first_imgTOTTENHAM are to ban one of their fans for making shocking Nazi salutes at Bayern Munich supporters during Tuesday’s Champions League match.The culprit was identified after a fellow Spurs fan complained via anti-racist campaigners Kick It Out.2 An investigation has been launched by Spurs after claims that one of their fans performed Nazi salutes directed at the Bayern Munich faithfulCredit: Rex FeaturesThe yob was also overhead referring to the visiting fans from Germany as “Nazi c**ts” and could now face criminal prosecution.A club spokesman said: “We have identified the individual involved and he will be issued with an immediate ban.”We have also passed all information to the police so they can carry out their own investigation. Behaviour like this is completely unacceptable.”Tottenham conceded seven goals at home for the first time in their history as they lost 7-2 to the German champions.A statement from Kick It Out read: “We can confirm we have received a report of a Tottenham Hotspur fan making Nazi salutes during their match against Bayern Munich on 1 October.”As per protocol, we have contacted the club and the UKFPU.”The incident took place in either block 112 or 113 of the North Stand at Tottenham’s new stadium.The travelling supporters from Munich were seated in the North East corner of the 62,000 capacity ground.LATEST TOTTENHAM NEWSHARRY ALL FOUR ITKane admits Spurs must win EIGHT games to rise into Champions League spotGossipALL GONE PETE TONGVertonghen wanted by host of Italian clubs as long Spurs spell nears endBELOW PARRSpurs suffer blow with Parrott to miss Prem restart after appendix operationPicturedSHIRT STORMNew Spurs 2020/21 home top leaked but angry fans slam silver design as ‘awful”STEP BY STEP’Jose fears for players’ welfare during restart as stars begin ‘pre-season’KAN’T HAVE THATVictor Osimhen keen on Spurs move but only if they sell Kane this summer2The Nazi salute is illegal in modern day Germany due to the country’s dark history in the lead up and during World War Two.This episode of alleged racial abuse will be particularly significant at Tottenham given the club’s relatively large proportion of Jewish followers.There has been much controversy over the use of the word ‘yid’ when sung by Spurs fans or chanted in an abusive manner by their rivals.Mauricio Pochettino speaks after Spurs are thrashed 7-2 in the Champions League by Bayern Munichlast_img read more

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first_imgGenetic data has pointed toward a unique group of dwarf galagos living in Africa for a long time, but the physical similarity between the primates in the Galago family has confounded scientists.Using these genetic clues as a guide, a team of researchers examined the skulls and teeth of galagos and analyzed their calls.They concluded that five species previously placed in other genera should be placed in a sixth genus of the family Galagidae. They chose the name ‘Paragalago’ for the new genus. Galagos have a reputation among scientists for being one of the more mysterious primates, in large part because they’re so tough to study. Endearingly known as bush babies, they stick mostly to forest treetops, and some weigh in at less than 100 grams (3.5 ounces). They’re also creatures of the night, when their bugged-out eyes and swiveling ears lend them an advantage in tracking down their insect prey.But a recent deep dive examining the genetic relationships of galagos, as well as their physical traits and the calls they make, has uncovered the need for a new, distinct genus of the tiny primates, and with it more evidence of how little we know about animals that live in forests under threat in eastern and southern Africa.Different galago species haven’t evolved vastly distinctive physical features, probably because they rely more on other cues like sounds to pick out members of their own species rather than looks, said Luca Pozzi, an evolutionary primatologist and coauthor of a study published online on Feb. 8 by the Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society.That’s made it difficult to pick out which groups share a common ancestor solely based on appearances, and it has led scientists to lump the smallest galagos into a group known as the dwarf galagos under the genus Galagoides.Map showing approximate geographic ranges of the two independent dwarf galago groups, Galagoides (red) and the eastern dwarf galagos (blue), now called Paragalago. Map courtesy of Masters et al. 2017“We couldn’t really tell them apart that much,” Pozzi said in an interview. But when they looked at the animals’ DNA on a molecular level, “we finally saw there was something weird going on.”Those genetic differences, which appeared as differences in the DNA of the mitochondria – or the bit of a cell that provides it with energy – meant that a handful of the galagos didn’t share a common ancestor with other species in the Galagoides genus.“The genetics were actually the first evidence that these guys might actually be something different,” he added.Pozzi’s colleague and coauthor of the current study, Judith Masters of the University of South Africa, led an effort to sift through hundreds of specimens at museums in the U.S. and Europe using these genetic clues as a guide. The team made a series of measurements, keeping an eye out for any physical differences to tip them off that some of the dwarf galagos belonged on a different twig on the tree of life.Like forensic scientists, they identified subtle differences, such as the shape of the skull and the arrangement of teeth, that backed up what the molecular genetic data was telling them.Further proof came from analysis of the sounds that galagos make to identify mates and alert each other of danger. These “buzzy alarms,” “mobbing yaps,” and “advertisement calls” tended to be similar among the species in the newly proposed genus and distinct from those in the original genus.That data in hand, Masters, Pozzi, and their team argue in their paper that five species of dwarf galagos belong in a new genus, which they called Paragalago. The official process to create a new genus, and thus change the scientific names of these five galagos, requires a submission to the International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature, which is underway. But Pozzi said that primatologists will likely start using the new classification now that they’ve published their research.“We now know that the western part and the eastern part are different beasts,” he said. “Literally, they’re two different animals.”A Kenya coast galago (Paragalago cocos). Photo courtesy of Luca PozziThe East African Rift separates the western or “true” dwarf galagos from an eastern population comprising these five species, which inhabit a patchwork of mountain and coastal forest along the southeastern coast of Africa in Tanzania, Kenya, Mozambique and Malawi.“Those forests are in extremely bad shape” as a result of deforestation and fragmentation, Pozzi said. Based on counts from previous surveys, “we have at least two species that are not doing that well.”Galagos are not alone in the threats they face. A recent study found that 60 percent of primates face the specter of extinction.The rondo dwarf galago (Paragalago rondoensis) is currently listed as Critically Endangered by the IUCN. In 2016, the International Primatological Society unveiled its list of the 25 most endangered primates, replacing the rondo with the mountain dwarf galago (Paragalago orinus). That’s because we still have a lot to learn about it, Pozzi said.“We know that they’re staying at the top of the mountain and that’s pretty much it,” he added.In fact, scientists have found the Eastern Arc Mountains in Kenya and Tanzania, where the mountain dwarf galago lives, to be a sanctuary for all kinds of unusual and unknown life.“Every time that they go [into] these forests,” he said, “they find things that are unique,” including birds, amphibians and other mammals.For Pozzi, that points to a critical – and urgent – need to figure out what’s living in these forests and how to protect them before the habitat disappears.“Understanding the biodiversity we have out there is kind of the first step to doing good conservation,” he said.Audio Playerhttps://imgs.mongabay.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/20/2017/02/19122028/Udzungwas_00153_07_zanzibaricus.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Audio recording of a Zanzibar galago (Paragalago zanzibaricus) courtesy of Luca Pozzi.Correction: February 20, 2017An earlier version of this article misstated Luca Pozzi’s profession. He is an evolutionary primatologist, not an ecologist.CITATIONS:Masters, J. C., Génin, F., Couette, S., Groves, C. P., Nash, S. D., Delpero, M., & Pozzi, L. (2017). A new genus for the eastern dwarf galagos (Primates: Galagidae). Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 1–13. https://doi.org/10.1093/zoolinnean/zlw028Perkin, A., Bearder, S., Honess, P. & Butynski, T.M. (2008).  Galagoides rondoensis. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2008: e.T40652A10350268. http://dx.doi.org/10.2305/IUCN.UK.2008.RLTS.T40652A10350268.en. Accessed on 19 February 2017.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Amphibians, Animals, Biodiversity, Birds, Conservation, Deforestation, Endangered Species, Environment, Forests, Habitat Degradation, Habitat Destruction, Mammals, Mountains, Primates, Rainforests, Wildlife Article published by John Cannoncenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Mangunharjo, Bedono, Sawah Luhur — these are just some of the communities where clear-cutting mangrove forests has caused environmental disaster.Mangroves are removed to make way for shrimp and fish farms. But without the forests’ protection, coastal communities become dangerously vulnerable to erosion and flooding.In some places, residents have planted new mangroves, and managed to reclaim their home from the sea. But not everywhere. Text by Jacopo Pasotti, photos by Elisabetta ZavoliMANGUNHARJO, Indonesia – A mangrove forest once surrounded this village on Java’s northern coast. That was before the woods were clear-cut to make way for shrimp and fish farms. The new industry improved the local economy; residents could finally afford the pilgrimage to Mecca.The bounty days were soon to vanish. The mangroves’ decline exposed Mangunharjo to massive erosion. In less than a decade, it wiped away the fishponds and almost sank the village.Local resident Sururi, who like many Indonesians goes by one name, remembers when the sea invaded the land, turning the aquafarms into a muddy lagoon. The shoreline, once 1,500 meters from their homes, the mosque, the school, advanced to within a third of that.In a desperate fight against the march of the sea, Sururi planted mangroves, hoping to stop the erosion and save the village. Step by step, with the support of volunteers and the entire village pitching in, they reclaimed 200 meters (656 feet). “The birds came back and built nests in the forest,” said Sururi, 58. “So did the fish and shrimp.”Sururi poses in his mangrove nursery in Mangunharjo: “I hope that future generations won’t forget the value of mangrove ecosystems.”Volunteers at Sururi’s mangrove nursery, where seedlings grow until they are ready to be planted.Flooded aquafarms west of Mangunharjo. Without the protection of mangroves, coastal areas are more vulnerable to erosion and rising seas.In Indonesia and beyond, mangrove deforestation is proceeding quickly. Many tropical coastal settlements are in danger. “Mangrove areas disappear at the rate of approximately 1 percent per year globally, with estimates as high as 2-8 percent per year in Indonesia,” said Daniel Murdiyarso, a scientist at the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), a thinktank headquartered outside Jakarta. In less than 50 years, the planet has lost more than a quarter of its mangroves, and at this rate they could all but disappear in 80 years.Nowhere are mangroves vanishing faster than Indonesia. A century ago, they covered 4.2 million hectares (16,200 square miles) of the archipelago country’s coastline. Today that figure stands at 3 million hectares. Most of the deforestation has occurred in the last half century; Java alone has lost at least 70 percent of its mangroves during that period. CIFOR reports that 40 percent of that loss is due to the “blue revolution” – the explosion of aquaculture, especially shrimp farming, in the last three decades. Seafood from fish farms has surged from the 13 million tons produced globally in 1990 to today’s production of 74 million tons. That’s projected to hit 92 million by 2022.The coastal valley of Sawah Luhur in western Java, where shrimp ponds have been established since the late 1980s. Almost all the coastal mangrove forests of Java and much of Sumatra have been cleared to make room for brackish shrimp and fish farms.Timan, 51, dredges a canal by hand to make a new bank in his Sawah Luhur shrimp pond. Since the valley was reclaimed for an extensive aquafarm network, the land has been deeply modified by people’s handiwork.An industrial shrimp farm on Java’s west coast. Intensive aquaculture consists of several ponds of 1 hectare or less, with constant mechanical airing and the use of feeding, antibiotics and other chemicals to keep shrimp growing fast.Mangroves are crucial in the fight against climate change. Champions of carbon sequestration, they retain up to five times more carbon than rainforests. The UN’s 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development includes mangrove-specific goals and targets; Indonesia too has committed to halting their loss.There are strong international campaigns to increase protein intake; the problem is how to keep production sustainable. Certifications such as GlobalGap and the Aquaculture Stewardship Council take sustainability into account. Unfortunately these are voluntary schemes, market-driven and only affordable to large operations. Most of Asia’s producers are small, often family-owned and unable to afford certification that could help to stop mangrove loss amid the rise of the blue revolution.Muhyasir, 62, is a fisherman in Mangunharjo. In the early 1990s, he and his neighbors cleared all the mangroves in front of the village in order to expand their aquafarms. In the late 1990s, sea currents swept away 150 hectares of coastline and Muhyasir lost all his wealth.Pictures of a 1996 flood in Manguharjo, worsened by erosion from sea currents.Land subsidence, saltwater intrusion, loss of marine ecosystem diversity – these are real dangers. Not all communities are ready to stop erosion and rehabilitate mangroves. Mangunharjo succeded, but Bedono, a village not far from the Javan port city of Semarang, did not make it. In less than 10 years the ocean erased Bedono from maps and satellite images. The soft sediments subsided under excessive groundwater extraction, clear-cutting of mangroves and rising seas. As fishpond expansion and urban development have encroached on Bedono’s mangroves during the past three decades, almost 700 hectares of land have been lost to the sea. Thousands of aquafarms, roads and houses have been submerged. Rice fields and towns inland are now prone to floods. Saltwater intrusion threatens crops and what fish farms remain.The ruins of a warehouse in Bedono. About a decade ago, the village was flooded by the sea and abandoned by its residents.Pasijah still lives in this partly submerged land. She is one of just two residents who did not abandon the doomed village. The ground sinks, the sea rises, but she refuses to move. She raised her home half a meter to keep up with rising waters. “I hope I don’t have to move somewhere,” she said. “I want to stay here.” Pasijah built a business as fish collector. Fishermen bring their catches, which she collects and brings by boat to sell in a nearby village’s market. It’s a life of solitude, but business is going well. Fishermen depend on her to sell their daily catch.Pasijah, the last inhabitant of the flooded village of Bedono.In some areas around her home mangroves are growing again. Where once were streets and houses, a mosque and a well, now grows a lush forest. The question is if the plants will keep up with the pace of sea level rise and land subsidence.Mangroves are beginning to colonize Bedono again, nearly a decade after the village was inundated by seawater. Decomposed wooden houses form the substrate on which the mangroves are rising again.Banner image: A flooded portico of a former mosque is one of the few ruins remaining in the coastal village of Bedono. This story was supported with a grant from the European Journalism Center. FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by mongabayauthorcenter_img Aquaculture, Blue Carbon, Carbon Sequestration, Certification, Climate Change, Coastal Ecosystems, Deforestation, Ecosystem Restoration, Environment, Environmental Economics, Erosion, Featured, Fish, Fish Farming, Fisheries, Forestry, Forests, Mangroves, Oceans, Reforestation, Sea Levels, Tropical Forests last_img read more

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first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Glenn Scherer climate policy, Corporate Role In Conservation, Corporate Social Responsibility, Corporations, Economics, Environmental Activism, Environmental Economics, Environmental Law, Environmental Policy, Environmental Politics, Finance, Global Environmental Crisis, Global Trade, Globalization, Governance, Government, Industry, International Trade, Regulations, Trade center_img As early as September 21st, the Comprehensive Economic Trade Agreement (CETA) could come into provisional effect, linking international commerce between Canada and all of the nations in the European Union (EU).Supporters claim CETA includes new mechanisms that make it a blueprint for future trade treaties, chief among them the replacement of the controversial Investor State Dispute System (ISDS), with the new investor court system (ICS).Opponents argue CETA’s rules guarantee numerous benefits for foreign investors and transnational corporations, while the agreement includes no enforceable rules to guarantee labor rights, environmental protection or food safety. “Profit comes before people and the planet,” argues one expert.Though it could come into provisional effect as early as this week, big roadblocks remain before CETA is fully approved, with resistance possible from the public, NGOs and government. The earlier years of CETA negotiations were met with protest in Canada. This photo was taken at a demonstration in Canada’s capital, Ottawa, in September 2014. Photo by campact licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 generic licenseAmongst the buzz over Donald Trump’s scuttling of U.S. participation in TTP, and of NAFTA being renegotiated, another major trade pact linking the European Union and Canada, the Comprehensive Economic Trade Agreement or CETA, has reached maturation without much media fanfare.Heralded as a blueprint for trade agreements of the future, CETA includes several novelties in response to past public concerns over corporate overreach, most notably a new investor court system.But opponents claim provisions still exist in the agreement that threaten national sovereignty and the environment, allowing corporations greater privileges than citizens and locking in current minimum standards and regulations.CETA has been called a trade treaty Trojan horse by its opponents; potentially easing the way for larger dealings between a far more divergent group of nations, like those proposed by the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP), a deal linking the U.S. with the European Union, the Transpacific Partnership (TPP), linking 12 nations bordering the Pacific Ocean, and the Trade in Services Agreement, (TISA), linking 23 nations (most included in either TTIP or TTP or both), and covering 70 percent of the world’s trade in services. In combination this new wave of trade deals would greatly expand the geographical reach for investors wishing to enter into both business and potentially, investment disputes.If everything goes smoothly, CETA could enter into provisional effect, meaning about 98 percent of the deal will be implemented, as early as this week, on September 21st. But the agreement still faces a potentially challenging road ahead.Before coming into full effect CETA must first be ratified by all EU member nations, several of which have already threatened to reject it. The European Court of Justice will also have to decide whether CETA’s arbitration process complies with EU law before the agreement can enter into full effect.Many opponents of CETA claim it is a free-trade Trojan horse. On the outside, the agreement claims to benefit average citizens and workers. But the privileges allowed to corporations, in particular investor protection provisions, mean CETA’s risks probably far outweigh its potential benefits. Photo courtesy of the Council of CanadiansA tedious birthAfter nine years of negotiations, two of the world’s largest trading partners have just about sealed the deal on the Comprehensive Economic Trade Agreement, CETA. The agreement, set to remove 99 percent of tariffs and most non-technical restrictions on bilateral trade, will also open new sectors of service and non-service markets ranging from energy to education.The agreement is aimed at strengthening ties between the EU and Canada, an already friendly relationship made even more ameliorable by the current chilly political climate in the U.S. and Russia.“From a geopolitical point of view [CETA] strengthens the North Atlantic Alliance,” explained Ojars Eriks Kalnins, Chair of the Saeima (the Parliament of Latvia) Foreign Affairs Committee. “In the past, many spoke about the U.S. as the major trading force, but in the last year or so, Canada has taken on a big role in Europe.”On February 23, 2017, Latvia became the first country to ratify CETA. Kalnins said, “the act was a thank-you of sorts,” in recognition of Canada’s lead role in a recently created Latvian NATO battalion . At the time of publication, four other EU member nations had ratified CETA: Denmark, Spain, Croatia and the Czech Republic.Aside from the claimed economic and geopolitical benefits, CETA will serve as important testing grounds for the new investor court system or ICS, a replacement for the controversial, secretive Investor State Dispute System better known as ISDS.Differences in food safety regulations between the EU and Canada, especially those concerning the use of pesticides, growth hormones, antibiotics, cleaning agents, and genetically modified organisms, has critics worried that the EU’s more stringent laws may be watered down to match its new trading partner’s lesser standards. Image courtesy of the War on WantAs good as it seems?On paper, CETA seems to be the groundbreaking agreement European and Canadian officials have been bragging about. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau even went as far as to say that if CETA fails it could be one of the last free trade deals attempted. In other words, if the EU and Canada can’t make it work, maybe free trade agreements simply don’t work in modern society.But by the numbers, CETA isn’t quite the economic boon being touted, say experts. In an email to Mongabay, Pierre Kohler, an economist with the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs in New York, wrote that even in the utopian scenarios propagated by the Canadian government and the EU Commission, GDP gains are extremely small under the agreement — about 0.1 percent of GDP per year over a period of 7 years for Canada and 0.01 percent of GDP per year over a period of 7 years for the EU.Kohler, who co-authored a study assessing CETA benefits, explained that all four government economic studies used the same optimistic model that relies on assumptions like full employment and neutral income distribution. Using a more variable model, Kohler’s study estimated that by 2023 CETA will have cut 200,000 European and 30,000 Canadian jobs and will lead to lost annual average earnings of C $2,460 for Canadian workers, and between C $440 and C $1,850 for European workers.There’s also worry certain EU economic gains could come at a heavy cost for Canadians, especially when it comes to prescription drugs. According to a 2014 study Canada already has the world’s second-highest drug costs and under CETA, these costs would rise between 6.2 percent and 12.9 percent starting in 2023.Even governmental impact assessments have struggled to pinpoint concrete CETA benefits for everyday citizens.Last spring the Canadian Office of the Parliamentary Budget Officer released their own CETA impact assessment, concluding the agreement would have “a small, but positive, overall effect on Canada’s economy,” translating to around 0.4 percent of GDP in the long term or $220 per person. But these benefits carry the same positive presumptions like full and equal employment, so are far from guaranteed.But the risks of CETA go far beyond lost GDP or rising drug costs.Dramatically increasing foreign trade and access to natural resource markets will likely increase production, making Paris Climate Agreement greenhouse gas commitments more challenging to uphold. And though some EU nations like France have discussed ways of protecting against this scenario, suggesting for example that the European Fuel Quality Directive be amended to brace for the impact of trade with the Canadian oil sands (aka tar sands), these suggestions aren’t set to be discussed in full until after the agreement has come into effect.Another warning note: experts on the treaty say that CETA will massively expand the possible scale and scope of investor disputes.NGOs like the Council of Canadians claim CETA is a gift to corporations originally given by Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper, known for his drastic anti-environmentalism and pro-corporate stance. Image courtesy of the Council of CanadiansWhy CETA?With such sparse gains and such substantial risks, who’s really backing the agreement?Kohler said CETA was clearly pushed forward by transnational corporations, noting that “the Canada Europe Roundtable for Business (CERT) acknowledges this on its website.”He explained this wasn’t necessarily an issue at the offset. “The problem appears when governments promote the exclusive interests of TNCs [transnational corporations], to the detriment of democracy, workers and the environment,” he wrote. “And when TNCs are basically the ones drafting the agreement, the risk is almost unavoidable.”Laurens Ankersmit, a lawyer focused on the relationship between EU trade and the environment with the NGO ClientEarth, said that in order to comprehend the motivations behind CETA, it’s important to understand the agreement isn’t your average trade deal.“CETA goes well beyond reducing tariffs and improving trade. The investment chapter is a big expansion on the investment protections included in previous European free trade deals,” he said. “And on top of that, the chapter concerning what is called regulatory cooperation is actually intended to allow both sides of the Atlantic to influence each other’s legislation to make them more similar, something negotiators call ‘reducing trade divergences’.”Jean Blaylock, policy officer with Global Justice Now UK, viewed CETA similarly to Ankersmit. She said the levels of straightforward EU-Canada trade are already very high and tariffs generally very low. “What this agreement is actually about is the removal of so-called trade barriers that most of us consider basic civil rights,” Blaylock revealed.Anne-Marie Mineur, a Dutch socialist and Member of the European Parliament, said CETA has always been a project for the benefit of multinationals and detriment of everyone else. “It was initiated at the request of multinationals, it was negotiated in close contact with multinationals, and it will continue to put the interests of multinationals first,” she said.And while the rules being negotiated guarantee all kinds of tangible benefits to foreign investors, there are no enforceable rules to guarantee civil issues like labor rights, environmental protection, or public safety. “Profit comes before people and the planet, whereas it should be exactly the other way around,” Mineur concluded.Busting myths: Governments claim CETA will be a boon to both EU and Canadian economies but most impact assessments have concluded otherwise, projecting meager gains for both national economies and everyday citizens. Photo by Frerk Meyer licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 generic licenseICS — beautifying the beast?At this stage, most people in the know about trade treaties are familiar with the infamous Investor State Dispute System or ISDS, the mechanism by which foreign investors can sue governments for compensation over failed investments, and through which companies can win huge settlements in secret court proceedings, often at the expense of the environment and national sovereignty, bypassing strict environmental regulations.For decades, corporations have used ISDS mechanisms built into treaties to put developing and developed countries on the line for millions, occasionally billions, of dollars in damages. Recently, however, some experts say the tide has started to turn.“There’s been a trend towards developed countries being sued,” said Scott Sinclair, a Senior Research Fellow with the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives. “Europeans have begun to see these investment provisions are actually powerful tools that can threaten their high [regulatory] standards.”Sujata Dey, a trade campaigner for the Council of Canadians, said when TTIP drafts were leaked last spring that included ISDS provisions, many Europeans began to look into CETA, note its similarities to TTIP, and worry. “As TTIP talks broke down people became even more curious about CETA and public protests erupted,” said Dey.Protests led several European leaders to publicly reject any agreement containing ISDS provisions, including CETA, forcing the EU Commission to create an alternative in early 2016: the Investment Court System ICS.Seven reasons why critics say CETA’s ICS is not an acceptable solution to ISDS in previous treaties. Image courtesy of the Corporate Europe ObservatoryISDS vs. ICSUnlike its ISDS predecessor, ICS tribunals will be created from a permanent pool of judges selected by governments, not investors, who may not serve as lawyers or experts in other investment dispute facilities. Other ICS firsts include a way to fast track frivolous cases (like the type that have bogged down ISDS courts in the past), an appeals process, and a loser-pays-all costs structure.The new system also reduces secrecy during litigation by including the UN Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL) transparency rules regarding arbitration, ensuring that more details about the proceedings and final awards are made public. Canada and Europe have also agreed to work toward the establishment of “a permanent multilateral investment court” that will eventually replace ICS.While ICS seems like a drastically different beast than the ISDS mechanism it is replacing, opponents note that at its core the same civil issues persist.“The new [ICS] system seems more professional now, not quite NAFTA’s Wild-West. But none of these changes really take away from the power of the system at large,” said Dey. “CETA still systematically gives rights and powers to corporations that citizens and domestic companies don’t have.”Many trade experts interviewed for this story also noted that in some ways ICS may actually be worse than ISDS, establishing a permanent institution to handle foreign investor disputes.Amélie Noilhac, an expert on international law and dispute resolution, said that the creation of a permanent court makes sense for investors — given that domestic courts factor in EU laws making favorable rulings less likely for investors and corporations and limiting the extent of potential awards — but not really for anyone else.“I really don’t believe that investors need, or should have, this kind of protection in a highly developed country like Canada,” said Noilhac. “We don’t need a separate court; cases should be brought openly in domestic court and arbitration only sought when all else fails.” The use of domestic courts for settling trade disputes also carries with it the added advantage of allowing a judge to call upon the full range of a country’s environmental protections, laws and precedents within any given case.“Overall, ICS vastly expands the ISDS mechanism rather than reform the system, especially in Europe,” Ankersmit with ClientEarth reflected. “I still choose to refer to ICS as an ISDS mechanism and will continue to because with the exception of a few minor changes, that’s exactly what it is.”Pieces of the global trade puzzle: CETA is just one of four major free trade agreements in the works globally, alongside the Transatlantic Trade and Investment and Partnership, TTIP, Trade in Services Agreement, TISA, and the Transpacific Partnership, TTPAn even more tipped playing field?Aside from further institutionalizing investor protection mechanisms, CETA will bind Europe and Canada under investor protection provisions. And under CETA, American corporations could also use Canadian or European subsidiaries to file for ICS arbitration.Laurens Ankersmit explained that aside from the Energy Charter Treaty, CETA is the first major European trade deal to include ICS (aside from the yet-to-be ratified EU-Vietnam FTA). Currently only a handful of EU nations have Bilateral Investments Treaties, or BITs, with Canada.“TTIP and CETA would make the investor dispute picture far more complex with cases possible between big, developed capital blocks,” said Juergen Knirsch, Trade Policy Advisor for Greenpeace Germany. “Such disputes would carry weight enough to set global standards.”This dramatic widening under CETA of the segment of investors eligible to invoke ICS is also potentially bad for the environment in that a wide range of suits could act as a sort of multi-headed missile attack on a country’s environmental regulations.Whatever one makes of ICS, the impacts and implications of the new system will not be fully known for years after the treaty goes into effect. It will take time for lawyers and judges to interpret the document’s meaning. Still, many interviewed agreed that ultimately, without the outright exclusion of investor protection mechanisms like ICS and ISDS, true change is unlikely.“I want to be on the record saying that trade deals as they stand are so bad for the environment, no matter the language, you can’t outweigh the problems without simply removing investor provisions like ISDS,” said William Waren, senior trade analyst with Friends of the Earth U.S.Even if ICS manages to address major ISDS problems, there are still plenty of other CETA risks to consider. Under CETA, a range of new sectors will open to foreign business, many never before included in European or Canadian trade agreements like services, public contracts, and intellectual property.“Concern over domestic regulation is huge,” explained Sinclair. “Goods may face tariffs or quotas, but with the approval of something like a pipeline, the main barriers are regulatory, a realm where public and private priorities usually don’t align and conflict of interests are almost inevitable.”“Regulatory cooperation,” a popular term used in CETA and TTIP negotiation texts, seems to be a euphemism for deregulation, giving corporations undue influence when it comes to setting and creating regulations. Image courtesy of the Corporate Europe ObservatoryUnpacking CETA lingoLike its modern trade agreement peers, CETA includes terms to describe how governments and corporations will work together to promote free trade.According to Sinclair and others, one of the most seemingly innocuous but inherently dangerous of these terms is “regulatory cooperation,” a vague catchall phrase seemingly intended to describe varying agendas and tools aimed at increasing trade liberalization and privatization, while reducing national sovereignty concerning environmental regulations and other protective laws.Sinclair said that at the offset, regulatory cooperation seems like a good idea, but when actually applied to marketplaces it has the potential to cause a regulatory backlog. For example, though Canada and Europe do share some cultural and ideological similarities, even subtle differences in regulations, policy or procedure implies compromise. And sectors involving or affecting the environment and public health tend to be wrapped in the most regulatory red tape.Mineur further explained that the EU, unlike North American countries, practices a precautionary principle approach when it comes to civil issues like food, health, and the environment. This is a major difference and an important distinction between the two region’s economies and would logically be a major source of conflict when trying to establish trade between them.But terms of regulatory cooperation could help even the playing field, or even lower it. “Any rule that is not shared by the other party can be considered an impediment to trade,” she explained, meaning it could be listed for elimination.Mineur added that the dispute settlement mechanism is in itself devised to put pressure on democratically established rules. “A normal judge has to check a case against the laws of the land, but an arbitration panel only has to check the trade agreement.”Under Chapter 12 of CETA, countries can choose to exclude certain sectors and subsectors of their economies from CETA, and they have during the negotiation phase. But there is worry elements of sectors will be missed, or become important later on.CETA is just one of four major trade treaties on the table alongside TTP, TTIP and TISA. Though President Trump has rejected U.S. involvement in TTP, it is still moving ahead with other nations. Image courtesy of the Centre for Research on Globalization.Blaylock explained that while past European trade agreements have used a positive listing approach to distinguish included sectors, CETA uses a negative listing approach, meaning all sectors are included in the agreement unless exclusively listed. She said this list-it-or-lose-it method makes it harder to predict disputes and easier to overlook potential problems. This negative listing approach, like that included in NAFTA, also doesn’t allow governments to add sectors to the list going forward.Another issue experts have with CETA’s regulatory cooperation agenda are standstill and ratchet clauses, which apply mostly to included, but technically, even to excluded sectors and services.“Standstill” clauses lock in current regulations and levels of liberalization as minimum standards when the agreement takes effect. That means, going forward, if a country alters or creates new regulations, companies can challenge these changes on the grounds that they conflict with their investments, or in lawyer lingo, are discriminatory to foreign investments.“Under the standstill clause, whatever minimum standards are set in the agreement become locked in for good,” Ankersmit said. “Governments simply can’t go above and beyond minimum standards after that, whether they like it or not.”“Ratchet clauses” work to encourage the ratcheting-forward of minimum standards towards liberalization by only allowing changes to policy if those changes encourage the furthering of business interests. Notably, investors rarely view tougher environmental regulations as encouraging business interests.“Big changes in public policy are frequent and often relatively unpredictable,” said Blaylock. “With such limiting clauses and wide-sweeping provisions in play, governments can’t be experimental with public policy.”Sinclair noted that corporate lobbyists also have privileged, early access to negotiation points and texts, tipping agreement texts in their favor. He said corporate lobbyists have put pressure on CETA negotiators to restrict even non-discriminatory regulations concerning services and investments in the hopes of making later hurdles, like licensing procedures, easier to overcome.The CETA Joint Committee, a group created by the agreement to supervise and facilitate the implementation of Chapter 21 (regulatory cooperation), also allows input from the private sector.Sinclair explained all of this means trade negotiators essentially rely on industry lobby groups to select potentially profit-limiting barriers for elimination. Even when voluntary, he argued, this method gives corporate lobbyists an early foot in the door.Ankersmit agreed: “Say a standard is being developed in Europe, regulatory cooperation would allow Canadian interests to have a say in the process, placing outside stakeholder interests on par or even above other important interests, like environmental concerns.”Mineur put it more bluntly: “The joint committee is in effect a hotline for multinationals to the European Commission by which they can tell what they want to have on the table and what should come off.”Waren concurred: “Regulatory cooperation [like that in CETA] allows a review process corporations can use to squash regulation proposals before they ever see the light of day.”Though it may be close to entering into effect, protests across Europe have slowed CETA’s progress and could still threaten its full implementation. This protest in Berlin back in October 2015 is just one of many since held in Germany. Photo by Jakob Huber licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 generic licenseWho wins?All of these criticisms aside, the CETA negotiating process did include some scrutiny over environmental and social concerns, but the experts argue in most instances, not nearly enough.Kohler explained that all EU free trade agreements must undergo a Sustainability Impact Assessment, but that this analysis is conducted using the same positively presumptive model utilized to project CETA benefits. As a result, while some potential negative outcomes of the agreement are mentioned, they don’t make it to the executive summaries sent to policymakers. As a result, the final text of CETA’s Sustainability Impact Assessment, released in June of 2011, cites no anticipated negative social or environmental impacts at all from the proposed treaty — an assessment that many policy experts challenge.Dey said free trade supporters and negotiators generally assume that everyone can, and will, work together for the good of all. While this would be a wonderful scenario, she noted, this optimism overshadows the actuality of what is being committed to in the agreement.“Beyond all the language choices and distractions, when you actually look at texts and consider reality, the agreement is more about changing the rules and regulations for corporations, not everyday citizens,” said Dey.And as it stands, Mineur explained, CETA really doesn’t include any new, or most importantly, legally binding environmental provisions. “There are some 38 interpretative declarations [in CETA],” Mineur said, “but as Greenpeace put it, they have the value of an advertising brochure.”The tiny French-speaking Belgian region of Wallonia has fought against CETA since the beginning and never backed down, at one point threatening to derail negotiations entirely. Now Belgium awaits the ECJ’s opinion on the validity of CETA’s investment provisions, in particular the newly introduced investor court system, ICS. Photo by campact licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 generic licenseThe road ahead: CETA not a done dealAccording to all interviewed, just because CETA has gotten this far doesn’t mean it can’t be stopped. Blaylock noted that even after the agreement takes provisional effect, because ICS has been excluded from this preliminary round, there is still time to avoid some CETA risks.In order to enter into full effect, and for investor protection measures to take force, the agreement must first be ratified by the remaining 34 European national and regional parliaments.And along the way, CETA has faced several major setbacks due to European protest. In fact, the whole deal was nearly derailed when several Belgian regions, predominately the French-speaking region of Wallonia, refused to sign the agreement unless all ISDS provisions were removed, blocking the approval of the entire country.And those conditions of distrust haven’t changed.During a visit to Canada this March, European Union trade commissioner Cecilia Malmström said she anticipated problems ratifying CETA in one-quarter of EU member nations. This time around, Belgium is joined by several other nations like France, Germany, Italy, and Bulgaria, in threatening to reject CETA outright unless investor dispute provisions are sidelined. And in early September, Poland announced it would reject the agreement if the ICS panel did not include a judge from each EU member nation.Mineur explained that in her own country of the Netherlands, a group of citizens has already begun to collect signatures for a petition to force a referendum should the Dutch parliament fail to reject CETA.She added that Ireland and France might also force a referendum if their courts find CETA violates their constitutions. “Austria is also working on a petition. And a majority of Austrian, Greek, French, Irish and Italian MEPs voted against CETA in the European Parliament,” she said.And there are positive signs that the EU is taking ISDS protests seriously.The European Commission recently announced they intend to create two separate agreements on trade and investment, rather then combining them, in the hopes of easing the ratification process for the new EU-Singapore FTA. On September 14th Cecilia Malmström announced ISDS provisions wouldn’t be taking effect anytime soon. “In order not to waste time, we propose not to include the investment protection part” in the negotiating mandates that will be submitted to member states for ratification, Malmström said, adding “it will come later.”And as part of a deal struck between Wallonia and the federal government last year, in September, Belgium formally asked The European Court of Justice to decide whether CETA’s arbitration system is valid in the context of EU law. Even if the ECJ sides with CETA, the agreement must still be approved by five of Wallonia’s regional and language-based parliaments and their accompanying Upper Houses.France may also still reject the agreement on environmental grounds.On September 8th the commission of experts created as part of a campaign promise by French Prime Minister Emmanuel Macron to review the environmental and health impacts of CETA released their report. The committee concluded that CETA’s environmental and health ambitions paled in comparison to its commercial aspirations. They also claimed negotiations still lack transparency, as well as legally binding environmental commitments.On September 14th, French officials announced CETA would still enter into provisional effect, claiming recommended environmental changes would be negotiated later. French NGOs have put out the rallying call and protests to repeal CETA’s upcoming provisional application are scheduled.Despite these potential obstacles, most opponents agree that now is not the time to let up on advocacy. Sinclair said that many European and Canadian organizations see CETA as a kind of Trojan horse for larger, even more contentious agreements, like TTIP and TTP. As a result, killing CETA will almost certainly remain a shared goal of European NGOs.Dey contends that, though it’s easy to believe that individuals, and even countries, are powerless to influence complex international negotiations, like those for CETA, that’s simply not true.“We need to keep in mind that it will only take one ‘no’ vote to cripple the entire agreement,” said Dey. “And that gives us reason for serious long-term hope.”FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

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first_imgLong-term declines in rainfall on the Big Island of Hawaii have added up over time to make forests shorter and less green.Data from satellites and airplane surveys showed that forest canopy greenness decreased twice as much in areas where annual rainfall had steadily declined since 1920.Long-term drying trends in other parts of the world may have far-reaching impacts on forests. A plant without water will wither and, eventually, die. This is easy to observe in the browned leaves of a neglected houseplant, but what happens when an entire forest gets less and less rain over the course of nearly 100 years?To address this question, researchers used satellites and a high-tech airplane to spy on the native forests of Hawaii’s Big Island. The effects of drought do not end when rains return, the study showed. Rather, these impacts add up over time to make forests shorter, less dense, and less green.Unprecedented droughts and large-scale decreases in average rainfall are affecting many locations around the world, climate data has shown. Scientists have long wanted to know how these changes will affect tropical forests. But such projects require high-quality weather data that spans decades, and it is difficult to make precise observations for vast swaths of forest.The Carnegie Airborne Observatory used a laser tool called LiDAR to detect the three-dimensional structure of the forests and terrain below the canopy. Photo courtesy of Gregory Asner/Carnegie Institution for ScienceEcologists Jomar Barbosa and Gregory Asner from the Carnegie Institution for Science at Stanford University met these challenges by using recent advances in remote-sensing technology. They also used a unique, long-term weather dataset on Hawaii’s Big Island, where rainfall has declined on one side of the island for the last century—affecting the native forests that grow on the volcanic slopes.For their study, the researchers used data from the Carnegie Airborne Observatory (CAO)—an airplane designed by Asner to study ecosystems at this scale. The plane carries nearly a metric ton of computing and remote-sensing technology.“Work on the ground is very hard to translate into the big picture,” said Asner in an interview. “The airborne observatory was conceived to try to draw out the major findings derived from all these different landscapes.”Changes in forest photosynthesis on Hawaii’s Big Island from 2002 to 2016. Red: decrease in photosynthesis. Green: increase in photosynthesis. White: other land-cover classes such as bare soil, invasive species, or human settlements. Graphic from Barbosa and Asner, Environmental Research Letters (2017).The study also used data from NASA’s Terra satellite, which tracked the greenness of forest canopies on the Big Island between 2002 and 2016. Greenness reflects how much photosynthesis is taking place. Less photosynthesis reflects a decline in plant growth—which means the forest can’t support as much life.The CAO flew over two patches of the Hawaiian forest in 2007 and 2016. One patch was on the island’s wetter side, and the second was on the island’s drier side. A laser instrument fired 400,000 pulses per second to measure the canopy’s height in detail. Taller trees typically contain more biomass, pointing to more sustained growth over time.Waipio Valley on the Big Island of Hawaii. Photo by Eric Tessmer/Creative CommonsTo connect the changes seen in canopy height and greenness to rainfall, the team used data developed by researchers at the University of Hawaii to trace the island’s rainfall by year and by location from 1920 to 2012. This allowed Barbosa and Asner to pinpoint the driest spots on the island at various time scales.They found that forests which had seen less and less rain since 1920 were shorter and two times less green than they would have expected from the effects of short-term droughts alone. Browned leaves and dying vegetation are common during extended droughts. But these results show for the first time that when rainfall declines over much longer time scales, the damages to forests pile up.“They were able to distinguish the loss of greenness from short-term versus long-term drying trends,” said Christian Giardina, a Hawaii-based ecologist with the U.S. Forest Service who was not involved in the study. “This kind of analysis highlights the importance of long-term climate data and paves the way for future studies that seek to integrate short-term and long-term datasets where they are available,” Giardina told Mongabay.Applying this work to managing important forests may be easier said than done, Asner said. “It’s time for land managers and policymakers to consider alleviating some of the other stresses on forests, like fire or invasive species,” he said. “Then you’re giving the forest a better chance of surviving this long-term decrease in precipitation. When I say this in meetings people know it’s the answer, but it’s hard to get it done.”The I’iwi or scarlet honeycreeper, a native Hawaiian forest bird. Photo by Bettina Arrigoni/Creative CommonsCITATIONJomar M Barbosa and Gregory P Asner (2017). Effects of long-term rainfall decline on the structure and functioning of Hawaiian forests. Environmental Research Letters. 12. 094002. http://doi.org/cf8r Alex Fox is a graduate student in the Science Communication Program at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Other Mongabay stories by UCSC students can be found here. Header image: Pair of scarlet honeycreepers. Credit by Cari Lynn Squibb for USGS. Article published by Rhett Butlercenter_img Conservation Technology, Drought, Environment, Forests, Impact Of Climate Change, Remote Sensing, Satellite Imagery, Trees, UCSC Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Isabel Esterman Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Deforestation, Encroachment, Endangered Species, Environment, Featured, Infrastructure, Mammals, Protected Areas, Rainforest Animals, Rainforests, Roads, Tigers, Wildlife center_img Sumatra’s Kerinci Seblat National Park is part of a UNESCO World Heritage Site known as the Tropical Rainforest Heritage of Sumatra (TRHS), which has been inscribed on UNESCO’s List of World Heritage in Danger since 2011.UNESCO has noted particular concern about a spate of road projects planned for Kerinci Seblat and other protected areas within the TRHS.According to park officials, Indonesia’s forestry ministry has refused permits for all new roads within the park; the sole project to receive permission is the upgrade of an existing road.The park still faces immense pressure from encroachment for agriculture, logging, mining and poaching. The rainforests that once carpeted Indonesia’s Sumatra Island are among the world’s most biodiverse ecosystems, home to iconic species like the Sumatran tiger, rhino and orangutan. They are also among the most imperiled; in just two decades, between 1990 and 2010, Sumatra lost 40 percent of its old-growth forest. The tigers, rhinos and orangutans that roamed those forests are now critically endangered.Much of the intact forest that remains is protected, at least nominally, in a series of National Parks, and, since 2004, as a UNESCO World Heritage Site known as the Tropical Rainforest Heritage of Sumatra (TRHS).Rainforest foliage surrounds a waterfall outside Lempur village in Sumatra. Image by Rod Harbinson/RodHarbinson.com.In recent years, concern has grown that Indonesian authorities are not doing enough to protect this critical biodiversity hotspot. Since 2011, the site has been inscribed on UNESCO’s List of World Heritage In Danger due to the risks of logging, encroachment, road expansion and poaching.In 2016, UNESCO flagged up concerns about road construction in the area, particularly in Kerinci Seblat National Park, a protected area extending for 350 kilometers (217 miles) from northwest to southeast along the rugged spine of the Bukit Barisan Mountains.In the years since, it’s been some good news and some bad news for Kerinci Seblat National Park.Canceled RoadsIn 2016, UNESCO identified 12 planned or proposed road projects in four zones of the park. Now, park officials say, the list of road expansion projects of concern has been whittled down to five. And of those, four are cancelled. The only project currently set to go forward is the improvement of an existing road, which runs from Sandaran Agung mountain across to Tapan near the West coast.A slide presentation from the Kerinci Seblat National Park office details proposed road projects, four of which have been canceled.According to Hadinata Karyadi, a spokesman for Kerinci Seblat National Park in Sungai Penuh, the town encircled by the park, the local office of the forestry ministry had formally recommended to the minister that the four now-cancelled projects be denied approval. For example, Karyadi says his office urged the ministry to refuse approval for a proposed road through the village of Lempur because it threatened critical tiger habitat. Those rejections were duly issued over a two-year period, with the last project being denied a permit in 2018.The road-improvement project that was approved presents fewer environmental concerns, Karyadi says, because it involves upgrading an already existing road rather than building a new one. The current road is steep, winding and currently in such bad condition that even public minibuses will not use it, Karyadi says. Once improved, though, he says the road will be sufficient to serve as an evacuation route in case of natural disasters — one of the frequent justifications for proposing new road projects in the park. “Improving the existing road is better than building a new one,” he says. “If it is good, it will be enough for evacuation needs for now.”Some concerns do remain, because any increase in traffic on a road through the park could affect the local wildlife. In late 2018, Fauna & Flora International (FFI), an NGO working closely with the national park management, planned an “intensive biodiversity survey” to “assess impacts of upgrading a road running through the national park and make recommendations to government.”For now, the most hazardous road proposals seem to be off the table, though FFI notes that “local political elites” continue to push for the revival of the cancelled projects. But the park and its ecosystems remain under serious threat due to population growth, agriculture and industry.“Encroachment on the national park is the main problem,” Karyadi says. He adds that the current staff of around 70 rangers isn’t enough to police the huge perimeter and that his office has requested a larger budget.This road from Lempur village towards the Kerinci Seblat National Park was proposed for upgrading by local politicians. So far park authorities have refused because the area it would cross is in a highly sensitive biodiversity area and tiger core zone. Image by Rod Harbinson/RodHarbinson.com.A rejected roadOne of the most controversial projects was the proposed new road in the south of the park, through Lempur. At present a trail runs from Lempur, through the village rice fields and continues as a wide rocky walking trail that winds through the forest. According to locals, it’s been there ever since anyone can remember. These days it’s used mainly to get to local tourist sites such as Kaco Lake and for trekking to the national park.“My team made a full report and gave it to the ranger,” says trekking guide Andi Tiasanoawa in Lempur, explaining his response to the road proposal. “We don’t want people cutting the trees,” he says, adding that he makes his living from the forest and doesn’t want it damaged.Guide Zacky Zaid, who has been trekking these hills regularly for 10 years, says a past road project in the area made people aware of the potential downsides such developments can bring. Zaid says that around five years ago the government agreed to build an access road to the village of Renah Kemumu inside the park boundary. “This route was one of the popular five-day treks that we did,” Zaid says. But once the road was built, the wildlife that the tourists came to see dwindled. “Lots of people cut the trees when the government built the road,” he says. “The nature is not really good anymore. There are no big trees anymore. For us I’m so sad. We closed trip there a couple of years ago.”Ultimately, the Lempur road was rejected “because it threatened the tiger core area,” Karyadi says.A woman fills a sack with freshly harvested rice in a paddy field near Sungai Penuh in the Kerinci valley. Image by Rod Harbinson/RodHarbinson.com.Fertile farmingAt 3,805 meters (12,483 feet) above sea level, Mount Kerinci is the tallest volcano in Indonesia, and dominates the landscape here. The alluvial sediment deposited by past eruptions provides the valley with mineral-rich soil that draws farmers. Steep hills that ring the valley create the boundary to the national park beyond. Migration into the valley has led to pressure on the park as farmers encroach on the hills.A huge 10,000-hectare (24,700-acre) tea plantation stretches across the valley floor; in between, farmer’s plots host a variety of everything from potatoes to tomatoes and coffee.As the elevation rises and the valley floor gives way to the steep mountain slopes, the crops change to cinnamon, rubber, coffee and cloves. These tree crops give the slopes a forested appearance, but close up the hills are cultivated and densely populated with farming communities.“The cinnamon boom is a particular problem” driving encroachment, says Karyadi. Others see it as a benign and sustainable traditional practice that also has economic benefits for poor farmers.In the farming village of Talang Kemulun at the foot of the hills that form the valley’s southern perimeter, Eibru Hajar says he mainly grows cinnamon and coffee on his own land. “I have around a hundred cinnamon trees and cut them in a rotation cycle of 15 years,” he says. “I get around 50 kilos [110 pounds] per tree.“The rangers come by every couple of months,” Hajar adds. “So I’m afraid of cutting the trees [inside the park boundary]. The penalty for cutting forest trees is a big fine and if you don’t have money you get several months in prison.”Eibru Hajar is a cinammon farmer in Talang Kemulun village which sits at the bottom of steep hills marking the border of the Kerinci Seblat National Park. Image by Rod Harbinson/RodHarbinson.com.But the threat of penalties doesn’t deter everybody, and NGOs like FFI report that land continues to be cleared within the borders of the park.Illegal mining is another threat. In a 2018 report, FFI said it found alluvial gold mining sites in and around the park’s borders, “posing serious threat to a key tiger corridor with a dirt road constructed which entered the edge of the national park.” Despite the central government’s commitment to protecting the park, local political pressure on the park remains high. In 2017, it spilled into open conflict when gold miners held a municipal government official hostage, according to FFI.FFI also tracks illegal logging and poaching of pangolins, tigers and other wildlife. It notes that law enforcement efforts since 2016 did seem to have an impact on reducing the poaching, but that these efforts remain a challenge.With agribusiness and extractive industries hungry for new land, the pressure on Sumatra’s forests is relentless. Kerinci Seblat is no exception, and migrant farmers have swelled the local population, placing further pressure on the national park.Last year the park management set up a Role Model Program, to try and stem escalating encroachment, especially by migrant farmers who frequently claim that the park’s boundaries are unclear.“The park boundary is well demarcated with concrete markers about one meter [3 feet] tall,” Karyadi says. “In some places locals have dug up the marker posts.”The scheme aims to restore encroached forest and establish alternative livelihoods. Along the way are manifold obstacles, not least gaining the participation and cooperation of sometimes reluctant farmers.“This week we caught some illegal loggers and handed them to the police. They will be judged by the law,” Karyadi says. His office is trying to navigate a tricky path between encouraging farmers to change their practices through incentives (some get financial rewards under the Role Model scheme), and punishing offenders who have clearly broken national park rules.For now, encroachment by farmers is ongoing, but local political attempts to accelerate this by opening up new areas through road-building have been limited. Meanwhile, political tensions remain between politicians seeking more infrastructure building and the forestry ministry, which works with the support of international NGOs to maintain the integrity of the national park and its borders.Rainforest overhangs Kaco Lake near Lempur village near Kerinci Seblat National Park. Image by Rod Harbinson/RodHarbinson.com.Banner Image: a Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae), one of the park’s iconic species, by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

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first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Agriculture, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Logging, Amazon Soy, Cattle, Cattle Pasture, Cattle Ranching, Conservation, Controversial, Corruption, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Crime, Environmental Politics, Forests, Green, Illegal Logging, Illegal Timber Trade, Industrial Agriculture, Land Use Change, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Logging, Rainforests, Saving The Amazon, Social Justice, Soy, Threats To The Amazon, timber trade, Transparency, Tropical Deforestation Recent research finds that a failure to track environmental infractions and to enforce environmental laws and regulations is aiding and abetting ever escalating rates of deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon and Cerrado.Researchers studied the failings of three environmental initiatives: the TAC da Carne, blocking cattle sales raised in deforestation embargoed areas; the Amazon Soy Moratorium, stopping sales of soy grown on deforested lands; and DOF timber permitting, which allows logging only in approved areas.The study found that timber, soy and cattle producers often subvert Brazil’s environmental laws by illegally “laundering” harvested logs, beef and soy to conceal illegal deforestation. These practices have been largely helped by the weak governance of the Jair Bolsonaro administration.The scientists recommend the closing of illegal soy, cattle and logging laundering loopholes via the strengthening of Brazilian environmental agencies, the improvement of monitoring technologies, better integration of policies and systems, and putting market pressure on producers. Confiscated timber harvested illegally within a Brazilian indigenous reserve in Roraima state. Law enforcement raids like this one have largely become a thing of the past under President Jair Bolsonaro. Image courtesy of IBAMA.Brazil’s deforestation control agreements and environmental legislation — once considered strong and successful — now require an “urgent” upgrade as soy planters, cattle ranchers and timber merchants have found ways to easily circumvent regulations, experts warn in a recent scientific study.At the center of the problem are the country’s current inadequate enforcement and legal system — weakened first under President Michel Temer, and now further under Jair Bolsonaro — which provides multiple opportunities for environmental law infractions to go undetected or unpunished, according to the findings published by the Perspectives in Ecology and Conservation journal.“It’s a priority not only to keep what already exists, but also to consider new and better policies,” said Philip Fearnside, a research professor at Brazil’s National Institute of Amazonian Research (INPA) and one of the six authors of the study.Through their findings, the scientists shed light on the limitations of three key Brazilian environmental initiatives; the researchers also listed measures that could help the nation reverse the upward trend in deforestation occurring since 2012, as clearing rates rise in the Amazon and Cerrado savanna biomes.These recommendations include the strengthening of Brazilian environmental agencies, improvement of monitoring technologies, better integration of environmental policies, and putting market pressure on producers, along with other measures.Ranching in Pará state, Brazil. The nation is home to more than 200 million head, with “cattle laundering” made easy by weak monitoring and enforcement. Photo credit: acmoraes on Visualhunt / CC BY.TAC Agreement bypassed via “cattle laundering”In 2009, meatpacking companies, cattle producers and the Brazilian government signed a voluntary agreement known as the TAC da Carne, aimed at blocking the sale of cattle produced within areas embargoed due to illegal forest clearing.However, since then, producers have learned how to bypass the agreement by “laundering” their cattle — raising and fattening them on ranches responsible for deforestation, then shifting them to ranches where no deforestation has occurred, from which middle-men sell to slaughterhouses who only track the final sale. This finding is according to audits made by federal prosecutors.Despite this rampant illegal process, there has been no punishment for slaughterhouses or producers routinely using the cattle tracking loophole. Nor has the government made any effort to close that loophole by demanding better reporting and enforcement. The result is a weak TAC agreement, the study showed, which fails to curb deforestation.A viable solution, Fearnside said, is tracking the cattle continuously from origin to slaughterhouse. “In England, since the mad cow crisis, they started tagging the cattle,” he noted. “Each animal has an individual code that tracks all the farms where the cattle have been. It is also possible to be done in Brazil.”The integration of systems that track complementary regulatory regimes is another solution proposed by the authors. The federal government, for example, could link its animal transit permit (GTA) system — a legally required hygiene check of transported livestock — to its rural environmental register (CAR) — which identifies all rural properties and their location within mandatory forest preservation areas. Tying together those two systems would enable monitoring compliance with environmental legislation and livestock agreements.An IBAMA agent measures timber volume and confirms botanical identification at a sawmill suspected of receiving illegal Ipê logs in Pará state. Fraud occurs along the entire timber supply chain according to experts. Image © Marizilda Cruppe / Greenpeace.Timber harvesting plagued by permit fraud As with cattle producers, timber merchants regularly launder trees logged in the Amazon and elsewhere to conceal illegal deforestation.They typically do so by subverting a compulsory license, known as a DOF, intended to track and control the origin and transportation of native forest products and by-products. Illicit merchants conceal the illegal cutting of trees by purchasing black market invoices and DOFs from locales where the government has authorized extraction, the report showed.The fraud scheme also relies on overestimating the high volumes of commercially valuable timber species found within approved extraction areas, and then tagging trees of that same species illegally cut elsewhere to the permit, according to the findings.Impunity fuels criminal action in both the cattle and timber industries, agrees Ricardo Abad, a long-term remote sensing expert at the Socioenvironmental Institute (ISA), an NGO. “The problem,” he notes, “is that there is no oversight, no punishment for those producers caught in an irregular situation; fines are never paid, the system is bureaucratic, and people are corrupted along the way.”New soy fields and neighboring forest in the Brazilian Cerrado. Image by Jim Wickens, Ecostorm / Mighty Earth.Amazon Soy Moratorium evadedA third environmental initiative subject to both “laundering” and “leakage,” the study notes, is the Amazon Soy Moratorium, a voluntary agreement between producers, commodities companies, environmental NGOs and government, by which major soy traders have agreed not to purchase soybeans grown in Amazon areas deforested after July 2008.However, soy laundering is carried out in much the same way as cattle laundering, via fraudulent tracking that allows soy produced in embargoed areas to be listed as being produced in “regularized” areas free of recent deforestation, or under the names of laranjas, or “oranges,” poor people who pretend to hold land deeds in order to conceal actual ownership by large landholders, according to the findings.Thanks to such scams, researchers say, a commodity company making a final soy purchase may not know the true source of the beans. Indeed, since many producers own multiple farms, soy produced in an embargoed area can easily be moved from an embargoed plantation to one with regularized status, before sale to a trading firm.Meat for sale in São Paulo, Brazil. Cattle aren’t tracked from their point of origin in Brazil, so deforestation can easily be concealed along the supply chain as livestock is resold before arriving at a slaughterhouse. Photo credit: wallyg on Visualhunt.com / CC BY-NC-ND.The consumer’s roleRicardo Abad, an expert who dedicated the last 10 years to assessing Brazil’s supply chains, says that the most successful approach for achieving environmental enforcement is through market pressure to create a more sustainable commodities industry. He notes that transnational companies, especially those in the European Union, have been changing their supply chain requirements to include social and environmental factors, and this is key to ensuring that promises made under agreements such as the TAC da Carne and Amazon Soy Moratorium are kept.According to the study, eight years after TAC da Carne’s creation, 63 meatpackers — responsible for the processing of approximately 70 percent of cattle produced in the Amazon — had joined that agreement, with some positive results. However, there remains no real market pressure for non-signatory companies to join TAC, with many importers, including the increasingly key Chinese market, not requiring any kind of monitoring and enforcement of rules regarding cattle origin and deforestation.For Abad, it’s not only a matter of having the enforcement tools but using them to prevent buyers from accessing these products. He believes that “big traders, such as Walmart and Carrefour, are also responsible [for deforestation within their supply chains] and need to be really held accountable.” This can best be done by raising consumer awareness.A tractor ploughs up newly deforested land in the Cerrado, Brazil’s savanna. While fines are often issued for illegal deforestation, few are ever paid due to lax government enforcement. Photo by Jim Wickens, Ecostorm / Mighty Earth.Political challenges aheadAccording to Carlos Souza, a Research Associate at Imazon, a Brazilian NGO that independently tracks Amazon deforestation, there is already available technology to monitor and identify environmental infractions. The problem, he says, resides in the government’s failure to enforce and punish.Recent rising deforestation rates in the Brazilian Amazon, Souza says, should serve as a wakeup call to trigger action to halt forest degradation and destruction, but, he adds, “we have an even bigger challenge now under this government,” a reference to the Bolsonaro administration.Still, Souza hopes to see improvements in Brazil’s current environmental agreements. “As a society, we all expect a new 2.0 version of these agreements to fight deforestation,” he concludes.Without these enhancements, the researchers agree, escalating deforestation and the loss of all habitat types will continue across Brazil’s biomes, turning the country into an ever more fragmented patchwork of soy plantations and cattle pastures.Banner image caption: An IBAMA raid on illegal deforesters within a Munduruku indigenous reserve under a previous administration; President Bolsonaro has greatly diminished the agency’s law enforcement capacity. Image courtesy of IBAMA.Amazon rainforest cleared by burning, the primary means of converting forests into pastureland. Photo credit: bbcworldservice on Visualhunt.com / CC BY-NC.center_img Article published by Glenn Schererlast_img read more

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first_imgExcelsior High and Jamaica female shot put and discus star, Shanice Love, had a dream to end her Champs career with gold and the shot put or discus record. On yesterday’s second day of the ISSA/GraceKennedy Boys and Girls’ Athletic Championships, Love recovered from two early bad throws to take the Class One discus with 52.73 metres, more than 10 metres farther than second-place Devia Brown of Hydel High, 42.76m. St Jago’s Tracey-Ann Simms was third with 41.52m. “This is my last Champs and I really wanted to make my mark and I did,” Love told The Gleaner. “I am very pleased with Champs (career), my God, I am so excited. I don’t know what to say, my teammates are happy for me, so too my mom, my dad and my coach.” Love admitted that she was a little unsettled at the start of the event, after messing up her first two attempts. “My two throws in the first round were bad, so I had to get in a standing throw. After that I decided I am going for it and when I say I am going for it and I go for it,” she said. “Nervousness caused the first one, but I forgot about it. The second throw was too early, I was an anxious throw, but I decided to go for it. I went into the final in second place but decided I was not staying in second, that I am going for first place,” she continued. ” I was very confident with my coach by my side and my teammates supporting me,” she said. – L. Slast_img read more

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first_imgBudget 2017Finance Minister Winston Jordan has assured that the Ministry is on stream in presenting its Annual Budget for 2017 come December 5, but shied away from any specific details regarding any increases in taxes or fees to be paid by stakeholders. “It’s going to be a lovely budget, don’t worry,” he quipped.Finance Minister Winston JordanMinister Jordan was at the time engaging members of the local media corps on Friday last at the Finance Ministry’s boardroom. Asked specifically by Guyana Times about any increased payments to be made by taxpayers or those seeking to access Government services, Minister Jordan said: “I cannot speak to anything beyond what has already been done earlier in the year, as it relates to the raising of fees, and so on and so forth this year.”He suggested that stakeholders wait for the details, saying “The upcoming budget, we’ll wait on it, in a couple more months. It’s going to be a lovely budget, don’t worry.”Meanwhile, responding to reported criticism on the lack of adequate consultations by Government in preparation of the Budget by sections of the Private Sector, namely the Georgetown Chamber of Commerce and Industry (GCCI), Minister Jordan denied being in receipt of any formal complaint of displeasure from that body.The Minister reminded that he had met with representatives of the Private Sector Commission earlier this year “where I reiterated to them that at the last consultation I had said to them, we can meet every quarter”.He told media operatives that representatives of the Private Sector Commission (PSC) had admitted to him their tardiness in meeting with Government on the annual budget preparations.The Minister did seek to assure stakeholders; however, “We are on track for the Budget for December 5.”He said the relevant personnel were currently assessing the various submissions by Budget Agencies, “to get an understanding of how they were put together and whether they are consistent with what they are looking for”.Since the coalition Government’s ascension to office, two National Budgets were presented early by the Finance Minister.By law, the National Budget should be debated and approved by the National Assembly and approved for assent by the President no later than April 30 of each year.last_img read more

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first_img**Update – Power was restored at 7:57pm Sunday.Once again for the second time today, power is out in the Mile 0 City.A lightning strike has knocked out power to just under 1500 customers in the South Peace region.  The outage stretches from the 212 road to the north and to the south the BC and Alberta Border.  These same people also lost power early Sunday morning at around 6am and had it restored at 4pm.- Advertisement -This outage is expected to be restored by 8pm and went out at 6:30pm.  For more details you can visit www.bchydro.com/outagesIf you have any photos of the storms in the Dawson Creek area, send them to contact@energeticcity-beta.mystagingwebsite.comlast_img read more

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