first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Interested in learning how Farm Bureau can help you? Be sure to attend Farm Bureau Fest on Feb. 6 from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. The free event will feature networking opportunities, informational seminars and a complimentary lunch.“Folks considering joining Farm Bureau are encouraged to come to the event and get more information on how the organization works,” said Zach Taylor, Delaware County Farm Bureau president. “It’s a fun way to kick the tires, meet members and learn about the benefits of membership.”During the event attendees can join sessions for updates on a variety of topics including:Safety training with an update on OBWC from our CompManagement team. Attend at least one safety session to meet your Workers’ Compensation Group Rating requirement for the year.Membership discussion covering benefits and services.Public policy with a water quality update, Current Agricultural Use Value, a 2016 priority issues, and energy issues and pipeline construction update.A Nationwide Insurance Land as Your Legacy seminar will provide direction as you consider generational transition planning for your farming operation.Members bringing a NEW member will both receive a special gift. Additionally, supervised children’s activities will be available, featuring games, ag activities and a live animal presentation from the Columbus Zoo.The event takes place at Tri Rivers Career Center, 2222 Marion-Mt Gilead Rd, Marion and is hosted by Crawford, Delaware, Marion, Morrow, Richland and Wyandot county Farm Bureaus. Attendance is free but registration is required. Deadline to register is Jan. 29. Participation at a membership session is required to receive a lunch ticket. For more information, or to register, contact Delaware Farm Bureau at 740-363-1613.Delaware County Farm Bureau has more than 3,300 members who are farmers, gardeners, food enthusiasts and more. The organization partners with local businesses and organizations to make life better for members and grow communities. For more information, follow on Facebook or go to GrowWithFB.org.last_img read more

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first_imgOne of the benefits of using light-emitting diodes (LEDs) over conventional light bulbs is that they produce a lot of light without using a lot of electricity. This low current draw, and the possibility of using a low-voltage direct current (DC) circuit rather than a conventional alternating current (AC) circuit, has Caroline Di Diego looking for advice. “I understand we are still very much in a hybrid AC/DC universe and AC has to exist for kitchen appliances and infrastructure appliances in the utility room,” Di Diego wrote in a 2015 Q&A post. “However, our client wants to take the step into LED.” At the time, Di Diego was having trouble finding answers to “LED wiring 101” questions about wire gauge options, voltage regulation issues, and other quirks of running DC circuits.RELATED ARTICLESLEDs Could Get A Lot CheaperAre LEDs Worth Their Extra Cost?Martin’s 10 Rules of LightingLighting and Phantom LoadsA Short History of Lighting The post is now four years old, but recent additions to this thread, and a surge of interest in the efficiency benefits of LED lighting, suggest the issue is very much alive. Is there anything new to be said about LED lighting and its implications for residential wiring? Let’s find out. Don’t overthink the problem There’s no need to do anything unusual for LED lighting, advises Thomas Stone. Don’t overthink the problem. “My house was built in 1957 and has been converted to nearly all LED lighting,” he says. “What did I have to rewire? Nothing. After some experimentation, I can recommend Cree and Philips as reliable brands, but not the new low price-point versions.” Charlie Sullivan thinks that’s good advice, and he helps Di Diego sort out the AC/DC current question. “Although inherently LEDs run on DC, the high-quality end-use products are all made to run on AC,” Sullivan says. “The current draw on an LED light on an AC circuit is small, so in theory you could use smaller wire than normal wiring for lighting, but in practice you can’t go smaller than is allowable with a standard 15-amp circuit breaker, so you’ll be wiring it the same as for any other lighting.” Sullivan points out that LEDs are improving rapidly, so he would not recommend fixtures with built-in LEDs that lock the buyer into existing technology. The AC/DC battle goes on Thomas Edison promoted the use of DC electricty, an electrical current that runs in one direction, in the late 1880s. That was the standard in the early  years of electrification, according to an account from the U.S. Department of Energy called “War of the Currents.” Direct current had some advantages, but it was not easily converted to higher or lower voltages. Edison’s rival, Nicola Tesla, pushed AC (alternating current) instead. With AC, electrical current changes  directions — 60 times per second in the U.S. — and voltages can easily be stepped up or down with a transformer. Tesla won that battle, and AC became the standard. But the war may not be over. Computers, LEDs, solar cells, and electric vehicles all run on DC, and DC still has its advocates. “Engineers have been touting the advantages of wiring homes for DC power for over a hundred years, ever since Thomas Edison lost the AC/DC battle with Nikola Tesla,” writes GBA Editor Martin Holladay. “There are still a few engineers lobbying for DC wiring.” That said, Holladay continued, DC advocates can’t even agree on voltage, “so I wouldn’t be putting all my eggs in one basket if I were you. Stick with AC wiring.” Where to locate the transformer Even with an all-LED lighting scheme running on DC circuits, the house would still need conventional 120-volt AC current for appliances and other plug-in devices. The lighting would need a transformer that converts AC to DC. “My thought was to have a central device near the service panel instead of multiple transformers,” Di Diego writes, “That seems obvious, and [a] much cleaner design.” Mike M., however, thinks it would be a better idea to run 120-volt AC power to areas where DC was needed and install transformers there. “Even if you have a central transformer, you’d have to have a DC protection panel with fuses or breakers to protect all of the DC wiring,” he says. “You would also end up with two sets of wires running to each area, one for the AC receptacles and one for the DC lighting. I think this would be extremely cumbersome and more difficult to retrofit or alter later.” Charlie Sullivan lists two other reasons why distributing the AC/DC conversion makes more sense than a centralized transformer. Lighting fixtures drawing 12 or 24 volts would require bigger wire than a 120 volt AC circuit, he says, “so distributing the conversion makes more sense in that respect.” Also, Sullivan adds, power supplies have standby losses. If there is a central power supply it’s going to be on all the time, so standby losses are higher. “Another disadvantage of a central system is that if it fails, all the lights quit,” Sullivan says. “Having one light ‘burn out’ is much more tolerable, especially given that the power supply is not something you can buy at a local hardware store.” Small gauge conductors are not very practical Laurel Davidson wonders about the possibility of using “power over Ethernet” cables to run LED ambient lighting, task lighting, and possibly operating DC-powered appliances such as a television. Davidson says that Cat 5 cable with 24-gauge conductors can safely carry 360 milliamps at 50 volts. Yes, Holladay replies, but remember that 360 milliamps at 50 volts equals just 18 watts, enough for one or two LED lamps. “Contrary to popular belief, low-voltage DC wiring (for example, wiring for 12 volts or 24 volts DC) needs to have a bigger wire gauge, not a smaller wire gauge, than 120-volt AC wiring (assuming loads of the same wattage),” Holladay says. The smallest wire gauge allowed by code for residential AC circuits is 14-gauge, Trevor Lambert says, which can handle 15 amps. “For a circuit of, say, eight LED light fixtures at 12 watts, that’s 96 watts,” he says. “At 24 volts that is only 4 amps. So you could certainly get away with 18-gauge wires for that application. However, it’s not clear whether that would actually be cheaper. The volume of sales of 14/2 wire makes it pretty cheap. At best the difference is going to be barely more than negligible.” Holladay is very familiar with the inconvenience of running two types of cable. “My off-grid house is wired with two voltages in every room,” he says, “120 volts AC and 12 volts DC. The AC wiring is all 12 gauge, while the DC wiring is 10 gauge. Needless to say, the DC wiring cost me more than the AC. But wiring an off-grid house is a little different from the subject at hand — a few LED light fixtures.” Our expert adds this Let’s hear from Peter Yost, GBA’s technical director: BuildingGreen has great resources for LED lighting and DC power systems within its Product Guidance tab. (Note: BuildingGreen takes no advertising. Its business model relies on subscribers paying for full access. But it does have quite a bit of information in front of the paywall.) BuildingGreen’s collection for lighting is usefully broken down by lighting type: pendant lighting, recessed lighting, task lamps, wall lamps, and replacement lamps. The good news is that there are LED products available for every type of light fixture. Yes, BuildingGreen is tuned more for commercial buildings, but pretty much every type of lighting can be (and is) used in residential buildings. A big move forward for LED lighting was the advent of modular LED lighting, where key components of the lighting can be replaced rather than the whole fixture. Back in 2008, just about every lighting manufacturer was jumping into the LED market; there was a lot of confusion and there were low-quality products on the market. Fortunately, programs such as EPA’s Energy Star jumped in with standards that you can use to help separate the wheat from the chaff with LED lighting. There is also a ton of information on residential LED lighting within the Rennselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting (PEARL).  Especially useful is the Solid State Lighting division. While it is true that “…our analog-like AC power is increasingly at odds with our digital DC world” — the quote comes from an August 2016 BuildingGreen feature article, “The Death and Rebirth of DC Power”– moving completely away from AC is not going to happen for quite some time. And deciding at just what level to convert to DC (for certain loads, for certain end-uses, for subsystems) is certainly not “settled” for residential buildings. Can we look to commercial buildings for crossover technology regarding DC power systems? There is an organization working on moving our commercial building electrical systems (and even microgrids) from AC to DC power: the EMerge Alliance. EMerge has a residential standard initiative that will address both existing and new home hybrid power system standards.last_img read more

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first_imgLATEST STORIES Jason Day of Australia, talks during a news conference at the PGA Championship golf tournament at the Quail Hollow Club Wednesday, Aug. 9, 2017, in Charlotte, N.C. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Jason Day’s swagger — and his motivation — have returned.“I’m hungry again — and I’m looking forward to trying to beat these guys,” Day said Wednesday on the eve of the 99th PGA Championship.ADVERTISEMENT K-pop star Jung Joon-young convicted of gang rape, spycam crimes That pressure, along with his mother’s lung cancer surgery in March, led to a rough start to the 2017 season. He tearfully pulled out of the Match Play Championship six holes in, too distraught to play, to join her ahead of the surgery.“It was difficult for me to be on the golf course and even think about actually playing at the time,” Day said.On the course, his driving deteriorated and his normally reliable short game eluded him. In short, he felt like his game plateaued.“You’re not panicking or anything, you’re just wondering why,” Day said. “You’re up at night thinking about, ‘OK, what do I need to do to get back to that winning room?’”If Day does get back to No. 1, he’s vowed to handle things differently. In some ways, he’s already done that.He didn’t arrive in Charlotte until Tuesday night and checked in to the tournament on Wednesday morning so he could spend more time at home in Ohio away from distractions.Day refuses to call this a lost season.Sure, he’s finished out of contention at the Masters (tied for 22nd), the U.S. Open (cut) and the British Open (tied for 27th), but he believes his putting and driving are coming back.And he harkens back to 2014 when he finished the year strong, which served as a springboard for two incredible seasons.“I want to win again,” Day said. “So I’m excited about that.” Day is in the midst of what he called a “very poor season” with only two top 10 finishes and no wins in 15 starts. But the world’s former No. 1 player feels like he’s about to turn the corner after finishing tied for 24th last week at Bridgestone.He’s also drawing confidence from his past success at the PGA Championship, winning at Whistling Straits in 2015 and finishing second last year to Jimmy Walker at Baltusrol. His renewed confidence may not be good news for the rest of the field this week. Jordan Spieth is aiming for a career grand slam.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“I’m motivated now,” said Day, who withdrew from a tournament in March to be with his cancer-stricken mother.His best finish this year is second at the AT&T Byron Nelson, where he lost a playoff to Billy Horschel. Prosecutor: Tiger Woods to plead guilty to reckless driving Onyok Velasco see bright future for PH boxing in Olympics PLAY LIST 00:45Onyok Velasco see bright future for PH boxing in Olympics00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games SEA Games in Calabarzon safe, secure – Solcom chief UPLB exempted from SEA Games class suspension Catriona Gray spends Thanksgiving by preparing meals for people with illnesses Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH WATCH: Streetboys show off slick dance moves in Vhong Navarro’s wedding LOOK: Venues for 2019 SEA Games Day entered the season as the top-ranked player but has since dropped to No. 7 — something that he says “annoys and motivates me at the same time.”He made it clear his goal is to get back on top — and anticipates that will start with a strong performance this week at Quail Hollow.The 29-year-old Australian said his passion waned late last season after getting “burned out.” Looking back, Day felt like he spread himself too thin trying to fulfill obligations and spending less time practicing and relaxing.“I was trying to do too many things,” he said.By the time the end of last year rolled around, Day said he was exhausted after spending nearly a full year as the top-ranked player.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC View comments Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Read Nextlast_img read more

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first_imgYou could say the villagers here look the bull in the eye. There was a time when Baghpat was notorious for its gun-toting dacoits. But the local people wanted a more honourable reputation for their district.And you can’t say they haven’t succeeded. You still hear the click of triggers being,You could say the villagers here look the bull in the eye. There was a time when Baghpat was notorious for its gun-toting dacoits. But the local people wanted a more honourable reputation for their district.And you can’t say they haven’t succeeded. You still hear the click of triggers being pulled and the loud retorts as the guns fire, particularly in Johri village. But the idea is not to frighten people into giving up their material wealth. Winning medals is.In the past three years marksmen from Johri, 50 km from Delhi, have won medals in national and international shooting tournaments. Seema Tomar won a gold and a bronze at the 1999 Kathmandu South Asian Federation (SAF) Games.Zakir Khan and Shweta Choudhary won medals at the Meeting of Shooting Hopes contest held at Plzen in the Czech Republic. Vivek Singh – gold medal winner at the Asian, Commonwealth, SAF and National Games – even got the Arjuna Award in 1999.The man behind the transformation of this tiny village is a native who works in Delhi as a physician. Rajpal Singh, 51, got hooked to shooting when he saw the sport at the 1982 Delhi Asiad. He was so captivated that he took up the sport, becoming proficient enough at it to win a few national medals.But it was Rajpal’s decision to set up a 10-m shooting range at his village that put Johri on India’s sports map. Started in the courtyard of a dilapidated haveli, the Johri Rifle Club failed to generate enthusiasm.advertisement”Initially, the villagers felt I was misleading their children who needed to work in the fields,” says Rajpal. The club started with four trainees, most of them children of Rajpal’s friends. The turnaround came when two elderly women became members.During her regular visits to the club – she escorted her granddaughter to the range every day – Prakasho Tomar, 68, developed a fascination for shooting. Encouraged by Rajpal and her own family, Tomar started practising seriously.Soon her sister-in-law Chandro, 65, joined in. Finding these grey-haired matrons training with air pistols, the villagers started sending their children to Rajpal’s classes. Today, the club’s membership has crossed 200-and Johri sends big contingents to the national championships.AGE NO BAR: Sexagenarian Prakasho Tomar trains with youngsters at the Johri Rifle ClubAll this when Rajpal’s shooters train with antiquated weapons on a primitive, thatch-roofed range. The Sports Authority of India (SAI) has provided air pistols to the club’s two international medal winners – Seema and Zakir – but most members train with donated or loaned weapons.Rahul Gandhi, son of former prime minister Rajiv Gandhi and once a Rajpal trainee, gifted an imported air pistol. So did Jayant Singh, son of Union Agriculture Minister Ajit Singh. Rajpal’s son Vivek contributed Rs 50,000 of the Rs 1.5 lakh he got as the cash component of the Arjuna Award.All these have helped. Following their good performances, a few of Rajpal’s disciples now train on SAI scholarships; five are sponsored by organisations like Air-India and Indian Airlines. Shooting has even helped Rajpal’s two sons find jobs with the Indian Airlines.Rajpal divides time between his work at Municipal Corporation of Delhi dispensaries and the shooting range in Johri. “I believe in lighting one candle with another. Now people I have trained are imparting training to others in Johri and other places,” he says. For instance, Farooq Pathan, a former trainee, now coaches at Meerut University and Kuldeep Tomar is the official coach of Delhi University.Rajpal himself has trained the national shooting teams of Nepal and Mauritius. He also helped Punjab Chief Minister Parkash Singh Badal set up a national shooting academy in Badal village in his state. Fear of political and administrative interference has prevented Rajpal from approaching the Government for funds. “I will ask for the Government’s help only after my trainees prove their mettle,” he says.SAI has not responded to his request for the adoption and upgradation of the Johri Rifle Club. But even if the club fails to get recognition, Rajpal has the consolation of knowing that his aim to improve the fortunes of youngsters in Johri through his beloved sport has hit the bull’s-eye.last_img read more

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The NBA regular season ends Wednesday, and the playoffs begin Saturday. And with that in mind, we’re going to shake things up a bit with regard to FiveThirtyEight’s NBA Power Ratings.Until now, we’ve ranked every team according to a projection of its true talent over the upcoming week — and the upcoming week only — using Real Plus-Minus (RPM) player ratings provided by Jeremias Engelmann and Steve Ilardi. (For more details on the original methodology, see our introductory rankings post.)But this week, with many teams resting key players in preparation for the playoffs, we’re ranking every team according to its projected playoff power rating. This means we’re projecting every team to be at “full strength” in terms of minutes given to players who will be available for the postseason, instead of only projecting for the next week. Playoff probabilities and expected end-of-season wins are still driven by projected minute distributions over the next few days, but the power ratings themselves have been geared to capture the talent that each team is bringing into the playoffs.With the playoffs being emphasized more in our ratings, it’s fitting that the San Antonio Spurs rank in the top two for the first time since early February. They’ve won 11 straight games, a run backed up by the underlying talent of one of the league’s best teams.The Atlanta Hawks also benefit from our switch to “playoff power” — while Thabo Sefolosha’s bizarre season-ending injury hurts their chances of winning the championship, we’ve boosted the playing time for many of their good players who have consistently been listed as day-to-day in the injury report in recent weeks.As for teams on the fringe of the playoffs, we noted last week that the Boston Celtics were basically a coin flip to make the playoffs, battling it out with the Brooklyn Nets, Miami Heat and Indiana Pacers for one of the two remaining postseason slots in the Eastern Conference. A week later, the Celtics have all but completely claimed their spot; our model now gives them a 98.9 percent probability of making the playoffs.By the same token, the Heat have almost completely dropped out of the race, with just a 2.4 percent chance of qualifying for the postseason. That leaves the Nets and Pacers to fight over one spot with two games left per team. Our calculations give Brooklyn the inside track largely because of the team’s possession of the tiebreaker over Indiana, in addition to an easier remaining schedule (the Nets face the No. 9 Chicago Bulls and No. 23 Orlando Magic; Indiana faces No. 7 Memphis and No. 15 Washington).Out West, the race for the No. 8 seed is between the New Orleans Pelicans and Oklahoma City Thunder, and the Pelicans have the edge in our simulations. Oklahoma City is marginally more talented, according to RPM, and is even projected to win fractionally more games on average, but New Orleans holds the tiebreaker over the Thunder.In no small part because of those tiebreakers, there’s a 45 percent probability that the Nets and Pelicans will be the final two teams to slip into the playoffs when the season ends Wednesday. read more

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OSU sophomore Keita Bates-Diop (33) takes a free throw in a game against Louisiana Tech on Nov. 24 at the Schottenstein Center. OSU lost 82-74. Credit: Maria Martello | Lantern PhotographerIn Ohio State coach Thad Matta’s head coaching career, he has stood on the sideline for 531 games.He has won 403 of those, while dropping 128. But in none of those 531 contests has his team had more losses than wins in the record column.That will change on Tuesday, as the Buckeyes (2-3) are set to welcome No. 10 Virginia (5-1) to the Schottenstein Center for a 7:30 p.m. matchup as part of the Big Ten/ACC Challenge.OSU’s season started off without any noteworthy results, grabbing 20-plus-point victories over a pair of unspectacular opponents. The wheels came off from there, however, as consecutive home losses to Texas-Arlington and Louisiana Tech dropped OSU to .500, before an overtime loss to Memphis in Miami gave Matta a losing record for the first time in his career.Sophomore forward Jae’Sean Tate said having a losing record comes as a shock when a player comes to a school like OSU, but the team has to keep its composure and keep getting back on track.“None of us expected to be 2-3, but we’ve just got to stay the course,” Tate said. “We have to learn how to grow, how to improve every week in practice.”Tate and fellow sophomore forward Keita Bates-Diop each offered the same two culprits for the Buckeyes’ struggles: turnovers and poor free-throw shooting.“We’re not losing games by a lot. They’re close games. It’s just the turnovers, we have to cut back on those, and make our free throws,” Bates-Diop said. “We could be getting different questions right now if we’re doing that.”The Buckeyes are turning the ball over 16.2 times per game, ranking 323rd in the nation out of 346 qualifying Division I schools. Virginia, on the other hand, ranks second with just 7.5 turnovers per game.Matta said the praise for the Cavaliers’ efficiency lies with coach Tony Bennett, who is now in his seventh season in Charlottesville, Virginia.“I think Tony Bennett has done a tremendous job in terms of coming in and establishing that program … I don’t think Virginia gets the respect of other schools, but they’re as good as any of them, that’s for sure,” Matta said.For the Buckeyes, Tate said it is never easy to snap a losing streak, and the team is unlikely to get any help against a team like the Cavaliers. Still, he said the team is trying its hardest to keep its focus one game at a time.“Any loss will have an impact on your confidence, but coach is doing a great job telling us to stay the course,” Tate said. “Teams go through losses all the time, it’s just how you bounce back the next game.”A glance at the CavaliersVirginia comes into Tuesday night’s matchup 5-1, with the lone loss coming in a second-game hiccup at George Washington.While the quality of its other five opponents hasn’t been the strongest, Matta said he has been more than impressed with what he’s watched.“They’re as good of a basketball team as I’ve seen this year … They’re such a great blend of the positions, inside, outside,” Matta said. “It’s definitely a veteran basketball team that’s going to be a great challenge for us.”Virginia — which earned a No. 2 seed in the NCAA tournament a season ago but was ultimately upset by Michigan State in the Round of 32 — uses a balanced offensive attack rather than relying on a go-to scorer.Redshirt senior guard Malcolm Brogdon leads the team with 16.7 points per game. The 2014-15 AP All-American Second-Team recipient has also chipped in 4.5 rebounds and 3.2 assists per game.The Cavaliers have shot exceptionally well this season, shooting the ball at a 51.7 percent clip from the field while holding opponents to 39.1 percent. Those marks rank 13th and 74th in the nation, respectively.“They’re a great defensive team,” Tate said. “They run a lot of offense through their post, so post defense will be really key. We’ve just got to execute and take care of the ball.”Up nextAfter the Cavaliers, the Buckeyes are set to resume action on Saturday against another school from the 10th state — Virginia Military Institute. Tip is scheduled for 4:30 p.m. at the Schottenstein Center. read more

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The Senior Bowl, held in Mobile, Ala., is an opportunity for senior football players to showcase their talents in front of pro scouts and coaches. And Former Ohio State football players Ross Homan and Dane Sanzenbacher were invited to the field. Homan and Sanzenbacher understand the importance of the opportunity. “The best players in the nation are out here, competing and trying to showcase their skills,” Homan said. Being at your best and separating yourself from the rest is something Homan said is crucial in a game like this. “It’s very important. You’re always being evaluated every time you step on the field,” Homan said. “It’s a huge job interview; that’s the way I look at it.” Sanzenbacher agreed. “It’s an opportunity for you to show your talents and stand out from everybody else,” he said. Since the Sugar Bowl, Homan and Sanzenbacher have been training for the NFL draft process. Both were recently invited to the NFL Combine, and both said they plan to attend. During practice, Homan said coaches and scouts have been telling him to keep doing what he is doing and to relax and play to his ability. Sanzenbacher, who was a late addition to the Senior Bowl, had his first day of practice Tuesday, and said the competition there is one of a kind. “You can’t really replace that competition. It makes everybody better,” he said. “You’re working with some of the best players in the nation and it makes every rep that much more critical.” Being so close to the NFL, Homan said he is ready to make the most of the opportunity. “It’s a dream come true,” he said. “I have dreamed of it since I was a little kid, and now I have the opportunity to make it a reality.” Sanzenbacher said the feeling is surreal. “It’s weird. It doesn’t feel that close,” Sanzenbacher said. “There’s still a lot of steps that you need to go through to actually put on that jersey and play in the NFL.” Homan’s ultimate goal is to be a success and leave nothing undone. “Just be successful; just have no regrets,” Homan said. “Never look back and wish I could have done this or could have done that.” Sanzenbacher has different ambitions. “(I want) to put myself in a position to be successful after football,” Sanzenbacher said. “Obviously you want to play well and take (football) as far as you can, but ultimately, while you’re playing, set yourself up for the future.” Neither Homan nor Sanzenbacher has a preference of what team he would like to compete for. They said would just be grateful for the chance to play in the NFL. Sanzenbacher said he would never forget the experiences he had playing for OSU. “It kind of made me the football player that I am,” he said. “Being able to run out on Senior Day, to get your name announced as captain and your family on the field was definitely up there for me.” What Homan will remember most about OSU is his success on the team. “The close games, battles, sealing the deal on Big Ten championships,” Homan said. “Everything we’ve won, I’ll keep memory of.” The Senior Bowl will be televised at 4 p.m. Saturday on the NFL Network. read more

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Junior defenseman, Clark Cristofoli (6), takes control of the puck in a game against Canisius. OSU won 3-0 at the Schottenstein Center Nov. 15. Credit: Brooke Sayre / Lantern photographer With freshman goalie Logan Davis’ first two collegiate starts came two victories as the Ohio State men’s ice hockey team swept Canisius College over the weekend.Davis took over the reins after fellow freshman Matt Tomkins sustained a lower-body injury in the first four minutes of OSU’s victory against Niagara Nov. 9.“That’s why (Davis is) out there in practice every day,” OSU coach Steve Rohlik said. “Sometimes you take it for granted, and I know our guys don’t, and Logan went out there and did his job.”Alongside Davis’ performance, Rohlik attributed the Buckeyes’ (8-4-0, 0-0-0) wins to their defensive unit, which he said has been a focus of the team.“Our guys played hard. Our guys blocked a lot of shots – I think we blocked over 40 shots this weekend – and Logan, in the nets, did his job,” Rohlik said of the defense, which gave up only one goal against the Golden Griffins. “When guys buy in and they’re willing to sacrifice their body in this game and get in front of pucks like that, you know you’ve got something special, and I think we can build on this.”Coach Dave Smith of Canisius (2-7-0, 1-3-0) shared the same sentiment of the Buckeyes’ defense, saying “their desperation and their commitment to blocking shots was the difference in the game.”The second game of the two-game series was played Saturday, and the Buckeyes managed to hold onto to the lead to win, 3-1.Both teams were held scoreless in the first period, but OSU got on the board and took a 2-0 lead with two goals by senior forward Alex Szczechura and freshman defenseman Josh Healey. Canisius responded with a wraparound goal by junior forward Mitch McCrank at 7:49 to pull the Golden Griffins within one goal.For the remainder of the game, OSU played a defense-centric game and fended off any attack on the net that Canisius attempted. With less than a second left on the clock, junior forward Ryan Dzingel sealed the victory with an empty-net goal.The Buckeyes outshot the Golden Griffins in the game, 29-23, and Davis stopped 22 of the shots he faced in his third victory as a goalie.Healey said playing consistently and not making drastic changes to the gameplay was what helped the team to keep its lead.“We just stuck to our game plan and kept going,” Healey said. “They pushed at the end, but we stuck to our game — get pucks deep, keep (the puck) on the other side and keep the lead.”The two-game series opened up Friday, and OSU came away with a shutout victory over the Golden Griffins.After a goal in the first period by Dzingel, who leads the team with seven on the season, the Buckeyes opened up the gap even more in the second period with goals from junior defenseman Justin DaSilva and freshman forward Nick Schilkey. With these, OSU extended the lead to 3-0, which was decidedly the final score after neither team scored in the third stanza.The series ended the Buckeyes’ seven-game homestand, during which they won six games. The team has a weekend off before it is slated to open Big Ten play with against rival Michigan in Ann Arbor Nov. 29 at 7 p.m. OSU is then scheduled to return home against the Wolverines Dec. 2 at 7:05 p.m. read more

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first_imgTianjin Quanjian forward Alexandre Pato believes Milan pulled off a masterstroke by having Leonardo return.He also admitted he is ‘waiting’ for a call from his fellow Brazilian. Leonardo managed Pato at Milan between 2009-10 campaign and ever since then has returned to San Siro as the club’s general manager, prompting hype from the striker.“Leonardo has the vision, competence and authority to give the club a new approach,” the 28-year-old told Tuttosport and quoted in Football Italia.“I’m not only talking in a technical sense. I imagine that at the club, there’s been some loss: many people have left in just a year and a half, so Leonardo can give security to the whole club.Cristiano Ronaldo, JuventusSerie A Betting: Match-day 3 Stuart Heath – September 14, 2019 Considering there is a number of perfect starts so early in the Serie A season, as well as a few surprisingly not-so perfect ones….“He’s the right person at the right place at the right time: he’ll do a great job. In the meantime, I’ll be waiting for his call… after that we’ll see!Pato also shared his thoughts about Elliott Management’s takeover of the Rossoneri.“It seems to me that in a few weeks, the new owners have moved decisively with regards to the club’s organisation,” he added.“That’s good for Milan and their future. The club deserve to return to the top.”last_img read more

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first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR While changes are coming to how the department operates military grocery stores, they won’t be implemented in a haphazard manner, according to David Tillotson III, DOD’s assistant deputy chief management officer.Tillotson, who has been charged with identifying ways to reduce the $1.4 billion annual subsidy Congress provides the commissary system, said any changes would be carried out deliberately and with mechanisms in place to ensure they don’t degrade the commissary benefit for military families. “We’ll work on it a piece at a time, and that’s our intention,” Tillotson told the American Logistics Association, a group of manufacturers and distributors who serve commissaries, exchanges and morale, welfare and recreation facilities.Privatization, for example, is not an “all or nothing” proposition, he said. It is possible that only some elements of commissary operations are handled by the private sector, reported Military Times. The main sticking point to privatizing commissaries will be overseas stores, Tillotson said.“We are unequivocally certain that people are really, really going to choke on the overseas operation portion. We’re certain of that because nearly every conversation I’ve had chokes on that point,” he said.Tillotson noted that the department was pleased that the Senate had removed language from the fiscal 2017 defense authorization bill allowing DOD to privatize commissaries at five major installations.The Pentagon already has proposed allowing commissaries to charge variable prices for items and to introduce private labels in an effort to reduce the annual subsidy.In addition to looking for ways to save money in commissary operations, Tillotson said the deputy secretary of defense has asked him to find $10 billion in savings from other reforms across DOD over the next four to five years.last_img read more

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