first_imgActivism, Agriculture, Community Forestry, Community-based Conservation, Forestry, Forests, Governance, Islands, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Protected Areas, Rainforests, Tropical Forests In 1972, Indonesia’s central government mapped Kalaodi, a village of 454 people, into a protected forest.Locals were upset because the protected status robbed them of the ability to continue their centuries-old tradition of cultivating spice groves.Today, Kalaodi residents are taking the first steps towards restituting past government oversteps. KALAODI, Indonesia  — August through September is clove harvest season here in this corner of the Maluku Islands. The scent of clove flowers pierces the air over the winding, precipitous roads that lead to Kalaodi.From the 1400s well into the 1800s, this hamlet on Tidore island was one of the world’s few sources of nutmeg, mace, vanilla, cinnamon and cloves. British, Dutch and Portuguese merchant ships spent months crossing oceans to buy spices here. The Dutch thought they had a bargain in 1664 when the British traded them Run Island on the south end of the archipelago for a swampy, unknown American colony called New Amsterdam that was later dubbed New York City. Today, the Malukus, and Kalaodi, still feel remote. Locals refer to their township as the community above the clouds. Peering to the east on a clear day, visitors see only the neighboring island of Halmahera. To the west is more water, and Ternate and Maitara islands.Until 1986, houses in Kalaodi were built solely with bamboo. What cement was used had to be piggybacked in from towns three kilometers away. Only in 1992 was a tarmac road into town completed. Indonesia’s Maluku Islands. Image by Morwen/Wikimedia CommonsDecisions from the central government feel arbitrary yet have large consequences. For example, in 1972, bureaucrats in Jakarta mapped the village of 454 people into a protected forest. The 2,513-hectare Tagafura national forest encompasses three subdistricts – Southern, Eastern and Northern Tidore. Kalaodi sits in the middle.Locals were very upset because the protected status robbed them of the ability to continue their centuries-old tradition of cultivating spice groves. It also disregarded local institutions of nature protection. Many Kalaodi people moved to Halmahera. And one wise village headman convinced them to set aside some orchard parcels to be maintained collectively. The harvest from these communal lots was used to build infrastructure, said village elder Yunus Hadi. This was a brave move because it came only five years after the Indonesian mass killings of 1965-6 targeted communists who espoused such land arrangements.Today, with the help of the local branch of the Indonesian Forum for the Environment (Walhi), the country’s largest environmental pressure group, Kalaodi residents are taking the first steps towards restituting past government oversteps. They mapped locally owned groves to bring to future negotiations with the state. “Our measurements showed that the size of the town was different from that measured by the government forestry office,” said Ismet Soelaiman, the director of Walhi-Maluku. His team concluded that the village, including all houses and orchards, spans 2,000 hectares.“Our village has been here for centuries,” chimed in current village secretary Samsudin. “How can the government suddenly arrive and place us within the jurisdiction of a protected forest? Unfortunately, at the time, the people were not wise enough to protest.” Samsudin thinks his village was within its rights to protest. “This was just after independence. Kalaodi has existed for centuries before independence,” he said.Samsudin thinks the designation was political, a gambit aimed at pushing villagers out of the mountains and into Tidore city. “Many also went to Halmahera,” he pointed out. “Three members of every household moved elsewhere to find work,” said Abdurahman, one Kalaodi resident who migrated at that time.Freshly picked cloves on the island of Tidore. The tree from which the aromatic flower buds come is native to the Maluku Islands in eastern Indonesia. Photo by Eko Susanto/FlickrThe spice villageKalaodi residents cultivate a diversity of plants. Primarily, they grow nutmeg and clove. But they also harvest bamboo – as a preventative to soil erosion on the steep local slopes. Clove trees are also grown interspersed with cinnamon, durian, areca nut palm and Javanese or kenari almond trees.“Bamboo roots help us guard against soil erosion. It also offers good building and crafting material,” Abdurahman said. “Nutmeg and clove are our main crops though. Everyone plants them.”At the end of the season, mace, nutmeg and clove crops are dried on large tarps on the side of the road. Local nutmeg and clove harvests come in the hundreds of tons. “We don’t have a proper count,” Abdurahman said. “But it’s likely that we send hundreds of tons to Tidore. This is because hundreds of local hectares are set aside for growing clove.”Today, bamboo is rarely used as a building material and more likely woven into broad tolu hats to be worn in harvest season to keep out the rain and sun; or saloi baskets used in the tree orchards. Some of these crafts get sold at the market.Kalaodi is also famous for its durians. In season, the fruits flood the markets of Tidore and Ternate.The islands of Maitara and Tidore are seen from Ternate Island in Indonesia’s Maluku archipelago. Photo by Fabio Achilli/FlickrForest governanceSince the 1970s, Kalaodi has had a system of community groves in addition to private, individual groves. No new forest has been cleared to make orchards since the village area gained protected forest status.There is a youth grove, which has 200 clove trees. The harvest from this grove gets used for infrastructure projects in the village. For example, there is a 200-meter-long retaining wall in the village that was built with a few years worth of profits from this grove. There is also a village grove and a mosque grove. These groves are planted and maintained communally and during harvest season, the crop is divided communally. Kalaodi has four areas, each two kilometers in size, separate from residents’ groves. Each area has its own land management regulations. Locals only retain land rights year to year. The land is owned communally. Only the harvest is owned individually. This is the system of land management the village has functioned under since 1970, said Hadi, the elder. He played a major part in convincing locals to farm communally. “He instructed local farmers to plant clove seedlings in the 1970s,” according to the current village secretary Samsudin. “We owe the abundance of clove and nutmeg on our lands to Yunus.”This story was reported by Mongabay’s Indonesia team and was first published on our Indonesian site on Oct. 2, 2016. Article published by mongabayauthorcenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Mike Gaworecki The 12-time Grammy-winning singer-songwriter recently announced on Mongabay.com that he is embarking on a 17-date US concert tour, with all proceeds benefitting Half-Earth, an initiative of the E.O. Wilson Biodiversity Foundation.Mongabay contributor Justin Catanoso interviewed Paul Simon about his long-time friendship with E.O. Wilson and why Dr. Wilson’s Half-Earth idea inspired him to get involved in this environmental cause.We also feature another Field Notes segment, this time with Zuzana Burivalova, a conservation scientist at Princeton University who has recorded the soundscapes of over 100 sites in the Indonesian part of Borneo. On this episode of the Mongabay Newscast, we’re thrilled to feature a conversation with the one and only Paul Simon, who’s just announced he’s going to tour in support of the environment. The 12-time Grammy-winning musician recently announced on Mongabay.com that he is embarking on a 17-date US concert tour, with all proceeds benefitting Half-Earth, an initiative of the E.O. Wilson Biodiversity Foundation.Mongabay contributor Justin Catanoso interviewed Paul Simon about his long-time friendship with E.O. Wilson and why Dr. Wilson’s Half-Earth idea inspired him to get involved in this environmental cause. You can find info on Paul Simon’s 17-date tour in support of Half-Earth here.Also on the program, we feature another Field Notes segment, this time with Zuzana Burivalova, a conservation scientist at Princeton University who has recorded the soundscapes of over 100 sites in the Indonesian part of Borneo together with colleagues from The Nature Conservancy. We listen to a variety of those recordings, each made in a different type of habitat, from protected rainforest to an oil palm plantation, and Burivalova explains what we’re hearing — and in some cases, what we’re not hearing.Here’s this episode’s top news:13,000 acres of cloud forest now protected in ColombiaCruise ship wrecks one of Indonesia’s best coral reefs at Raja AmpatInvestigation reveals slave labor conditions in Brazil’s timber industryStepping on their paws: study explores recreation’s unfun impacts on wildlifeRare beaked whale filmed underwater for the first timeIf you enjoy this podcast, please write a review of the Mongabay Newscast in the Apple Podcasts app, iTunes store, Stitcher page, or wherever you get your podcasts from! Your feedback will help us improve the show and find new listeners. Simply go to the show’s page on whichever platform you get it from and find the ‘review’ or ‘rate’ section: Stitcher, TuneIn, iTunes, Google Play, Android, or RSS.Paul Simon performing at a conference sponsored by the E.O. Wilson Biodiversity Foundation. Photo by Chris Sims, E.O. Wilson Biodiversity Foundation.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Acoustic, Animals, Bioacoustics, Bioacoustics and conservation, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Bold And Dangerous Ideas That May Save The World, Conservation, Coral Reefs, Environment, Environmental Heroes, Human Rights, Illegal Logging, Illegal Timber Trade, Interviews, Law Enforcement, Mammals, Marine Mammals, Podcast, Protected Areas, Video, Whales, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation last_img read more

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first_imgArticle published by Glenn Scherer Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Accidental take of marine animals by commercial fisheries is a serious global environmental problem, with 40 percent of the world’s ocean fishing totals disposed of as bycatch annually.Roughly 63 billion pounds of unwanted wildlife — seabirds, marine mammals and sea turtles, countless fish species, rays, and cephalopods — are killed as bycatch due to the swallowing of baited hooks or entanglement in nets.Namibia, once known as the “world’s worst fishery” regarding avian bycatch is addressing the problem. It has installed “bird-scaring” lines on the nation’s 70 trawlers and on its 12 longline fishing vessels, and has also adopted other low cost methods to minimize avian bycatch, which once killed more than 30,000 birds annually.The Meme Itumbapo Women’s Group, known for its seashell necklaces and other jewelry, is now sustainably manufacturing and supplying the bird-scaring lines from their headquarters “Bird’s Paradise,” in Walvis Bay, Namibia. The hope is that these combined efforts will reduce avian bycatch by 85-90 percent in the near future. A juvenile Black-browed albatross caught on a baited hook. The bird was released by Albatross Task Force. Photo courtesy of the Albatross Task ForceMany years ago I joined my cousin, the mate on a sporting vessel, on a fishing trip off the North Carolina coast. We were trolling baited lines in hopes of catching striped bass.I was in the wheelhouse when a mighty expletive arose from one of the three paying client fishermen. Looking astern, I saw a large white bird floundering in the sea — it had dived to take one of the towed baitfish and now was hooked.The client angrily jerked the rod, reeling in the struggling animal, a Northern gannet. The bird, once on deck, was judged to have swallowed the hook. The captain moved swiftly to cut the line and toss the doomed bird overboard, but before he could act, I asked to examine the bird.He handed it over, all seven struggling, kicking, flapping pounds of it. The bird’s face, so close to my own now, was striking; its desperately clacking chisel-like bill, a slight taupe tincture at the top of the head, and staring white eyes ringed in startling turquoise.With the captain’s help, I pried the bill open and found that the hook hadn’t been swallowed but was merely caught in the bird’s throat. Using pliers, I reached into the wildly vocalizing mouth, seized the hook and with a quick downward motion removed it.The captain immediately, and with unexpected delight, hurled the bird high into the air, and we all watched silently as it departed our company at top speed. The client who’d been so enraged at the bird’s interruption of his fishing exclaimed quietly: “Man, that was… really something.”Unfortunately, this Northern gannet was one of the few lucky victims of bycatch. Most of the billions of animals swept up accidentally by commercial fishermen and sport anglers every year die. But in far away Namibia, they’ve found a simple solution to the problem the rest of the world could tune to as an inspiration and example.The Critically Endangered Tristan albatross (Diomedea dabbenena). Breeding populations are restricted to Gough Island, roughly 2,000 miles southwest of Namibia, according to the IUCN; adults fly above fishing waters several hundred miles off Namibia’s coast. A major threat to the species are longline fisheries. Photo by michael clarke stuff Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic licenseThe waste of bycatchAccidental take of marine animals by commercial fisheries is a serious but largely unsung global problem, with a breathtaking 40 percent of the world’s marine fishing haul essentially disposed of as garbage annually. That’s roughly 63 billion pounds of unwanted wildlife — seabirds, marine mammals and sea turtles, countless fish species, rays, and cephalopods — inadvertently killed by swallowing baited hooks or getting entangled in nets.This bycatch, as it is called, suffers the fate that our Northern gannet nearly experienced. All 63 billion pounds of marine animals, usually dead or dying, is thrown overboard, a tremendous waste of wildlife, that until fairly recently was casually taken for granted.Today, some governments — with an increasing understanding of the devastation wrought by traditional fishing methods — are beginning to require that commercial, and sometimes sport, fishermen apply specially designed devices to their equipment to minimize this senseless loss of life.An Endangered Atlantic Yellow-nosed albatross (Thalassarche chlororhynchos). Uncounted numbers of seabirds fall victim to bycatch every year, even though there are fairly simple and inexpensive devices available to prevent their deaths. Photo by JJ Harrison, Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License 3.0Turtle Excluder Devices or TEDs, for example, have been required in the United States since 1987, with the nets of shrimping boats mandated to include a metal grid that allows shrimp to pass through while blocking the turtles, sharks and other large animals that otherwise would be rendered as bycatch — this allows the unwanted animals to escape unharmed through a vent at the top or bottom of the net.This is a promising technological achievement for a rich country that long neglected its bycatch problem. But financially strapped nations in the developing world have been slow to follow with bycatch prevention equipment, or with the governmental programs needed to get it installed and accepted by traditional, often very conservative fishermen.Namibia leads the way in battling seabird bycatchLittle-known Namibia, in southwest Africa, could well be the nation that is currently leading the pack in protecting seabirds, a particularly interesting happening considering that the country was previously known as the “world’s worst fishery” in terms of avian bycatch.Namibia’s fishermen are usually going after hake, a cod-like fish that constitutes around 50 percent of the country’s N$11 billion (US$845 million) fishing industry. However, in the process, commercial fishermen have been killing more than 30,000 seabirds as bycatch every year, including the Tristan albatross (IUCN Red Listed as Critically Endangered); the Atlantic yellow-nosed albatross (Endangered); black-browed albatross and shy albatross (both Near Threatened); and the White-chinned petrel and Cape gannet (both Vulnerable).Albatrosses are the most highly threatened group of birds on earth, and at Namibia’s level of accidental take, the country’s fishing industry was on the way to playing a major role in helping these bird species spiral to extinction.Samantha Matjila preparing to go to sea. She’s found Namibia fishermen to be receptive to the introduction of new devices to prevent bycatch. Photo courtesy of the Albatross Task ForceSamantha Matjila is with the Namibia Nature Foundation, which represents her country on the international Albatross Task Force (ATF) composed of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Ecuador, Uruguay, South Africa and Namibia. Last spring, she enrolled in a program that the ATF, which is hosted by BirdLife International, had been conducting in Namibia since 2008, but which has been ramped up since the Namibian government introduced tight new regulations in 2014 to mandate the use of bycatch abatement equipment on all commercial fishing vessels, with a fine of N$500,000 (US$38,400) and up to ten years in prison awaiting violators.Matjila’s job is to show fishermen how to fit the various devices used to avoid bycatch to a boat’s fishing gear. Then she accompanies the fishermen out to sea to show them how the gadgets work in practice.The anti-bycatch tools are quite simple and easy to use, and include “bird-scaring” lines (also known as tori lines or streamers) that are being used by the nation’s 70 trawling vessels. Bird-scaring lines, along with line-weighting and nocturnal baiting techniques, are used by Namibia’s 12 longline fishing vessels.Albatrosses, some of which can live for 60 years, are caught and drown when they attack a baited hook before it can sink out of their diving range. The bird-scaring lines consist of 150-meter-long ropes with brightly colored streamers placed two or three meters apart. Line-weighting involves the placement of additional weighted sinkers on each line so the bait sinks more rapidly while setting a longline — a miles-long main line with as many as 2,500 baited hooks dangling from shorter lines. These lines are also set out at night to prevent the bycatch of diurnal albatrosses.Namibian fishermen sort through “bird scare” lines in preparation for their use. Photo courtesy of the Albatross Task ForceAcross the border in South Africa, where the ATF has been working with fishermen since 2006 using the same simple techniques, the successes have been astounding, with a decline of over 90 percent in seabird bycatch. Similar success is being seen in Namibia, with the ATF hoping to reach an 85-90 percent reduction in bycatch in the near future.The ATF first worked with volunteer Namibian fishermen in 2008, says Matjila. “We didn’t know what the impact of Namibian fisheries would be back then, but we knew there was an overlap of where albatrosses roam and where the vessels set their hooks. We also knew that simple, practical measures existed that could reduce seabird deaths.”But what about hostile reactions to new regulations (something seen at first when TEDs were introduced in the U.S.)? “Working with the fishermen and sharing in discussions with them about the bycatch law, it is safe to say that, yes, they are very accepting as they realize the benefits of the mitigation measures introduced to them,” Matjila says.After being certified by the ATF, Namibia’s commercial fishermen are monitored aboard their vessels by agents of the National Fisheries Observer Agency. Oliver Yates, BirdLife International’s Global Albatross Task Force Coordinator, says that today, “close to 100 percent of vessels carry observers. This is particularly good coverage and makes Namibia a perfect example of how this could/should work effectively,” around the globe.The Meme Itumbapo Women’s Group and their handmade bird-scaring lines. Photo courtesy of BirdLife InternationalSaving birds through a sustainable economyIt’s not just seabirds that benefit from Namibia’s program. According to Matjila, “The fishing companies purchase bird-scaring lines produced by a local organization called the ‘Meme Itumbapo Women’s Group.’ Meme Itumbapo is a consortium of five women, aged 33 to 47, who generate a small income from traditional jewelry sales. These women also now manufacture and supply the bird-scaring lines for the longline and trawling fisheries from their headquarters ‘Bird’s Paradise,’ in Walvis Bay, a coastal city.“The women are funded by an independent Namibian port authority, Namport, and we are working to make this a sustainable venture which will ensure provision of affordable bird-scaring lines for the fishery,” she says.These hardworking and adaptable women shifted easily from stringing together beautiful necklaces made out of seashells to supplying ten percent (so far) of the equipment needed by Namibia’s fishing fleet to save seabirds — an example of sustainable, affordable conservation, as well as gender equality.The ATF is now promising that, “Their hand-built, quality-assured, local, affordable lines will be flying off the back of more and more Namibian fishing boats in the next two years.”A Near Threatened shy albatross (Thalassarche cauta). Photo by JJ Harrison Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported LicenseClemens Naomab was one of the ATF’s first Namibian anti-bycatch trainers. He tells how he earned the trust of often insular and independent fishermen: “Namibians like to watch European football, especially the English premier league,” he explains. “Most of our relationships are developed by trading stories about football. When you have a good relationship with the fishermen it is easier to communicate with them.”Using the universal language of sports, Naomab broke through barriers and earned a place alongside his fishermen buddies, who all quickly absorbed his instructive and useful lessons and mastered the skills needed to save seabirds. “Most of the fisherman are quick to adopt the measures once you explain to them the procedures and what is required of them,” he says.Naomab adds: “I have always loved nature and everything that comes with it,” which is why he eagerly accepted his job with the ATF, a move he initially regretted when he realized he was prone to seasickness.Now he laughs off those early days of misery at sea, saying that, “My first few trips were hard, because I used to get really sick. At first I didn’t know much about seabirds, actually I never thought I would be involved with seabirds. As time passed, I started noticing how beautiful and majestic these birds are, and at the end of the day all those sleepless nights on the fishing vessels were worth it.”FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Clemens Naomab of the Albatross Task Force (ATF) cataloging seabirds. Photo courtesy of the Albatross Task Forcecenter_img Birds, Bycatch, Conservation, Featured, Fishing, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Innovation In Conservation, Marine Animals, Marine Biodiversity, Marine Birds, Marine Conservation, Marine Crisis, Marine Ecosystems, Oceans, Sustainability last_img read more

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first_imgArtificial intelligence, virtual reality, holograms, and “smart” devices aren’t just the stuff of sci-fi anymore. They are all disrupting gaming, entertainment, and even the way consumers interact with their homes and vehicles.They are also rapidly becoming important business technologies with which every entrepreneur should become familiar.Typically, the latest technology is developed for and adopted by the consumer market. Businesses are too risk averse to take chances on the latest tech goods and services, preferring to wait to analyze how the consumer market responds and to perform beta testing to ensure that any new technology integrates well with existing systems and processes.However, there is the danger of a business waiting too long to adopt the latest in tech and losing out to more future-forward competitors. There are already several major businesses that have adopted or are developing revolutionary business technologies. These technologies can help a business outpace competitors, boost operational efficiency, and cut costs.Soundwaves: The New Frontier of ConnectivityRodney Williams is the CEO and co-founder of LISNR, a new communication protocol that sends data over audio. It is a digital sound file that turns any speaker or piece of media into a beacon, working seamlessly across physical and digital spaces.LISNR’s use-case scenarios include proximity marketing: Retailers can deliver content, information, and experiences based on where customers are. Venues can use LISNR to drive mobile-app engagement before, during, and after an event and can also deliver instant messages and promotions to attendees without using their existing wireless networks.Broadcasters can use this technology to provide dual-screen content, supporting second camera angles or content feeds associated with the main broadcast.Some of LISNR’s clients include Cisco, Visa, the Cleveland Cavaliers, and the company just signed up the Indianapolis Colts.Williams not only created an innovative technology solution, but has provided a way for other businesses to incorporate advanced marketing and customer engagement technology into their strategies for success.He explains the thought process behind creating LISNR’s SmartTones: “Can we connect sound? Could we take something like Morse code or a dial-up modem and just push it up above the human hearing level but at the level devices could hear? Could we connect a device to what a person is watching?”A huge product update is about to be released. “We can now have devices talk to each other,” says Williams.This capability opens up an entire new customer market for LISNR. SmartTones can be used for more than driving engagement, the asynchronous device-to-device connectivity means the technology can be used for contactless payments and other transactions; as well as for security, and even transportation.The updates “help devices connect in the world’s most complicated environments,” Williams says.“I’ve got a cell phone, laptop, smartwatch, and tablet–‘hey, how about you innovate sound as a way to connect that other piece of equipment.’ We can do that over a TV show while watching a live game–something pops up, and you want to buy it,” he says.LISNR has the power of investors behind it. The company has raised $15 million in funding since its launch in 2012, including $10 million in Series B funding led by Intel.Recently, Williams demonstrated LISNR at the Mobile World Congress event in Barcelona. “Each attendee had a chance to create, upload, and play SmartTones on the fly.”Even with all the Internet traffic congestion at the show, guests were able to see their just-created content played on various mobile devices upon ‘hearing’ the tones, according to a statement on LISNR’s blog.Williams will further explore using LISNR as an alternative way to connect devices instead of Bluetooth and other short-range protocols.Virtual Reality: A Step Up in Experiential MarketingA great example of an entrepreneur who has incorporated the latest in technology into their business is that of Tricia Clarke-Stone, the co-founder and CEO of Narrative, a marketing agency.Prior to Narrative, Clarke-Stone was the head of Russell Simmons’s agency and his digital business. It was there she learned of the power of technology in marketing.“That’s when I developed an immense affinity for technology. When you are trying to do things that haven’t been done before, you have to invent the thing that you want to do,” says Clarke-Stone.“I started utilizing tech as part of my solution as it relates to marketing and advertising. Gone are the days where you can just engage consumers with a short advertising spot. It’s about building relationships with these brands, and why do people care about your brand.The brand has to almost create a persona.”Narrative created a virtual reality (VR) experience for a JCPenney campaign. “It was an in-mall experience in four different markets. It was meant to entertain folks during the holidays, but [also] to be a trigger to engage consumers and drive them into the JCPenney location. VR is not usually used in that sense; it’s usually an entertainment vehicle. It has a wow factor,” she says.“We wanted it to be more of an inclusive experience so that we can get the scale we needed to attract more people,” Clarke-Stone explains. “So, we ‘gamified’ it. We put up a big screen and the audience started to build. They could engage with elements of the content–instead of going to the mall to see Santa, we are going to take you to the North Pole. You sit in the sleigh [via Virtual Reality] and as you took flight, you would feel cold bursts of air.“In this virtual world, Santa hands you a gift. In the physical world, an elf actually handed you a physical box. When you opened it; we had a coupon or special offer that served as a driver to a JCPenney location. We had record numbers of driving people into the stores.”Clarke-Stone says that was just the beginning of Narrative’s exploration of immersive marketing. “Now, how do we step up VR; how do we make it measurable? Every time we use tech we’ve used before, we figure out new elements and layers to evolve.”Read the full article in the May issue of Black Enterprise magazine. be_ixf; php_sdk; php_sdk_1.4.18 https://www.blackenterprise.com/business-tech-revolution-2/ https://www.blackenterprise.com/business-tech-revolution-2/ 3 Wearable Tech Devices to Help Keep Your Children Safe4 Ways Artificial Intelligence Will Help You Cr…Artificial Intelligence and Algorithms: 21st Ce…last_img read more

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