first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Customs officials at the Kuala Lumpur International Airport raided the cargo area of the airport on May 14 following a tip-off, and found the tortoises packed into five boxes labeled as stones.The boxes reportedly arrived on an Etihad Airways flight from Antananarivo airport in Madagascar, and were registered with a fake business address in Malaysia.No arrests have been made yet, but the case is being investigated under Section 135(1)(a) of the Customs Act 1967, officials say. Malaysian customs officials have seized 330 tortoises that were smuggle into the Kuala Lumpur International Airport.The tortoises, which included 325 Radiated tortoises as well as five Ploughshare tortoises, were all found to be alive, Abdul Wahid Sulong, deputy director of the customs department, told the AFP. The tortoises are believed to be worth nearly $280,000. Both species are listed as critically endangered on the IUCN Red List.“It is a big haul. It could be for the local market or for re-export. We are investigating,” Sulong said in a statement.The customs officials raided the cargo area of the airport on May 14 following a tip-off, and found the tortoises packed into five boxes labeled as stones. The boxes reportedly arrived on an Etihad Airways flight from Antananarivo airport in Madagascar, and were registered with a fake business address in Salak Tinggi, Selangor in Malaysia.“In this specific incident, an attempt to illegally transport tortoises was made as part of a shipment that originated from another carrier during transit at Abu Dhabi International Airport,” an Etihad Airways spokesperson told Gulf News. “Etihad Airways will cooperate with the concerned authorities and provide any information that may assist the investigation of the incident.”Malaysia seizes smuggled tortoises worth nearly S$400,000 – good work by Malaysian Customs & investigations underway https://t.co/rRbnmulesf pic.twitter.com/8PIxNwQBDB— John E. Scanlon (@John_CITES) May 15, 2017No arrests have been made yet, Sulong said, but the case is being investigated under Section 135(1)(a) of the Customs Act 1967.  Those found guilty for illegally transporting the threatened tortoises to Malaysia can be imprisoned for up to three years, or can be fined a maximum of 20 times the value of the smuggled items, or both, according to New Straits Times.The customs officials will hand the seized tortoises to the Wildlife Protection and National Parks Department, Sulong added.Ploughshare tortoise (Astrochelys yniphora) is one of the most endangered tortoises in the world. Fewer than 100 individuals remain in the wild, all occurring within Baly Bay National Park in northwestern Madagascar. The tortoise’s striking gold and black domed shell has made it an attractive pet in the international market, and continued poaching of these animals for the illegal pet trade will likely wipe out the last few ploughshare tortoises in a few years, conservationists say. Like the ploughshare, the Radiated tortoise (Astrochelys radiata), too has brilliant yellow lines radiating from its dark shell, making it a prized pet.  The tortoise is found in Madagascar, and is under immediate threat of extinction due to habitat loss, poaching and the illegal pet trade.“It is vital that highly threatened seized tortoises, especially Ploughshare Tortoises, are repatriated to Madagascar and reintroduced following the appropriate protocols to augment the wild population there,” Chris R. Shepherd, Regional Director for TRAFFIC in Southeast Asia, said in a statement. “The thoughtless greed of those buying these animals is driving Ploughshare Tortoises to extinction, and we encourage the authorities to go after not just the traffickers but also those buying them.”Between 2000 and 2015, over 300,000 tortoises and freshwater turtles have been confiscated, according to John E. Scanlon, CITES Secretary-General.“Many seizures of tortoises and freshwater turtles seem to involve small numbers of animals that are carried or kept as personal pets or souvenirs, but more significantly, a smaller number of seizures of large to very large shipments containing several hundreds or thousands of live specimens, suggests the involvement of well-organized criminal networks,” Scanlon said at the meeting of the CITES Tortoises and Freshwater Turtles Task Force in April.Malaysian customs authorities seized 325 radiated tortoises. Photo by Bernard DUPONT (From Flickr under CC BY-SA 2.0)Correction, 05/17/2017 08:35 pm: A previous version of the article said that 325 Indian star tortoises had been seized. The Malaysian customs authorities have, in fact, seized 325 Radiated tortoises and not Indian star tortoises. This has been corrected in the story. We regret the error. Animals, Conservation, Critically Endangered Species, Environment, Environmental Crime, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Herps, Illegal Trade, Pet Trade, Reptiles, Turtles And Tortoises, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking center_img Article published by Shreya Dasguptalast_img read more

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first_imgThe Most Common “Bad Fish” list features species primarily captured unsustainably from coral reefs. Image credit: For The Fishes The “Good Fish” list features commercially available, captive-bred saltwater fish. Image credit: For The Fishes Cyanide fishing is often quicker and easier than other methods but is highly destructive to coral reef habitat, is used to catch up to 90 percent of saltwater fish that are imported into the United States.Most of the fish imported into the United States come from countries where cyanide fishing is prevalent and enforcement of fishing regulation is limited.For the Fishes’ ‘Tank Watch” app lists fish that are captive-bred vs wild caught and makes the information readily available to potential buyers of marine life.As efforts to strengthen enforcement improve fisheries management, consumers can use these lists to decide if the fish that they are looking to purchase are suitable for their personal aquariums. The fish and other marine life displayed in household or public aquariums may conceal a dark secret. Many of the over 1,800 species of tropical fish bought and sold globally to populate aquariums are caught using the destructive and often illegal custom of using cyanide to stun fish. The lack of data and public awareness of this practice allows it to continue, harming reef ecosystems across the tropics.In 2012, Rene Umberger, founder and Executive Director of the non-profit group For the Fishes, noticed the limited understanding of where the marine fish in private aquariums came from. She created a short reference guide identifying the species often involved in the harmful international trade.Capturing yellow tang in Hawaii for the global aquarium trade. Photo credit: Brooke LandtSoon, because of the lack of knowledge concerning cyanide fishing and international fish trade, Umberger realized a tool was needed that could be easily accessed by conservationists and hobbyists to assess the sourcing of tropical aquarium fish.From this, the app Tank Watch was launched in September, 2014 and has since been downloaded by over 14,000 people worldwide.The Tank Watch app being watched by a tank of clown anemone fish. Photo credit: For The Fishes“We didn’t set out to use technology when we began our campaign to protect coral reefs and wildlife, but it now plays a major role in our projects,” Umberger said.Tank Watch conveniently separates its listings into “Good Fish” and “Bad Fish” categories, in which potential fish buyers can search for specific species. The “Good Fish” list is based on a list compiled annually in CORAL magazine by field experts and includes all of the captive-bred species available to consumers, Umberger said. The “Bad List” identifies those fish that are caught in the wild, where supply chains are less traceable.Some experts emphasize the need to shift business practices to those that promote local stewardship of reef fish in the wild. Nevertheless, data on current and sustainable fishing practices are scarce, so knowing whether a species is wild-caught or captive-bred may be as much information as can be made consistently available to the consumer. The app allows consumers to sort the lists by family name, common name and/or color to customize their search for the fish they are considering purchasing. Easy access to the database allows consumers to quickly see whether or not the particular fish that they are interested in is likely to be captive-bred and, if not, whether an alternative captive-bred species exists.Umberger says that only the individual seller can give final confirmation of the fish’s origin.“Ultimately, we see Tank Watch as a global effort to raise awareness about illegal wildlife in the saltwater aquarium trade, reduce consumer purchases of these coral reef fish and invertebrates, and improve their status in the wild,” Umberger said.Capturing marine life unsustainably and dangerouslyCyanide is often used to capture wild fish. Reef fishers squirt the toxic liquid into the fish’s face, or into crevices where fish hide, to stun it and catch it.The fish often suffer immediately from their exposure to the toxin, and its effects weaken fish, making them more vulnerable to the stresses of transit and a new environment once in their aquarium owner’s tank.Studies have found that “if rapidly moved to clean water about 50% survive the initial exposure…Even if fish survive the initial pulse-exposure…they are subject to a high delayed mortality (>80%) during export to other countries.”Cyanide fisher spraying a reef. Photo credit: James Cervino_NOAAIn addition to directly harming the fish, the method harms other marine life in the process. Umberger said that for every wild fish sold for aquariums, several other fish, non-target reef creatures, and surrounding corals are killed from exposure to the chemical.The practice is illegal in many countries, but the laws are not well enforced. Up to 80 percent of saltwater fish imported into the U.S. come from countries that frequently use this method, and techniques to detect cyanide excretion in harvested fish are still under development.Lethal methods such as cyanide fishing are used to capture the “exotic” fish that many aquarium enthusiasts look to include in their tanks, as well as food fish in some Asian countries.“Very few people, including aquarium enthusiasts, realize that nearly all of the marine life sold for aquariums is captured from the wild, most likely in unsustainable and destructive ways,” Umberger said. “This means that hobbyists are unknowingly contributing to significant harm and destruction of coral reefs and their wildlife…”Today, fewer than 60 species–only two percent of the species imported in the U.S. annually—are captive-bred in a sustainable manner and thus suitable for commercial purchase. About 80 percent of wild-captured fish will die before they ever reach a tank, and almost all are likely to die within a year of their capture.Reef fish that did not survive the cyanide spray. Photo credit: Nanang SujanaMaking a differenceAccording to a recent poll conducted by For the Fishes, 81 percent of the public believe that only captive-bred fish should be kept in personal aquariums, even if the selection of available fish diminishes.For each fish that survives the cyanide and transport to a small private aquarium, several others, plus the surrounding coral and invertebrates, do not make it. Photo credit: Gregg Yan, Best Alternatives CampaignAdditionally, a survey found that the majority of aquarium hobbyists who purchased wild-caught fish or were unsure of their origins in the past two years noted that fish purchases in their future would likely to be only captive-bred. These results came after they learned about the cyanide fishing issue through For the Fishes.“By providing accurate information and correcting the widely-held misconception that captive fish were captive-bred, Tank Watch creates a ripple effect of awareness, behavior change, and intention,” Umberger said.Tunicates and sea squirts are just some of the many invertebrates potentially harmed by cyanide sprayed to stun reef fish. Photo credit: Sue PalminteriTo measure the app’s success, For the Fishes obtains information from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service of in the number of wild-caught fish imported into the United States by the marine aquarium trade. The group acknowledges that there are several factors that play into the decreased import numbers, but their efforts on Tank Watch and education contribute to the success.However, because Tank Watch can identify the fish species that are most commonly bred in captivity and those potentially wild-captured through its lists, it is up to the consumer to confirm with the seller that their purchase is captive-bred. Moreover, tracing the supply chain of wild-harvested fishes is difficult due to limited monitoring of trade and false claims by some traders that their fish were captive-bred.Umberger said that the only way that consumers can be absolutely certain that they are buying captive-bred fish would be to buy a “designer” clownfish, which come in color morphs that are not found in nature. Given the uncertainty when purchasing tropical fish, the Tank Watch app aims to minimize the possibility of the purchase of an unsustainably wild-captured fish.Healthy reef scene with anthias fish and coralline algae. Photo credit: Derek Keats, Creative CommonsEfforts continue to strengthen supply chains for the aquarium trade, with the aim to creating a sustainable harvest of high-value reef fish that provide fishing communities with an alternative to other, more destructive fishing practices.Unless supply chains can be verified as sustainable and non-destructive, purchasing captive-bred fish can help save the other fishes, reef invertebrates and corals that are indirectly affected by cyanide fishing.“…Every captive-bred fish that’s purchased instead of a wild one saves a piece of one of the most beautiful and fragile ecosystems on the planet,” Umberger said.Learn more about the use of cyanide in the documentary video below by Nanang Sujana:Banner image is a pair of pennant bannerfish. Photo credit: Rob, Creative CommonsEditor’s note: This post has been updated to reflect additional data on the uncertainty of marine aquarium trade fisheries. Marine, Marine Ecosystems, Technology, Wildlife Trade, Wildtech Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Sue Palminterilast_img read more

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first_imgIn a new paper, scientists assert that environmental impact assessments (EIAs) for major Brazilian Amazon infrastructure projects often fail in their performance of comprehensive biodiversity evaluations, so underestimate ecosystem risk.Their proposed solution is the development and use within EIAs of multiple, complementary scientific methods they say would be cost effective, and make more comprehensive biodiversity assessments possible.These methods include satellite imaging, near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy, and DNA metabarcoding to detect a wider range of species. The scientists propose these methods be implemented to improve pre-construction biodiversity surveys and EIAs.A major concern by researchers is that Brazil’s Congress is currently considering legislation that would do away with the existing environmental licensing process, and reduce or eliminate existing EIA requirements. Looking up into the canopy of the Amazon rainforest. Numerous major infrastructure projects are under construction or planned for the Amazon basin. A new study examining the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) process for three very large such projects found their EIAs, as conducted, to be inadequate for evaluating biodiversity impacts. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / MongabayMany dozens of major infrastructure projects — including highways, dams and mines — have been given the green light in the Brazilian Amazon in recent years, and hundreds more are in the pipeline – but how well do their Environmental Impact Assessments (EIAs) perform? Are their projections of harm accurate, and do they sufficiently manage risk?Many projects, such as the Tapajós dam complex, have hit the headlines due to their projected social and ecological impacts, which include deforestation, harm to aquatic and terrestrial species, disruption to flood and nutrient cycles, increased carbon emissions, the flooding of sacred lands and the forced relocation of river communities.As a guard against these threats, all major development in the Brazilian Amazon requires that an environmental impact assessment (EIA) be carried out as part of the project licensing process. But a recent paper, examining three large infrastructure projects in the region, has found just how ineffective the existing EIA process can be.As a result, the scientists behind the study are calling for the incorporation of new technology into Brazilian EIAs to more accurately measure biodiversity and habitat quality ahead of construction, allowing a full cost-benefit analysis of development to be carried out.The BR-319 highway, linking the cities of Manaus and Porto Velho, was one of three major Amazon projects examined by scientists. Repaving the highway would open up biologically important areas of remote forest to deforestation, they say, something not adequately taken into account in the project’s EIA. Photo by Agencia CNT de Noticias under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic licenseInadequate EIAsThe research team, led by Camila Ritter of the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, looked at an existing highway, hydropower dam, and mine:Paving the BR-319: This Amazon rainforest highway links the cities of Manaus and Porto Velho. Constructed in the 1970s, it fell into disrepair by the late 1980s. An EIA for paving a large, central section was rejected in 2008, but maintenance work — which effectively permits the reconstruction of the BR-319, except for paving itself — was approved in 2016. Although in this case the EIA contributed to the project license being formally rejected (for now) the scientists argue that the assessment fell far short of accurately analyzing the environmental consequences of paving. The improved BR-319 would likely do extensive harm to a highly biodiverse region between the Madeira and Purus rivers, rich in endemic species. Amazon highways, the researchers note, are a key driver of deforestation, with once remote and now newly accessible roadside forests a prime target for exploitation.Building the Belo Monte dam: When fully operational, the Belo Monte dam on the Xingu River will be the third largest in the world with an 11,000 megawatt generating capacity. Dogged by controversy and licensing hold-ups, the reservoir was filled in December 2015. The scientists argue that its EIA overlooked the synergistic effects of the dam in combination with other hydropower dams within the watershed. The EIA, they say, failed to fully evaluate the disruption to natural flood cycles, the carbon emissions caused by the reservoir, and also underestimated the dam’s impetus for a rapid increase in the local human population, which impacted the surrounding forest and wildlife. The Belo Monte EIA “is descriptive rather than predictive, and it falls short of proposing mitigating actions,” said the researchers.The Juruti bauxite mine: In the case of the Juruti bauxite mine, an industrial complex that includes a mine, port and railway on the southern bank of the Amazon River in Pará state, the scientists found that biological sampling for its EIA was inadequate. Not only was biodiversity significantly underestimated, but rare, endemic species were likely to have been missed altogether. This is on top of the “significant and long-lasting environmental changes” that the development is likely to bring to the region.What all three projects share, the scientists say, is a failure in one of the main components of every good EIA: to properly assess biodiversity. “The most important aspect in the discussion of Brazilian Amazonia EIAs is that we need to obtain better estimates of biological diversity, which translate into better predictions of biological and ecological impacts of these large infrastructural projects,” says Ritter.Belo Monte dam under construction in 2015. Large dams obstruct the flow of sediments and nutrients from headwaters to lowland floodplains, disrupt natural flood cycles, impede animal movement and migration along river channels, and drive deforestation. Photo by Pascalg622 used under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported licenseThe satellite solutionThe team recommends that planners look to the skies, and the soil, to get a more complete picture of existing biodiversity, so EIAs can more accurately assess the harm that planned developments might cause.Their proposed solution is the development and use of multiple, complementary scientific methods that they say would be cost effective, and make more comprehensive biodiversity assessments possible.This would include techniques such as remote sensing, where satellite images are used to analyze habitat extent and quality, making it possible to “monitor large areas in a consistent manner.” Another remote sensing method, called near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy, offers “enormous but largely unrealized potential” to identify individual tree species from their spectral signature — the way in which they reflect light.Nathalie Pettorelli, who heads the Environmental Monitoring and Conservation Modelling team at the Zoological Society of London, UK, believes that “satellite remote sensing provides a fantastic opportunity to refine the EIA process.”“Importantly, these data could be used to learn about likely environmental impacts of various anthropogenic developments, by monitoring environmental changes in places where such developments have already occurred. This could help improve predictive abilities of future EIAs; and this could be particularly true in areas where these data get to be combined with reliable on the ground information,” added Pettorelli, who was not involved in the study.A bauxite mine in Brazil. Open pit mining, if not properly managed, can pollute the water table, creeks and rivers, and no matter how managed, results in deforestation. Norsk Hydro ASA photo found on flickrDNA analysisOn the ground, it could be the soil itself that holds the key: the third method highlighted by Ritter’s team for improving EIA accuracy is DNA metabarcoding — the sequencing of DNA found in soil to identify species and build up a picture of the biodiversity in a local area. Not only does this method have the potential to identify plants, animals, and microorganisms within a particular habitat without needing individual specimens, it also lends itself to repeatable and comparable analysis of regions and impacts.Douglas Yu, of the University of East Anglia, UK, leads research into metabarcoding methods, and is a co-founder of UK-based NatureMetrics, a company providing metabarcoding services to land managers. He agrees that using multiple methods is the way forward: “I think combining these independent data sources could provide a real boost to informativeness. Earth Observation provides continuous coverage of the environment, and metabarcoding (and other genetic information) could help to interpret those remote images.”Scientific and political obstaclesBut hurdles remain before these methods become mainstream. “The most useful satellite data for biodiversity monitoring in Brazil are not systematically readily available for the moment,” explained Pettorelli. But more important challenges “are linked to capacity, specifically capacity to analyze the available satellite data in a meaningful way,” she said.A red howler monkey howling. According to the study, all three of the project EIAs examined failed to fully assess biodiversity. The scientists suggest that technological advances offer cost-effective ways to improve biodiversity evaluations in the EIA process, including satellite imagery and DNA metabarcoding of soil samples. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / MongabayFor metabarcoding, “[t]he main obstacle would be to build a good DNA sequence reference database of all — or as many as possible — organisms in Brazil and the Amazon,” Ritter said. But, in the meantime, a simplified approach could make use of metabarcoding data to measure and compare diversity without knowing the exact species, she explained.There is added urgency for this debate: the legislative framework that defines EIAs in Brazil is under attack from proposed legal amendments that “would essentially abolish environmental licensing by making the mere submission of an environmental impact statement an automatic approval to go ahead with construction of the project in question,” said Philip Fearnside, of the National Institute for Research in Amazonia, and co-author of the new study.Once proposed amendments gutting the environmental licensing process come up for a vote in Brazil’s Congress — something Fearnside says is likely to happen at any time — “their approval is hard to stop due to ruralist control,” he explained, referring to the bancada ruralista, the agribusiness and mining rural lobby that currently wields tremendous power in the legislature and the administration of President Michel Temer.“The battle is focused on keeping the regulations we have from being abolished,” he added.But, Fearnside still sees the adoption of cutting edge EIA data gathering methods as a real possibility. “Technological improvements such as these are much more easily incorporated than are changes that require legislation,” he said, noting that similar changes have been made numerous times in EIA methodology over the past 30 years.Ritter is also optimistic about Brazil’s ability to make these necessary improvements.“I believe it is indeed possible to combine societal progress and large infrastructural projects with a continued high biodiversity. The money is available, as are the scientific expertise and the methodological progress,” concludes Ritter. “What is lacking, I fear, is the will to make this happen.”Citation:Ritter, C. D., McCrate, G., Nilsson, R. H., Fearnside, P. M., Palme, U. and Antonelli, A. 2017. Environmental impact assessment in Brazilian Amazonia: Challenges and prospects to assess biodiversity. Biological Conservation, 206, 161-168FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Amazon Biodiversity, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Dams, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Mining, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Biodiversity Hotspots, Dams, Deforestation, DNA, Drivers Of Deforestation, Energy, Energy Politics, Environment, Environmental Politics, Flooding, Forests, Green, Hydroelectric Power, Hydropower, Infrastructure, Land Use Change, Mining, Monitoring, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Mining, Rainforests, Rivers, Roads, satellite data, Satellite Imagery, Saving The Amazon, Threats To The Amazon, Tropical Deforestation Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Glenn Schererlast_img read more

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first_imgThis photo essay comes via Mongabay’s partnership with the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Wild View blog.Once a month we’ll publish a contribution from Wild View that highlights an animal species.This month, Julie Larsen Maher and Megan Maher write about the bald eagle. Taking a bath can be one of the more relaxing things in life – even for bald eagles.Pausing briefly to give us a curious look, the eagle dipped its head into the cool water and fluffed out its feathers, sending droplets in all directions. Birds of all sizes seem to enjoy time in the tub, but the actual reasons for bird bathing are unclear. It is suggested that splashing about helps to keep their feathers fresh and functional in water and weather for both flighted and non-flighted birds.Rehabilitated bald eagles that are unable to fly find forever homes in zoos. Credit: Julie Larsen Maher ©WCSResplendent with their beaks of gold and plumage of white and blackish brown, bald eagles have historically soared throughout the United States. But in the mid-1900’s, these birds of prey were losing ground. Bald eagle feeding and nesting spots near coastlines, lakes, and rivers were shrinking. And the pesticide, DDT, had taken its toll on the eagle population. Our national symbol was on the brink.Conservation measures put in place – including a 1972 ban on the use of DDT by the federal government and passage of the Endangered Species Act the following year – provided eagle habitat protection. By August 2007, bald eagle numbers had recovered to over 9,700 pairs according to US Fish and Wildlife Service, and they were taken off the endangered species list.Bald eagle nests are among the largest of bird nests that can weigh a half ton. They typically return each year to raise their young. Credit: Julie Larsen Maher ©WCSEven though bald eagles have made a comeback, they still need our commitment to conserve them. Collisions with cars, hunting, electrical wires, and ingesting poison can cause injuries that are fatal or require rehabilitation. Fortunately, eagles unable to fly after recovery have found forever homes in zoos and other raptor facilities. The Wildlife Conservation Society’s Bronx Zoo and Queens Zoo host pairs of bald eagles, as do other Association of Zoos and Aquariums parks like Beardsley Zoo where we spotted these bathing beauties.Learn more about bald eagles from posts on WCS’s Wild View photo blog. Taking baths may help bald eagles keep their plumage in order to aid in weather protection. Credit: Julie Larsen Maher ©WCS Bald Eagle bathing at the Beardsley Zoo in May 2017. Photo by Megan Maher. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Bald eagles mate for life. Credit: Julie Larsen Maher ©WCS Bald eagles are an iconic bird of prey adopted as a national symbol in the late 1700s. Credit: Julie Larsen Maher ©WCS 1234 read more

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first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Erik Hoffner Environment, Mongabay, the business of running mongabay center_img As you may have noticed, we’ve redesigned Mongabay.com. The site has gone through many changes since its founding in 1999, and this one is perhaps the biggest one yet.For this new design — which applies across our English, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, French, Chinese, and Japanese news sites — we went for a cleaner layout that puts more emphasis on imagery. We’ve also laid the groundwork for some new features we’ll be introducing in the coming months.Meanwhile, you may notice a few bugs. We’re still correcting a few issues on legacy posts, and appreciate your patience.Because Mongabay’s global readership is growing rapidly, the number and kinds of devices that readers use to access the site is also growing. The new site will be optimized to function across all of these platforms, and will also load more quickly.You might also notice that we’ve returned to a variation of our gecko logo that was used at the site from 2004-2015. Internally we had a robust debate over whether to use the gecko or a photo of our mascot — the Scale-created Pygmy Tyrant — for the header. In the end, the gecko won out:The new layout retains some of our most popular features, including location and topic sections where you can find the latest news about issues and regions you care about most, plus hundreds of RSS feeds.Set up a free, weekly e-mail newsletter subscription for yourself or request automatic alerts when we publish news stories about topics you care about most here (another way to keep in touch is to follow Mongabay on the main social media channels of Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, just search for @mongabay in each.)We have also improved our special features layout. Here’s an example:What happens after a mining rush?Photographs from MadagascarMongabay is a community effort — being a nonprofit means that we rely on our readers for support, and we are indebted to everyone who makes our daily environmental news coverage possible.We are particularly grateful to one key member of this community, our web developer, Martin, for helping make the new design a reality.We hope you like what you see!Please send any feedback about the new design via this form.last_img read more

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first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Coral Reefs, Environment, Happy-upbeat Environmental, New Species, Oceans, Species Discovery, Wildlife From a red coral fishing ground off Taiwan, scientists have collected a new species of crab.The orange crustacean is covered in numerous tiny, star-shaped protrusions and has been named Pariphiculus stellatus, from the Latin word stellatus meaning ‘starry’.In the same study, the scientists report the first-ever record of a rare crab species – Acanthodromia margarita – that they collected from the red coral beds. A small seamount by Peng-Chia-Yu Island, located 60 kilometers (~37 miles) off Taiwan, is prized for its red corals — corals with red or pink skeletons, popularly used for jewelry.From these red coral fishing grounds, scientists have collected a new species of crab: an orange crustacean covered in numerous tiny, star-shaped protrusions. The crab has also been discovered in the Philippines.In a new study published in the journal ZooKeys, scientists have named the crab Pariphiculus stellatus, from the Latin word stellatus meaning ‘starry’.The starlike outgrowths change with age, the researchers write in a statement, “becoming shorter, blunter and mushroom-shaped to resemble wart-like outgrowths and granules. Regardless of their sex, as the crabs grow larger, their carapaces also get proportionately rounder and wider.”The new species Pariphiculus stellatus has star-like outgrowths on its body. Photo by Dr. Peter K. L. Ng.The crab’s orange color varies too. While some specimens of the crab that the scientists collected were dull orange with white patches, others had pale or intense orange shells, with white spots covering whole or part of the tiny protrusions. The underside of the crab’s body is typically dirty white to light brown, authors Peter Ng of National University of Singapore and Ming-Shiou Jeng of the Biodiversity Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taiwan, write in the paper.In the same study, the scientists report the first-ever record of a rare crab species — Acanthodromia margarita — that they collected from the red coral beds. The crab was previously known only from the Andaman Sea in the eastern Indian Ocean, Japan and the Philippines.Acanthodromia margarita has a striking orange-pink or orange-yellow body covered with tiny spines, which makes it look like a hedgehog, Peter Ng said in the statement. Moreover, the female crab they collected is one of the largest representatives of the species known so far, he said.The newly recorded from Taiwan species Acanthodromia margarita. Photo by Dr. Peter K. L. Ng.The starlike outgrowths change with age. Photo of adult specimen of new species by Peter K. L. Ng.Citation:Ng PKL, Jeng M-S (2017) Notes on two crabs (Crustacea, Brachyura, Dynomenidae and Iphiculidae) collected from red coral beds in northern Taiwan, including a new species of Pariphiculus Alcock, 1896. ZooKeys 694: 135-156. DOI: 10.3897/zookeys.694.14871center_img Article published by Shreya Dasguptalast_img read more

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first_imgSome 70 percent of the world’s freshwater is used for agriculture, but cities and other sectors have growing demands on the same water resources. To adapt to climate change without undermining food security and farmers’ livelihoods, we will have to fundamentally rethink agricultural water usage, our food systems, and our diets.A major new report from the Global Commission on Adaptation (GCA) makes this case loud and clear. The report urges us to face the fact that climate change will require ‘massive’ adaptation. It urges us to meet this challenge with urgency and resolve.The GCA report paints a sobering picture of our water and food security futures. We can and must adapt more quickly and effectively. Adaptive water management is an important place to start.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. The world is in a slow-moving, persistent water crisis. Rapidly rising water usage, increasingly uncertain rainfall, and widespread water pollution push more of our world into water stress and intensify competition for water — a competition that tends to be lost by the poor and by our ecosystems. Meanwhile, sea level rise, floods, droughts, and storms continue attacking cities, communities, and crops.Climate change is expected to exacerbate all of these challenges. Our changing climate means we will face more frequent and more severe extreme weather events. Higher temperatures mean thirstier crops, quenched with less predictable rains.Some 70 percent of the world’s freshwater is used for agriculture, but cities and other sectors have growing demands on the same water resources. To adapt to climate change without undermining food security and farmers’ livelihoods, we will have to fundamentally rethink agricultural water usage, our food systems, and our diets.A major new report from the Global Commission on Adaptation (GCA) makes this case loud and clear. The report urges us to face the fact that climate change will require ‘massive’ adaptation. It urges us to meet this challenge with urgency and resolve.A contributor to the GCA report, the International Water Management Institute (IWMI), where I am Director General, is already developing many practical solutions that can be scaled up to adapt to the immense water challenges posed by climate change.Firstly, adaptation efforts must focus on the needs of smallholder farmers, who will be hardest hit and are least equipped to cope. They will be the front lines in the battle of adaptation. And in fact, the report calls for doubling the scale of agricultural research through the network of which we are a part, CGIAR.Smallholders farmers (with less than 10 hectares) manage up to 80 percent of the farmland in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia. They are fundamental to food security in the developing world and they are extremely vulnerable to the climate. Building the resilience of these farmers is an urgent climate adaptation priority.Pyawt Ywar Pump Irrigation Project in Myanmar’s Central Dry Zone. Creating an institutional framework to connect farmers to irrigation scheme managers and boost equitable access to water. Photo Credit: Madeline Dahm / IWMI.Solar-powered irrigation technology, for instance, allows farmers to irrigate their crops on-demand, which provides resilience against untimely rainfall. In many places, solar pumps are replacing diesel pumps and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. In India, farmer collectives are also earning additional income by selling excess energy back to the grid. This diversifies farmers’ incomes, helps ‘green’ the energy mix, and discourages the overexploitation of agricultural groundwater. This innovative model is now set to scale out across the country.Elsewhere, pastoralists in the drylands of Ethiopia contending with increasingly intense floods have worked to build resilience through the construction of small dams. These dams can slow and capture floodwaters, then distribute it to grazing and crop lands, in turn boosting productivity.Secondly, research must support the vital role that water plays in preserving our natural environment.Wetlands are a prime example. They perform vital services for people and the environment. They provide air and water purification, water flow regulation, carbon sequestration, and flood and drought mitigation.Preserving and restoring wetlands around the world is also essential for resilience. Sri Lanka’s capital of Colombo was recently accredited as a Ramsar Wetland City. The city’s multipurpose wetlands provide a sustainable habitat for birds and aquatic life and are an excellent example of an integrated ‘green and grey’ (natural and man-made) flood management system — using nature to enhance ecosystem and urban resilience.Thirdly, investing in preventing water-related hazards from turning into food supply disasters is essential.Floods, for example, can cause huge losses to life, crops, and property. But using early warning systems can help farmers and governments prepare in advance and minimize the impacts of heavy flood seasons. Where harm cannot be avoided, flood insurance can be developed that meets the needs of small farmers.The GCA report paints a sobering picture of our water and food security futures. We can and must adapt more quickly and effectively. Adaptive water management is an important place to start.Pyawt Ywar Pump Irrigation Project in Myanmar’s Central Dry Zone. Photo Credit: Madeline Dahm / IWMI.Claudia Sadoff is Director General of the International Water Management Institute. Adaptation To Climate Change, Agriculture, Climate Change, Climate Change And Extreme Weather, Commentary, Drinking Water, Drought, Editorials, Environment, Extreme Weather, Farming, Flooding, Food Crisis, food security, Global Warming, Researcher Perspective Series, Water, Water Crisis, Water Pollution, Water Scarcity Article published by Mike Gaworeckicenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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first_imgAmazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Amazon People, Controversial, Culture, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Endangered Environmentalists, Environment, Environmental Crime, Ethnocide, Featured, Forests, Green, Indigenous Culture, Indigenous Cultures, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Land Rights, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Saving The Amazon, Social Justice, Threats To The Amazon, Traditional People, Tropical Deforestation Article published by Karla Mendes Erisvan Guajajara, 15 years old, was found dead with multiple stab wounds Friday in the Brazilian Amazon. It is the 10th murder of indigenous people recorded this year.The body of Erisvan was found in a soccer field in the town of Amarante, in the Northeast state of Maranhão. And on December 7, two Guajajara leaders — Firmino Silvino Guajajara and Raimundo Bernice Guajajara — were killed in a drive-by shooting in a nearby area.Four Guajajara indigenous people have been reported killed in the last two months. In November, Paulo Paulino Guajajara, who was on the frontlines of Amazon protection as part of the indigenous Forest Guardians group, was also murdered. The crimes remain unsolved.Seven indigenous leaders were murdered as of December 2019, making it the country’s deadliest year for indigenous leaders in two decades, according to an NGO linked to the Catholic Church. Indigenous leaders have been calling for action to halt increasing violence against indigenous people. A young indigenous Guajajara man was found dead with multiple stab wounds Friday in the Brazilian Amazon, making 2019 the country’s deadliest year for indigenous peoples since 2016 with a total ten murders.The body of Erisvan Guajajara, 15 years old, was found in a soccer field in the town of Amarante, in the Northeastern state of Maranhão, according to the victim’s sister Lucivânia Guajajara. “What they did to him was an atrocity. There wasn’t any blood where he was found. They killed him elsewhere and dumped his body,” she told Mongabay. The murder was also reported by the Indigenous Missionary Council (CIMI), an NGO linked to the Catholic Church.It is the latest death in a wave of increasing violence against the Guajajara people and indigenous people overall in the Brazilian Amazon this year. A total of 10 indigenous people were killed this year; seven were indigenous leaders, the highest number in two decades, according to data from the Pastoral Land Commission, an arm of Brazil’s Catholic Church.“Another brutal crime against the Guajajara people!” Sônia Guajajara, the executive coordinator of the National Articulation of Indigenous Peoples of Brazil (APIB), said on Twitter.On December 7, two Guajajara leaders were killed in a drive-by shooting – Firmino Silvino Guajajara and Raimundo Bernice Guajajara. In the same attack, another two were injured by the gunfire – Neucy Vieira and Nico Alfredo.“We are human, we don’t deserve to die like this,” said Magno Guajajara, an eyewitness to the attack and relative of the deceased, in a WhatsApp audio file sent to Mongabay. The leaders were riding back to their village on motorbikes after attending a meeting with a utility company at the time of the attack. “The people in the surrounding towns have this rage, this hate, this prejudice, this intolerance against us, indigenous people,” he said. “And we are paying for it with our lives.”These attacks come shortly after the murder of another Guajajara leader – Paulo Paulino Guajajara, who was a member of “Guardians of the Forest,” a group of 120 indigenous Guajajara who risk their lives to fight illegal loggers in the Arariboia indigenous reserve — one of the country’s most threatened indigenous territories, where Paulo Paulino and Erisvan lived — and to protect the uncontacted Awá people.Protests outside the government building in Brasilia on December 7, following the death of two Guajajara indigenous leaders. In this photo, an indigenous man raises the photo of indigenous leader Paulo Paulino Guajajara, reportedly murdered by loggers in November. Image by Tiago Miotto/CimiAfter the latest attack, Guajajara leaders summoned a meeting in the El Betel indigenous village in Maranhão to discuss survival strategies and ways to pressure authorities over their rising body count, according to Mídia Índia, a collective of indigenous communities of various ethnicities. A public hearing will be held with government officials to combat the rising violence against their people, Mídia Índia said.Escalating violenceMurders of indigenous people make up 37% of all rural killings this year, up from 7% in 2018, according to CPT data.“These crimes reflect the escalation of hate and barbarism inflamed by Jair Bolsonaro’s government, which is attacking us daily, denying our right to exist and promoting the historical illness of racism,” said Sônia Guajajara in a statement last week.Regarding the latest crime,  the Military Police of Maranhão state reported that the murdered indigenous boy was another person — 28-year-old Dorivan Soares Guajajara — claiming that he was involved with drug trafficking, according to news portal G1. Lieutenant Coronel Jorge Araújo Junior reportedly ruled out hate crimes and conflicts with loggers as potential motives. FUNAI also issued a statement about Dorivan’s death, denying connections with land disputes, news portal UOL reported.But the Forensic Medicine Unit, known as IML in the neighboring town of Imperatriz, confirmed to Mongabay that Erisvan was the victim, not Dorivan. Mongabay contacted the military police battalion, but no sources were available for comment as this story went to print.Murders of indigenous leaders is at a level not seen in two decades. Seven indigenous leaders have been killed, 26% of all murders over land conflicts in Brazil. Killings of indigenous peoples overall reached 10 this year, the highest number since 2016. Source: Pastoral Land Commission (CPT)Since President Jair Bolsonaro took power in January, he has weakened environmental and indigenous protection agencies, replacing lifelong public servants with military personnel, slashing funds, and campaigning against environmental enforcement like fines. “The government is giving a green light to the criminal networks. The climate on the ground is of fear,” César Muñoz, the director of Human Rights Watch (HRW) told Mongabay.Land invasions in indigenous territories have more than doubled in the last year, according to partial data from CIMI. Over 153 different lands have been encroached upon, with over 160 cases registered in the first nine months of 2019. The expectation is that this number will rise further when the last quarter of the year is accounted for.Activists claim that Bolsonaro’s long history of racist and anti-indigenous remarks has reportedly empowered land grabbers and loggers to invade indigenous territories without fear of reprisal. “He is openly supporting exploration by agribusiness and mining companies, putting indigenous people as an enemy to the nation’s progress and development,” said Antônio Eduardo Cerqueira, CIMI’s executive secretary.Environmental defenders and public servants have also been targeted and killed this year. In March, a leading environmental activist Dilma Ferreira Silva was murdered in Pará where her struggle against hydropower dams made her a target. In November, Maxciel Pereira dos Santos was executed in front of family members in the state of Amazonas. He was a lifelong public servant at FUNAI, Brazil’s indigenous agency. Indigenous groups protest against Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro’s policies in Brasília. Image by Karla Mendes / Mongabay.ImpunityOf over 300 murder cases in the last decade, only 14 were brought before a judge, according to a recent report by HRW. Their investigation analyzed 16 murder cases from 2015 onwards, and identified severe flaws. “In at least two, police detectives didn’t visit the crime scene. In another five, there hadn’t been an autopsy,” the report states.For Magno Guajajara, the message is coming from the Bolsonaro administration. “They come and shoot and kill and do what they want, because they know they have support,” he said.Protective measures were requested before the wave of murders in Maranhão, after an escalation of invasions and threats was identified. Francisco da Conceição, the head of the human rights department of Maranhão state, sent a letter to the Federal Police in August warning about “constant threats due to illegal logging activity in the region, where over 30 trucks of wood are extracted daily.” But no additional protective measures were taken at the time, the government of Maranhão said.Following the deaths of Firmino and Raimundo, Brazil’s Justice Minister Sérgio Moro sent a Federal Task Force to the region “to prevent any further criminal incidents.” The case is currently under investigation by the Federal Police, who said in a statement that evidence collected so far has not implicated loggers.In response to the increased attacks on Brazil’s indigenous people, civil society is summoning the federal government to act. “Our hope is that they [the government] will revisit their stance and open a channel for dialogue. But until now, the Justice minister has not invited them in to talk,” says Cerqueira.Mongabay reached out to the Ministry of Justice and the Federal Police for further clarifications. The Federal Police responded that the investigations are confidential and they would not be giving interviews on the topic. The Ministry of Justice did not respond to request for comment.Banner image: Protests outside the government building in Brasilia on December 7, following the death of two Guajajara indigenous leaders. Image by Tiago Miotto/Cimi.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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first_img Partager Elle est distincte de celle du “footballgate”, vaste dossier de fraude instruit en Belgique dans lequel une vingtaine de personnes (agents, arbitres, dirigeants etc) ont été inculpées depuis octobre 2018.Aleksandar Mitrovic, aujourd’hui attaquant vedette de Fulham en Angleterre, avait été transféré à l’été 2015 d’Anderlecht, club le plus titré de Belgique, à Newcastle, qui évolue comme Fulham dans la première division du championnat anglais (Premier League).À l’époque, ce transfert estimé à 18,5 millions d’euros avait impliqué les agents de joueurs Pini Zahavi et Fali Ramadani, a souligné le quotidien belge La Dernière Heure.«Les soupçons visent des agents de joueurs»Interrogé, le parquet fédéral a refusé de donner des noms et souligné qu’il n’y avait eu aucune interpellation au cours des cinq perquisitions effectuées mercredi matin.“Les soupçons visent des agents de joueurs. Des transactions touchant à des joueurs semblent suspectes. On est pour l’instant au stade du contrôle et de la vérification”, a expliqué Eric Van Duyse, porte-parole du parquet fédéral, qui chapeaute les enquêtes en matière de criminalité organisée.Le stade et le centre d’entraînement du RSC Anderlecht, le club aux 34 titres de champion de Belgique, figurent parmi les trois lieux visités par les enquêteurs dans cette commune bruxelloise.Deux autres perquisitions ont eu lieu à Laeken, où est établie l’Union belge de football (fédération), et à Schaerbeek au siège d’une société soupçonnée d’être impliquée dans des transferts douteux, ont rapporté les médias belges.“Aujourd’hui, mercredi 24/04/2019, des perquisitions se sont déroulées tant au centre d’entraînement de Neerpede qu’au stade. Le RSC Anderlecht a évidemment apporté son entière collaboration aux enquêteurs”, a simplement commenté sur son site le club présidé par le milliardaire belge Marc Coucke.AFP Le siège de la Fédération belge de football et des installations du club d’Anderlecht ont été perquisitionnés mercredi dans le cadre d’une enquête judiciaire ciblant notamment le transfert en 2015 de l’attaquant serbe Aleksandar Mitrovic d’Anderlecht à Newcastle (Angleterre).Une source judiciaire a confirmé des informations de presse selon lesquelles la vente de Mitrovic par Anderlecht compte parmi les transferts considérés comme douteux aux yeux de la justice belge.L’enquête, dirigée par un juge d’instruction de Bruxelles spécialisé en affaires financières, vise des faits de blanchiment d’argent et d’association de malfaiteurs, selon le parquet fédéral.last_img read more

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first_imgEnd of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legend OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson Missile-capable frigate BRP Jose Rizal inches closer to entering PH Navy’s fleet Jordan Mintah and Robert Lopez Mendy struck in the second half as Kaya FC Makati turned back JPV Makati, 2-0, for its second straight win in the Philippines Football League at the muddy University of Makati pitch.Mintah, the Ghanaian striker in his second season with the club, opened the scoring in the 61st minute with a low shot from just inside the box, before Mendy added a second goal with 10 minutes remaining as Kaya jacked up its tally to 20 points from 11 matches.ADVERTISEMENT Malacañang open to creating Taal Commission Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks PLAY LIST 01:40Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks01:32Taal Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite LATEST STORIES The win pushed Kaya to third spot, a point behind Global Cebu, which was held to a goalless draw by Davao Aguilas on Saturday night at Cebu City Sports Complex.Davao remained winless in 10 matches, but picked up another point after a fifth draw of the season.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSEnd of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legendSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’“We’re very happy with the win,” said Kaya coach Noel Marcaida. “All the players responded well to the game plan against a tough team like JPV.”JPV lost for the second straight game, after missing top scorer Takumi Uesato, who was out due to an injury. LIVE: Sinulog 2020 Grand Parade MOST READ The Marikina side fell to fifth spot with 18 points.Mintah had a couple of appeals for a penalty waived off earlier before he pounced on Adam Reed’s long ball into the box. After expertly controlling Reed’s pass, Mintah sent the ball past JPV keeper Felipe Tripulca.Kaya’s ploy of sending long balls to its strikers worked anew in the 80th minute when Mendy outfoxed JPV defender Camelo Tacusalme in an aerial challenge before firing to the bottom corner to make it 2-0.Known for its short and crisp passing game, JPV struggled with the poor field conditions which was compounded by rains the past days.Marcaida said his team only played to its strengths.ADVERTISEMENT Marcosian mode: Duterte threatens to arrest water execs ‘one night’ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Duterte’s ‘soft heart’ could save ABS-CBN, says election lawyer IT happens: Facebook sorry for Xi Jinping’s name mistranslation Pirates, not Lions, in roaring start “We have the strength on top with our strikers and its a good thing we were able capitalize on our chances,” Marcaida added.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next 787 earthquakes recorded in 24 hours due to restive Taal Volcano View commentslast_img read more

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