first_imgNew Kingston FC Head Coach Geoffrey Maxwell says that the quality of the Red Stripe Premier League (RSPL) has declined in recent years.Maxwell, who recently took charge of the KSAFA Major League side, says that this is because of the type of players that exists in the RSPL today.”Based off what I have seen of some of the name sheets in the Premier League at the moment, they’re not sides that you can’t coach [against] and beat,” he says.”Half of them [the sides] now are bringing in a lot of schoolboy players. Premier League and Dacosta Cup and Manning Cup are three different things. Sometimes, you can take a fool and programme him and make him go out there and win in the Premier League because, I think, the Premier League defenders are poor, but that’s just my opinion. I think the attacking players in the Premier League nowadays are also poor.”It is for this reason that Maxwell, who drew his first game with New Kingston after taking over a couple weeks ago, believes he could get them into Jamaica’s top flight and do well with them. He believes his team has the talent but just lacks experience. If he is to make this objective a reality, it will, however, take him at least two seasons as the Major League is two divisions below the Premier League.He says that the Premier League’s poor quality, as he describes it, comes down to the poor development structures that exist locally at the moment.Maxwell wants coaches to get rid of egos that exist in the youth level of Jamaican football and wants coaches to stop letting players see themselves as the focal points of their teams, but instead realise that it is a team effort, which requires humility and cooperation.The coach goes even further to say that Jamaica’s youth system has been led to become a “free for all”.”If we are supposed to go into the Caribbean again and start dominating it, we’re going to have to look to outlay development programmes. We have none!”last_img read more

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first_imgBarbara McNair, the pioneering black singer-actress who hosted her own TV variety show and starred in Hollywood with Sidney Poitier in the early 1970s, has died. She was 72. McNair died Sunday in Los Angeles after a battle with throat cancer, her sister, Jacqueline Gaither, said. “She was very family oriented,” Gaither said. “She was more than just a star or a famous personality. She was a person of her own.” Gaining fame in the 1960s as a nightclub singer, McNair graduated to film and television as opportunities were opening up for black women late in the decade. She made her Hollywood debut in 1968 in the film “If He Hollers, Let Him Go.” She later starred with Elvis Presley in his 1969 film “Change of Habit” and as Poitier’s wife in the 1970 film “They Call Me MISTER Tibbs!” She found movie acting “a more rewarding kind of work than singing,” she told The Washington Post in 1969. She hosted television’s “The Barbara McNair Show,” a syndicated musical and comedy program, from 1969 to 1972. McNair went to the University of California, Los Angeles, before moving to New York City to pursue her dream of becoming an entertainer. She made TV appearances into the 1980s on such shows as “The Jeffersons” and “The Redd Foxx Show.” In later years, McNair performed on cruise ships and at charity events, nightclubs and retirement villages in Florida. Last year, she opened shows for comedian Bob Newhart in Philadelphia and New Jersey. Along with Gaither, McNair is survived by her fourth husband, Charles Blecka.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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first_imgKareem Abdul-Jabbar and John Wooden sat at the end of a star-studded assembly line Saturday. Abdul-Jabbar was signing his new book, “On the Shoulders of Giants: My Journey Through the Harlem Renaissance” at UCLA’s BookZone, and so was Wooden. The book-signing was a well-oiled machine, just like the three championships the dynamic duo won together from 1967-69 at UCLA. Their athletic accomplishments are unparalleled. But on this day, they were celebrating history. Wooden, a former English teacher, and Abdul-Jabbar, a UCLA history graduate, were promoting a book about the Harlem Renaissance. People will gain insight into what Abdul-Jabbar experienced while growing up in NewYork. It has been decades since Wooden and Abdul-Jabbar have coached and played, respectively, but the two can still put on quite a show. Abdul-Jabbar wore a casual outfit – navy-blue UCLA polo shirt and jeans – while Wooden looked dapper, as usual, in a navy-blue suit with his customary bolo tie. As the two sat and signed, cell phones and cameras clicked behind a roped-off area in front of the table. Fans lined the stairs in the middle of the bookstore. Security was everywhere. The autograph line started in the bookstore and worked its way outside, winding around the J.D.Morgan Center. Abdul-Jabbar and Wooden didn’t have much time to chat, but when they do, it’s special. center_img “We’ve always had things to talk about, and it usually has nothing to do with basketball,” Abdul-Jabbar said. “My father passed away about a year and a half ago, and (Wooden) is from his generation, so it’s nice to have him here. I share his grandchildren and great-grandchildren.” Most of the time, Abdul-Jabbar had his head down as he signed book after book. He would say “thanks” and “you’re welcome” often. Abdul-Jabbar, a three-time NCAA Most Valuable Player and NBA MVP for the Lakers, has kept to himself, but fans still can’t get enough of him. Twenty minutes into the book-signing, patrons outside were informed that if they hadn’t already purchased a book, they were out of luck. All 500copies had been sold. Erkki Corpuz, an Anderson School graduate student, was the first in line. He arrived at 9a.m. for the 1p.m. signing. And that was after he slept outside Pauley Pavilion overnight, to ensure he’d have a seat in the student section for Saturday’s UCLA game against Stanford. He had yet to read much of the book because he had schoolwork to do. But he was interested in it. He became an Abdul-Jabbar fan through his family. “I’ve never met Kareem, but my dad moved to this country in the mid-’70s, and we became Lakers fans,” Corpuz said. “I’ve read “Giant Steps” (another book by Abdul-Jabbar) and did about five book reports on it.” Ruthee Goldkorn had read 59 pages during her nearly four-hour wait. She insisted she would finish the book by the end of the day. “One of the first things he says in the book is that if he wasn’t a basketball player, he would’ve been a history teacher,” Goldkorn said. “This is important. African history is American history.” Abdul-Jabbar seems to withstand time. It’s hard to believe, but perhaps the best collegiate basketball player ever will celebrate his 60th birthday in April. “I’m just happy to be here,” Abdul-Jabbar said. “When you’re young, you never think about what the end of your life is going to be like.” Wooden, 96, signed his name under Abdul-Jabbar’s and exchanged pleasantries with folks. Wooden always has thought of himself as a teacher, so he’s most proud of Abdul-Jabbar at events like these. “There’s always a reason behind each book, which pleases me,” said Wooden, who has written many. “He was a student-athlete, a student first. I don’t think he ever missed a class without a (legitimate) reason.” Then Wooden and Abdul-Jabbar sat next to each other at Pauley Pavilion. If there’s a sporting event at Pauley, Wooden is almost always there. But this was the first game of the season for Abdul-Jabbar. He had many reasons to be in Westwood, one of which was that UCLA was honoring the 1967 NCAA championship team. When Abdul-Jabbar was introduced at halftime, he raised the index finger on each hand as he was showered with applause. “He was really unselfish,” said former teammate Mike Warren, a longtime UCLA season-ticket holder. “Had he been a different type of player, that would’ve made things difficult. Being a team player made it much easier. He could’ve averaged 60 points a game if he wanted to.” jill.painter@dailynews.com (818) 713-3615 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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first_imgObituary notice for today, Wednesday, August 5th.PEOPLESThe death has occurred of George PEOPLES of Carrowreagh, Bridgend, DonegalFuneral Service in his home on Friday, August 7th, at 1.30pm, followed by burial in Ballyoan Cemetery. DOHERTYThe death has occurred of Charlie DOHERTY of Anney, Rathmullan, DonegalAt St.James’ Hospital, Dublin. Reposing at his home. Funeral from there at 10.20am on Thursday for 11am Requiem Mass in St.Joseph’s Church, Rathmullan followed by interment in the adjoining cemetery. Deeply regretted by his relatives and friends.McGARVEYThe death has occurred of Norma MC GARVEY of Glenleary, Ramelton.At hospital in Dublin. Deeply regretted by her son and daughter, sister, father, mother, relatives and friends. House strictly private at the request of the deceased.Funeral from the family home in Glenleary, Ramelton at 2pm on Thursday to Tully Cemetery. ANDERSONThe death has occurred of Ann ANDERSON of The Glebe, Ramelton Rd., Letterkenny, Donegal / Kells, MeathThe sudden death has occurred at the Santo André Hospital, Fatima, Portugal of Nurse Ann Anderson, The Glebe, Letterkenny, and formerly of Kilskyre, Kells, Co. Meath.Ann’s remains will repose overnight at her home from 4pm today (Wed.5th August) with removal on Thursday (6th) to the Church of the Irish Martyrs, Ballyraine, Letterkenny for 2pm Mass, followed by removal to Kilskyre Parish Church, Co. Meath, reposing there overnight for 10am Requiem Mass on Friday 7th August. Burial afterwards in the family plot in the adjoining cemetery.Family flowers only please, donations in lieu if desired to the Fatima Pilgrimage Fund.REST IN PEACE – DONEGAL DEATH NOTICES was last modified: August 5th, 2015 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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first_img gameday cracker latest silverware Boxing Day fixtures: All nine Premier League games live on talkSPORT England’s most successful clubs of the past decade, according to trophies won RANKED Top nine Premier League free transfers of the decade Latest Liverpool FC News A late goal for Napoli as #LFCU19s are held to a draw… #UYL pic.twitter.com/I8AYooLkgw— Liverpool FC (@LFC) October 3, 2018But the goal was awarded despite the animated protests from Liverpool’s youngsters.Liverpool’s academy director Alex Inglethorpe went on to the field to speak to the referee after the final whistle.It was a frustrating end to the game for the Reds made worse by the fact their goalscorer hobbled off and left the stadium on crutches.And substitute Bobby Duncan took an elbow to the head in an off-the-ball incident in a game where seven bookings were handed out. REVEALED Oxlade-Chamberlain suffers another setback as Klopp confirms serious injury huge blow Which teams do the best on Boxing Day in the Premier League era? Liverpool’s youth side were controversially robbed of a win at Napoli in a bad-tempered UEFA Youth League clash at the Stadio P. Ianniello.Gianluca Gaetano’s bundled effort in the final minute of stoppage-time cancelled out Bobby Adekanye’s first-half goal but the Reds were furious Napoli’s goal stood as two balls were on the field at the same time. shining Liverpool news live: Klopp reveals when Minamino will play and issues injury update REVEALED Where Ancelotti ranks with every Premier League boss for trophies won Premier League Team of the Season so far, including Liverpool and Leicester stars last_img read more

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first_imgDonegal is due to welcome the Palestinian ambassadors to Ireland on Thursday 14th August as a number of events are planned in conjunction with their visit.At a county council meeting on July 31st Donegal County Council supported a call to have the Israeli Ambassador to Ireland expelled in the wake of the Israeli bombardment of the Gaza strip.At the same meeting the council voted to officially welcome Ambassador Ahmad Abdelrazek and his deputy Yunus Dorkman to the county when they visit in August for a public meeting about the ongoing crisis in Gaza. The public meeting, which has been organised by Councillor Micheál Cholm Mac Giolla Easbuig, will be held in the Rosses in Ionad Naomh Padraig, Dore at 7.30pm on the evening of August 14thand will feature guest speakers Thomas Pringle TD and Donegal County Mayor Councillor John Campbell.Speaking of the public meeting to be held with the Palestinian Ambassadors Cllr Mac Giolla Easbuig said it was important for people to both get informed on the day and also to show their support for the Palestinian people.“I have long had a connection to the plight Palestinian people and have had a long term relationship with the Palestinian embassy over the years because of it” Cllr Mac Giolla Easbuig said.“I have visited Palestine in the past and I have a strong affiliation with is people and their daily suffering of brutal occupation by the Israeli government. This latest slaughter of the people of Gaza and the near destruction of the Gaza strip itself moved me to organise this upcoming meeting. “We held a similar meeting in Dore following the last major attack on the people of Gaza back in 2009 and I didn’t think then we would be back here again. But sadly the Palestinian people continue to be oppressed and in Gaza there are 1.8million people basically living in an open air prison smaller than Inishowen. Now they also have to endure being under heavy bombardment from the worlds forth most powerful army and all its military might.”Speaking of the current situation in Gaza Mr Mac Giolla Easbuig said that there is massive support for the Palestinian people here in Donegal which he very much welcomed.“The massacre of so many innocent people by the Israelis in the last few weeks has enraged so many people here in Donegal,” he said. “But despite a lot of media trying to stifle the reality of how disproportionate and unjust the Israeli army’s actions have been, it is quite clear the people here are doing all they can to inform themselves and take action in whatever way they can.“There has been a growing support of Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions against Israel and many people are now boycotting Israel by not purchasing Israeli goods in the shops. Already we have supermarkets in Gweedore and Dungloe refusing to sell Israeli goods which is a very welcome development. And with our county council supporting a call for the Israeli Ambassador to be expelled from Ireland it seems the people of Donegal are sending a strong message to Israel of their disgust at the Israeli treatment of the Palestinian people.”Calling for people to continue their support Councillor Mac Giolla Easbuig said attending the public meeting on the 14th of August in Dore would be both informative and an opportunity to send a warm message of support to the people of Gaza. “It would be great to see a large turnout for this public meeting for it would be a great opportunity for us as a people to send a message of support and solidarity from Donegal to the people of Gaza through their Ambassador. It will let them know how much we sympathise with them as they continue endure such hardship in the face of this brutal attack and massacre. At the very least if the people of Gaza know other people in the world stand with them it will give them hope for the future.”DONEGAL PEOPLE URGED TO ATTEND MEETING WITH PALESTINIAN AMBASSADORS was last modified: August 6th, 2014 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:donegalPALESTINIAN AMBASSADORvisitlast_img read more

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first_imgTo start his first official day on the job as the Kings’ pied piper, the day players reported to El Segundo for physicals, Jeremy Roenick talked himself and his Porsche into an executive parking lot. Roenick doesn’t know whose spot his car occupied. One team employee said it belonged to Lakers coach Phil Jackson. Told this, Roenick debated that part of the story for a moment, but ultimately shrugged. Then there’s Roenick. In his brief Kings career, he already has done television segments with Carson Daly and former Playboy playmate Jenny McCarthy, hung out with the crew on Fox’s Best Damn Sports Show Period and done a segment locally with KTLA Channel 5. That’s more publicity than most Kings get in their careers, and Roenick hasn’t played a regular-season game here. “I love the guy; I think he should have been in L.A. 10 years ago,” Luc Robitaille said. “He’s entertainment. If you think of the Lakers when they had Magic (Johnson), it was pure entertainment. That’s what JR brings to our team. On top of being a hard player, he does entertaining things.” Like say, perhaps, disco-dancing on the ice? During the Kings’ preseason game in Las Vegas, one of the Plexiglass panes became dislodged. Ever impatient, Roenick skated over to offer advice to the rink crew, and during the break, music was played to keep the fans entertained. Roenick began to groove a bit, and an astute rink employee shined a spotlight on him, which was a huge invitation. Roenick began a full-out disco routine, pumping his arms as he skated back to the bench and the crowd roared its approval and smiling players looked on. “Too many people in this game, they’re strictly about, /\x27/Play hockey, play hockey, play hockey, don’t smile, pay attention to hockey, concentrate, play hockey, play hockey, play hockey,” ‘ Roenick said. “This is entertainment. Yes, it’s a business, but we’re also in the business of entertaining. “The lockout hurt us, and we need to find ways to entertain the fans. It doesn’t have to be your actions on the ice. It can be the things you say, whether it’s talking with the fans or just acting stupid sometimes. That can’t be taken as a lack of concentration or a lack of competitiveness.” And therein lies the rub with Roenick. The Kings lost the Disco Night game, and although it was just a preseason game, Roenick knows that some around the league would be critical of him goofing around in a game his team lost, a game in which coach Andy Murray wasn’t happy with the team’s effort. Roenick has dealt with this before, the perception that he puts himself before the team, that personal attention and accomplishments are more important to him than team goals. Roenick strongly disagrees. “Certain things might not seem beneficial, like dancing at center ice,” Roenick said. “When you lose a game 2-1, there are individuals around the league who would point to that. /\x27/Aw, he wasn’t ready to play. He’s too busy trying to entertain and fool around and bring attention to himself instead of the team.” “That’s just a cop-out. That shouldn’t be a problem. Not everybody can separate those two sides, but I’m a guy who has shown he can separate it, which is important.” Roenick has had his share of management run-ins in previous stops. Most recently, in Philadelphia, he was suspended for throwing a water bottle at a referee and once referred to coach Ken Hitchcock as a “control freak’ because Roenick was unhappy about Hitchcock changing line combinations. But Roenick also is the guy who returned after 19 games from a broken jaw and a concussion after being struck in the face by a puck. He is the guy who has never missed the playoffs in 16 seasons. “He’s a really good friend and teammate, and at the end of the day that’s all that matters,” Hitchcock said. “The people around him understand that. He just enjoys every aspect of sports and entertainment and certain people see that as attention-grabbing, but Jeremy is a very competitive person. “We had a very good working relationship. He never detracted from the team and never cheated the team. The rest of the stuff made it interesting and kept you on your toes.” That’s something coming from Hitchcock, as old school as they come. But then again, so is Kings coach Andy Murray, who already is on the record as saying that he doesn’t mind “if players talk, as long as they back it up.” That theory surely will be put to the test by Roenick. Roenick drew the most attention of any player during the lockout when he said a segment of fans could kiss his backside. Roenick later clarified those comments, but they were a good example of what can happen anytime he’s face-to-face with a microphone. And it’s not an act. What you see is Roenick, as he is, for better or worse. “I’m the same way at home,” Roenick said. “My kids look at me sometimes and they bow their heads, like, /\x27/Oh my God, Dad.” I’ll dance in the car, sing in the car. I’ll be around my kids’ friends and do something wild and crazy and my (11-year-old) daughter goes, ‘Dad, stop it, you’re embarrassing me.” I say, ‘What do you have to be embarrassed about?” ‘ 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! “That’s OK. I had a heavy bag and I didn’t want to carry it all the way in from the main parking lot,” Roenick said. “I figured, I’m a new guy, just let me use the spot for the day. It was a welcoming gift. “I met Phil (two weeks later) and he didn’t say anything, so I guess I’m OK.” center_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREThe top 10 theme park moments of 2019 Welcome to JR’s world. It’s a world easily misunderstood, one where the words subtle, discreet and restrained have no significance. So for the Kings, Roenick isn’t just a first-line center; he’s a personality on a team desperately in need of one, the face of a franchise too often anonymous in its own city. Roenick isn’t all talk, but he’s big on it. The Kings acquired him in August from Philadelphia, hoping that at age 35 and with a history of concussions, he still has something left. But arguably, Roenick’s bigger role will be off the ice, in helping the Kings regain a presence after the nightmare of last year’s lockout. Whether he is talking about fellow players, coaches, the collective-bargaining agreement, fans or the baseball playoffs, Roenick has opinions on every subject, and isn’t afraid to share. “With JR and the profile he has, it’s already been very helpful to us,” general manager Dave Taylor said. “There’s a lot of competition for the sports dollar in L.A. and he’s helped raise awareness for our team.” Even in the heyday of Wayne Gretzky, the Kings never saw anything like this. Gretzky, while immensely talented, often had the humility of a fourth-line checker. last_img read more

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first_imgOur columnist Nikki Bradley is stirring up the airwaves as a top radio DJ will soon have her on the air.Nikki Bradley is on a mission to get fit to create awareness for Ewing’s Sarcoma, a rare form of cancer.Her story caught the attention of Spin 1038 DJ Nikki Hayes, who will feature her on her show. Hayes, who has Donegal connections through her fiancé Frank Black, has promised to help Nikki promote her cause. She arranged for Wicklow radio station East Coast FM to host Nikki next Monday, September 23, where she will talk about her fitness journey and awareness plans.Hayes also contacted the director of Dundrum Town Centre, Don Nugent, who’s son Ross tragically died from Ewing’s Sarcoma in 2010. His parents set up The Ross Nugent Foundation, a Dublin-based charity set up to raise funds for equipment in oncology wards in Beaumont and other hospitals. The charity has agreed to help Nikki generate even more awareness for her goal.MAKE SURE TO CATCH ‘NIKKI’S FIGHT FOR FITNESS’ COLUMN EVERY FRIDAY, ONLY ON DONEGAL DAILYDOUBLE TROUBLE: DONEGAL NIKKI JOINS SPIN FM’S NIKKI ON AIR was last modified: September 18th, 2013 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:fighting for ewingsnikki bradleyradiolast_img read more

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first_img1 August 2013 The state injected R202-billion in capital spending into the South African economy in 2012, Statistician-General Pali Lehohla told journalists in Pretoria on Wednesday. Lehohla was speaking at the release of Statistics South Africa’s public sector capital expenditure survey for 2012. According to the survey, total capital expenditure by the country’s public institutions increased by R21-billion, from R181-billion in 2011 to R202-billion in 2012. Capital expenditure refers to any expenditure on acquiring or improving land, buildings, engineering structures, and machinery and equipment. According to the report, the bulk of state capital spending in 2012 went into new construction works, with plant, machinery and equipment lagging behind. At least R137-billion was spent on new construction works, while R38-billion was spent on plant, machinery and equipment. “You will see that expenditure on machinery and the like is fairly low, but expenditure on actual work is fairly high consistently across government and it continues to rise over time,” Lehohla said. “Service delivery is influenced by long-term infrastructure, but municipalities are not investing adequately in equipment and machinery,” he added. “Employment-related costs in municipalities continue to grow. But there is no spending on equipment and machinery. This raises the question: who is doing the work?” The report covers capital expenditure by national, provincial and local government departments, state-owned enterprises, higher education institutions, and extra budgetary accounts and funds (such as the SA Revenue Service). State-owned enterprises spent the most, according to the report, spending R79-billion on new construction works in 2012, up from R30-billion in 2008. Source: SAnews.gov.zalast_img read more

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first_imgPhil: That was Martin Holladay’s pyramid, wasn’t it?Chris: It was… He put it in one of his posts. (I think it was from Minnesota Power.).Phil: Okay, so this is three-cycled right now.Chris: Right. This is six degrees from where it really originated. But, check out our slide: things you should start off with first and then move on up the pyramid.Phil: I will say that the cost of solar panels is coming down, and will continue to – and the incentives will dry up as those costs come down, but right now we’re pretty close (we’re closer than most people think) – for solar being cost-effective.Chris: Oh yeah. In fact, if you’re not financing your house, you should be buying solar.Phil: Right. If you’ve got the cash, then you’re paying 8 cents per kilowatt-hour – which is pretty hot. I mean, most places in the country – that’s good. We pay, what, 15 cents per kilowatt-hour here?Chris: Yeah, between 13 and 15.Phil: Connecticut is 20?Chris: Yeah. Hawaii is off the charts. It’s a million dollars!Phil: And Canada is, like, 5.Chris: Yeah. How do they do that?Phil: I don’t know.Chris: I don’t know either.Phil: Okay.Chris: Okay. Let’s move on… eh? Number Eleven: you get to say it.Phil: Chris, go blower-door yourself.Chris: Yeah, blower-door me, Phil. We’re talking about blower doors. If you don’t know what ACH50 is, man, I feel bad for you. I do!Phil: [He laughs] Again, you’re talking to the newbies, Chris. Be nice.Chris: Well, you’re right.Phil: In their defense, there are a number of metrics out there to measure airtightness. There is “effective leakage area”…Chris: Right. And what we’re talking about, of course, is hooking up a blower door to your project at the end – or even better, midway through the project, when you can actually access (and shell-test) your project. Windows are in; sheathing is in. Insulation is not; sheetrock is not. If you can blower-door test at that point, that is a great time, because you can find leaks and you can plug them and you can move on. It’s great.Phil: And if you’re an architect, put that in your specs. Write it down somewhere: “This building needs to be blower-door tested three times in the process.”Chris: Nice! And you get that phone call from the builder: “Whoa, whoa, whoa. Hey, I just read this spec. We’re supposed to blower-door this thing? Are you blower-door-ing this or am I?”Chris: “Well, someone is. I know some people, if you can’t do that.”Of course, if you are going after some rating system – if you are doing either LEED or Passivhaus – it has to be a third party. Or Energy Star. The point here, folks, is: there is a very easy way to test your building to see how much it leaks air, and it’s called a blower-door test. Learn about it. Use it.Phil: if you don’t do it, you’re an air-hole.Chris: You’re an air-hole. You’re being an air-hole. Stop doing that!Phil: Number Twelve, Chris.Chris: Yes.Phil: Touch the sweet spot.Chris: Touch it, Phil.Phil: That’s it, baby. You know when you touch it.Chris: That’s right. And we talked about this earlier in Part One, but, we’re looking for that sweet spot. If you’re energy-modeling, it’s easier to find the sweet spot.Phil: I wouldn’t say easy.Chris: No, easy is not the right word. It’s hard.Phil: It is hard. But, the energy model will certainly help. Having a builder on-board is vital – or having someone who knows what things cost, because that’s what you’re looking for here – you’re looking for the optimization point between costs and energy efficiency.Chris: Right. We’re making the envelope really robust; we’re introducing solar gain; we’re able to reduce energy demand to the point where we can shrink mechanical systems. And then, at that point, you should see some savings by shrinking the mechanical systems that will offset the cost of making the house better in performance – that would be the sweet spot. You hit that and you’re a hero. Otherwise, you’ve failed and everyone’s angry.Phil: For newbies, we’ve posted this on past episodes. We’ll throw it on again – the spreadsheet that we’ve developed in-house that allows people to compare multiple scenarios to find that sweet spot.Chris: That’s right. All the cool kids are doing it, so get in there.Number Thirteen: Sustainability is design, dummy. (We said that in the slide because I feel that way.) I mean, we picked on Tom Kundig directly in our presentation.Phil: He’s got this beautiful building made out of Cor-Ten steel.Chris: He has more than one. To say he’s not good is terrible; he’s great. But I have this love/hate – I see his work and “I love that; I love that; I hate that; I love that” – because of those thermal bridges. It’s this big, steel “W” or wide flange that just goes on to support something and it’s just bridging right through.Phil: And you know it’s just raining on the inside of the house in the wintertime.Chris: Oh yeah. Energy-inefficient. And I think in our slides we gave him an “F+”.Phil: Yeah. It’s really pretty, but your building is failing.Chris: It’s failing; big ol’ “FAIL!” But it gets the “+” because it looks pretty and we like it from a design standpoint. But, “F+.”So what we’re saying is: no longer can architecture ignore energy efficiency and sustainability as a metric for good design. It’s one and the same.Phil: That’s right. That’s not a separate thing now.Chris: Right. And for you to do your beautiful glass box with steel pins that go out and make this cool form…Phil: You may as well have a building that’s falling down.Chris: You might as well, because in ten years you’re going to look like an idiot. Idiot!Phil: That’s right, especially given our climate in this decade.Chris: Right. Philip Johnson – he can be forgiven. (It was the sixties – gas was cheap; everyone didn’t care; beautiful house.) Love him; love that.Phil: That’s right. People who design glass houses…Chris: Shouldn’t… something clever!Phil: Something clever! [Much laughter.]Chris: Damn! Damn these drinks! We could be so much better! If only we had some good radio hosts in here.Phil: Let’s move on. (That way we don’t have to think about it.) Chris, what’s Number Fourteen?Chris: Don’t LEED your clients down a dark alley. And, by that, we’re not picking on LEED.Phil: We are, a little bit.Chris: Yeah, okay. We are. I was on the board that founded the Maine chapter of the U.S. Green Building Council here. I loved LEED and was part of it when it was a pilot project, but very quickly you see that people become point-chasers. And that’s when LEED takes a turn for the worse.Phil: Right. Respect LEED and use it as you need it, but don’t make it the end-all. Make a great building first.Chris: Make a great building. If you want that certificate, if you want that plaque, if you want validity from a third party – I imagine if you were, for example, a developer and this is a house that you’re going to put on the market and you’re saying, “It’s green,” it helps to have a respectable third party say, “Yes, it is green. You’re LEED Silver. You’re LEED Gold. You’re LEED Platinum.” That means something, yes.Phil: Or, if you’ve got a builder who hasn’t really done this before and you want to keep him in check. And he’s got to watch his waste, for instance, and he’s just not doing the right things. And he’s got to make an airtight building.Chris: Right. This is a great tool, a great structure, in which he has to provide certain documentation that proves he does these things. So it’s a good tool. But, to put LEED on a pedestal and say, “LEED equals green” is not right. A LEED house is a green house, but LEED is not the end-all, be-all of it.Phil: There are two great builders in this state…Chris: Only two?Phil: It was Peter Taggart and Wright-Ryan Construction. I don’t know if that’s still the case, but when I talked to them, I think it was maybe a year and a half ago, they had still each only done one LEED building.Chris: Is that right?Phil: And I was shocked! They may have done more since then, but one LEED home.Chris: Interesting. One LEED home. Yeah.Phil: And I thought about it, and at first I said, “Really? You guys are really good; you know how to do this.” And the point was: they’re really good. And they know how to do this. And it’s not vital that they chase the points anymore.Chris: Interesting. I’ve got a few LEED plaques on the wall in the conference room, and I’ve got a few in the drawer.Phil: We’ve got a stack of them. We’ve got a stack of (literally!) eight of them. We talked about it the other day: “Are we going to put these back up? What do we do with these?”Chris: All right, moving on. We’re not bashing LEED. But, we’re kind of bashing LEED. It’s just a rating system. It’s a rating system, is what it is, and you pay for it – and that’s the thing.All right. I’m sorry. Fifteen?Phil: Watch your language, Chris.Chris: I will, you son-of-a…Phil: Hey, hey, hey, hey! [Much laughter,]Chris: And, of course, by this we mean: we’re out there as green architects; we’re the torch-bearers for this – and when I say “we,” I mean you guys, too (whoever is listening to this) – if we’re out there talking like a green pamphlet, this is all meaningless and it becomes like a green pamphlet. There’s some real, tangible things that connect to the everyday homeowner. It’s not just about being green. In fact, stop using that word.Phil: And the other things that happen, Chris, I would say, that yes, you and I want to save the world.Chris: I do! I do want to save the world.Phil: Genuinely, we do. But it may not catch on with that language. We’re trying to get this across to the general public. And if we’re going to make an impact – climate change is coming freakin’ fast (we may already be too late) – we have to change the words that we use when we talk to other people, because it doesn’t really matter to most people that we’re going to “use your money to save the world.” We want to talk about durability and quality and comfort, and that it’s a good investment.Chris: Investment. I use that word quite a bit with my clients, because it takes away the stigma of… When you say something is “green,” immediately… If they’re a liberal hippie, great. (That word is friendly and nice and you want to snuggle with it.) But if you’re not (if you haven’t already drinken the Kool-aid)…Drinken??! Did I just say that?Phil: Dranked is the proper…Chris: Dranked! I just dranked me some of the Kool-aid. [Much laughter.]I don’t even know what we’re talking about anymore.Phil: The word “investment” is… if you’re talking to a conservative guy, that’s how you’re going to get through. It’s all about the numbers; it’s all about the money.Chris: I’m not going to say, “You want these windows because of the solar heat gain coefficient and they’re going to save on fossil fuel and that’s going to help save the environment and reduce your carbon footprint.”I’m going to say, “You want these windows because they are very high quality. You can stand next to them when it’s zero degrees outside and not feel like you’re standing next to a cold window that you need a sweater for the draft and the heat-suck that comes off of you. You’re in an awesome house.”Phil: Right. Do you want a high quality building? If not, that’s fine.Chris: Right. We can do that single-pane glass thing that you mentioned.Phil: Or would you like to give money to save the spotted owl? It’s not going to fly.Chris: [He laughs.] I love the spotted owl. It’s our mascot around here at Briburn.Phil: So, watch your language. Change your language.Chris: Right. Do you want to recap them all? Let’s just do it. In fact, maybe we can do drum roll sounds. I don’t know – if Sheila’s up for it – but let’s just do it. Don’t do it on the table.Phil: Number fifteen –Chris: Watch your language.Phil: Number fourteen –Chris: That’s you.Phil: Don’t LEED your clients down a dark alley.Chris: Number thirteen – Sustainability is design, dummy.Phil: Number twelve – Touch the sweet spot.Chris: Number eleven – Blower-door me, Phil.Phil: Number ten – Pushing solar first is shady.Chris: Number nine – Keep it clean.Phil: Number eight – Pump it; pump it real good.Chris: Number seven – Bigger isn’t better.Phil: You should know. Number six – Do your modeling before the runway.Chris: Number five – Don’t wait to integrate.Phil: Group hug! Number four – Belt, suspenders, and clean underwear.Chris: And also redundancy.Phil: And redundancy.Chris: Number three – Don’t cross that bridge when you come to it.Phil: Number two – Raise your glass, Chris.Chris: Thanks. Number one (and the number one thing) – Don’t be an air-hole.All right.Phil: All right. Should we go out with a nice song?[The episode closes with a song by Hamilton Leithauser: “I retired.”] RELATED CONTENT PODCAST: Don’t Be an Air Hole! — Part 1PODCAST: An Interview With Martin Holladay, Part 1PODCAST: An Interview With Martin Holladay, Part 2PODCAST: Net-Zero-Energy Homes, Part 3PODCAST: Net-Zero-Energy Homes, Part 2: How to Get to Net ZeroPODCAST: Net-Zero-Energy Homes, Part 1: Concepts and Basics PODCAST: Deep Energy Retrofit: Apply the Energy Efficiency PyramidAir Leaks or Thermal Loss: What’s Worse? The highlights:8. Pump it! It’s time you learned about ductless minisplit heat pumps and ground-source heat pumps.9. Keep it clean. Tonic, not toxic. Keep the toxic stuff out of your airtight home. By the way, there’s no need to write in. I misspoke about the British fighting scurvy with tonic water. I meant to say malaria. Quinine (found in tonic water) was a treatment and preventative for malaria. The Brits liked to mix theirs with gin. There. On with architecture.10. Pushing solar first is shady. Chances are likely that there’s a lot more you should do to improve your project before you add PV.11. Blower door me. By now, you should all be comfortable with blower-door tests and ACH50 metrics.12 Touch the sweet spot. Find that sweet spot where spending money on the envelope allows you to save on mechanicals.13. Sustainability IS design, dummy. No more can a design be judged without using sustainability as a criterion for design.14. Don’t LEED your clients down a dark path. LEED is just a rating system, people. It is not the be-all and end-all of green design.15. Watch your language! How we, as professionals, talk about energy efficiency affects how the public perceives and receives energy efficiency.No episode is complete without a song selection from Phil, and the one he has chosen for this episode is a really good one. It’s “I Retired” by Hamilton Leithauser. Go get this one, folks!Thanks for tuning in. Cheers! Subscribe to Green Architects’ Lounge on iTunes— you’ll never miss a show, and it’s free!center_img TRANSCRIPTChris: Pump it, Phil.Phil: Pump it real good. Welcome back, Chris.Chris: Thank you, Phil. We’ve got fresh drinks. Let’s do Part Two of this thing real fast.Phil: That’s right. So, we’re up to Number Eight on our list of 15 ‘Top 10’ things not to do.Chris: Right. Pump it real good, Phil. A.K.A., don’t learn mechanical systems from a fossil… right?Phil: Yeah. The ‘old school’ guys – they’re coming around, bit by bit.Chris: Yeah. But really, what we’re saying is: you and I – the houses we’ve been doing – nine out of ten houses, are…Phil: Air-source heat pumps or ground-source heat pumps.Chris: Right. The heat pump is ruling; it’s back, man.Phil: Yeah, it really is. Our loads have come way down, and we can handle it with these things. And these heat pumps are pretty freakin’ efficient. Come on.Chris: Yeah. And, of course, if you don’t know about ductless minisplit heat pumps or ground-source heat pumps at this point, well then you are a sprout and… Welcome! Welcome aboard. We’re going to make sure…Phil: Oh, you were just about to dig into them…Chris: Yeah, but I went the other way… because they’re on Green Building Advisor probably, and they’re just flooding their green little brain full of awesome knowledge, so they’re…This is not the podcast to learn about ductless minisplits, but it is the podcast to learn that, hey, you need to go learn about ductless minisplits because they are very efficient for the low-demand house (which yours probably is, because you’ve done all these other things).Phil: That’s right. So it’s a heat pump. You’ve got your air-source heat pump and you have your ground-source heat pump.Chris: Right. And can we say, “Don’t say ‘geothermal’!” All right? Because you sound like a dink. And I think that’s what we said in the slide.Phil: Yeah. I mean, it’s technically not wrong, but you kind of think of those guys way below the ground…Chris: Right. I’m in Iceland. I’m in Yellowstone, tapping into the magma.Phil: Yeah, that’s not really what we’re doing here. We are just using the natural heat that’s at sub-grade.Chris: I remember at the conference, you went down to the (I forget who they were – ground-source heat guys) – and they had a big sign over their booth: ‘Geothermal.’ It was really big! And you said, “Don’t you guys really want to just say ‘ground-source heat pumps’?” And they kind of shrugged and said, “Yeah, but everyone calls it ‘geothermal.’ Lighten up. Who cares?”Phil: They were nice about it. They said, “Yeah. It’s absolutely wrong.”Chris: Yeah. Geothermal’s wrong, but that’s how everyone knows it. But, if you want to be one of the cool geeky guys like Phil and me…Phil: Wait. Did you say, “Cool geeky guys?”Chris: It’s an oxymoron.Phil: I love that.Chris: I know. It’s the year of the geek. And we’ll put it on a T-shirt and make six digits. “Stop being an air-hole.”Phil: So, that was Number Eight. Number Nine, Chris: Keep it clean.Chris: Right. Or A.K.A., tonic – not toxic.Phil: I just like that because it took a revelation for me when I realized that tonic was the opposite of toxic.Chris: I know, and I learned that when we were putting this together and you told me. And that makes sense, because a gin and tonic – we should be having gin and tonics!Phil: Actually, by the way – by the fifth gin and tonic, it’s a gin and toxic.Chris: Oh, I see. That makes sense. It used to be, the British would take tonic water to keep scurvy [actually, malaria] away and other things while they were down in Africa. And they would mix their gin with it, and so they’d have a gin and tonic, and that was their drink of choice. And, boy, look at it now!Phil: Wasn’t it the lemon that kept the scurvy away?Chris: Probably. But, you know… Brits. Limeys. It was limes.Phil: All right. So, when we make our tight houses, you can’t do that in a vacuum. You really have to pay attention to all the stuff inside the house.Chris: That’s right. All these materials that we bring into our environment – that we bring into our house – are…I think about those FEMA trailers back when Katrina hit. So many people were housed in brand-new FEMA trailers and they were coming down with all kinds of respiratory ailments. And that was because they were just inundated with cheap materials within these little boxes that were being cooked in the sun. These FEMA trailers were just filled with formaldehyde! All the wood products and materials were new and it was just wreaking havoc with their bodies. Poor people – they’d been through so much anyway.Phil: That’s really interesting.Chris: Spray foam goes in – and they’re wearing haz-mat suits (Tyvek suits, basically) – and, man, those projects don’t smell healthy. Right?Phil: No. You see these guys who apply this spray foam, and they’re wearing the astronaut suits, and you think, “That’s going into my healthy house?”Chris: Right. I don’t think so. Are you doing a lot of spray foam, Phil?Phil: No. We really try hard to avoid it. We use it to fill in some gaps.Chris: It’s hard to avoid completely. But anyway…Number Ten: Oh yeah, we said, “Pushing solar first is shady.” And that is because you want to grab that low-hanging fruit first… right?Phil: Right. And solar is not that.Chris: Right. There are so many things to do before you do that. For someone to say, “We’re green; we do solar.” Wow. Yeah, solar is cool, and that’s a great way to provide your electricity – and we’re advocates of solar – but, there’s just so much you can do before that.Phil: Right. If that’s where you start in your conversation about how sustainable your buildings are, that’s not going to fly. People are going to see through that. And if you hear somebody talking like that, then clearly they don’t know what they’re talking about. They’re using that because it’s a billboard to sustainability.There’s a building, Chris, on Route 1 in Falmouth on your way to Cumberland. And you can look at it and they’ve spackled it with solar panels on the roof.Chris: Oh yeah, yeah. Yeah, that’s great.Phil: I’ve been in that building, and there’s thermal bridging all over that place. It’s got fiberglass in the walls. They’ve got solar panels on the roof!Chris: That’s “green”!Phil: Yeah, so…Chris: You can buy your green, like Al Gore does.Phil: Right. Carbon offsets.Chris: Carbon offsets. And that’s honorable and great. But if you’re starting your project saying, “We’re going to be green because we’re going to put solar panels on this. Done and done” – you are not done. You’re a sprout, dude. Get in there; dig in there. There’s so much to do.In this slide show, we’ve got the pyramid. Remember the pyramid? It’s like the food pyramid. Phil and I have freshened up our drinks and now we’re ready to tackle Items 8 through 15. Be sure to go back to Part 1 to listen to Items 1 through 7.Here’s a link to the PowerPoint presentation that inspired this podcast: Sprout Follies at NESEA. KTA-GAL-PVcostsheet.xlsxlast_img read more

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