Both nations are threatened by global warming-induced sea-level rise.Press assembled to cover the conference. COP23 offered little in the way of major climate policy breakthroughs. Now hopes have been deferred to COP24 in Poland in 2018. Photo by Justin Catanoso“As a small island nation, I cannot stress how important this initiative is,” said David Paul, the Marshall Islands’ minister of the environment. “Coal is by far the single-largest barrier to staying within the 1.5 degree [Celsius] temperature rise, and thus giving vulnerable nations like mine the best chance of a viable future.”He added: “The difference between 2 degrees [Celsius] rise and 1.5 degrees is the difference between the Arctic we know now or an ice-free Arctic in the summer. It is the difference between several meters of sea-level rise.”The COP mantra: wait til next yearThe coal phase-out announcement allows COP23 to end on something of a high note. However, the big hope for the summit, that the developed nations would pledge to ramp up their Paris carbon-reduction targets, did not materialize. Likewise, attempts to find clear pathways by which developed nations will raise the tens of billions needed for vulnerable developing nations to deal with climate change were blocked – primarily by the United States – until next year.Despite the presence of the U.S. subnational delegation, led by California Gov. Jerry Brown and former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, this COP seemed to lack the sense of urgency many delegates had hoped for as climate change in 2017 escalated in its impacts, with more drought, sea-level rise, catastrophic storms, and millions of climate refugees in Africa and the Middle East.“It’s been a stepping stone COP; next year is the step up year,” said David Waskow, World Resources Institute’s international climate action initiative director. “It put in place the pieces that are needed so next year can consolidate the Paris Agreement with the new rulebook and really be a springboard for increasing action and strengthening action by 2020.”Claire Perry (left), the UK’s minister of state for climate change and industry, and Catherine McKenna, Canada’s minister of the environment and climate change, address the press following their announcement regarding the 19-nation Powering Past Coal Alliance. Photo by Justin CatanosoWaskow added: “I am confident that will happen. And I think this COP has been important in emphasizing the importance of pre-2020 action. We can’t wait to take action. I think this COP has been helpful in focusing minds on the urgency and action that needs to take place.”Thus, COP23 is ending as most UN climate summits do, with the notable exception of Paris in 2015. Decision makers will wait another year – for COP24 in Katowice, Poland ­– to possibly take much needed, course-changing action. Meanwhile, global temperatures for 2017 are expected to surge into the top three ever recorded (in a La Niña year when temperatures should go lower), even as global carbon emissions set new records.Justin Catanoso is a regular contributor to Mongabay and a professor of journalism at Wake Forest University in North Carolina, USA. Follow him on twitter @jcatanosoFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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first_imgArticle published by malavikavyawahare Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Environment, Green, Plants center_img An opinion piece in the journal Trends in Plant Science emphatically argues that plants are not conscious.The article questions the soundness of widely covered studies that mimosa plants (Mimosa pudica) and peas (Pisum sativum) display learning behaviors that amount to having a consciousness.Plants do not have a brain or anything resembling it, the authors point out, and to possess consciousness a structurally complex brain is required.Monica Gagliano, who has reported learning behaviors in plants, rejects this view saying that the criteria used to determine animal consciousness cannot be uncritically extrapolated to plants, and that the opinion piece fails to cite sound evidence. While the world wonders whether sentient robots are in the offing, scientists continue to grapple with an ancient mystery: Are plants conscious?A new opinion piece in the journal Trends in Plant Science seeks to nip this debate in the bud. “We are arguing that the likelihood of consciousness in plants is effectively nil,” Lincoln Taiz, a co-author and professor emeritus of molecular, cell and developmental biology at the University of California, Santa Cruz, told Mongabay in an email.It’s the latest salvo in a heated debate sparked by the publication of studies widely covered in the media that suggest that plants exhibit learning behavior. Monica Gagliano, an evolutionary ecologist at the University of Western Australia, is a leading proponent of the idea that plant might possess consciousness, based on her experiments with mimosa (Mimosa pudica) and pea plants (Pisum sativum), which have generated tremendous interest and controversy.In 2014, her team published findings that mimosa plants “learn” not to fold their leaves in response to being dropped multiple times and not suffering any harm. In 2016, she and her colleagues published a paper in Nature’s Scientific Reports on “learning by association in plants,” based on experiments with peas that reportedly displayed “learned” behaviors.Gagliano rejected Taiz’s position in an emailed response, noting that “crucially in science, opinions are cheap, but can be valuable (and perhaps correct) if they are well-informed, balanced and based on the best available experimental research. The piece fails in just about all these criteria.”Taiz cites Gagliano’s work in the piece only to caution that the latter’s conclusions were hastily drawn. What we see in plants is actually an adaptive response, Taiz and his colleagues argue, adding that the studies were not rigorous enough and needed to be replicated.The argument against intelligent plant life rests primarily on two legs: given that even animal brains need a level of structural complexity to support consciousness, what chance do brainless plants have? They even lack neurons, opponents point out. Second, that the behaviors observed in flora can be explained by other things, not consciousness.The opinion piece draws heavily on the work of evolutionary biologist Jon M. Mallatt and neuroscientist Todd E. Feinberg, who studied the evolution of consciousness in animals and found that only vertebrates (including fish), arthropods (like insects and crabs), and cephalopods (like octopuses and squids), possess the hardware for consciousness.Gagliano said she believes their work has been unjustifiably extrapolated to plants.“It selectively piggybacks on one hypothesis — proposed by Feinberg and Mallat on the evolution of consciousness (in animals) — and appropriates it as the premise to affirm a pre-conceived and ontologically reductionist idea regarding (plant) consciousness,” she said.But Mallat and Feinberg themselves disagree.“We fully agree with their point that consciousness needs complex cellular networks for fast information-processing, which effectively means it requires neurons and brains, which plants lack,” they told Mongabay in a joint comment. They have expounded on their ideas in two books: The Ancient Origins of Consciousness (2016) and Consciousness Demystified (2018).They also appear to agree with Taiz that actions such as moving toward a food source or avoiding harm are adaptive behaviors. Highly complex reflexive actions do not qualify as proof of consciousness. For the two authors, possessing a consciousness means “neural complexity, using many elaborate senses to build mapped representations (‘mental images’) of the world in which one’s behavior occurs, learning complex new actions from experience, or self-delivery of analgesics to avoid pain.”Taiz and colleagues also contend that plants do not need consciousness because it bestows no evolutionary advantage. “They are perfectly able to carry out their physiological functions by means of genetic and epigenetic adaptations, without any need to invoke consciousness,” they write. In their view, having a brain or brain-like mechanisms would be costly for plants, depleting their energy unnecessarily with no real benefits.The debate about consciousness in plants has implications for humans, one of which is whether plant neurobiology is a valid science. Can you belong to a discipline that studies plant consciousness if its very existence is in question? The Society for Plant Neurobiology was founded in 2005, and a year later a 2006 article heralded the birth of “plant neurobiology” as a new field of plant biology. In 2009, in the face of criticism, the organization changed its name to the Society of Plant Signaling and Behavior.The debate is not merely a question of semantics. It reveals deeper fractures in the biological sciences about fundamental questions, such as: What is a brain? And what does it mean to have a consciousness. This is how Gagliano frames the question. “When we, as scientists, accept a particular idea without questions — for example, the idea that consciousness is a process that exclusively arises through the structure and dynamics of the brain — we are prone to bias of reasoning and at risk of resting our thinking on erroneous assumptions,” she said.Citations:Taiz, L., Alkon, D., Draguhn, A., Murphy, A., Blatt, M., Hawes, C., … Robinson, D. G. (2019). Plants neither possess nor require consciousness. Trends in Plant Science. doi:10.1016/j.tplants.2019.05.008Gagliano, M., Vyazovskiy, V. V., Borbély, A. A., Grimonprez, M., & Depczynski, M. (2016). Learning by association in plants. Scientific Reports,6(1). doi:10.1038/srep38427Gagliano, M., Renton, M., Depczynski, M., & Mancuso, S. (2014). Experience teaches plants to learn faster and forget slower in environments where it matters. Oecologia,175(1), 63-72. doi:10.1007/s00442-013-2873-7Banner Image: Leaves of a rainforest shrub illuminated in a ray of sunlight. Image by Rhett A. ButlerMalavika Vyawahare is a staff writer for Mongabay. Find her on Twitter: @MalavikaVyFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

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first_imgAnimals, Birds, Cities, Conservation, Diseases, Environment, Green, Infectious Wildlife Disease, Pollution, Urbanization, Wildlife, Zoonotic Diseases House sparrows exposed to light at night had higher levels of West Nile virus in their blood for two days longer than sparrows that were exposed to darkness, according to a new study.The research sought to mimic the effects of light pollution common to urban environments on virus levels in a known reservoir of West Nile virus, which can cause a flu-like fever in humans.The team’s research suggests that an outbreak could be 41 percent more likely to happen as a result of the persistence of the virus in this host. Light pollution could lead to more infections with West Nile virus by increasing the amount of time that small songbirds hold on to the virus, according to a new study.“The findings may be the first indication that light pollution can affect the spread of zoonotic diseases,” Meredith Kernbach, a doctoral student in global health at the University of South Florida and lead author of the study, said in a statement. Kernbach and her colleagues published their findings in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences on July 24.Scientists already know that exposure to artificial light can affect animal biology, including our own, interfering with immune system functioning, metabolism and behavior.City lights in the United States. Image courtesy of NASA’s Earth Observatory.“Many hosts and vectors use light cues to coordinate daily and seasonal rhythms,” Kernbach said. “[D]isruption of these rhythms by light exposure at night could affect immune responses, generating the effects we see here.”She and her colleagues wondered whether artificial light might influence the way the birds’ bodies react to the virus that causes West Nile fever. Symptoms, when they do appear, are typically similar to those of the flu in humans, and in rare cases can be fatal.Research has shown that songbirds like house sparrows (Passer domesticus) carry West Nile virus, along with other diseases. They’re also frequent visitors to towns and cities, where light pollution abounds and where there are dense human populations to which they can hand off the virus through successive bites by the same mosquito.One of the house sparrows used in the study. Image courtesy of the University of South Florida.To test their hypothesis, the team kept two groups of wild house sparrows under different lighting conditions. The control group experienced 12 hours of light and 12 hours of darkness each day for up to three weeks. The second group of birds was kept in an area with 12 hours of light as well, but then the researchers exposed them to 12 hours of dim light meant to mimic the nighttime street and building lights of an urban environment. In the midst of the light exposure experiments, Kernbach and her colleagues inoculated the birds with West Nile virus.Beginning two days after exposure to the virus, the team measured the amount of the virus in the blood of each bird. They all had comparable levels of the virus after four days, but six days in, the birds being exposed to the nighttime lights had significantly higher levels of West Nile virus in their blood than the control group.The researchers also created a statistical model demonstrating that the lingering viral load in light-pollution-exposed sparrows could increase the chances of an outbreak of West Nile fever by 41 percent.A mosquito (Culex pipiens pipiens) known to transmit West Nile virus. Image by Fabrizio Montarsi via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 3.0).Earlier research had shown that higher levels of the stress hormone corticosterone made another species of birds more enticing to hungry mosquitos, and the scientists did notice a slight bump in this compound in the birds exposed to the dim night lights. But that alone didn’t explain the persistence of West Nile virus in the animals’ blood samples, pointing to the need for more research. The stress that light induces could have other effects, for example, on the secretion of the hormone melatonin, that could affect bird behavior, the authors write.In the meantime, the team suggests that motion-sensitive lights might diminish exposure to light pollution and that lights could be turned off at night when the transmission of West Nile virus is particularly high.Banner image of a house sparrow courtesy of the University of South Florida. Citation:Kernbach, M. E., Newhouse, D. J., Miller, J. M., Hall, R. J., Gibbons, J., Oberstaller, J., … Martin, L. B. (2019). Light pollution increases West Nile virus competence of a ubiquitous passerine reservoir species. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 286(1907), 20191051. doi:10.1098/rspb.2019.1051FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by John Cannoncenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Controversial, Diseases, Environment, Governance, Government, Green, Ocean Crisis, Oceans, Oil, Oil Spills, Pollution, Regulations, Water Pollution Article published by Glenn Scherercenter_img Oil was first sighted on Brazil’s northeastern coast on August 30, with more than 4,000 tons washing up since. Authorities claim the oil didn’t come from Brazil, but rather had come from a tanker loaded with crude from Venezuela — a failed state.The trending theory is that the dumping was done by a “dark ship” with its location transponders intentionally turned off so as to dodge U.S. sanctions against the transport of Venezuelan oil. While “bilge dumping” could be the cause, analysts say the practice isn’t likely to have resulted in Brazil’s mass spill.The government initially identified one tanker as the likely perpetrator and then expanded to five possible culprits. But a new analysis of satellite data by Federal University of Alagoas researchers may have pinpointed the responsible tanker; those findings are to be presented to the Brazilian Senate on November 21.The Bolsonaro government has been faulted for its disaster response. It seemed unaware of Brazil’s 2013 National Contingency Plan for dealing with spills, and didn’t enact the plan until October 11. Also, the executive committee charged with implementing the plan was disbanded by the administration early in 2019. While the Brazilian government’s oil spill reaction was viewed by critics as lackluster, the response by local volunteers was exceptional as they worked to clean up contaminated beaches. Image by Clemente Coelho / State University of Pernambuco.On August 30th, what appeared to be crude oil began washing up on the beaches of Northeastern Brazil. Authorities didn’t know where it was coming from. Now, more than two months since the initial contamination, over 4,000 tons of oil have sullied the region’s beaches and mangrove swamps — devastating tourism and the environment.The crude’s origins still remain uncertain, with the Jair Bolsonaro government criticized for its slow response and for the secrecy that may be hampering the investigation. However, the disaster has shed light on the challenges of policing ocean dumping, and the phenomenon of “dark ships.”Dark ships are cargo vessels that turn off their location transponders so as to navigate without sending a signal indicating their position, allowing them to travel the world’s oceans undetected except by satellite — a violation of international maritime law.Satellite images analyzed by LAPIS, the Satellite Image Processing Laboratory at the Federal University of Alagoas now suggest that the oil tanker originally fingered by investigators is likely the wrong one. Moreover, it appears that the culprit was traveling with its location transponder turned off. That is, it was a “dark ship.”Further, LAPIS researchers have informed the Brazilian publication Exame that the tanker in question left an Asian nation on July 1, but that it’s next transponder signal only registered near the coast of Guyana on July 28. While the ship was crossing the Atlantic, it didn’t make any port stops and it made a “strange maneuver,” indicating a change in course, according to the report.Boots on the ground: volunteers fought the spill with shovels, scooping up oil and isolating it as best they could on plastic sheeting. Image by Clemente Coelho / State University of Pernambuco.Dark ships aren’t uncommon off the South American coast — or in other oceans, for that matter. Kpler, a data intelligence firm offering transparency solutions in commodity markets, provided Mongabay with a list of 14 ships that had turned off their transponders after leaving the Venezuelan port of San José between late May and mid-October. Thirteen of those ships were carrying a kind of crude oil known as Merey 16.In October, Brazilian authorities accused the Greek-flagged ship, Bouboulina, of the spill, later adding four more Greek ships to the list of suspects. Like the other “dark ships,” the Bouboulina was carrying Merey 16. Brazilian authorities have not said whether this is the kind of oil hitting the country’s beaches. Delta Tankers, the Boubolina’s owner, said it would cooperate with the investigation. However, the new information from LAPIS would seem to exonerate the Bouboulina. The details about the new suspect tanker will be shared with Brazil’s Senate this coming Thursday, November 21.“This is a safety issue as these AIS signals help vessels avoid collisions and other maritime accidents,” Emmanuel Belostrino, a crude oil market analyst with Kpler explained. “Ship captains will not normally stop broadcasting these signals, unless they are actively trying to hide their positions, like the case of vessels carrying Iranian and Venezuelan crude.”Oil-rich Venezuela has been grappling with the challenges brought by U.S. sanctions invoked by the Trump administration. “Prior to January of this year, there were some sanctions on dealing with PDVSA [Venezuela’s state oil company], but they weren’t general prohibitions,” explained Jonathan Epstein, a maritime trade attorney with the firm Holland & Knight. The target of the sanctions then, Epstein said, were tankers carrying Venezuelan oil to Cuba. Subsequently, the U.S. issued new guidance implying that foreign shipping firms could be subject to the sanctions if they carried Venezuelan oil, regardless of destination. This, Epstein said, “scared away most of the trade because there is a fear, and a legitimate fear, that [the firms] could be sanctioned or that a vessel could be sanctioned for carrying oil.”These sanctions complicate the monitoring of oil shipments off the coast of Brazil and could be intensifying illegal behavior in shipping lanes there. Reuters reported in October that Chinese firm COSCO Shipping Tanker (Dalian) had turned off transponders aboard roughly a third of the company’s fleet. This, after the US sanctioned the firm in September for allegedly transporting Iranian oil.Communities all along the contaminated sections of the Brazilian coast responded to the call to action. Image by Clemente Coelho / State University of Pernambuco.Pinpointing the spill’s origin hasn’t only been hampered by dark ships. Brazilian authorities have yet to release a chemical analysis of the oil, which could indicate its source. Experts interviewed by Mongabay criticized this decision, saying the silence prevents organizations outside Brazil from helping solve the mystery.The Bolsonaro administration has also come under fire for its lax disaster response. Although the Navy reacted to the crisis early on, the administration seemed unaware of Brazil’s National Contingency Plan created in 2013 to deal with oil spills. In fact, at the start of the year, the President disbanded the executive committee charged with implementing that plan as part of sweeping administrative changes. Minister of Environment Ricard Salles only enacted the contingency plan on October 11, more than a month after the first oil sightings.The spill has also highlighted how the practice of “bilge dumping” goes largely unregulated off the shores of developing countries. The “bilge” is the lowest compartment of a ship, which often collects water and residual oil. Bilge dumping is the practice of pumping this contaminated wastewater out of a ship and into the open sea.John Amos of the environmental monitoring group SkyTruth notes that his organization has identified similar bilge dumps off the Brazilian coast over the past several months, including one in July near the northeastern city of João Pessoa. Sky Truth has also identified bilge dumps in Southeast Asia and off the coast of Africa, showing it to be common practice globally.However, Amos and oil spill expert Gerald Graham both agreed on an important detail, telling Mongabay that they don´t believe a bilge dump was the source of Brazil´s present oil troubles because of the large amount of oil involved.A fish killed by the spill. There has yet to be an assessment of the ecological harm done. Image by Clemente Coelho / State University of Pernambuco.Speaking specifically of the Bouboulina, Amos raised a question that could equally apply to any oil-laden tanker leaving Venezuela: “They clearly were [there] picking up a load of crude oil. Why would you do that and then intentionally dump that crude oil into the ocean?”Graham concurred, underscoring the commercial value of oil. “I fail to see how anybody could think this was from a bilge spill. You don’t have high viscosity, very thick crude oil coming from bilge tanks, which is basically wastewater, sewage, essentially.”Marcus Silva, an oceanographer at the Federal University of Pernambuco, told Mongabay that he and a team of researchers are preparing an ocean expedition aboard a Brazilian Navy ship at the end of November. The scientists will collect water and sediment samples to determine the extent and intensity of contamination.“We have to be careful with the sediment,” Silva said. “Historically, around the world, the big impact from oil spills comes from the sediment near the bottom. This has consequences for the entire food chain, and it’s slow-acting,” he said.Silva uses mathematical models to predict the flow of oil and other materials in water. To assist with the spill investigation, Silva provided his models to Brazil’s Federal Police who swore him to secrecy regarding the results. He was, however, able to tell Mongabay that “various aspects of my models correspond to what is being presented,” but not all of them.“My simulations are not yet conclusive,” Silva clarified. He noted that after sharing his original results with the Federal Police, he was supposed to receive data back from them that he could feed back into his analysis. In spite of his follow-up requests, that data hasn’t been forthcoming.The Federal Police told Mongabay they do not comment on ongoing investigations.“What I know, and what I can say, is that I use tools used by the European Community for [spill] forecasts in the Mediterranean and the North Atlantic,” Silva said. These tools include currents and models for predicting oil spill dispersion. Silva described this modeling program as “the best in the world” pointing out that the U.S. uses the same system to track hurricanes.In contrast, Silva said Brazilian federal authorities are using a different data set to feed the model. This set, he said, is not as robust as the one used for hurricane forecasting. This, Silva said, could lead to what modelers call “garbage in, garbage out.”Neither Brazil’s environmental agency, IBAMA, nor the Navy, replied to emailed questions concerning the spill investigation.Banner Image caption: An oil tanker at sea. Photo credit: tfadam on VisualHunt / CC BY-NC-ND.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.An oil polluted Brazilian beach. Illegal dumping by dark ships is a major environmental problem around the globe. Image by Clemente Coelho / State University of Pernambuco.last_img read more

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first_imgLONDON (CMC):Half-centuries from compatriots Nico Reifer and Joshua Bishop have helped the WICB Invitational Under-15s to victory in the two latest matches on their tour of the United Kingdom.Reifer cracked 60, spurring the WICB Under-15s to a nine-wicket victory over Hertfordshire Under-15s Thursday at West Herts, while Bishop scored a vital 57, propelling the visitors to a one-wicket victory over Barmy Army Colts yesterday at Stanmore.On Thursday, Reifer, the younger cousin of former Barbados batsman and West Indies captain Floyd Reifer, smashed five fours and four sixes from 48 balls as WICB Under-15s successfully chased 135 for victory in a Twenty20 contest at the Herts Under-15s.Before he was the only scalp claimed by the Herts Under-15s, Reifer shared an opening stand of 91 with Crystian Thurton, whose run-a-ball 42 not out included five fours and one six. The visitors’ captain, Kirstan Kallicharran, was not out on 29.Collin Barlow was the Caribbean side’s bowling with 3-23 from his allotted four overs after West Herts won the toss, chose to bat, and posted 134 for seven from their 20 overs.Batting for victoryYesterday, a rearguard innings from Bishop, which included four fours and five sixes from 41 balls, catapulted the WICB Under-15s to victory.The visitors were wobbling on 42 for seven in the 18th over, chasing 143 for victory, before Bishop entered to get them back on track with a stand of 83 for the eighth wicket, with Johnnel Eugene, son of former Windward Islands batsman John Eugene, supporting with 30.Earlier, Raewin Senior grabbed 4-22 from nine overs, and Eugene captured 3-20 from the same number of overs to undermine the Barmy Army Colts’ batting.Summarised scores:At West Herts CC on Thursday: WICB Invitational Under-15s won by 9 wickets. HERTFORDSHIRE UNDER-15s 134 for seven off 20 overs (A. Neal 39, A. Verdi 32, W. Latham 23 not out, O. Marin 22 not out; Collin Barlow 3-23, Nyeem Young 2-36). WICB INVITATIONAL UNDER-15s 135 for one off 17.2 overs (Nico Reifer 60, Crystian Thurton 42 not out, Kirstan Kallicharran 29 not out).At Stanmore CC yesterday: WICB Invitational Under-15s won by one wicket. BARMY ARMY COLTS 142 off 43.2 overs (A. Laws-Mather 40, W. Latham 25, A. Neal 24 not out; Raewin Senior 4-22, Johnnel Eugene 3-20, Nyeem Young 2-18). WICB INVITATIONAL UNDER-15s 143 for nine off 37.5 overs (Joshua Bishop 57, Johnnel Eugene 30; C. Yorath 3-26, T. Stock 2-22, A. Neal 2-26).last_img read more

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first_imgThe Liberian nation has faced many challenges in its 167-year history.But it started long before 1847 when our Declaration of Independence was proclaimed.Remember Elijah Johnson?  After the first shipload of Pioneers were denied landing at Shebro Island, Sierra Leone, the rest of the group said, “Let’s go back to America.”  That is when Elijah Johnson made his historic statement:  “For two long years I have sought a home. Here I have found one, and here will I remain.” That inspiring, forthright utterance stopped the ship from turning back.  It sped southward to an island at the tip end of the Mesurado River, and that is where the pioneers finally landed. In thanksgiving to God who mercifully led them there, they named it Providence Island.  Scarcely a mile up the hill the pioneers found another spot on which they built their first church, naming it Providence Baptist Church.  It was in that church, exactly a quarter century later, on July 26, 1847, that they signed the Declaration of Independence.  A nineteen year-old Liberian genius, Edwin J. Barclay, reminded us in his immortal “The Lone Star Forever,” that it was this Declaration of Independence that proclaimed “to Afric’s sons and sires” and to the world, “the birth of liberty” on the African continent!Then there were the settler-indigenous misunderstandings over land.These included the trouble in faraway Maryland between its settlers and the Grebos.  But all of these were eventually settled, and Liberia continued to expand its territory. They reached as far as Nimba and Grand Gedeh–long before the French colonialists got there.  But because our “Mother Country”–the United States–turned a blind eye to the naked aggression of British and French colonial encroachments, we lost half of Nimba, Lofa and Bong, more than half of Grand Gedeh and Grand Cape Mount counties.The French, in negotiations with the Liberian delegation in Paris in 1958, were close to giving us back some of that land when Sekou Toure said “No” to President Charles De Gaulle’s French Association of African States, and declared Guinea an independent Republic.President Tubman immediately withdrew his delegation from Paris because, he argued, the disputed territory was “no longer French, but African, owned by the newly independent “Republic de la Guinea.”Malaria and other tropical diseases also decimated the small population of settlers and their indigenous siblings.It was amidst this dwindling population scenario that President Daniel B. Warner, author of our National Anthem, sent a delegation to Barbados in the West Indies asking for “new blood” to help repopulate the diminishing Liberian population.  The result was the 1865 Immigration that brought Edwin Barclay’s ancestors here.  His cousin, Arthur Barclay, later President, came on that ship as an 11 year-old.Then came World War One, when Germany gave an ultimatum to the Liberian government to close the French Cable at Front Street, Snapper Hill and expel the French operators.  President Daniel E. Howard refused and the Germans bombed Monrovia, killing many citizens.President Howard immediately called on all the churches to toll their bells, and the people to  their churches to pray for God’s protection amidst this international crisis.That, too, passed.Then came 1930 and the Fernando Po Crisis, when European powers attempted to “mandate” Liberia, meaning colonizing the country.  It was President Edwin Barclay and Secretary of State Louis Arthur Grimes who, through their defense of the nation before the League of Nations in Geneva, saved Liberia’s sovereignty.Then came World War II when Liberia declared war on Germany, our main trading partner,   plunging the nation into economic and financial crisis.  All Germans, including the doctors, had to leave.Then the various political crises, beginning in 1951 when D. Tweh fled to Sierra Leone; and Ben Freeman suddenly died a few hours after the True Whig Party Convention nominated him as Tubman’s vice presidential candidate.  The political crisis of 1955 followed, with the murder of David Coleman and his son John, the arrest of most partisans of Edwin Barclay and Nete Sie Brownell’s Independent True Whig Party and the the mass arrest of its partisans; followed by the untimely death of President Edwin Barclay.Then the 1980 coup d’etat, the HIV Aids epidemic and the 14-year civil war.We have survived all of these.  Who says we cannot survive Ebola, too?We can and by the grace of God, we definitely WILL.  Let us simply do what is required by acknowledging the epidemic and taking all preventive measures to fight it off.And this, too, shall pass.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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first_imgLonestar Cell MTN wants the Liberia Football Association and Cellcom/Orange to realize that no degree of threats and intimidation from any quarter at home or abroad, will influence the change of its corporate name now or anytime in the future.The company in a release Thursday noted that the recent US$1.5 million frivolous legal threat from both Cellcom/Orange and the LFA is a mere bluff and should not be taken seriously by its subscribers. Lonestar Cell MTN maintained that it has every right and will continue to send SMS/texts to its many subscribers, to disseminate news of all sorts, including sports and promotions at the will and pleasure of its subscribers; but will not tap and recklessly send SMS to the rival subscribers, as has been the case with Cellcom/Orange against Lonestar Cell MTN.At the same time, the leading cellular giant is cautioning the President of the Liberian Football Association (LFA), Mr. Musa Hassan Bility not to politicize football in the country against the standards and guidelines of the World governing body of football, FIFA.“Mr. Bility, the new Corporate Spokesman for Cellcom/Orange and the President of the LFA, is treading a dangerous pathway in mixing sports, politics and business, in his official position. Mr. Bility was actively involved with the LFA in other roles for many years, when Lonestar Cell MTN sponsored the Lonestar National Soccer Team and the National County Meet with serious financial infusion; not once did Mr. Bility question Lonestar Cell MTN’s rights to the name. Why now? What has given him and others this new enthusiasm to fight a battle for Cellcom/Orange?” the release added. The company maintained it will continue to honor its obligation to the Liberian government, provide excellent telecommunications services and reach out to communities through its Corporate Social Programs.It may be recalled that LFA President Musa Bility last Monday at a press conference in Monrovia said he would petition both Houses at the Legislature to compel Lonestar Cell MTN to abandon the name ‘Lone Star’ because it is Liberia’s identity and not that of a private business company.The LFA also threatened US$1.5 million lawsuit against Lonestar Cell MTN, to be jointly done with Cellcom GSM, because false messages about Liberia’s game with Togo on Sunday were coming from Lonestar Cell MTN, as well as asking its subscribers to request information at the cost of 30c and 60c, which the LFA said should not happen.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORESanta Anita opens winter meet Saturday with loaded card Sanmarco followed another car through a gate at the facility and gained entry to the building by taking an employee’s identification badge at gunpoint, police said. That worker was not hurt. Sheriff’s deputies responding to calls about gunshots found two bodies in the parking lot, another just outside the front door and a badly wounded woman just inside. Three bodies – including the shooter’s – were found not far apart elsewhere in the building. “According to witnesses from the scene, she had a 9 mm pistol and reloaded at least once during her rampage,” Anderson said. It was unclear whether Sanmarco targeted her victims or fired randomly, Anderson said. However, U.S. Postal Inspector Randy DeGasperin said “chances are” she knew them. It was the deadliest shooting at any workplace since 2003, when 48-year-old Doug Williams gunned down 14 co-workers, killing six, at a Lockheed Martin aircraft parts plant in Meridian, Miss., before turning the gun on himself. GOLETA – A former postal worker who had been put on medical leave after exhibiting psychological problems fatally shot five people at a huge mail-processing center and then killed herself in a nighttime rampage, authorities said Tuesday. A sixth shooting victim was hospitalized Tuesday in critical condition in what was the deadliest postal shooting in 20 years and perhaps the worst workplace shooting ever perpetrated by a woman. Police identified the shooter as Jennifer Sanmarco, 44, of Grants, N.M. She had worked at the Santa Barbara Processing and Distribution Center but was given a disability retirement in 2003 for an unspecified psychological problem, postal authorities said. Shortly after 9 p.m. Monday, she returned to the 200,000-square-foot center, armed with a handgun, Santa Barbara County Sheriff Jim Anderson said. James Alan Fox, a criminologist at Northeastern University and an expert on homicides, said he believed it might be the deadliest workplace shooting ever carried out by a woman. “Men, more than women, tend to view their self-worth by what they do” at work, Fox said. Men also are more prone to use violence in seeking revenge while “women tend to view murder as a last resort,” he said. According to federal statistics, 12.3 percent of homicides are committed by women. However, Fox said his analysis of 450 workplace shootings over the past 30 years shows that only 7 percent were carried out by women. The killings occurred 90 miles northwest of Los Angeles, in a picturesque area about a mile from the ocean. The plant is off a quiet road connecting the University of California, Santa Barbara, student community of Isla Vista to shopping areas and U.S. 101. According to DeGasperin, Sanmarco was placed on disability after co-workers reported she was acting oddly. She made no threats, but co-workers were afraid she might hurt herself, he said. He provided no other details but did say police were called and removed her from the building one time in 2003. Sanmarco moved to western New Mexico. In July 2004, she applied for a business license to start a publication called “The Racist Press,” said Terri Gallegos, deputy clerk for the city of Milan, N.M. She engaged in constant conversation with herself during the meeting – “not just mumbling to herself, but real audible, like she was arguing with someone but there was no one there,” Gallegos recalled. Officials filed a complaint with authorities last spring claiming Sanmarco harassed a worker during another visit to the office. Police in nearby Grants talked to her last June after someone at a gas station called to complain of nudity, Police Chief Marty Vigil said. Sanmarco was dressed when officers arrived, he said. Only about 80 of the roughly 300 postal facility workers were on duty when the shooting began Monday in Goleta. They ran out of the building, with some seeking shelter at a nearby fire station. “I was dumping mail on a belt when the gunshots suddenly (went) ‘boom, boom, boom, boom!” said postal worker Alger Busante, 56, of Santa Barbara. “It is really very shocking. This is a peaceful place.” Killed were Ze Fairchild, 37, and Maleka Higgins, 28, both of Santa Barbara; Nicola Grant, 42, and Guadalupe Swartz, 52, both of Lompoc; and Dexter Shannon, 57, of Oxnard. The wounded woman, Charlotte Colton, 44, of Santa Barbara, remained hospitalized Tuesday. It was the first lethal shooting at a postal installation in nearly eight years and one of the deadliest since a string of high-profile cases in the 1980s and ’90s – including one in which a part-time letter carrier killed 14 people in Edmond, Okla., before taking his own life. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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first_imgThe giant mushroom which was discovered in Manorcunningham. Pic by Liam McLaughlin.It’s amazing the things you come across during a clean-up!Just ask those who took part in a clean-up at Raymoughey Abbey in Manorcunningham in recent days.The clan-up tam with the giant mushroom. Pic by Liam McLaughlin.Amongst the litter was this amazing mushroom specimen. Those taking part in the clean-up won’t quite sure what to make of it at first or wether to even touch it!But it’s perfectly safe.Donegal Daily gardening expert Gareth Austin has revealed that the mushroom is a Giant Puffball which grow occasionally on agricultural land.And even beer news is that the mushroom is edible. Needless to say w know what kind of soup the hard-working clan-up teams in Manor will be having during their next outing!Many thanks to Liam McLaughlin for sending in the pictures. ‘MUSH’ DELIGHT AFTER WORKERS’ GIANT DISCOVERY! was last modified: August 16th, 2015 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:clan-updonegalGareth AustinGiant Puffballmanorcunninghammushroomworkerslast_img read more

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first_img1 Newcastle have agreed to pay the £8.7m needed to trigger former Manchester City defender Florian Lejeune’s release clause, according to reports in Spain.The Eibar man has been a target for Newcastle ever since their promotion back to the top flight was assured.Earlier this month, Marca had claimed that the deal was already done with both clubs settled on a fee.However that was not the case and the move is still yet to go through.But now, Diario AS has claimed that Newcastle are on the verge of completing their swoop for Lejeune after finally agreeing to meet his release clause.It means the 26-year-old’s return to England now looks imminent, with an announcement expected in the coming days.His debut in English football has been a long time coming having signed for Manchester City in August 2015.But he was immediately loaned back to Girona and was then sold on to Eibar this time last year. Florian Lejeune (right) in action for Eibar last_img read more

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