Kyung-wha Kang, Deputy High Commissioner for Human Rights, said that there is an urgent need to address issues – such as violations of socio-economic rights, land issues, large disparities between classes, marginalization and exclusion – at the root of the violence after the disputed polls in which President Mwai Kibaki was declared the winner over opposition leader Raila Odinga.“Durable solutions to these problems will take the determination and require broad participation from all sectors of Kenyan society,” she said.Reforming the constitution and the police system, as well as the adoption of new laws including on witness protection, will be crucial, Ms. Kang noted.“Implementation and action must replace evasion and denial,” she said, adding that she was encouraged to hear during meetings with Mr. Odinga and other senior officials of their commitment to put the recommendations of a report by the Commission of Inquiry on Post Electoral Violence into practice.Realizing these suggestions, especially the creation of a credible Special Tribunal to bring those behind the most serious crimes committed after the elections, “will be a critical test of the Kenyan political leadership in the struggle to end impunity,” the Commissioner said.While in Kenya, she also visited Dadaab refugee camp, home to nearly 200,000 people, mostly Somalis fleeing violence in their country.“Somalia is not a lost cause,” Ms. Kang emphasized. “It is a long-term cause, and one that will require stamina, creativity and a concerted effort by the international community, civil society, and above all, Somali political leaders.”She pointed to a conversation she had with a 17-year-old who has spent his entire life at the camp in north-eastern Kenya, who told her that “we are the ones” who must solve the conflict in Somalia, which has not had a functioning government since 1991.“Any lasting peace in Somalia must be based on accountability and justice for the serious violations of human rights committed by all sides throughout the Somali conflict,” the official said. 24 October 2008The problems that sparked the crisis following last December’s contested Kenyan presidential elections must be dealt with, a top United Nations human rights official said, wrapping up a visit to the East African nation. read more

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A group of Sri Lankan fans had their drums and flags taken off them in the crowd – both of which they’ve used in Eden Park before, and entered the park with, no problem. “They said it’s a rule of Eden Park but it feels very different because last world cup which was just last year, we took the same drums to Eden Park and then Wellington as well, so why the big difference now.”“We come here to enjoy it, this is a fan base. If you don’t like us to bring drums then you should make a Sri Lankan fanzone so we can bring drums and stuff to that area, and then we can enjoy.”Shirly Goonathilaka said the security asked for him to shorten his flag pole which he did, but it was still taken off him because it could “injure” someone. Witnesses have reportedly seen Sri Lankan fans being escorted from the ground by police and security guards. Dilini Wijesinghe said everyone was enjoying the drums, but they still had them confiscated without any proper explanation.“It just sort of feel like it’s racist. I’m really sorry but you know, that’s how I felt because we were enjoying it. If we did something illegal, that’s perfectly fine, take it away.” Spectator Hayden Eastmond-Mein, said the security were being over the top and taking extreme measures.“The big group of Sri Lankans they were targeting were just having a good time and providing most of the atmosphere in what can be a pretty dull stadium”To add insult to injury, the half-time entertainment was a group of samba drummers who walked straight past the group of Sri Lankan fans, he said.“I don’t blame the individual guards, they’re obviously just following inflexible rules that are supposedly about safety – but they just serve to make Eden Park a dull, fun-free zone.”A spectator, who didn’t want to be named, said security guards were hanging around a group of Sri Lankan supporters near the boundary. About six of them had been evicted.“They seem loud but well behaved and self contained,” he said.Police communications staff said they did not have any information about the reported incidents. (Colombo Gazette) New Zealand police have been accused of treating Sri Lankan cricket fans unfairly by removing some of them for playing music during the New Zealand vs Sri Lanka Twenty20 cricket match at Eden Park today.Twitter and Facebook are rife with accusations security guards are acting as the “fun police” and being too hard on fans, confiscating musical instruments and kicking people out, stuff.co.nz reported. “Cricket is about festivities, its about fun, it’s about the terraces, it’s about having a good time,” he said.“It was disappointing to see them get in trouble, get their drums confiscated and they actually create an atmosphere, you know.”It’s embarrassing he said. There were no dramas, everyone loved the atmosphere – and they weren’t the only people who had brought support. Hayden Wilson who was sitting near the group said as a New Zealand European, it was disappointing. read more

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first_imgThe ITRI reports that key speakers from China will provide their insight on a number of sustainability topics to be addressed at its upcoming Asia Tin Summit in Kunming, with presentations from government regulatory body ASQIQ and the Kunming University of Science and Technology, who will detail China’s conflict minerals standards as well as recent developments in sustainable tin smelting technology.“Sustainability is becoming an increasingly important issue for the tin industry inside China, with greater expectation to demonstrate responsible sourcing of raw materials and to further limit the environmental impacts of mining and smelting operations. The progress being made in both areas will be outlined in these two expert presentations.”AQSIQ (General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine of the People’s Republic of China) is a ministerial-level government department which has been directly involved in setting and enforcing conflict minerals regulation in China and Kunming University of Science is one of the top research institutions for minerals science in China, notable for its close links to the minerals industry in Yunnan.The 2017 Asia Tin Summit is expected to attract some 300 delegates from China and the rest of the world.last_img read more

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