first_imgArticle published by Isabel Esterman After policies of decentralization gave regional governments more control over the mining sector, the number of permits issued exploded.A countrywide investigation into Indonesia’s mining sector revealed that 2,522 mining permits do not fulfill clean and clear standards.Investigations have revealed the government is owed $380 million in mining royalties.Collecting remaining arrears proves challenging, as basic details about mining companies in arrears, including where offices are located – or if they exist at all – remain missing from government permit data. Indonesia is now one of the world’s largest exporters of coal, an industry that contributes around four percent of the country’s gross domestic product mostly through exports to China and India. Despite its massive size, however, observers are concerned that the sector’s actual contribution to the public treasury — in the form of taxes and royalties — is not nearly enough to balance out the social and environmental impacts of coal extraction.According to data from the Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources, hundreds of millions of dollars in royalties and taxes owed to the government remain unpaid. The government often lacks key information it needs to collect the revenues owed to it, even down to the addresses of mining companies’ offices.Indominco Mandiri coal mine operation in Santan Ilir village in East Kalimantan, Indonesia. Residents of downstream villages say the mine has left the Santan River too polluted to be used for drinking, bathing or irrigation. Photo by Ardiles Rante/Greenpeace.The consequences of decentralizationIndonesia’s decentralization era, beginning in the early 2000s, saw a shift in control over extractive industries from central to regional governments. The most significant law for the mining sector was the 2009 Mining Law, which gave district and municipal governments the authority to issue permits for mid-sized mines.District government’s new authority to control permits did not come with an increase in budget or capacity to ensure that permits adhered to environmental laws. This, combined with a boom in global commodity prices, resulted in a subsequent explosion of mining permits across Indonesia, many of which have operated in violation of permit laws. According to the International Energy Agency, an estimated 74 million tons of coal were extracted illegally from small mining operations in Indonesia in 2013, contributing to an oversupply of coal.Mining is now a major contributor to Indonesia’s economy. In 2014, revenue from the mining sector reached IDR 37.37 trillion ($2.8 billion), contributing around 10 percent of total state revenue, according to data from the extractive sector oversight body Extractive Industry Transparency Initiative (EITI). Government revenue from mining comes mainly from non-tax revenues in the form of royalties and land rent.However, poor management and control of the mining permitting process — particularly for small to medium-sized mining concessions — has led to an excess of mining permits being issued by district governments, without adequate oversight or enforcement of related laws.Coal mining pit in Jambi, Sumatra. Abandoned mining pits fill with water, becoming literal death-traps for people in nearby communities, particularly children. Photo courtesy of Feri Irawan/Perkumpulan Hijau.Researcher Anna Funfgeld observed that 90 percent of Indonesia’s coal originates from Kalimantan, where strip mining is largely used to excavate coal close to the surface. The cheapest and most favored form of extraction, strip mining causes the destruction of landscapes and agricultural land and the contamination of water and soil, Funfgeld found.Poor management in the issuance of mining licenses has meant that an excess of mining concessions has been issued, including in areas zoned for other purposes. According to a network of regional and nationally-based NGOs called Anti-Mining Mafia Coalition, 6.3 million hectares of mining concessions have been allocated illegally within forests zoned for protection.Evidence of excessive and poorly regulated mining permitting emerged in the findings from a recent investigation by the National Human Rights Commission and NGO groups into the mining sector in East Kalimantan, where the majority of Indonesia’s coal is sourced. The investigation revealed that almost 70 percent of the province has been allocated for mining concessions. The same study found that 632 coal mining pits have been left abandoned across East Kalimantan. These pits often fill with water, and have been the cause of 27 deaths by drowning to date, including 21 children.Poor management of mining permits has also resulted in revenue “leakage,” as financial dues – such as royalties and land tax – owed by mining companies are left unpaid. The revenues that are able to be collected from the coal sector in no way outweigh the expenses needed to address the extensive social and environmental damages brought by poorly managed mining operations, Merah Johansyah, the national coordination of JATAM, Indonesia’s Mining Advocacy Network, told Mongabay. “These include the impacts of flooding, forest destruction, community conflict and river and water source pollution,” he said.Aerial view of the PT Borneo Indobara coal mining operation in South Kalimantan, part of Indonesian Borneo. Photo by Daniel Beltra/Greenpeace.The central government’s responseIndonesia’s central government responded to problems in coal-mine permitting by tightening coal mining sector regulations, including introducing a clean and clear certification system. To obtain a clean and clear certificate, mining companies must prove they have no outstanding royalty and other tax debts; that rehabilitation funds have been collected and saved in a government bank account; that exploration and environmental commitments have been fulfilled; and that concession areas do not overlap with protected forest areas or with other companies’ concessions, including for palm oil and timber plantations.In early 2014, following initial civil society reports of significant corruption, illegalities and environmental and social damage in the mining sector, the Corruption Eradication Commission (KPK), together with the Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources and the Ministry of Environment and Forestry, began investigations into mining operations in 12 provinces with the largest number of mining permits. The initiative, called Korsup Minerba, aimed to assess the legality of mining permits, ensure companies were registered to pay tax, land rent and other royalties, and determine whether permits adhered to all relevant permitting and environmental laws.The Korsup Minerba investigations began in February 2014, when there were a total of 10,992 locally-issued licenses across Indonesia. Within a year, investigations revealed that 40 percent of these licenses were non-clean and clear.By April 2017, data from the energy ministry indicated that already 2,187 permits had been canceled or their operational period had ended and not been extended. The total number of permits active in Indonesia had reduced to 8,524 mineral and coal mining permits. However, 2,522 mining permits active in Indonesia are not clean and clear. After three years of implementation, Johansyah is concerned that the Korsup Minerba is yet to result in any significant improvements in mining governance.“The clean and clear certification system is only a desktop exercise, to check that all documents are in place. It does not involve a site assessment,” Johansyah said. Clean and clear certification may not reflect whether companies’ operations adhere to environmental and human health protection laws. There are many instances of mining companies that violate laws but that hold clean and clear certification, Johansyah reported: “A child drowned in an abandoned mining pit in Kutai Kartenegara owned by a clean and clear mining company, PT Multi Harapan Utama.”A baby orangutan in North Sumatra, Indonesia. Along with habitat loss due to mining, orangutans in both Sumatra and Borneo are threatened by fires and deforestation for oil palm and pulp plantations. Photo by Rhett Butler/Mongabay.Efforts to clean up the mining sector also face challenges in collecting remaining debts owed. Mineral and coal mining companies owe the government a total of IDR 5.07 trillion ($380 million). Although this is a reduction from the total of IDR 6.65 trillion owed in December 2016, collecting the remaining arrears is proving to be difficult. “Collecting royalties has not been as easy as we initially thought. There are many obstacles,” an energy ministry official told Tempo in February.Divisions in authority and a disconnect between central and regional government has made collecting revenues challenging.  Although district, and now provincial governments are empowered to issue permits for mining, responsibility for collecting royalties, land rent and taxes lies largely with the central government.As Hendra Sinadia, the deputy director of the Coal Production Association has observed, this has resulted in major gaps in data on mining operations between different levels of government. “I am certain the government does not have accurate data about coal mining production. Ever since the authority for mining has been with the regional government, the total number of mining permits has been hard to trace,” Sinadia told CNN Indonesia in January.A lack of accurate data on mining permits, combined with a lack of resources, makes it difficult for the collection of state revenues from mining companies, explained Agung Budiono, communication and outreach manager at mining sector oversight NGO Publish What You Pay Indonesia.“The Directorate General of Mineral and Coal Mining already has detailed data that includes the names of the thousands of companies that are in arrears. However, one of the biggest challenges has been that after tracing the names of the companies in arrears, it emerges that their existence is unknown. The addresses used when applying for a permit were not provided correctly,” Budiono told Mongabay.It is not known whether the addresses were fake or companies have moved since registering for mining permits. “The Director General of Mineral and Coal Mining sent letters to mining permit holders in an effort to recover non-tax state revenues owed to the government. However, many of the letters came back return to sender, indicating the addresses are incorrect,” said Budiono.The Anti-Mining Mafia Coalition are pushing for more transparency in the issuance of mining permits. Making public all mining permits in Indonesia, including their full names and addresses, as well as their progress towards meeting clean and clear certification, would help to ensure better civil society oversight, said Ali Adam Lubis, a representative of the Anti-Mafia Coalition in a media statement.“Going forward the government needs to blacklist individuals or companies that don’t comply with laws. It is important to make data on mining permits available to the public and law enforcement agencies,” Budiono told Mongabay. Partnerships between government agencies like the Directorate of Mineral and Coal Mining and the Directorate of Common Law Administration, could also help government to identify debt-owing mining permit holders, said Budiono.Coal barges come down the Mahakam river in Samarinda, East Kalimantan, Indonesian Borneo every few minutes. Photo courtesy of Ardiles Rante/Greenpeace.Cracking down on non-compliant mining companies brings its own challenges for provincial governments. Governors who have canceled non-clean-and-clear permits are facing resistance from the mining sector and from district governments. Already 20 mining companies that have had their permits revoked are threatening to sue provincial governments. Budi Santoso, Director of the Centre for Indonesian Resources Strategic Studies, said that mining companies base their cases against provincial governments on the lack of legal strength with clean and clear certification. “Mining permits that are revoked for not having clean and clear status can potentially be contested, because clean and clear does not have a legal basis,” Santoso told Kontan.co.id.There are reports that district heads are also pushing back against the cancelation of permits. In East Kalimantan, 59 percent of the 1,404 mining permits issued to coal companies are not clean and clear and are at risk of revocation. The governor told local media in April that he is under pressure from district heads to not make problems for coal mining companies by canceling their permits.The government is seeking to increase revenues from mining by increasing royalty rates paid by mining companies. In February 2017, the House of Representatives decided that smaller coal mining companies will have to pay royalty rates of between 10 to 13 percent, depending on the quality of coal they mine – an increase of the current royalty rates of 3.5 to 7 percent. Parliamentary lawmakers are optimistic that these increased royalty rates will see state revenue rates increase.Environmental activists caution, however, that without improvements to the government’s management of the mining sector, the increased royalty rates may also not result in increased state revenues. Appropriate law enforcement must follow for companies that don’t obey laws, said Johansyah. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Coal, Corruption, Environment, Environmental Politics, Governance, Habitat Loss, Law, Law Enforcement, Mining, Rainforest Destruction FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

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first_imgArticle published by Genevieve Belmaker Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Forests, Illegal Logging, Illegal Timber Trade, Illegal Trade Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img The findings are based on months of undercover field research made public by the Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA).Approximately 300,000 cubic meters of logs have been smuggled from Cambodia and legalized in Vietnam through these quotas since last November, with kickbacks as high as $13 million.The related report from the EIA comes on the eve of Vietnam’s bid for a FLEGT agreement on timber with the EU. HO CHI MINH CITY, Vietnam – A new in-depth report from the Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA) shows that Vietnamese officials, companies and private individuals are smuggling enormous amounts of illegally logged timber from protected areas of Cambodia into Vietnam.The report, “Repeat Offender: Vietnam’s persistent trade in illegal timber” provides eye-opening details gleaned from months of undercover investigations in Cambodia and Vietnam by EIA investigators. EIA alleges that Vietnamese government officials are reaping huge financial benefits by facilitating large-scale logging in eastern Cambodia.Jago Wadley, senior forests campaigner at EIA, described the situation in the starkest of terms.“This is the single largest log-smuggling operation that we have seen for years,” Wadley stated in a press release which accompanied the report. “Vietnam must address this weak approach to any agreement with the EU to combat illegal logging and the associated trade.”Vietnamese representatives will meet in Brussels this month to finalize a Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade (FLEGT) agreement with the EU. On paper the agreement would ensure that all timber exported to the EU from Vietnam has legal, verifiable origins.However, the EIA found in their investigation, which they conducted from November 2016 to March 2017, that Vietnamese government officials and security force personnel are major customers for illegally logged Cambodian timber. They are banking millions of dollars in illegal cash bribes, kickbacks, and fees from timber smugglers while hundreds of thousands of cubic meters of logs are pilfered from Cambodian national parks.During the investigation period, unprecedented illegal logging was uncovered in Cambodia’s Virachey and Ou Ya Dev national parks, as well as Lumphat Wildlife Sanctuary. These areas are located in Cambodia’s Ratanakiri province. All of the logs were being moved into Vietnam.Pointless regulationsThe timber smuggling from Cambodia to Vietnam is taking place despite a blanket ban the Cambodian government placed on log exports to Vietnam early last year. Corrupt officials on both sides of the border have rendered this ban toothless. The EIA found that Cambodian officials are taking payments from neighboring traders, while Vietnamese authorities have created quotas to give the logs legal status within the country while incentivizing devastating logging.It is estimated that roughly 300,000 cubic meters of logs have been smuggled from Cambodia and legalized in Vietnam through these quotas since last November, with kickbacks possibly reaching over $13 million.While these profits go to local officials directly involved with the illicit trade, the central government has also benefited by taxing these imports, effectively sanctioning illegal activity, the report alleges.Map via freeworldmaps.netThe massive theft of Cambodia’s forests has largely been directed from Gia Lai province in Vietnam’s rugged Central Highlands. In late 2016, the provincial People’s Committee permitted the importation of 300,000 cubic meters of logs through five designated border crossings, in addition to divvying the amount up among 16 local companies. According to this regulation, the entire amount of logs must be brought across the border before May 30.First-hand observations by EIA reported seven major storage depots on the Vietnamese side of the border where logs were brought after exiting Cambodia. These depots appeared in late 2016, along with roads leading to the logging sites.After clearing customs, the logs were taken to factories in Gia Lai and Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam’s commercial capital, as well as to buyers in Quy Nhon, a port on the south-central coast.Other loopholesMeanwhile, Vietnam is also removing large amounts of Siamese rosewood from Laos, despite a largely effective ban put in place by the Laotian government. During a visit to Đồng Kỳ , a wood processing village outside of Hanoi, EIA investigators were offered 1,000 tons of such timber per month.Piles of rosewood litter the ground in Đồng Kỳ, Vietnam late last year. Photo by Michael Tatarski for Mongabay.Reporting by Mongabay in the same town late last year revealed lax enforcement conditions. A large timber market with little oversight is located in the center of Đồng Kỳ , where traders shared that their supply came from Cambodia and Laos, even though both countries have banned exports to Vietnam.Such blatant illicit timber trading should give the EU pause before signing its agreement with Vietnam, EIA argues. It will be difficult for the European bloc to verify timber imports when corruption is so rampant along Vietnam’s border. This isn’t a small industry either, as Vietnam’s wood product exports are now the sixth-largest in the world, estimated to hit $8 billion this year, up from $7.3 billion in 2016, according to the report.“Vietnamese State involvement in multi-million-dollar transnational organized timber crime simply cannot be accepted by the international community and absolutely must not be ignored by the EU,” states Wadley.Banner image: Arevs in O’Tabok, Virachey National Park, Cambodia Feb 2017. Photo courtesy of EIA.Michael Tatarski is a freelance journalist based in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. You can find him on Twitter at @miketatarski.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

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first_imgFishing boats line the beach in the village of Beheloke Bas. Photo by Rowan Moore Gerety for Mongabay.That this is possible at all speaks to the marvels of marine biology. The big blue octopus (Octopus cyanea), the most important commercial species in southwest Madagascar, has a growth rate that defies belief. The “horita,” its Malagasy name, grows as much as 100-fold in just over a year, and converts its prey into protein with remarkable efficiency. For every two pounds of shrimp or crab a blue octopus eats, it can add more than a pound of octopus meat.As Alasdair Harris, Blue Ventures’ founder, put it, “Because of the speed with which fisheries species can recover, we can see returns on a conservation investment much more quickly and readily and visibly — you’re never going to see that rate of return on conservation in a terrestrial ecosystem in Madagascar, anywhere, period.”Hunt a terrestrial carnivore and its most important prey to the brink of elimination from a given patch of forest, and you could hardly expect it to make a noticeable recovery within six months. Even if it did, would you be able to sell the meat for export?The resilience of important marine species, and in the case of octopus, the tight links between conservation measures and potential profit (the global octopus market is worth close to a billion dollars a year), have helped to make marine conservation the subject of intense interest by NGOs and donors alike in Madagascar. Inspired by early successes like Blue Ventures’, LMMAs have grown to cover over 14 percent of Madagascar’s 3,000-mile coastline in just 15 years, and aquaculture initiatives have taken off as well.Next year, the World Bank plans to begin the Second South West Indian Ocean Fisheries Governance and Shared Growth Project, or SWIOFish2, which will inject more than $70 million into fisheries management and conservation in Madagascar by 2023. By way of comparison, the annual budget of Blue Ventures, whose marine programs have the largest footprint in Madagascar, was less than $3 million dollars last year, including programs in four other countries. NGOs also report increasing interest in marine management and conservation from bilateral donors like the U.S. and Germany. But existing marine conservation initiatives have an uneven track record. Massive new financing carries the risk of amplifying both successes and failures, and the potential of making it harder to fund worthy conservation initiatives on land. Inspired by early successes in marine conservation, locally controlled fisheries projects have expanded quickly along Madagascar’s 3,000-mile-long coastline over the past 15 years.Now that growth is poised to skyrocket, with rising interest in fisheries management and conservation from international donors, including a planned injection of more than $70 million by the World Bank.But the scale of funding for marine conservation has prompted concerns from both small NGOs that already work on fisheries and advocates of terrestrial conservation, who point to the uneven track record of locally controlled fisheries projects around the country.This is the fifth story in Mongabay’s multi-part series “Conservation in Madagascar.” BEHELOKE BAS, Madagascar — For a few days each year, fishermen here can travel back in time. When octopus season opens on a new part of the reef every three months, a single boat with three or four divers might catch as much as 200 pounds in a few hours. That, says Jean François, a fisherman who goes by the nickname Retsipa, is almost as good as the good old days.In the 1990s, wholesalers working with the French- and Malagasy-owned seafood company COPEFRITO regularly bought 3,000 pounds of octopus each time they came to the village. “Today, 400 pounds for the whole village is a good day,” said Retsipa, who serves as treasurer of Vezo Mitsinjo ny Ho Avy, or “Vezo, Look to the Future,” a fishermens’ association named for the local Vezo ethnic group.“It’s the same trend with lobsters, squid, fish: It’s not the same as before.” He shook his head. “Now, we have to choose the fish we eat — only the little ones, the fish we can’t sell…Before, the Vezo wouldn’t eat ‘fiandolo,’” Retsipa said, referring to the small, spiny striped eel catfish (Plotosus lineatus). “Now, we do.”Beheloke Bas is a village of a few hundred residents that sits on a stunning turquoise bay protected by a shallow reef about 40 miles south of the city of Toliara, in Madagascar’s arid southwest. The Vezo are fishermen through and through but they haven’t always lived here: Beheloke Bas served as a remote fishing camp until the 1980s, when the reefs closer to the city started showing signs of depletion. Twenty years later, the Vezo began to see the very same problem here.Since 2008, Retsipa and other members of the association have experimented with seasonal closures on the local octopus fishery, alternating between “no-take zones” where all fishing is prohibited for three months at a time to allow octopus time to spawn. While the strategy has clearly boosted octopus yields for a few days after each part of the reef is re-opened, Retsipa and his colleagues say it hasn’t changed the overall trajectory of the reef: fish are still getting smaller, and scarcer. And the association still hasn’t managed to crack down on people who don’t follow the rules.The seasonal or “partial closure” approach was pioneered in 2003 by the British NGO Blue Ventures with residents of the village Andavadoaka, 130 miles to the north. Their partnership led to the first of Madagascar’s Locally Managed Marine Areas, or LMMAs, where local communities control the scope and restrictions (equipment, fish size, and so forth) on use of natural resources in designated areas near their homes. The results brought worldwide attention: between 2004 and 2011, a Blue Ventures analysis published in the journal PLOS ONE showed that fishermen were able to maintain their income by relying on other areas during closures, but double their income in the month immediately afterwards. Octopus landings increased sevenfold in the 30-day periods after the seasonal closures that the paper analyzed.last_img read more

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first_imgThe EU-Mercosur trade deal, being concluded this month by the European Union and the South American trade bloc (Brazil, Argentina, Paraguay and Uruguay) is being negotiated in secret. However, part of the document has been leaked to Greenpeace, alarming environmentalists.The leaked secret trade documents show that the accord would encourage the export of high-value goods, like automobiles, from Europe to Latin American, while encouraging the export of huge amounts of low-value products – including beef and soy – from South America.This emphasis on production and international consumption could greatly increase the need for agricultural land in Latin America, and result in a major increase in deforestation of the Brazilian Amazon and Cerrado, and Argentine Chaco.The conversion of forests to crop and range lands could significantly decrease carbon storage, leading to a rise in carbon emissions that could help push global temperatures more than 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) above pre-industrial levels by the end of the century, with potentially catastrophic results for ecosystems and civilization. Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) soy silos in Mato Grosso along the BR-163 highway, where Amazon rainforest has largely been replaced by soy plantations. Large commodities companies like ADM, Cargill, Bunge and Brazil’s Amaggi have much to gain from the Mercosur agreement. Photo by Thaís BorgesSecret documents, leaked by Greenpeace, revealing confidential trade talks held between the European Union (EU) and Mercosur, the South American trade bloc (Brazil, Argentina, Paraguay and Uruguay), suggest that the agreement, which negotiators hope to clinch by year’s end, could exacerbate environmental problems in Mercosur countries, despite the inclusion for the first time of human rights clauses, aimed at protecting indigenous groups.While this new European concern with indigenous rights will be welcomed by activists, the underlying environmental problem with the agreement – that it will further encourage Mercosur country exports of agricultural products, particularly beef and soy – remains.With almost all arable land in Argentina and Uruguay already planted with soy and corn, the majority of “available” land is found in Brazil. However, as Mongabay has reported in many articles, the expansion of soy farming and cattle ranching there drives deforestation and the destruction of precious ecosystems.“Mercosur countries want to boost meat exports to Europe, which would push cattle farming into pristine habitats in the Amazon and the Cerrado regions in Brazil, and the Chaco in Argentina,” said Greenpeace trade campaigner Kees Kodde.The Mercosur trade agreement will greatly benefit cattle ranchers responsible for a significant portion of Amazon deforestation. It will also benefit Brazilian meatpacking companies, like JBS, whose top management have been charged with corruption connected with President Michel Temer and his administration. Photo by Rhett A Butler / MongabayAccording to Greenpeace Netherlands, which obtained 171 pages of previously undisclosed documents, the leaks expose the failure of the European Commission and European state governments to stick to commitments on transparency. With so much secrecy surrounding the talks, Greenpeace says, it has been impossible for analysts to assess properly the impact the deal will have on Mercosur nations. And now, as the accord nears finalization, there is little time left for public comment or input.The leaked documents show that both trade blocs are seeking to maximize market access while also increasing exports. The European Union’s focus is on exporting financial services to Mercosur countries, and gaining market access for energy companies, cars, motor parts and beverages, among other businesses. The EU wants European companies to be able to bid on procurement contracts at the local level, including contracts with big municipalities and federal states. The Mercosur countries want easier access for their exports, largely agricultural goods, to a large and wealthy EU market of about 250 million consumers.Although being presented as a win-win deal that benefits both sides, the agreement is controversial.EU farmers are enraged by what they see as a double standard. Barclay Bell, the Ulster Farmers’ Union president, in Northern Ireland, said that South American countries do not come close to matching the food safety, animal welfare or environmental regulations growers must observe in Europe: “Farmers in the UK comply with world-leading standards, so it seems completely hypocritical for UK politicians to keep raising the bar for UK farmers, yet accept much lower standards for inferior products exported from South America.”Like dominoes falling, the EU-Latin America trade agreement –likely to be concluded this month – will encourage agricultural exports from Brazil, which will encourage more soy and beef production there, which could lead to greater deforestation and a loss of biodiversity, especially in the Amazon and Cerrado. Photo by Mayangdi InzaulgaratEnvironmentalists are concerned about ecosystem impacts. The leaked documents reveal an agreement with a chapter on trade and sustainable development. In part, it pledges to: “enhance the integration of sustainable development in the Parties’ trade and investment relationship, notably by establishing principles and actions concerning labor and environmental aspects of sustainable development.” Article five reads: “The Parties recognize the importance of pursuing the ultimate objective of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in order to address the urgent threat of climate change and the role of trade to this end.”Critics, however, see this as lip service. The agreement, in practice, by increasing agricultural exports to Europe and encouraging more cattle and soy production in the Amazon, Cerrado, and Chaco, can only make it harder to implement the Paris Climate Agreement, and much more difficult to keep average global temperatures from rising more than 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit), with likely catastrophic results.The Amazon rainforest, a vital carbon sink, may already be producing more carbon than it absorbs, largely as a result of deforestation and human-caused forest fires used to clear land for agriculture. This trade agreement, which will boost farm commodities exports from Mercosur, and mean the conversion of more forest to crop and grazing lands, will accelerate carbon emissions, which soared in Brazil by nearly 9 percent in 2016.“No more deforestation in the Amazon.” A Greenpeace protest in Brasilia, December, 2007. It was Greenpeace that recently leaked more than 100 pages of the secretly negotiated Mercosur agreement, documents that give lip service to the environment and climate, but that offer no significant protections. Photo courtesy of Agência BrasilExperts also say that the trade deal is expected to bring greater benefits to the EU than to Mercosur. A report by the European Union predicts that the rise in the EU’s GDP would be at least five times greater than the rise in Mercosur’s GDP:A 2011 external impact assessment estimates the gains for the EU through increased exports of industrial goods could range between €21 and €29 billion. It states that the deal could enhance the EU’s GDP by €15-21 billion and Mercosur’s GDP by €2-3 billon.The trade deal between Mercosur and the EU has been in the pipeline off-and-on for almost two decades. Negotiations began in 2000 but were suspended in 2004 after substantial differences emerged between the parties concerning the level of liberalization of trade in agricultural goods, services and public procurement markets. With progressive governments in power in much of South America, many analysts thought the deal was dead.But the talks gained momentum in 2016, after Mercosur governments lurched to the right politically, with progressive presidents voted out of power or impeached. In one leaked document, the EU welcomed “the arrival in power of pro-business presidents in Argentina and Brazil.”It is widely accepted today that the world cannot go on producing and consuming more and more meat without doing serious – and almost certainly irreversible – damage to the environment, and especially the climate. In the same week that Greenpeace leaked the Mercosur documents, analysts from Farm Animal Investment Risk and Return (FAIRR), which manages more than $4 trillion in assets, said that it seemed “inevitable” that within five to ten years some form of meat tax will emerge to curb consumption and limit the impact of the global livestock industry on greenhouse gas emissions. The industry contributes 15 percent of greenhouse gas emissions today and meat consumption is rising around the world.An immense Cargill soy terminal in Santarem, Brazil, on the Tapajós and Amazon Rivers. An increase in agricultural production under the Mercosur agreement would likely lead to the rapid growth of road, rail and industrial waterway transportation networks in Legal Amazonia, opening the region to further development and settlement. Photo credit: sara y tzunky via VisualHunt.com / CC BY-NCJeremy Collier, the founder of FAIRR, said: “Far-sighted investors should plan ahead for this day,” advice that applies in equal measure to beef- and soy-producing countries.Yet, instead of encouraging Mercosur countries to develop truly sustainable agricultural practices that combine high production with ecosystem protections, while reducing carbon emissions, the EU-Mercosur trade agreement will likely encourage Latin American nations to rely ever more on primary exports – particularly beef and soy.The new concern of EU politicians for upholding indigenous rights, even to permit trade embargoes against Brazil if the clauses are broken, is a positive development, but it will do little to mitigate the harmful impact of the EU’s growing reliance on soy and beef imports.While the Brazilian and Argentinian governments strongly support the deal, largely because of their politically powerful agribusiness lobbies, the Venezuelan government (formerly a Mercosur member) is fiercely opposed. Fernando Vicente Prieto, a member of the pro-government organization ALBA Movimientos, said that that this is the kind of accord that is “controlled by big companies and sets up cartels in the different sectors.” Although political differences may have played a role, observers believe it was Venezuela’s vehement opposition to the EU agreement that was the main factor that led to the suspension of its membership from Mercosur in October 2017.International trade agreements tend to be similar – ranging from NAFTA to CETA, TTIP and TPP, such pacts are made in secret, with negotiations dominated by corporate lawyers, and with the environment, democracy and national sovereignty brought in as an afterthought. The EU-Mercosur agreement looks not to be fundamentally different. Nick Dearden, director of the London-based NGO, Social Justice Now, told Mongabay, these accords “lock developing countries into colonial patterns of trade whereby they export low-value products and import high-value goods, and this distorts their economies.”FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Deforested plain in the Brazilian Amazon, now used for cattle. Rhett A. Butler / Mongabay Article published by Glenn Scherer Agriculture, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Logging, Amazon Soy, Carbon Emissions, Carbon Sequestration, Cattle, Cattle Pasture, Cattle Ranching, Climate Change, Climate Change And Forests, Controversial, Corporate Environmental Transgressors, Corporate Responsibility, Corruption, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Crime, Environmental Politics, Food, Food Crisis, Forest Carbon, forest degradation, Forest Destruction, Forest Loss, Forests, Global Environmental Crisis, Global Trade, Global Warming, Green, Industrial Agriculture, Infrastructure, International Trade, Land Conflict, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Meat, Pasture, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Logging, Rainforests, Ranching, Saving The Amazon, Soy, Threats To The Amazon, Tropical Deforestation center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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first_imgThe KIG JEEP Junior and Mentor Doubles Tennis Classic is scheduled to serve off on Saturday at the Liguanea Club, New Kingston, at 9 a.m.The Junior and Mentor programme is the brainchild of Llockett McGregor and is part of his mandate to invest in junior players on multiple levels.The concept, which began six years ago, was forged because of the apparent disconnect between juniors, seniors, and past players.Judith Denton, sales and marketing manager at KIG JEEP, said that they got involved in sponsoring the event because of the intent behind the tournament.”Kingston Industrial Garage is very pleased to be associated with an event that encourages ‘giving back’ and which has the potential for positive, lasting effects on the development of young tennis players in Jamaica,” said Denton.This unique tournament features amateur players (21 and over), partnered with young players on the junior tennis circuit, enjoying competitive action on the courts.The adult amateurs are meant to form a bond with their junior partners and will, hopefully, follow their progress on and off the courts, offer encouragement, advice, and continued moral support.”Adult amateurs select a junior’s name and they’re teamed with them as doubles partners. The mentors are expected to continue in the juniors’ lives, whether it’s on court or off court, providing moral support and encouragement,” McGregor said.Amateurs and juniors alike are invited to sign up to participate, by today, through their respective clubs’ notice boards, Tennis Jamaica, or directly with McGregor at the Liguanea Club.As part of its sponsorship arrangement, an extensive range of KIG’s Jeep vehicles will be shown at the event, and participants, patrons, and members of the Liguanea Club are invited to see and experience the brand at leisure.Trophies will be awarded to the winners and runners-up following the conclusion of finals on Saturday.last_img read more

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first_imgSri Lanka was supposed to host the 18th Conference of the Parties to CITES in May 2019, but the event has been rescheduled for Geneva in August due to security concerns after the Easter Sunday bombings.Sri Lanka is involved in nine proposals concerning 43 species, the most for a single party at the upcoming CoP. Six of the proposals concern species of reptiles and spiders endemic to Sri Lanka or South Asia, and the other three concern species of saltwater fish.The CITES Secretariat has recommended rejecting four of Sri Lanka’s proposals and adopting five, highlighting how lack of data is hampering conservation efforts in the country.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. The 18th Conference of the Parties (CoP) to CITES, the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, should have started on May 23 in Colombo. It was supposed to showcase Sri Lanka’s rich biodiversity to an international audience, boost local conservation efforts, and vitalize the country’s ecotourism.However, the terrorist attacks in Colombo on Easter Sunday that killed 259 people created security concerns. After a U.N. security assessment and lobbying from different organizations, the CITES secretary-general announced on June 12 that the conference would be moved to the CITES headquarters in Geneva and take place in August.Ultimately, safety concerns and the need for a timely conduction of the conference outweighed other considerations. As a triannual conference with several thousand participants, CITES CoPs are planned long in advance, and finding another venue to keep the timelines intact was essential.However, the shift to Geneva does not mean that Sri Lanka has been left outside the door. It has submitted or co-submitted more proposals than any other single nation. Out of 57 total proposals, Sri Lanka is involved in almost 16 percent, many of which concern species endemic to the island. By virtue of that alone, it will play a large role during the conference and retain some of the spotlight.Sri Lanka’s proposalsSo, what is Sri Lanka proposing? Do its proposals have a reasonable chance of success?The goal of CITES is to protect wild flora and fauna from unsustainable exploitation and extinction caused by international trade. It maintains three lists of species with descending levels of protection: Appendix I, which prohibits any international trade of species threatened by extinction; Appendix II, which monitors and regulates the trade of species that might otherwise become threatened; and Appendix III, which provides international cooperation to help CITES parties protect certain species.Only parties to CITES can propose amendments to Appendices I and II, and only the CoP can decide on these proposals.The CoP strives for consensus decisions but can otherwise pass proposals with a two-thirds majority. Decisions on appendix amendments are informed by scientific data provided by the parties and outside organizations like the IUCN’s Species Survival Commission. They are mainly based on the criteria outlined in resolution Conf. 9.24 of CoP9 in 1994 (revised at COP17 in 2016).Sri Lanka wants to include several endemic reptiles into Appendix I, specifically two species of garden lizards, five species of horned lizards, two species of pygmy lizards, and one species of hump-nosed lizard. None of them are on any appendix so far, although their export from Sri Lanka is banned under the domestic Fauna and Flora Protection Ordinance. Sri Lanka and India also want to move the Indian star tortoise from Appendix II to Appendix I to curb their flourishing illegal trade.Together with the EU and a host of other countries, Sri Lanka also proposes to include several marine species into Appendix II: two species of mako sharks, six species of giant guitarfish, and 10 species of wedgefish. Finally, Sri Lanka and the United States want to list 15 species of ornamental tarantulas in Appendix II as well.This brings Sri Lanka to nine proposals and 43 species, 25 of them terrestrial and 18 aquatic. However, when the CITES Secretariat presented its recommendations on May 1, it recommended four of Sri Lanka’s nine proposals for rejection and expressed some concerns over the other five.To be eligible for inclusion in Appendix I, species must be threatened by extinction because they either have a small and vulnerable population, a limited geographic range, or a marked decline in population size.The detailed assessment of Sri Lanka’s five Appendix I proposals highlights one of the main problems for Sri Lankan conservationism: scarcity of data. The assessment is littered with phrases such as “is unclear,” “indicates,” “is inferred,” “suggests,” “information is very limited,” “quotes anecdotal information,” “opportunistic observations,” or “little is known.”Despite this, the Secretariat has applied a precautionary approach and recommended the adoption of three lizard proposals. It recommended rejecting the hump-nosed lizard and the Indian star tortoise, the latter because of its large populations and the fact that most traded specimens come from captive breeding, which is not covered under CITES.The criteria for Appendix II are more lenient: the regulation of trade must be necessary to prevent species from becoming eligible for Appendix I. The Secretariat has recommended the inclusion of giant guitarfish and wedgefish but ruled for the rejection of the mako shark proposal after extensive feedback from the U.N.’s Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) Expert Panel stating that the shark populations are stable and not projected to decline significantly.Sri Lanka and the United States jointly submitted the last proposal, which had been rejected before at CoP11 in 2000. It concerns Poecilotheria, a genus of 15 species of completely arboreal tarantulas threatened by deforestation and habitat loss. Their range is limited to Sri Lanka and India, but the proposal lacks hard evidence of the impact of legal and illegal trade on their wild population. Therefore, the CITES Secretariat has again recommended the rejection of this proposal.This August in Geneva, Sri Lanka has the chance to make a difference and draw attention to its biodiversity, its range of endemic species, its potential for ecotourism, and its fight against wildlife trafficking. It remains to be seen which proposals will be adopted, but the Secretariat’s recommendations have highlighted problems that hinder conservation efforts in the country.The issues of lacking wildlife data and wildlife trafficking will need to be addressed to preserve biodiversity in Sri Lanka and around the globe.Hear an interview with the new Secretary General of CITES about the upcoming COP in August 2019 on Mongabay’s podcast, here.Dennis Mombauer is a freelance writer and researcher on climate change, conservation and special needs education based in Colombo. He focuses on ecosystem-based adaptation and sustainable urban development as well as on autism spectrum disorder. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Banner image of a lyre-headed lizard (Lyriocephalus scutatus), a species endemic to Sri Lanka, courtesy of Anslem de Silva. Biodiversity, Cites, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking Article published by dilrukshilast_img read more

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first_imgWhile the devices we carry around in our pockets everyday provide us with unprecedented convenience and levels of access to information, the materials they contain are often linked to the destruction of some of the planet’s richest ecosystems.Yet small-scale mining is an important source of income more than 40 million people worldwide, generating livelihoods and, in some cases, creating paths to escape poverty.For these reasons, last week a broad coalition launched a $750,000 global competition to identify ways to make small-scale and artisanal mining less damaging to communities and the environment.The Artisanal Mining Grand Challenge is hosted by Conservation X Labs, a Washington, DC- and Seattle-based non-profit that has organized other prize-based competitions around difficult environmental problems. While the devices we carry around in our pockets everyday provide us with unprecedented convenience and levels of access to information, the materials they contain are often linked to the destruction of some of the planet’s richest ecosystems. Extracting metals and minerals like gold from the Amazon, coltan from the Congo, and nickel from Indonesia can take a heavy on local peoples, wildlife, rivers, and forests. Gold mining is a major threat to the forests and biodiversity of the Peruvian Amazon, including protected areas. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.One of the most complicated aspects of addressing the issue is the disparate nature of small-scale and artisanal mining, which accounts for a significant share of production of some of the most critical materials that go into mobile phones, tablets, and laptops as well as jewelry: 15-20 percent of diamonds, 15-20 percent of gold, 20 percent of cobalt, and 70-80 percent of colored gemstones. Much of this mining is informal, unregulated, or even illegal, putting it beyond the reach of authorities. And some of the companies that sell products to consumers may have very little knowledge of what raw materials ultimately end up in their supply chains.Yet small-scale mining is an important source of income more than 40 million people worldwide, generating livelihoods and, in some cases, creating paths to escape poverty. So outright crackdowns on the activity can have a downside.Gold mining in the Peruvian Amazon. The launch event for the Artisanal Mining Grand Challenge featured a talk by Dr. Luis E. Fernandez of Wake Forest University Center for Amazonian Scientific Innovation (CINCIA), who discussed the impacts of artisanal mining in Madre de Dios in the Peruvian Amazon. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.For these reasons, last week a broad coalition launched a $750,000 global competition to identify ways to make small-scale and artisanal mining less damaging to communities and the environment. The Artisanal Mining Grand Challenge is hosted by Conservation X Labs, a Washington, DC- and Seattle-based non-profit that has organized other prize-based competitions around difficult environmental problems.“This is a wicked problem,” said Alex Dehgan, Co-founder and CEO of Conservation X Labs. “All of the partners involved are doing this because we like to run to hard problems, rather than run away from them.”“Our problems are scaling exponentially and our solutions have been linear. We seek to work as part of a coalition because none of us can solve it alone,” Dehgan continued. “Our only competitor should be extinction.”A view of the Soarano wetland, cleared of forest by illegal gold miners, near Ranomafana, Madagascar. Image by Daniel Burgas.The Artisanal Mining Grand Challenge is structured into three categories: preventing and remediating damage at mine sites; addressing social and environmental costs in mining supply chains beyond mine sites; and developing information solutions that measure the environmental and social impacts of mining. On top of those categories, Microsoft’s AI for Earth Initiative is awarding $100,000 “for solutions that utilize or deploy artificial intelligence (AI), including machine learning,” to the issue.The challenge is open to anyone offering solutions. Paul Bunje, Co-founder and CSO/COO of Conservation X Labs, expects a wide range of entities — from NGOs to companies to entrepreneurs — to get involved.“We can now use a crowd-based innovation competition, not just to incentivize new solutions and accelerate innovation – which is critical – but also use this as an opportunity to capture huge value,” Bunje said. “It’s the opportunity for all of us to be a part of something huge.”Forest cleared for gold mining in Indonesian Borneo. Photo by Rhett A. ButlerThe Artisanal Mining Grand ChallengeCorrection October 9, 2019: Conservation X Labs is based in both Washington, DC and Seattle, not only Virginia as originally stated in this post.Disclosure: Mongabay is participating in The Artisanal Mining Grand Challenge through a special reporting project on small-scale and artisanal mining worldwide. The Artisanal Mining Grand Challenge does not have any editorial influence on the stories Mongabay produces. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Gold Mining, Green, Mining, Prizes, Water Pollution center_img Article published by Rhett Butlerlast_img read more

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first_imgThis year’s August Amazon fires grabbed headlines around the world. In response, Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro and his administration accused the media of lying and exaggerating the disaster, then finally sent in the army to combat the blazes. As of October, many of the fires were under control.But experts note that the fires are only a symptom of a far greater problem: rampant and rising deforestation. Altogether, 7,604 square kilometers (2,970 square miles) of rainforest were felled during the first nine months of this year, an 85 percent increase over the same period last year.Unscrupulous land speculators are growing rich, say experts, as they mine, log and clear rainforest — operations often conducted illegally on protected lands. Typically, the speculators cut valuable trees, burn the remainder, and sell the cleared land at a heavily marked up price to cattle ranchers or agribusiness.So far, Bolsonaro has done little to inhibit these activities, while doing and saying much to encourage deforestation, mining and agribusiness. The government has de-toothed the nation’s environmental agencies and slashed their budgets, while hampering officials from enforcing environmental laws. Deforestation caused by an Illegal gold mine and encampment within Yanomami Park, July 2018. An estimated 20,000 illegal goldminers (garimpeiros) have entered Yanomami Park, one of Brazil’s biggest indigenous reserves, located in Roraima and Amazonas states, near the border with Venezuela. Image courtesy of Rogerio Assis / ISA.In late August, as dramatic images of raging Amazon fires were relayed around the globe, the Brazilian government at first made denials, then finally took action. President Jair Bolsonaro announced his Guarantee of Law and Order Operation (GLO), and the nation’s armed forces were rapidly deployed to implement the plan and control blazes.A month later the army proclaimed the operation “effective,” having “destroyed 17 illegal camps and apprehended 74 vehicles and over 20,000 liters [3,500 gallons] of fuel.” Most important, the number of forest fires fell by 25.1 percent in September, according to IBAMA, Brazil’s environmental agency. General Hamilton Mourão, standing in as president while Bolsonaro visited the UN in New York in September, decided to extend the operation for another month.By the end of October, GLO will have cost 90 million reais (US$22 million) — more than the 76.8 million reais (US$18.7 million) annual 2020 budget earmarked for IBAMA. It is IBAMA that principally fought past Amazon fires with considerable success, but whose budget cuts and disempowerment under presidents Michel Temer, and especially Bolsonaro, have left the agency largely unable to battle this year’s conflagrations.Now, with fewer dramatic images of out of control fires appearing on the Internet, the Amazon rainforest has again dropped out of the world’s headlines. But what really matters for the long-term survival of the biome are not the wildfires themselves, but the extent to which people are cutting down trees.Land grabbers set fire to an IBAMA office in Humaitá in Amazonas state in 2017. Ruralist hostility to Brazil’s environmental agency has escalated during the Bolsonaro administration. Image by Raolin Magalhães / Rede Amazônica.RedeBrasilAtual.Deforestation risingThe deforestation situation in the Brazilian Amazon, far from improving, has dramatically deteriorated. Alerts from the DETER satellite monitoring system, run by the National Institute of Space Research (INPE), indicate that deforestation increased by 222 percent in August, compared with August of last year, and by 96 percent in September, compared with September of 2018.Altogether, 7,604 square kilometers (2,970 square miles) of rainforest were felled during the first nine months of this year, an 85 percent increase over the same period last year. The Amazon fires were a mere indicator of this massive amount of deforestation, as agribusiness and land grabbers burned away the dried downed trees, creating ash which helps fertilize grass to feed the cattle herds that will move in to replace the forests.Deforestation rates are rising rapidly again, for two reasons: it is a very profitable activity, and the government is doing little to stop it, say analysts.Logging, land grabbing and mining, often carried out illegally on protected land, are making some unscrupulous operators very rich. So far, Bolsonaro has done next to nothing to inhibit their activities. Indeed, employees working for IBAMA have told Mongabay on condition of anonymity that the government is encouraging land grabbers to deforest. A closer look at GLO helps back up their accusations.IBAMA destroys an illegal mine inside Jamanxim National Park in September 2019. Under Bolsonaro, illegal incursions into neighboring Jamanxim National Forest and deforestation have dramatically increased, with the so-called “Day of Fire” seeing many illegal blazes intentionally set within the preserve. Image by VINÍCIUS MENDONÇA (IBAMA).Military firefighters, meet the deforestation mafiaA Mongabay contributor and co-author of this article was in Pará state and Altamira in August — the municipality with the most reported fires — and witnessed a large number of troops arriving there, supported by sophisticated military hardware including aircraft and vehicles.The GLO operation in Pará, however, overlooked a crucial factor: geography. Altamira is Brazil’s largest municipality, covering almost 160,000 square kilometers (61,800 square miles), an area bigger than Greece, with much of it rural. While it is true that Altamira saw more fires than anywhere else, most were occurring on the municipality’s edges, hundreds of kilometers away from the city of Altamira itself. In fact, army helicopters deploying from that urban area couldn’t reach the fires without refueling.Which is why the army next shifted its base to the town of Novo Progresso, in southwest Altamira, much closer to most fires. It was there that the ruralistas — elite land owners and speculators — announced a “day of fire” on 10 August, apparently to demonstrate to Bolsonaro their wish to work. The main target of many illegal acts of burning occurring then was Jamanxim National Forest, a large protected area long targeted by land grabbers.Paulo de Tarso, a public prosecutor at the Federal Public Ministry (MPF), a group of independent government litigators, commented: “The gang [felling forest in Jamanxim National Forest] has been active in the region for many years. It was dismantled in Operation Castanheira in August 2014, a joint initiative by the Federal Police, the environment agency IBAMA, the Internal Revenue Service, and the MPF. Deforestation and the numbers of fires fell heavily at the time, but the gang survived.”And it may be seeing a resurgence under Bolsonaro; the MPF is presently investigating the gang’s involvement in this year’s blazes. “The actions seem to have been orchestrated and planned for a long while,” Raquel Dodge, a former Prosecutor-General of the Republic, said at a recent press conference.While Bolsonaro and others in his administration often claim that much Amazon burning is legally done by small-scale farmers, de Tarso notes instead that the clearing is generally well organized and “done by various groups of criminals. Some fell the forest, others extract and sell the valuable timber, and [still] others set fire to the vegetation and [then] plant pasture. There is yet another group that finds laranjas, stooges, that let their identities be used to register the land,” to get round the legal limits on land ownership by a single individual.Carrying out this systematic large-scale deforestation does not come cheap — it costs an estimated one million reais (US$243,000) to clear 1,000 hectares (3.9 square miles) of forest. But, as de Tarso explains, the rewards can be enormous: “The group is betting that at some moment in the future the Brazilian state will give into pressure and remove the protected status currently enjoyed by this land. It will then be worth a fortune.”If necessary, the land grabbers can wait. “Men who carry out ‘speculative deforestation’ are in for the long haul,” explained a Novo Progresso inhabitant, speaking off the record. “They will wait until next year to burn what they are felling this year [if need be]. They’re not interested [in immediately] getting the land to produce, but [rather] in eventually selling it at a huge profit.”Land grabbers set fire to an IBAMA government vehicle near the Zoró Indigenous Reserve in Rondônia state in July 2019. Image courtesy of RondoniaoVivo.Indicators of government complicitySeveral pieces of evidence seem to indicate that the Bolsonaro administration, while anxious to put out fires and extinguish international outrage, is doing little to combat land speculation linked to deforestation, along with illegal mining, which also brings major environmental harm. On the contrary: IBAMA officials say confidentially that the government is sending clear signs that illegal activities should be tolerated by enforcers.One indication is the drastic decline in the number and amount of fines imposed by IBAMA for illegal deforestation in 2019 under Bolsonaro, as compared to in 2018 under Temer —data that helps explain this year’s rapid rise in deforestation.In September 2018, IBAMA issued 258 fines, totaling 139.5 million reais (US$33.8 million) in the Amazon states of Acre, Amazonas, Amapá, Pará, Rondônia and Roraima. This year, in that same month (the first month of GLO) and covering the same states, the number of fines fell to 128, with a total value of 42.9 million reais (US$10.4 million) — that’s a 50 percent drop in number, and a more than 60 percent decline in amount.Speaking to BBC Brasil, environment minister Ricardo Salles shrugged off the statistics. “Only about 1 percent of the fines were ever paid. And this shows that to impose a large number of fines is not a good policy. It is better to have far fewer, properly investigated fines that are paid.” But, far from ensuring that fines will henceforth be paid, the government has further facilitated non-payment.  In April it passed decree 9,760 that set up “centers of conciliation” which will allow those fined to appeal. They may have their fines reduced or even cancelled. IBAMA officials see this as a further green light to illegal deforestation.An illegal gold mine destroyed by FUNAI, Brazil’s indigenous agency, in Yanomami Park during Operation Walopali, 23 September to 3 October, 2019. Image courtesy of FUNAI.De-toothing IBAMA enforcementAnother indication of the administration’s failure to curb illegal activities is the refusal of GLO’s military commanders to offer IBAMA employees protection when combatting illegal mining activities, even when an operation is so dangerous that it can’t be undertaken without army security. This happened on at least three occasions in September alone.Mongabay saw an internal IBAMA report that explained why: “The Military Commands refused to help because the IBAMA operation could have involved the destruction of assets.” This issue has become a serious bone of contention between IBAMA and land invaders. Speaking to Mongabay off-the-record, the owner of a goldmine near Novo Progress, who has also been involved in illegal logging, said: “The problem arises when they [the environment agencies] destroy [mining and logging] machinery. People aren’t worried by fines — they don’t pay them in any case — but it hurts when they destroy machinery.”Decree 6,514, passed in 2008 by the federal government, has served for over a decade as a key enforcement tool that IBAMA uses as a last resort against perpetrators. The destruction of illegally deployed mining and logging equipment — expensive trucks, tractors, bulldozers, mining dredges and more — has exposed loggers and land grabbers to major financial risk.But Bolsonaro is very unhappy with the policy. In a video shot last April and widely circulated among land grabbers and miners, the president said that “nothing should be burnt, not machinery, nor tractors, nothing, that is the instruction I am giving.” However, Decree 6,514 remains an active statute on the books.Equipment being destroyed at an illegal mine in Yanomami Park by a FUNAI agent in September 2019. President Bolsonaro objects strongly to the currently legal practice of destroying machinery used for illegal purposes in the remote Amazon. Image courtesy of FUNAI.IBAMA raids called off, FUNAI raid goes forwardOne of the planned IBAMA operations that had to be cancelled because of the army’s refusal to provide support was particularly important. It concerned an illegal mine inside the Trincheira Bacajá Indigenous Territory, in the São Félix do Xingu municipality in Pará state. According to the not-for-profit organization, IMAZON, in July and August invaders cut down more forest in this indigenous reserve than in all other reserves in the country, bar one.Because federal authorities failed to respond to repeated indigenous requests for help there, armed Xicrin warriors organized an expedition in late August to expel the invaders. According to the Folha de S. Paulo newspaper, the intruders, when confronted, agreed to leave but then sent the Indians a threatening WhatsApp message: “Just take a look around you. There are now over 300 men in the forest hunting Indians.” While no loss of life has been reported since, there is a very real risk that this conflict could escalate and erupt in violence.However, Amazon miners and land grabbers don’t always get it their way. On 23 September, FUNAI, Brazil’s indigenous affairs agency, with the support of the army, launched, a federal and state coordinated 12-day operation to evict the thousands of miners who recently illegally swarmed into the 9.6 million hectare (37,000 square mile) Yanomami Park, in Roraima state. Demarcated in 1992 in the lead up to the Rio de Janeiro Earth Summit, the birth of this reserve has been hailed as one of the greatest achievements of the indigenous movement in Brazil.Since the invasion earlier this year the Yanomami leader Davi Kopenawa and others have campaigned ceaselessly for decisive action to evict invaders. Indeed, the army’s decision to support the operation may well be linked to the attention that the international press has paid to the Yanomami case.FUNAI’s operation led to the destruction of 30 illegal mines, a helicopter, dozens of pieces of expensive equipment, along with an illegal landing strip. In addition, a BAPE (Base of Ethno-environmental Protection) was reopened on the Mucajaí River, which should help FUNAI prevent future illegal mining incursions.But the intervention in the Yanomami Park remains at present an isolated case. It has done nothing to halt the ongoing campaign organized by some of Bolsonaro’s most fervent supporters, who are urging the president to permanently shut down the nation’s two chief environment agencies — IBAMA and ICMBio (the Chico Mendes Institute for Biodiversity Conservation which manages park lands).On 3 October, as the FUNAI operation in Yanomami Park was finishing, Bolsonaro once again expressed his support for the nation’s miners, saying in his weekly Facebook video address: “I will do all I can — and I depend on Congress — to give miners a free hand to search for gold, diamonds, all over Brazil, provided they preserve the environment and don’t use mercury.”Meanwhile, violent acts against IBAMA have escalated. In July, illegal loggers burned two bridges across the Transamazonian Highway, and set fire to an IBAMA vehicle after officials attempted to end illegal logging in the Zoró Indigenous Reserve in Espigão d’Oeste municipality, in Rondônia state. In September, miners reacted furiously when IBAMA and ICMBio teams set fire to backhoes — land moving equipment — at an illegal mine in Crepori National Forest in Pará state. The miners sent angry messages on WhatApp and via other social media. One of them shot a video in which a miner stood in front of a burning backhoe shouting: “I want you, Bolsonaro, to see this video and explain to Brazil what is happening! You said that this wouldn’t happen anymore.”On 18 September, the government hastily organized a meeting with a delegation of miners. In attendance were top officials, including Environment Minister Ricardo Salles; Presidential Chief-of-Staff, Onyx Lorenzoni; and Chief-of-Staff for Institutional Security, General Augusto Heleno. The administration listened to the miners’ complaints and promised to soon find “a structural, long-term solution for their demands.”One attending miner said afterward that they’d been told that never before had so many ministers been present at a meeting of this type. He boasted: “We achieved a great deal with our actions. We should all congratulate ourselves.”The government’s sympathetic reaction to miners’ demands angered IBAMA staff: “The same people who practice environmental crimes and invade indigenous land are asking for protection from the army and the president,” Denis Riva, President of the National Association of Civil Servants Specialized in the Environment (ASCEMA), told Mongabay. “At the very least, that leaves us in a very awkward position.”Banner image caption: A FUNAI agent looks out over deforestation resulting from illegal gold mining in Yanomami Park. The miners were expelled from the indigenous territory in a September 2019 raid conducted by the Bolsonaro government. Image courtesy of FUNAI.If you’re interested in learning more about protests against the fires in Brazil, watch here:FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Glenn Scherer Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Logging, Amazon Mining, Cattle, Cattle Ranching, Conservation, Controversial, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Crime, Featured, Forests, Green, Illegal Logging, Illegal Mining, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Land Conflict, Land Grabbing, Land Use Change, Mining, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Logging, Rainforest Mining, Rainforests, Saving The Amazon, Threats To The Amazon, Tropical Deforestation last_img read more

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first_imgLQ Mario Mutsch ne restera pas longtemps à la retraite : le joueur de 34 ans, qui met un terme à sa carrière à l’issue de la saison avec Niederkorn, a déjà trouvé une reconversion.Le recordman des sélections en équipe nationale du Luxembourg – 100 capes – va intégrer le staff technique de l’école de football de la FLF, a annoncé cette dernière vendredi.Celui qui affiche aussi plus de 200 matches en pro au compteur prendra ses fonctions à partir du 1er août, précise la Fédération. Partagerlast_img read more

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first_imgNew Kingston FC Head Coach Geoffrey Maxwell says that the quality of the Red Stripe Premier League (RSPL) has declined in recent years.Maxwell, who recently took charge of the KSAFA Major League side, says that this is because of the type of players that exists in the RSPL today.”Based off what I have seen of some of the name sheets in the Premier League at the moment, they’re not sides that you can’t coach [against] and beat,” he says.”Half of them [the sides] now are bringing in a lot of schoolboy players. Premier League and Dacosta Cup and Manning Cup are three different things. Sometimes, you can take a fool and programme him and make him go out there and win in the Premier League because, I think, the Premier League defenders are poor, but that’s just my opinion. I think the attacking players in the Premier League nowadays are also poor.”It is for this reason that Maxwell, who drew his first game with New Kingston after taking over a couple weeks ago, believes he could get them into Jamaica’s top flight and do well with them. He believes his team has the talent but just lacks experience. If he is to make this objective a reality, it will, however, take him at least two seasons as the Major League is two divisions below the Premier League.He says that the Premier League’s poor quality, as he describes it, comes down to the poor development structures that exist locally at the moment.Maxwell wants coaches to get rid of egos that exist in the youth level of Jamaican football and wants coaches to stop letting players see themselves as the focal points of their teams, but instead realise that it is a team effort, which requires humility and cooperation.The coach goes even further to say that Jamaica’s youth system has been led to become a “free for all”.”If we are supposed to go into the Caribbean again and start dominating it, we’re going to have to look to outlay development programmes. We have none!”last_img read more

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