A group of Sri Lankan fans had their drums and flags taken off them in the crowd – both of which they’ve used in Eden Park before, and entered the park with, no problem. “They said it’s a rule of Eden Park but it feels very different because last world cup which was just last year, we took the same drums to Eden Park and then Wellington as well, so why the big difference now.”“We come here to enjoy it, this is a fan base. If you don’t like us to bring drums then you should make a Sri Lankan fanzone so we can bring drums and stuff to that area, and then we can enjoy.”Shirly Goonathilaka said the security asked for him to shorten his flag pole which he did, but it was still taken off him because it could “injure” someone. Witnesses have reportedly seen Sri Lankan fans being escorted from the ground by police and security guards. Dilini Wijesinghe said everyone was enjoying the drums, but they still had them confiscated without any proper explanation.“It just sort of feel like it’s racist. I’m really sorry but you know, that’s how I felt because we were enjoying it. If we did something illegal, that’s perfectly fine, take it away.” Spectator Hayden Eastmond-Mein, said the security were being over the top and taking extreme measures.“The big group of Sri Lankans they were targeting were just having a good time and providing most of the atmosphere in what can be a pretty dull stadium”To add insult to injury, the half-time entertainment was a group of samba drummers who walked straight past the group of Sri Lankan fans, he said.“I don’t blame the individual guards, they’re obviously just following inflexible rules that are supposedly about safety – but they just serve to make Eden Park a dull, fun-free zone.”A spectator, who didn’t want to be named, said security guards were hanging around a group of Sri Lankan supporters near the boundary. About six of them had been evicted.“They seem loud but well behaved and self contained,” he said.Police communications staff said they did not have any information about the reported incidents. (Colombo Gazette) New Zealand police have been accused of treating Sri Lankan cricket fans unfairly by removing some of them for playing music during the New Zealand vs Sri Lanka Twenty20 cricket match at Eden Park today.Twitter and Facebook are rife with accusations security guards are acting as the “fun police” and being too hard on fans, confiscating musical instruments and kicking people out, stuff.co.nz reported. “Cricket is about festivities, its about fun, it’s about the terraces, it’s about having a good time,” he said.“It was disappointing to see them get in trouble, get their drums confiscated and they actually create an atmosphere, you know.”It’s embarrassing he said. There were no dramas, everyone loved the atmosphere – and they weren’t the only people who had brought support. Hayden Wilson who was sitting near the group said as a New Zealand European, it was disappointing. read more

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by The Associated Press Posted Dec 4, 2014 1:58 pm MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email Hershey’s candy bars Take 5, PayDay, Almond Joy and a York Peppermint Patty, examples of products that use corn syrup, are displayed for a photo in New York, Tuesday, Dec. 2, 2014. Will Papa, chief research and development officer at The Hershey Co., told The Associated Press the company uses a mix of sugar and high-fructose corn syrup in its products but that it is “moving more toward sugar.” (AP Photo/Richard Drew) Correction: Hershey-Sweetener story NEW YORK, N.Y. – In a story Dec. 2 about The Hershey Co. exploring the replacement of high-fructose corn syrup with sugar, The Associated Press, relying on information from a company spokesman, erroneously named several products the changes could affect. Some Hershey products that include high-fructose corn syrup are Hershey’s syrups, Rolo, Reese’s Nutrageous, Take 5 and certain Hershey boxed chocolates.The story also misstated a finding by the American Medical Association. The story should have stated that the association has said there’s not enough evidence to specifically restrict the use of high-fructose corn syrup, not regular corn syrup.A corrected version of the story is below:Hershey explores removing high-fructose corn syrupHershey explores removal of high-fructose corn syrup in favour of sugarBy CANDICE CHOIAP Food Industry WriterHershey is looking at replacing the high-fructose corn syrup in some of its products with sugar.Will Papa, chief research and development officer at The Hershey Co., told The Associated Press the company uses a mix of sugar and high-fructose corn syrup in its products but that it is “moving more toward sugar.”“We take into account what consumers want. And consumers are telling us between the two, they prefer sugar,” Papa said.A switch to sugar would make Hershey a high-profile example of the move away from high-fructose corn syrup in the food industry. Many people say they avoid it because it has gained a bad reputation for fueling weight gain and diabetes, though health experts says there’s not enough evidence to conclude it’s any worse than regular sugar.In an emailed statement, Hershey said its work on “exploring” the replacement of high-fructose corn syrup “is just underway” and that it did not have a timeframe on when it might be complete.The company said products that have high-fructose corn syrup include Hershey’s syrups, Rolo, Reese’s Nutrageous, Take 5 and certain Hershey boxed chocolates.“Our aim is to be transparent with our consumers about the ingredients we use in our products. Once we have more information to share, we will be back in touch,” Hershey said in its statement.Other products that have changed from high-fructose corn syrup to sugar include Gatorade drinks and Yoplait yogurt.As for health, the American Medical Association has said there’s not enough evidence to specifically restrict the use of high-fructose corn syrup. The Center for Science in the Public Interest, which advocates for food safety, has also said that there’s no evidence that the sweetener is any worse nutritionally than sugar.The Corn Refiners Association, an industry group, has been pushing back at the negative perceptions about high-fructose corn syrup, which is generally cheaper than sugar. In 2010, the association submitted an application to the Food and Drug Administration to have its sweetener renamed “corn sugar” on nutrition labels. The request was denied.The association said it has also commissioned market-research firms Mintel and Nielsen to study perceptions of sweeteners and shared the results online. For instance, the group notes in media materials that “67% of consumers agree that moderation is more important than specific sweetener types.”John Bode, president of the Corn Refiners Association, said in an interview that the number of companies changing from corn syrup to sugar has slowed. Still, he said consumption of high-fructose corn syrup has declined more than other sugars.Part of the reason is that people are cutting back on soda, which he said accounts for a majority of the market for high-fructose corn syrup.In some cases, he noted that companies have switched back from sugar to high-fructose corn syrup after failing to see a notable sales spike. Hunt’s Tomato Ketchup switched to sugar in 2010, but then switched back to high-fructose corn syrup in 2012. Lanie Friedman, a spokeswoman for ConAgra Foods, said demand for the version without high-fructose corn syrup wasn’t “as strong as expected.”She noted the company still offers a 100% Natural line that uses sugar.Among the members of the Corn Refiners Association are agribusiness companies Archer Daniels Midland, Cargill and Tate & Lyle.___Follow Candice Choi at www.twitter.com/candicechoi read more

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