first_imgJAMIE O’HARA has revealed that former Tottenham team-mate Robbie Keane once FLOORED Edgar Davids with a single punch in training following an altercation.The 33-year-old stated that the incident came just after the Dutch legend made the move to North London in 2005 from Inter Milan.3 Jamie O’Hara has revealed that Robbie Keane once dropped Edgar Davids with a single punchDavids, 47, quickly became a fan favourite at White Hart Lane, but it wasn’t all plain sailing in his early days at the club.According to O’Hara, the 1995 Champions League winner arrived at Spurs thinking he was the “main man”, but quickly found out who really was the top dog in the dressing room.Speaking on talkSPORT, he said: “I tell you who had a bit about him – Robbie Keane.”I remember a story with him and Edgar Davids and I hope he don’t mind me saying this.SPURS NEWS LIVE: Follow all the latest news on Tottenham“We were at training and Edgar Davids came in from Inter Milan and he thought he was the bee’s knees.”He thought he was the guy and the main man and everything, but everyone realised Robbie Keane was the main guy at Tottenham at that time.”I remember him giving it to Keano in training and they were having a barney, and I think he tried to step to Robbie Keane and say something – and Keano just sparked him, bosh!“He just went, bang – one punch. Gone.3LATEST TOTTENHAM NEWSHARRY ALL FOUR ITKane admits Spurs must win EIGHT games to rise into Champions League spotGossipALL GONE PETE TONGVertonghen wanted by host of Italian clubs as long Spurs spell nears endBELOW PARRSpurs suffer blow with Parrott to miss Prem restart after appendix operationPicturedSHIRT STORMNew Spurs 2020/21 home top leaked but angry fans slam silver design as ‘awful”STEP BY STEP’Jose fears for players’ welfare during restart as stars begin ‘pre-season’KAN’T HAVE THATVictor Osimhen keen on Spurs move but only if they sell Kane this summer3“Then Davids has just picked himself up and walked off – and that was it. He came in the next day like, ‘morning, Robbie…’“He knew – no-one messed with Keano. He had that Irish thing about him that if he switched he would put you straight out.”Despite the early tensions behind the scenes, the 2005/06 season turned out to be a fine campaign for Spurs, but they ultimately finished in fifth spot after losing to West Ham in their final match.José Mourinho delighted with Bergwijn’s Spurs debut but fumes that Raheem Sterling wasn’t shown red card in winlast_img read more

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first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Mike Gaworecki Colorado River flows were, on average, nearly 20 percent below the 1906-1999 average between 2000 and 2014, according to the study, published in the journal Water Resources Research earlier this month.That’s a reduction of about 2.9 million acre-feet of water per year. To put that in context: It’s been estimated that one acre-foot of water is the amount used by a family of four in one year.The multi-year drought in California receives far more press, but the Colorado River drought is just as severe and will also have far-reaching impacts, note the researchers with the University of Arizona (UA) and Colorado State University (CSU) who authored the study. A new study suggests that Colorado River flows have already declined due to rising global temperatures and are likely to experience further declines in the future.Colorado River flows were, on average, nearly 20 percent below the 1906-1999 average between 2000 and 2014, according to the study, published in the journal Water Resources Research earlier this month. That’s a reduction of about 2.9 million acre-feet of water per year. To put that in context: It’s been estimated that one acre-foot of water is the amount used by a family of four in one year.Meanwhile, the two largest reservoirs in the United States, Lake Mead and Lake Powell, were both about 40 percent full in 2014, despite being at maximum volume in 2000, when an ongoing drought in the Colorado River basin first began.The multi-year drought in California receives far more press, but the Colorado River drought is just as severe and will also have far-reaching impacts, note the researchers with the University of Arizona (UA) and Colorado State University (CSU) who authored the study.The US Bureau of Reclamation estimates annual natural upper Colorado River flow based on data recorded from streamgages at Lees Ferry. At that location, Colorado River streamflow reflects water that has drained from the upper basin, which includes Colorado, Wyoming, Utah and New Mexico. Photo Credit: U.S. Geological Survey.Close to 40 million people in seven states in the western U.S. as well as two Mexican states rely on the Colorado River for their drinking water and to support their livelihood, according to the U.S. Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Reclamation.“Fifteen years into the 21st century, the emerging reality is that climate change is already depleting Colorado River water supplies at the upper end of the range suggested by previously published projections,” the UA and CSU researchers write. “Record setting temperatures are an important and underappreciated component of the flow reductions now being observed.”The study was aimed at quantifying the various effects of precipitation and temperature on Colorado River flows. The researchers said their findings suggest that temperatures 0.9 degrees Celsius (1.6 degrees Fahrenheit) higher than the average for the past 105 years in the Upper Basin of the Colorado River, from whence 85 percent of the river’s flow originates, were likely responsible for reducing river flows between 2.7 and nine percent during the study period. That amounts to anywhere from one-sixth to one-half of the total flow loss the Colorado River experienced during the 2000-2014 drought.“This paper is the first to show the large role that warming temperatures are playing in reducing the flows of the Colorado River,” Jonathan Overpeck, Regents’ Professor of Geosciences and of Hydrology and Atmospheric Sciences at UA and one of the two authors of the study, said in a statement. “We’re the first to make the case that warming alone could cause Colorado River flow declines of 30 percent by midcentury and over 50 percent by the end of the century if greenhouse gas emissions continue unabated.”Bradley Udall, a senior water and climate scientist at CSU’s Colorado Water Institute and Overpeck’s co-author, added that “The future of [the] Colorado River is far less rosy than other recent assessments have portrayed. A clear message to water managers is that they need to plan for significantly lower river flows.”Overpeck and Udall note that “there is little doubt (i.e., high confidence) that temperatures will continue to increase as long as the emissions of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere continue.” They also state in the study, again with “high confidence,” that as temperatures in the region continue to climb, river flows will decline accordingly, anywhere from 11 percent to as much as 55 percent by end of century based on the temperature projections of moderate to high emissions scenarios.The researchers also found that it is unlikely that precipitation in the Upper Basin will increase enough to offset the temperature-driven river flow declines, even in part. Furthermore, they say there is ample evidence of a significant risk that the Colorado River Basin will experience a megadrought — a drought that lasts 20 years or more — in the coming decades, even if climate change is halted. (The risk of a megadrought in the region rises substantially if global warming continues apace, of course.)“The likelihood of drought and megadrought means that there will likely be decades-long periods with anomalously low runoff even if there is an increase in precipitation relative to the historical mean during some other periods due to anthropogenic climate change,” Overpeck and Udall write in the study. “Temperature-driven threats to the flows of the Colorado are thus large and real. The only way to curb substantial risk of long term mean declines in Colorado River flow is thus to work towards aggressive reductions in the emissions of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere.”The Colorado River Basin saw unusually wet periods in the 1920s and 1990s, and those will still continue to occur, the two researchers write. But given that these wet periods will now be occuring at a time when higher temperatures are increasing the water demands from plants, soil, and humans, the river’s flows are unlikely to return to 20th-century averages if we don’t take immediate action, they argue.“Current planning understates the challenge that climate change poses to the water supplies in the American Southwest,” Udall said. “My goal is to help water managers incorporate this information into their long-term planning efforts.”A late-afternoon view of the Colorado River in Marble Canyon looking upstream from the Navajo Bridge, near Lees Ferry, Arizona. Photo Credit: Stewart Tomlinson/U.S. Geological Survey.CITATIONUdall, B., & Overpeck, J. (2017). The 21st century Colorado River hot drought and implications for the future. Water Resources Research. doi:10.1002/2016WR019638FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Climate Change, Climate Change Policy, Drought, Environment, Global Warming, Impact Of Climate Change, Research, Rivers, Water last_img read more

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first_imgAnimals, Apes, Avoided Deforestation, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Hotspots, Bushmeat, Chimpanzees, Community Forestry, Community Forests, Community-based Conservation, Conservation, Conservation And Poverty, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Elephants, Endangered Species, Environment, Forest Elephants, Forest People, Forestry, Forests, Gfrn, Global Forest Watch, Gorillas, Great Apes, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Human Rights, Hunting, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Infrastructure, Ivory, Land Grabbing, Mammals, Megafauna, Migration, Primates, Protected Areas, Rainforest Biodiversity, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest People, Rainforests, Roads, Saving Rainforests, Tropical Forests, Wildlife Article published by John Cannon The 260-kilometer (162-mile) highway is slated to have six lanes and would have run through the center of Cross River National Park as originally designed.The region is a biodiversity hotspot and home to forest elephants, drills, Nigeria-Cameroon chimpanzees and Cross River gorillas.The proposal shifts the route to the west, out of the center of the national park, which garnered praise from the Wildlife Conservation Society.The route still appears to cut through forested areas and protected lands. The path of a major highway project in eastern Nigeria has been altered in response to concerns from local and international groups about its impact on wildlife and communities.The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), based at the Bronx Zoo in New York City, immediately celebrated the shift.“We did it,” said John Calvelli, the organization’s executive vice president for public affairs, in a statement. “The superhighway has been rerouted and wildlife saved.”The original (left) and rerouted (right) Cross River highway project and Cross River National Park in southeastern Nigeria. Map courtesy of WCS.WCS and other NGOs and scientific organizations have campaigned against the construction of a six-lane, 260-kilometer (162-mile) Cross River Highway because it cut through Nigeria’s Cross River National Park, which provides important habitat for wildlife, including IUCN Red List species and subspecies such as forest elephants (Loxodonta cyclotis), drills (Mandrillus leucophaeus) and Nigeria-Cameroon chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes ellioti). Identified as a biodiversity hotspot, the park also serves as the one of the last refuges for the roughly 300 remaining Cross River gorilla (Gorilla gorilla diehli).The new highway route has been moved to the fringes of the national park, according to a map produced by WCS.“The original route for the 160-mile superhighway, which included a 12-mile-wide buffer, would have been catastrophic for the Cross River rainforest, demolishing some of the last-remaining habitat of the highly endangered Cross River gorilla,” Calvelli said in the statement.Officials reduced the buffer to 140 meters (459 feet) in February.A camera trap photo of a Cross River gorilla. Photo courtesy of WCS-Nigeria.Bill Laurance, a tropical ecologist at James Cook University in Cairns, Australia, studies the impacts of roads on the environment and is one of the lead authors on a paper currently in press at the journal Tropical Conservation Science that outlines two alternative routes for this specific highway.Of this latest development in the Cross River project, Laurance said, “The proposed route certainly seems to be better than the original proposal.”But construction of the road along the new path doesn’t appear to be a perfect solution, he added.“To my eye, the proposed reroute still appears to be cutting through significant areas of forest and protected area,” he said in an interview. “I’m withholding judgment until I see this in more detail, but I still have some concerns.”Ben Ayade, the governor of Cross River state, has championed the project since taking office in May 2015 as a boon for the state’s economy. Sources say the road is expected to cost up to several billion dollars to complete, though the price tag could be as little as $1 billion. No estimates have been made public about how the changes to the route could affect those figures.Ayade’s office did not respond to requests through multiple channels for comment.“We need to open the horizon to get teeming young people employed,” he said in a speech in 2015. The road is designed to link the port of Calabar on the Gulf of Guinea with the landlocked Cross River city of Ikom, and with Katsina Ala in Benue state. That paved highway would trim the travel time between Katsina Ala and Calabar to 90 minutes from 5 to 6 hours, Ayade told the crowd.The drill is an endangered short-tailed monkey found in Cross River National Park. Photo by John C. Cannon.The influx of people in connection with the road construction worried conservationists and human rights advocates alike.If the road had gone in along the originally proposed route, “You can be sure that the entire forest will be gone in no time,” said Odey Oyama, executive director of the Rainforest Resource and Development Centre, a Cross River-based NGO, in a 2015 interview.The Ekuri Initiative, an indigenous organization that focuses on forest stewardship, collected 253,000 signatures from people opposing the project on the grounds that it threatened local rights to the land. The communities of Old Ekuri and New Ekuri, which jointly manage a 33,600-hectare (about 83,000-acre) forest in the buffer zone of the national park, characterized the highway “a land grab in the guise of a Super Highway” because of the amount of land that the government had taken over for the project. The initiative’s leaders delivered the petition to the Nigerian federal government in 2016.President Muhammadu Buhari, who was elected in 2015, initially seemed supportive of the project, but he cancelled a visit to a September 2015 groundbreaking ceremony when he found out that an environmental impact assessment for the project had not been filed.“The President’s reaction is a very strong signal to remind everyone that the law cannot be taken for granted,” said Nnimmo Bassey, the director of the environmental think tank Health of Mother Earth Foundation in Benin City, Nigeria, in a 2015 interview.Data visualized on Global Forest Watch show the newly altered route proposal for the Cross River highway (red) will still cut through intact forest and protected areas in southeastern Nigeria. Map courtesy of Global Forest Watch.Now, the Ayade administration is garnering praise for his government’s role in changing the path of the highway.“The proposed route will ensure that the nation’s incredible biodiversity is safeguarded,” said Calvelli. “We thank the government for listening to the local Ekuri Community and other communities’ voices who have expressed concern over the proposed highway’s impacts to lands important to people.”Calvelli also highlighted the need for continued participation as the road is built.“We urge the public to stay engaged on this issue as it continues to develop,” he said. “Together, we can do what’s right for Nigeria’s wildlife and the communities that depend on healthy forests and strong protected areas.”Much of the area between Ikom and Calabar, the two Cross River state cities the highway will connect, is a biodiversity hotspot. Map courtesy of Global Forest Watch.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.CITATIONS:Conservation International. “Biodiversity hotspots.” Accessed through Global Forest Watch on 28 April 2017. www.globalforestwatch.orgIUCN and UNEP-WCMC (2017), The World Database on Protected Areas (WDPA) [On-line], April, 2017, Cambridge, UK: UNEP-WCMC. Available at: www.protectedplanet.net. Accessed through Global Forest Watch in April 2017. www.globalforestwatch.orgEditor’s note: William Laurance is a member of Mongabay’s advisory board.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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first_imgAnimals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Environment, Habitat Loss, Invasive Species, Mammals, Megafauna, One-horned Rhinos, Parks, Protected Areas, Rhinos, Wildlife Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Mikania micrantha, a plant native to the Americas, has been present in Chitwan National Park since the 1990s. As of 2010, it was present in 20 percent of the park, becoming a threat to wildlife and local people’s livelihoods.The plant is particularly prevalent in habitats like wetlands, grasslands and riverine forests, which are also favored habitats for the more than 600 one-horned rhinos living in the park.Mikania chokes out native fodder species, pushing rhinos and other grazers out of the safety of the park and increasing human-wildlife conflict, researchers have found.Mikania is extremely difficult to eradicate since plants produce up to 40,000 seeds per year and can re-root from even small stems. Efforts are underway to improve removal strategies and engage local communities in the work. A little plant can go a long way — so long it has earned the name “mile-a-minute weed.” This prodigious propagator is Mikania micrantha, a plant that reached Asia from Central and South America and today is so widespread in Nepal’s Chitwan National Park that it has become a threat to the one-horned rhinoceros’ (Rhinoceros unicornis) grazing grounds, other wildlife and local people’s livelihoods.“How did that plant arrive in Nepal? That’s a mystery,” Dirgha Ghimire, director of the Institute for Social and Environmental Research – Nepal, told Mongabay. Some, he said, believe Mikania came as a dried grass used to cushion goods inside shipping crates, while others think monsoon rains brought its seeds from India. Another theory is that it was introduced into India after the Second World War to camouflage airfields and gradually spread into Nepal. What is certain is that the plant was first reported in eastern Nepal in the early 1960s, and was identified in Chitwan in 1997. By 2010 it was present in 20 percent of the Park, and it is now the most pervasive invasive plant in Chitwan and is also well distributed in other areas of the Terai region.Mikania micrantha’s nicknames include mile-a-minute weed, bitter vine, climbing hempweed, Chinese creeper and American rope. Photo by Jee & Rani nature photography via Wikimedia Commons.Mikania is a perennial plant that creates havoc by covering and smothering other plants. It kills native flora, including grasses and sapling trees that are important fodder plants for the more than 600  rhinos living in the park and its surroundings. A 2011 survey of Chitwan found that that Mikania is particularly prevalent in some of the preferred rhino habitats, such as wetlands, tall grasslands, and riverine forests. The plant also climbs and twines on crops, bushes, walls and fences, and its shoots can grow up to 27 millimeters a day. It is so vigorous that in a few months a single plant can cover over 25 square meters. Every year a single plant releases around 40,000 seeds that are then dispersed by wind, but can also travel on clothing or hair. Furthermore, its nodes root very easily.“It’s really strong, it’s like a vine, and if you pull it off the ground and it breaks it has a sort of a sticky, oily feel, and it’s difficult to remove,” said Abigail Sullivan, a research associate at Arizona State University’s Decision Center for a Desert City. Sullivan is an environmental social scientist who studied Mikania removal activities in community forests around the border of Nepal’s Chitwan National Park, the so-called “buffer zone”.“There are other invasive plants in Chitwan and in the Terai region that are almost as prevalent as Mikania, but they don’t cause quite the same issues,” she said.The plant, she explained, produces chemicals that inhibit the growth of other plants, and contains alkaloids that limit the amount of Mikania rhinos and other animals can successfully digest. Furthermore, it grows over grasses and small trees that people around Chitwan rely on to maintain farm animals and crops, and use for firewood and timber.On top of that, Mikania influences the movement of rhinos to other areas of the park, exacerbating human-wildlife conflict. “Mikania is taking more and more every year, [and there’s] less and less grass for the rhino to feed on, so the rhinos come out of the jungle and feeds on farmers’ crops,” explained Ghimire.Mikania is particularly prevalent in preferred rhino habitats like grasslands and riverine forests. Photo courtesy of courtesy of the research team of the Institute for Social and Environmental Research-Nepal.A recent study found that from 2003–2013 an average of 30 people per year were attacked by wild animals in and around Chitwan National Park, sustaining minor to fatal injuries. Rhinos were responsible for 126 attacks, 38 percent of the total incidents. Along with increasing animal populations and habitat improvements in the buffer zone, Mikania was cited as a potential cause of these attacks.According to the study, “[t]he increase in attacks in the buffer zone community forests and croplands … indicates that attacking animals, including rhinoceroses and bears, are moving out of the Park as it becomes increasingly difficult to find suitable food, shelter and breeding sites within the Park as a result of habitat destruction and human interference.”Still, Ghimire emphasized, local people love rhinos as they are seen as a part of their cultural heritage, and wildlife tourism helps to support their livelihoods. For this reason, area residents and conservationists are pulling together to fight this alien plant.“We do cleanings two times a year, and are working with local communities: we go there, we work with them, we teach them the techniques, and we expect them to collaborate in actually doing it,” said Ghimire.Mikania removal underway. The ease with which the plant re-roots means traditional removal methods can actually help the plant spread. Photo courtesy of the research team of the Institute for Social and Environmental Research-Nepal.But not everybody participates in efforts to remove Mikania. So, Sullivan and her colleagues embarked on a study to discover what factors are influencing locals’ participation. This research employed a survey with 1,041 households across 21 community forests in and near the park’s buffer zone, and took into account economic and geographic data as well. Findings show that people who are more dependent on community forest resources and perceive Mikania as a threat are more likely to engage in Mikania removal. But those factors, Sullivan says, don’t explain the whole picture.“There’s still a relatively low level of participation in Mikania removal: it’s somewhere around 30 percent.  So there’s so more to further understand why some people are choosing to participate and others are not.”The survey didn’t identify a single cause influencing people’s participation. But Sullivan did note that almost all the community members surveyed said they wished someone could tell them how to most effectively remove Mikania.People here have traditionally removed unwanted plants by pulling and uprooting or cutting and slashing, and then burning them. But since Mikania can reproduce both sexually (via seeds) and asexually (regrowing from stems), these methods can end up unintentionally distributing the plant.Mikania grows so vigorously that it chokes out native foliage. Photo courtesy of the research team of the Institute for Social and Environmental Research-Nepal.“All the methods they are using on other plants aren’t working on Mikania, so getting information out there is important, and also increasing community relationships between some of the NGOs in the area that have this information about Mikania removal is important because a lot of communities expressed distrust in NGOs, in the National Park, and in other organizations that have information that could help the communities.”This, Sullivan said, is because many believe money and resources are not always distributed fairly, or feel NGOs pursue their own agendas rather than working in the interest of local communities.The Mikania problem goes much deeper than just a lack of engagement in removal efforts. “The management techniques they use in the broader park are serving to support Mikania growth,” said Sean Murphy, invasive species expert at the Centre for Agriculture and Biosciences International, who in 2013 published a landmark study on the plant’s impact on rhino habitat in Chitwan.One of the major problems, he said, is that surrounding communities traditionally burn grassland to spur new grass growth. This promotes the spread of Mikania, because it is more efficient than native plants at making the most of the nutrients that are found in the soil after a burn.“One option would be to restrict burning of some areas important for the rhinoceros to once every few years; some controlled burning is important to maintain the grassland habitats in the longer term but further research is needed to determine the optimal regime for burning,” he wrote in his study. “Protection of areas from burning can be achieved by the use of fire breaks but the local communities and others who set fires need to be engaged in the plan, to avoid accidental burning of these areas.”Murphy added that people who go to the forest to collect resources often end up carrying Mikania into new areas. Moreover, conservationists still do not know what is the most efficient way to remove this plant, and removal efforts can inadvertently end up contributing to the spread and growth of the plant. One of the techniques being experimented with, says Murphy, is to bag and burn Mikania on the spot in a small pit rather than transporting it through the forest.“The interventions are based on what we know about the ecology of the plant and to keep interventions low-tech and based on what communities are familiar with and have resources to implement.”According to the 2015 census, 605 one-horned rhinoceros lived in Chitwan National Park, out of a total of 645 in Nepal. Photo by Nomad Tales via Flickr.Removal activities are being organized in community forests because here live the very people who directly benefit from a healthy environment, and experts agree that locals should play a pivotal role in the fight against invasive plants.“One of the things we are definitely working on is understanding how communities are already trying to tackle the Mikania problem,” said Abigail York, associate professor of governance and public policy at Arizona State University’s School of Human Evolution and Social Change.“These communities have been managing forests for hundreds of years, and in the community forests there are many vines that are native to Nepal that people go in and try to manage,” she said, highlighting that one of the major issues is that people simply cut the vines and then leave them on the ground. This is a problem with Mikania because the plant can re-root from even small stems.“It’s imperative that we understand what communities already do, and if possible just helping them modify those practices, not bringing in something completely new because in many of these communities they don’t have a lot of resources,” York said.Local communities are the ones on the frontline of this fight, she said, so removal activities should be tailored to them.“Expecting communities to completely change how they manage the resources would require a lot of probably money and training and other things that frankly we don’t have.” FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Isabel Estermanlast_img read more

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first_imgArticle published by dbettermann The services of pollinating animals are necessary for the reproduction of over 85 percent of flowering plants, and the majority of these pollinators are bees.Characteristics of individual bees, including their body size and tongue length, result in unique buzz signatures and allow for the study of the bee’s productivity.To help the productivity of bees’ pollination services, researchers have developed an inexpensive method of measuring each bee’s acoustics that will eventually be available for the public’s use. In a study published last month, Dr. Nicole E. Miller-Struttmann and a research team from the University of Missouri tested a new method to study bees–through acoustics.Pollinator species are in decline as habitat loss, climate change and exposure to pesticides affect their health and access to food resources.  Studies have concluded that 87.5 percent of flowering plants and 75 percent of commodity crops are pollinated by animal species, of which 200,000 are wild bees.With the decline of bee populations, the most effective pollinators, loss of their production services will be costly to native flowering plants and agriculture.Long-tongued bumble bee queens of Bombus balteatus visit flowers of the alpine skypilot Polemonium viscosum. These large bees have a distinctive flight buzz, the bee version of a cargo-plane flying from flower to flower. Photo credit: Zoe MaffettTo help combat the decline in bee populations, scientists and policymaking bodies, such as the Pollinator Health Task Force, are working towards methods for thorough and extensive population monitoring.According to the 2015 National Strategy to Promote the Health of Honey Bees and Other Pollinators, pollinators are responsible for the production of one in every three bites of food that we take and increase the value of agriculture in the U.S. by over $15 billion annually.“Unabated, these losses of our pollinators threaten agricultural production, the maintenance of natural plant communities, and the important services provided by those ecosystems, such as carbon cycling, flood and erosion control, and recreation,” the task force states in the Strategy document.Traditional vs. acoustic pollinator monitoring methodsTraditional, field-based methods of surveying bee populations provide delayed data, can be affected by weather and population sizes, and are limited to certain areas.Bumble bee worker resting on a microphone used to survey bumble bee activity and pollination services in high altitude meadows of Colorado. Photo credit: Elizabeth HedrickAccording Miller-Struttmann, bees are visually observed or collected through netting or traps in other studies, which could potentially kill the bee. Collecting data using these methods requires substantial time and expert knowledge.Acoustic monitoring has been used to monitor various animal groups, including bats, birds and whales. Because foraging bees can create vibrations, or “buzzes,” of between 120 and 400 hertz in flight, the researchers found that they could also apply acoustic monitoring to bee populations on Pennsylvania Mountain, Colorado.The data collected by harnessing a bee’s vibrations and using that to hone in on its location as well as its activity correlates to the bee’s productiveness in its natural environments.The research team collected the acoustic data using the Awesome Voice Recorder application on iPad Minis, amplified by microphones that Miller-Struttmann says cost five dollars to build.Using these iPads, the research team used an algorithm created based on Computational Auditory Scene Analysis to cut out background noise that wasn’t of interest and bring the buzzes to the foreground so that they could be counted.Acoustics allow for real-time monitoring over an entire foraging range, and the cost of the method is low enough to eventually be available to the common farmer or beekeeper in even the most remote locations. The method is also noninvasive and less harmful to the bees.Counting the bee’s buzzes: what do they mean?To get an idea of what most impacts pollination services, the researchers first looked at the bee’s physical traits. The researchers collected individual bees, measured their wing length to estimate the body size and buzz frequency data, and released the bees back into their collection location. They also collected tongue length data from published records.They found that both tongue length and body size influence which flowers a particular bee visits.Bees with longer tongues tend to visit long-tubed flowers, while short-tongued bees robbed nectar by feeding from holes in the flower without pollinating it, rather than entering into the flower’s natural bloomed openings. The bees with longer tongues have larger bodies and greater contact with the plant, so they will be more successful at pollinating.A bee approaches a bird-of-paradise flower in Costa Rica. Photo credit: Rhett A. ButlerThese traits that most affect bee pollination efficiency also result in unique acoustic signatures that can be deciphered to understand and monitor the bee’s activities.Miller-Struttmann and her team studied the relationship between physical characteristics and frequency of buzzes in flight of queen and workers of the bumblebees Bombus balteatus and B. sylvicola. Once they identified and counted the number of buzzes recorded at each location, the results were compared to the manually collected visual and auditory estimates and were found to match up.“Our results indicate that acoustic signals capture diversity in traits that mediate pollination success,” the study said. “Specifically, bee body size and tongue length predict characteristic frequency reflecting the phenotypic landscape of the community.”Real-life applicationThe acoustic monitoring method to study the productiveness of pollinating bees is inexpensive, time-efficient and could be used by beehive managers to measure their bees’ productivity.“We consider [this method] to be most cost effective in the amount of human hours, and although we don’t have a product that is readily available in stores, we’re trying to make it as inexpensive as possible,” Miller-Struttmann said.Miller-Struttman said that the team’s next step is to test their acoustic monitoring method in an agricultural setting, where the environment could differ from that of the wild populations that were monitored in the Colorado mountains. For example, the buzzing of increased fly populations in agricultural settings could displace the bees’ vibrations from the monitors.A bumblebee flies toward a yellow flower in Columbia. Miller-Struttman and her research team hope to make their acoustic monitoring devices easily and cheaply available. Photo credit: Rhett A. Butler“Farmers or managers can actually get real-time information about bee activity in their farms or wherever they’re monitoring,” Miller-Struttmann said. “It can tell them if they need to bring in more bees or if their bees are performing well.”Acoustic monitoring technology could also eventually allow scientists and farmers to detect and respond to bee population declines quickly or to enhance the success of wild pollinators with landscaping methods such as cover crops and no-till practices.Banner image is of a bumblebee on a Coneflower. Photo credit: alvaroreguly, Flickr.CitationsClark, C.W. & Fristrup, K.M. (2009) Advanced Technologies for Acoustic Monitoring of Bird Populations. Department of Defense Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP).DeLuca, P.A., Cox, D.A. and Vallejo-Marin, M. (2013) Comparison of Pollination and Defensive Buzzes in Bumblebees Indicates Species-Specific and Context-Dependent Vibrations. The Science of Nature. DOI 10.1007/s00114-014-1161-7.EPA.gov. Colony Collapse Disorder. https://www.epa.gov/pollinator-protection/colony-collapse-disorder.Frick, W.F. (2013) Acoustic Monitoring of Bats, Considerations of Options for Long-term Monitoring.  THERYA, 4: 69-78.Klein, A.M., Vaissière, B.E., Cane, J.H., Steffan-Dewenter, I. Cunningham, S.A., Kremen, C. and Tscharntke, T. (2007) Importance of Pollinators in Changing Landscapes for World Crops. Proceedings of the Royal Society, 274: 303-313.Lebuhn, G., Droege, S., Connor, E.F. Gemmill-Harren, B., Potts, S.G., Minckley, R.L., Griswold, T., Jean, R., Kula, E., Roubik, D.W., Cane, J., Wright, K.W., Frankie, G. and Parker, F. (2012) Detecting Insect Pollinator Declines on Regional and Global Scales. Society of Conservation Biology. 27: 113-120.Mellinger, D.K., Thode, A.M. and Martinez, A. (2003) Passive Acoustic Monitoring of Sperm Whales in the Gulf of Mexico, with a Model of Acoustic Detection Distance. Proceedings: Twenty-first Annual Gulf of Mexico Information Transfer Meeting. 493-501.Miller-Struttmann, N.E., Heise, D., Schul, J., Geib, J.C. and Galen, C. (2017) Flight of the Bumble Bee: Buzzes Predict Pollination Services. PLOS ONE, 12: 6Ollerton, J., Winfree, R. and Tarrant, S. (2011) How Many Flowering Plants are Pollinated by Animals? Oikos, 120: 321–326.Phys.org. (2015) Which Insects are the Best Pollinators? https://phys.org/news/2015-09-insects-pollinators.html.Pollinator Health Task Force (2015) National Strategy to Promote the Health of Honey Bees and Other Pollinators.Schwartz, J. (2016) Decline of Pollinators Poses Threat to World Food Supply, Report Says. The New York Times.Stout, J.C., Allen, J.A. and Goulson, D. (2000) Nectar Robbing, Forager Efficiency and Seed Set: Bumblebees Foraging on the Self-incompatible Plant Linaria vulgaris (Scrophulariaceae). Acta Oecologica, 21: 277-283.Wang, D. & Brown, G.J. (2006) Computational Auditory Scene Analysis, Chapter 1. The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. 1-36.Willmer, P.G. & Finlayson, K. (2014) Big Bees Do a Better Job: Intraspecific Size Variation Influences Pollination Effectiveness. Journal of Pollination Ecology, 14: 244-254. Acoustic, Analysis, Conservation, Invertebrates, Mobile, Monitoring, Portable, Research, Technology, Wildtech center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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first_imgArticle published by Sue Palminteri Artificial Intelligence, cameras, Citizen Science, data, Mobile, Research, Technology, Wildtech “Our image identification software (the feature in our app that we call “suggestions”) only works because of the photos and identifications provided by our community,” said Shepard. ”The more and better photos we have of a species, the better the software is at recognizing it. Conversely, without any photos to “train” on, the image identification software won’t work at all.“Once a species has 20 ”research grade” observations (photos for which the ID has been confirmed by at least two iNaturalist users), it is added to the computer vision network. Currently, the software is able to identify over 10,000 species, with a new species reaching that threshold and being added to the network every 1.7 hours. The software suggests identifications with varying degrees of certainty, ranging from species or genus to “we’re not confident enough to make a recommendation.” When the software is unable to suggest a species, users can then tap into the collective knowledge of the iNaturalist community, who are generally able to provide a more specific ID.User-designed projectsiNaturalist provides a platform for user-created Projects, which the website defines as “collections of observations with a common purpose.” One of the most common types of projects is a bioblitz – an event during which citizen scientists come together to document as many taxa as possible in a specific area. The United Nations recently sponsored a worldwide bioblitz for World Environment Day. Over 13 days, nearly 10,000 iNaturalist users from around the world made over 100,000 observations of 19,627 species. Another popular project documents roadkill sightings, while others help to track the spread of invasive species. Any iNaturalist user can create a Project with his or her own specific guidelines, such as limiting observations to specific locations or taxa.A red-backed vole photographed by visitors to Alaska, USA. Photo credit: Sue PalminteriUsers are also able to create Guides that document and provide more extensive information on the taxa present in a specific area. Guides can cover an area as large as continent or provide detailed information on the organisms that frequent a local park.Contributions to global biodiversity assessmentsLoarie described the initial vision of iNaturalist as providing a platform “to connect people to nature through technology.” However, said Loarie, “as iNaturalist has grown, we’ve also realized that it’s an increasingly important tool for scaling scientific research. With iNaturalist, we strive to simultaneously engage and educate the public while also generating scalable streams of research quality data for science and conservation.”iNaturalist has proven to be an effective tool for documenting Earth’s biodiversity. Loarie reported that in 2016, “over 90% of all North American, non-bird records uploaded to the Global Biodiversity Information Facility were generated from iNaturalist.” In addition, multiple species have been discovered or re-discovered using the iNaturalist app. For example, in 2014 a snail that had not been observed since the voyages of Captain Cook in the 1700s was rediscovered after a photo was uploaded by an iNaturalist user.iNaturalist Species page for the Spotted Tussock Moth. User annotations for life stage have created a robust life stage seasonality graph representing the number of observations each month of adult moths (in orange) and larvae (in blue). Image credit: iNaturalistA recent update to the app allows users to add annotations for Life Stage, Plant Phenology and Sex to their observations. For some species, this has already resulted in robust Seasonality graphs that show clear patterns in the timing and locations that stages or sexes of individual species are seen.Globally, biodiversity data are skewed geographically, with the bulk of observations representing North America and Europe, and across taxa — some species are simply easier to observe and found in locations that are easier to access. The data generated by the iNaturalist community are no exception and, as a result, this bias is also present in the new computer vision technology. According to Shepard, “one of the limitations of this approach is that the software isn’t great at recognizing species that our community hasn’t photographed and identified. If we want the image identification software to be a globally successful biodiversity monitoring tool, we need more photographs and more identifications of more species from around the world.”Loarie added, “iNaturalist can only be used to collect occurrence or presence-only data but not presence-absence or abundance data. We’re currently working to better understand the implications of sampling biases in estimates of distribution, phenology, and relative abundance from these data. eBird is a great example of a citizen science platform that has managed to collect not just occurrences but also presence-absence and abundance data for birds.”A curious short-eared owl flying by in Virgina, USA. Photo credit: George PowellThe importance of a growing iNaturalist communityDarwin’s finches are notoriously difficult to identify, with subtle variations in beak size and shape the only differences among most of the species. In addition, the birds have been shown to evolve rapidly in response to environmental changes. Still, for a visitor to the Galapagos islands equipped with a smartphone or camera, iNaturalist could provide some help– the small, medium and large ground finches have all crossed the magic 20 photo threshold and are in the computer vision network. For the other 10 finches, it’s likely that the iNaturalist community would be standing by to provide suggestions. Another option – consulting iNaturalist’s crowd-sourced place guide for the Galapagos.The iNaturalist app’s new automatic ID feature is a useful tool for anyone interested in identifying and learning more about the organisms they see in their local environment. As more people consult the app while exploring their surroundings, its usefulness will continue to grow. In the words of Grant van Horn, one of iNaturalist’s collaborators at Visipedia, “The model that is shipped with the iNaturalist app is only as good as the data that the iNaturalist community generates. While not an explicit limitation, this relationship means that improved automated classifiers will only come about with an actively engaged community that continues to collect data and explore the world.” The nearly 500,000 users in the iNaturalist network have uploaded over 6.5 million photo observations of more than 120,000 species of plants, animals, insects and fungi.The network provides a platform for collaboration and discussion among users, while also generating a stream of research quality biodiversity data.A recent update to the smartphone app utilizes computer vision to provide immediate taxonomic identifications for user-submitted photos, with varying degrees of specificity.The computer vision network requires a large database of identified images to learn the distinctive features of each species; every photo observation uploaded to iNaturalist and identified by the community helps to improve the coverage and accuracy of the automatic identification feature. Taxonomy goes online in the 21st centuryCharles Darwin’s theory of evolution by natural selection was developed in large part from the observations and collections of plants, animals and fossils that he made in the Galapagos islands and other stops during his voyage aboard the HMS Beagle. However, Darwin was an amateur naturalist unable to identify many of the species he recorded while on the islands. He sought the help of expert taxonomists in England, who were able to identify the organisms he collected and shipped to them.Perhaps most famous are Darwin’s finches, which the ornithologist John Gould classified into 13 distinct species. Darwin initially paid very little attention to these small birds, which he mis-identified as a collection of finches, blackbirds and “gross-beaks.”  It wasn’t until he returned to England over a year later and met with Gould that he learned of their actual identity – a realization that strongly influenced his conclusions about natural selection.John Gould’s drawing of the beak differences that distinguish Darwin’s finches.For today’s amateur naturalists, the iNaturalist online platform has greatly reduced the effort and time needed to obtain an accurate taxonomic identification. Rather than capturing, preserving and shipping a specimen to an expert, iNaturalist users just need to snap a photo with their camera or smartphone and upload it. From there, computer vision technology takes over to suggest an identification within a few seconds.iNaturalist was launched in 2008 as a Master’s project by students from the University of California, Berkeley School of Information and has since grown into a community of nearly 500,000 users who, collectively, have captured more than 6.5 million observations of over 120,000 species of plants, animals, insects and fungi.Until recently, photo observations that users uploaded to the iNaturalist platform were identified solely through crowdsourcing. Users can choose to provide an Identity (or ID, a common name or scientific name) for their observation, which is then either confirmed, improved or questioned by other members of the community. In this way, iNaturalist provides a platform for collaboration and discussion among people who share common interests and want to learn more about their local environment.Map of the distribution of over 2.5 million research-grade iNaturalist observations in the Global Biodiversity Information Facility open database. Image credit: iNaturalistThe platform also connects users with experts who provide identifications in their area of interest. For example, Greg Lasley, an expert birder, has provided a bird ID for over 100,000 observations uploaded by other users. The rapidly growing number of observations has begun to overwhelm this community of users who provide IDs. It takes an average of 18 days for an observation to be identified by the community, though the wait time is less than two days for half of all observations, mainly those of common species or in areas with many users, such as the West Coast of the U.S.Tech for training a computer as a taxonomistTo help minimize the number of organisms going unidentified, iNaturalist recently collaborated with Visipedia to develop artificial intelligence software that provides an immediate ID for an observation. In an e-mail to Mongabay-Wildtech, Dr. Scott Loarie, Co-Director of iNaturalist, explained, “We’ve recently worked with the Visipedia team to use the iNaturalist database of over 5.5 million observations to train up a computer vision neural network to automatically identify species.”What exactly is ‘computer vision’?  It’s the technology that social media websites like Facebook use in their facial recognition software and that some cars use to detect pedestrians in their path. However, identifying a human-shaped object is much simpler than differentiating butterfly species. In an e-mail to Mongabay-Wildtech, Alex Shepard, iNaturalist’s Mobile Applications Developer, emphasized the need for a large database of quality images to effectively teach the software the distinctive visual features of different species.center_img The iNaturalist app allows users to upload unidentified photos from a smartphone (left). Its artificial intelligence software offers a species suggestion for this photo (right). Once the species identification is confirmed by another user, the observation will be elevated to ”Research Grade.” Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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first_imgAprès le match nul (1-1) vendredi soir entre les deux actuels montants de la Promotion d’honneur, Rodange et Mühlenbach, l’ailier de Mühlenbach, Rachid Boulahfari, a reçu un texto visiblement très limite émanant d’un des dirigeants du club rodangeois.Ce SMS indiquerait en des termes à l’extrême limite de la décence et du racisme ordinaire que Mühlenbach avait cherché… à acheter le gardien rodangeois.Mis au fait de ce message par le joueur lui-même, qui l’a reçu lundi matin, les dirigeants de Mühlenbach ont pris le problème à bras le corps. Se disant outrés des propos tenus dans ce message, ils ont saisi la FLF et envisagent même de porter l’affaire bien plus haut. Partager LQlast_img read more

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first_imgWESTERN BUREAU: After defeating Montego Bay United FC 3-1 in Monday night’s Red Stripe Premier League fixture at the Montego Bay Sports Complex, Portmore United’s head coach, Jeffrey Hewitt, believes his team’s 3-1 victory proved they can adapt and still remain razor sharp. Hewitt employed a counter-attacking style in the second half as MBU had them pinned inside their half for the majority of the second half of a thrilling match, to come away with a result that put them back atop the standings with only three regular season games left in the schedule. “We knew how this Montego Bay team plays and we wanted to catch them on the break, which we did twice, as we can play counter-attacking football too, and we demonstrated that and got three goals for it,” said Hewitt. He said his core of players can play from the bench as well as from the start and whenever summoned they are ready to perform, which oftentimes ends in a good result for the team. Hewitt’s three second-half substitutes played key roles in Monday night’s victory, but Hewitt said they remain focused on the upcoming games and the semi-finals. Ricardo Morris fired Portmore into a fifth-minute lead, which they held way into the second half when substitute Mark Alves doubled the score in the 72nd minute. Tramaine Stewart made the game safe for Portmore when he scored in the 76th minute. CRISP SCORING FORM Owayne Gordon continued his crisp scoring form by netting in the 86th minute. However, it was the only goal MBU would muster on a night when they dominated the ball-possession statistic. Already assured a semi-final place, Portmore, according to Hewitt, went about embellishing their head-to-head record against MBU, posting a third win over their title-chasing rivals in emphatic style and now have eyes peeled on the bonus $1 million for the team ending the regular season with the most points. Portmore lead the standings with 57 points, one clear of MBU, and followed by defending champions Arnett Gardens FC (54). UWI FC (42), Humble Lion FC (41) and Harbour View (39) are also in a keen battle for the final semi-final spot. “We are taking it one step at a time. From this game, we will now concentrate on the next game and hope it gets us where we need to be at the end,” Hewitt stated.last_img read more

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first_imgDear Editor,Our attention was drawn to a letter published in the newspapers authored by Mr. Nigel Hinds, Auditor and Financial Consultant.We wish to clarify that the opinions expressed in that letter are not those of our company. We continue to hold Mr. Hinds in high professional esteem, and he remains our auditor.However, we were advised by our investors to retain additional professional assistance for the purpose of satisfying the legal requirements for the Casino Licence for which we have applied.Our decision to retain additional professional assistance was therefore in no way at the instance of the Gaming Authority.Yours faithfully,Sleepin InternationalHotel and Casino Inc.last_img read more

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first_imgThe Country Director of the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) has lauded the people of Bomi County for the level of progress made in combating the deadly Ebola virus disease (EVD).  Dr. Kamil Kamaluddeen said he was pleased that the county level support provided by the UNDP to Bomi and other counties has immensely helped in the EVD response in the country.   “We are here to monitor the progress that we are making with the support that the UNDP has been providing to Bomi County at the local level in response to the EVD,” Dr. Kamaluddeen said in Tubmanburg, Bomi County recently during a fact finding visit.  He said the UN specialized Agency — UNDP — has provided support, based on the request from the county leadership. “We are happy that UNDP support has helped in creating the necessary awareness that is being traced to the progress that Bomi has made.”He further stated that the progress seen in the county was as a result of the collective work of the community, the government through the local authorities and development partners, both local and international.The UNDP-Liberia boss indicated that UNDP would remain supportive of the government’s national Ebola response and other programs.“We were here supporting the national response and we’ll still be here. Already, we are working with the Ministry of Internal Affairs and the government as a whole to support the new momentum that has been given to the decentralization process,” he disclosed.UNDP has supported the county leadership in the areas of training for county health teams and logistics to boost contact tracing, social mobilization and sensitization in remote and inaccessible districts and communities in the county.During the field mission, the UNDP Country Director and team visited Bomi Hospital and the Ebola Treatment Unit in Tubmanburg.According to Dr. Nisar Ulkhak, the Medical Director at the ETU, when Dr. Kamaluddeen and other visited, there was no EVD patient and the last suspected patient had left the ETU two days earlier after being tested negative.Dr. Ulkhak said since the facility was opened, a total of 63 cases were admitted at the unit. He said at the peak of the Ebola epidemic, the ETU had over 100 patients, 20 of whom were confirmed positive, 9 survived and eleven died.  “We are happy with what we have seen and what we’ve been told by the Superintendent. I was happy visiting the ETU to know that there are no patients there at the moment and the last case they had was not an EVD confirmed case,” Dr. Kamaluddeen said.The 50-bed ETU was jointly built by engineers of the US Marine and the Armed Forces of Liberia (AFL). It served the entire western region of Liberia, including Bomi, Grand Cape Mount and Gbarpolu Counties.The Unit commenced operations on November 28, 2014 under the management of the International Organization for Migration (IOM).  Before the center opened, there were about 200 suspected and/or confirmed Ebola cases in Bomi. Many of them reportedly died while awaiting treatment.By the time the center was opened, the country was down to fewer than 100 cases per week, from a peak of more than 300. By December, the number had dropped to fewer than 30 cases per week.Bomi was one of the most affected counties during the peak of the epidemic recording high infections. Today, it symbolizes the declined trends in the EVD transmission.Meanwhile, the UNDP Administrator, Helen Clark is expected to officially visit the three countries most affected by the Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone from 11-18 February. The visit is to affirm the UN’s continued commitment to addressing the ongoing crisis, and support for the recovery process.During her visit in Liberia which runs from 13-16 February  the UNDP Administrator will hold discussions with President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, the UN Family, the Ebola Incident Management System and the donor community.Ms. Clark is expected to participate in a signing ceremony of a Social Safety Net Cash Transfer Program between UNDP and the Government of Liberia through the Ministries of Gender, Children and Social Protection and Internal Affairs, scheduled to take place in Bomi County.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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