first_imgArticle published by Glenn Scherer Animals, Apes, Biodiversity, Bushmeat, Chimpanzees, China wildlife trade, Conservation, Corruption, Endangered Species, Environment, Environmental Crime, Environmental Law, Featured, Forests, Great Apes, Hunting, Illegal Trade, Law, Law Enforcement, Mammals, Orangutans, Over-hunting, Pet Trade, Primates, Rainforests, Tropical Forests, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.The Chimelong Safari Park in Guangzhou is one of China’s biggest animal attractions. On its website — the source of this photo — the park claims to be the “largest wild animal theme park in the world” with a collection of more than 20,000 “rare animals.” Asian zoos, circuses and safari parks are mounting large-scale productions with costumed, dancing, roller-skating great apes. Investigations show that nearly all of these trained primates were not bred in captivity, but illegally traded out of Africa and Indonesia, with destinations in China, Thailand and other Asian countries.The United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) estimates that the illegal trade may have removed as many as 22,218 great apes from the wild between 2005-2011. An estimated 64 percent were chimpanzees, whereas 56 percent of great apes seized by authorities were thought to be orangutans.Wild young apes are traumatized by their capture, and many die along the supply chain, or with their final “owners” by whom they are frequently poorly treated. Young great apes trained in captivity become increasingly unmanageable as they age, and many are “retired” to tiny, solitary cages, or simply disappear.Trafficking arrests are rare. UNEP recorded just 27 arrests in Africa and Asia between 2005-2011, over which time more than 1,800 cases of illegally trafficked great apes were documented, with many more undetected. Solutions are in the works, but time is running out for the world’s great apes if they are to be conserved. Boxing orangutans at Safari World in Bangkok, Thailand. Video courtesy of PEGAScenter_img After 146 years of operation, Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey is closing its circus, citing dwindling ticket sales. That decline in business reflects a growing sentiment among Americans that circus-style shows involve inappropriate, if not inhumane, treatment of animals, says Julia Gallucci, a primatologist who works with People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA).That sentiment is not, however, current in many parts of Asia, where certain countries are seeing a rise in circuses and other forms of animal-focused entertainment.A growing number of Asian zoos and safari parks are mounting large-scale productions that feature great apes — with young chimpanzees and orangutans commonly forced to pose with visitors in clownish costumes, or to “ape” human behaviors, dancing and roller skating to entertain audiences. By contrast, Ringling halted its great ape performances in the early 1990s.Training techniques and conditions in captivity at these Asian zoos and parks are raising serious animal welfare concerns, while the illegal trade used to procure endangered great apes for Asian entertainment is a red flag for wildlife conservationists.China’s Shanghai Wild Animal Park. Photo by China-based NGO that asked to remain anonymousWild, not captive-bredIn theory, Asian zoos and wildlife parks should be able to breed great apes in captivity or legally acquire captive-bred animals from abroad for their shows. But, as evidence reported below suggests, many of the animals appearing in Asian performances have been, and continue to be, illegally snatched from the wild as infants.TRAFFIC, the international wildlife trade monitoring network, recently published a report detailing the demand for apes in wildlife attractions in Peninsular Malaysia and Thailand. It shows that a significant proportion of great apes in these attractions come from the wild or are of unknown origin due to sketchy recordkeeping. The authors found, for instance, that while 57 Thai facilities exhibited 51 orangutans, their studbooks only showed records for 21 of the animals.Likewise, a China-based animal welfare group — that prefers anonymity for the sake of ongoing undercover investigations — believes that the majority of great apes in Chinese animal shows originated in the wild; in fact, some shows even publicize that the chimpanzees they feature began their lives in Africa.Although two Chinese ministries ban the use of animals in circus shows, the animal welfare group has recorded 11 Chinese safari parks or zoos using chimpanzees in performances. Of these, at least six have featured wild-caught chimpanzees.Daniel Stiles manages the Project to End Great Ape Slavery (PEGAS), and has been investigating the great ape trade for four years. He’s made several trips to the Middle East, China and Southeast Asia since 2013, where he’s observed an increase in circus-style shows featuring chimpanzees and orangutans.International Circus in Zhuhai, China. Photo by anonymous sourceChina’s circus shows are the most sophisticated and large-scale, says Stiles, and they attract massive crowds. Over the recent Chinese New Year, the Chimelong Group reportedly welcomed 30 million visitors to its parks in a single day.The TRAFFIC study and other undercover investigations in China demonstrate that shows featuring animal performances are indeed widespread, but not necessarily that zoo and circus owners are acting in knowing disregard of international trafficking laws. Chinese importers are probably complicit, but even they could, theoretically, be ignorant of breaking the law because falsification of records has only been proven on the African end of the supply chain. Chinese and Thai officials did not respond to requests for comment for this story.Traumatized “photo props” and performersYoung great apes are initially traumatized when captured in Africa, then again by being trafficked (often without adequate food or care) to Asia. They are subsequently housed at zoos, circuses and animal parks in reportedly appalling conditions — deprived of proper attention, affection, and the company of other apes, something that is required for healthy development among these social species. Severe training regimens only compound the trauma.Great apes taken from the wild as infants are exceptionally vulnerable. And their first year of life is critical to their healthy development, explains Stephen Ross, Director of the Lester E. Fisher Center for the Study and Conservation of Apes at the Lincoln Park Zoo in Chicago.Asian animal attraction trainers typically break-in young chimpanzees and orangutans at just several months of age as photo props, reports Stiles. The animals are made to appear with visitors for a fee. Then, as the primates age, they’re trained to perform in shows that feature unnatural tricks ranging from faux-boxing matches to dance circles.Chimpanzees are social learners, explains Gallucci, so young chimps in captivity often mimic their keepers’ behaviors. However, Gallucci and Ross both believe that the training required for choreographed primate shows almost always requires animal abuse.Stiles agrees: “To train these animals to perform, keepers would almost certainly [need to] beat the animals into submission, rewarding good behavior with food, which means they’re not only traumatized: they’re also likely underfed.”A skating chimp at Yangcheng Safari Park just outside of Changzhou, China. Photo by China-based NGO that asked to remain anonymousRoss has extensively studied captive chimpanzee behavior, comparing that of chimps kept as pets or performers in early years against behaviors exhibited by animals that have had greater exposure to other chimpanzees while young. He found that adult chimps reared by people, and with limited exposure to other apes, are less extroverted as adults — even after years of enjoying improved conditions, like those offered by sanctuaries. This tendency toward introversion disrupts the animal’s ability to properly socialize with other chimpanzees. The resulting loss of wild tendencies means there is zero chance of these primates ever being safely returned to the wild.As importantly, Ross also discovered a major difference between how audiences perceive performance animals and their wild counterparts — with familiarity leading to a diminished belief in the urgency for conservation.In one study, researchers found that audiences who often saw chimps in commercials and on TV automatically assumed that these “common” animals were more numerous and less endangered than other great ape species. It seems likely that if Asian show-goers make the same leap in logic, they will struggle to understand the need for great ape conservation or to perceive the detrimental effects animal attractions have on captive primates.As apes grow older, they become less desirable to their masters. Adult primates are more difficult to control, not to mention stronger, which makes them more dangerous to the public and keepers.Adult chimpanzees are particularly hazardous: in 2009, a pet chimpanzee living in Connecticut attacked a friend of its owner, nearly killing her. (The event helped shift American attitudes away from the desirability of keeping pet chimps).TRAFFIC wonders what happens to Asia’s performing apes once they enter “retirement,” stating in its Apes in Demand Report, “It [is] unclear what happens to animals once they are too old for these activities.” If animal photo opportunities and performances continue to be legal across Asia, TRAFFIC recommends that facilities notify a country’s relevant authority once the animal is being retired, detailing future “care and housing.”Photojournalist and investigator Karl Ammann contends that Asia’s performing apes are often “retired” to tiny, solitary cages; others, he says, simply disappear. The lucky ones spend the remainder of their lives in animal sanctuaries.Traffickers in the Ivory Coast took this video to show potential buyers they had infant chimpanzees for sale, a video which PEGAS secured. Photo courtesy of PEGASThe scale of the tradeGreat ape trafficking is believed to be vastly underreported, and its usually illegal nature makes it difficult to quantify. In a 2013 report, Stolen Apes, the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) identified 1,808 great apes taken from the wild illegally between 2005-2011, but those were only documented cases. Far more surely entered the black market without a trace; likewise, multiple studies show that more animals die during the hunt or in transit than are ever confiscated.In its report, TRAFFIC notes that, “the number of apes that appear in trade is thought to be far smaller than the quantity that die in the process of capture and transit and with the final consumer.” Hard data is difficult to come by, but TRAFFIC asserts that deaths occur at every stage of the chain, from capture to transit to arrival with the ultimate buyer.The UNEP report echoes these points, stating, “It is likely that these numbers are in fact a gross underestimation of the real impact of the illegal trade.” To improve monitoring, UNEP urges governments and NGOs to work together to keep and share records.When it comes to wild-caught chimpanzees, their intimate social organization means that a large number of adults are killed for every infant that is captured. A BBC investigation discovered that 10 adult chimpanzees are typically killed when one infant is snatched from the wild. UNEP concluded that up to 15 great apes die for every individual that enters the illegal trade. Adults are typically shot and processed as bushmeat for local consumption, or their meat is shipped to urban cities, and possibly as far away as Europe. Adult skulls and body parts are also sold and transported via the illicit supply chain.Great ape trafficking is a worsening problem in countries like Cameroon, as human activity expands into great ape habitats via logging roads, and as more forests are converted to oil palm plantations and clear cut for other uses in Africa and Southeast Asia. As opportunities for encountering and taking animals from the wild rise, so does the likelihood that impoverished hunters as well as sophisticated, often heavily armed, poachers will seek out great apes for capture and sale to criminal trafficking networks.A source who elected to remain anonymous for fear of disrupting ongoing covert investigations took this photo of two costume-clad chimpanzees forced to dance for guests at China’s Heifei Wildlife ParkUNEP estimates that the illegal trade may have removed as many as 22,218 great apes from the wild between 2005-2011. An estimated 64 percent were chimpanzees, whereas 56 percent of great apes seized by authorities were orangutans. Chimpanzees, with whom we share 98 percent of our DNA, are Endangered, with a global population as low as 150,000 animals, according to the World Wildlife Fund (WWF). Orangutans are faring worse: they are Critically Endangered, and WWF estimates that just under 120,000 remain in the wild. However, Orangutan Foundation International points out that actual numbers could be considerably lower.Worryingly, UNEP believes that the great ape trade is continuing to grow, to the obvious detriment of wild populations. Some of that growth is fueled by the high demand for young primates as pets (often in the Middle East) or as performing animals in Asia.Traversing the legal landscape The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) is an international treaty that came into effect in 1975 to ensure that trade in wild plants and animals doesn’t negatively impact their survival. Currently, 183 countries are signatories; all are required to enact domestic laws to bring the treaty into effect.In a 2014 report, law firm DLA Piper noted that, although all signatories have passed some type of legislation to meet CITES requirements, these national laws sometimes fall far short of what’s needed, contain legal loopholes, or are poorly enforced.Too often, arrests are few and far between. UNEP found, for example, that only 27 arrests were made in Africa and Asia between 2005-2011, over which time more than 1,800 great apes were documented as being illegally trafficked. Prosecutions are uncommon, and sentences are often insignificant, so fail to deter future criminal activity. As a result, the illegal wildlife trade is flourishing. It is now considered the fourth most valuable form of illicit trade (behind drugs, guns, and human trafficking), per DLA Piper’s report.Keeper and infants in China’s Chimelong Safari Park. Photo by anonymous sourceGreat ape as “photo prop”: A visitor and baby chimp at Bangkok’s Samutprakarn Crocodile Farm and Zoo. Photo by PEGASAs with a range of species, it is important to note that some of the great ape trade occurs legally. Species protected by CITES are listed on three appendices — I, II, and II. Appendix I covers species threatened with extinction, specimens which can’t be traded internationally unless imported for non-commercial purposes. Species that could become extinct in the absence of closely controlled trade are listed on Appendix II. Although all great ape species are listed on Appendix I, they can be legally traded as if they were on Appendix II if they were bred in captivity at facilities registered with CITES.But traders often game the CITES system, sometimes exporting great apes by falsifying permits — claiming the animals they’re selling were captive-bred when they were in fact wild caught. According to Ammann, widespread corruption makes falsification easy.Between 2009-2011, China imported most of its great apes from Guinea, using permits stating that all traded animals were captive-bred. Conservationists knew, however, that Guinea didn’t have any ape breeding facilities, so they asked CITES to intervene. In fact, “CITES has not registered any chimpanzee or orangutan breeding facilities for commercial purposes,” anywhere in the world explains Juan Carlos Vasquez, the chief of the organization’s legal and compliance unit.After conducting an investigation, CITES concluded that Guinea was falsifying permits to illegally export wild-caught apes. As a result, CITES suspended all commercial trade in CITES-listed species with Guinea in 2013, and the head of Guinea’s CITES Management Authority was subsequently arrested for fraudulently issuing permits (he was convicted but subsequently pardoned by the country’s President).China, at the other end of the Guinea chimpanzee supply chain, suffered no consequences for these violations, and authorities there insisted they were unaware that the imported animals were wild-caught. However, both Stiles and Ammann suspect China was complicit. Regardless, any legal action against China could only have been initiated by the Chinese themselves under their domestic laws, since the importation had already occurred.Like China, Thailand is a CITES signatory that has passed domestic conservation legislation, but Thai law doesn’t protect the great majority of non-native species. And when someone is caught possessing a legally protected animal or plant, the burden of proof is on the Thai state rather than the individual to show legal importation. According to TRAFFIC, Thailand is currently drafting new legislation that would, if passed, protect non-native species. During a January 2016 CITES Standing Committee meeting, the international organization encouraged all countries to eliminate loopholes of this kind.Creative solutionsA range of individuals and organizations are developing and utilizing creative tactics to fight wildlife crime. There are new technologies under development — ranging from citizen reporting apps, to DNA testing kits for use in the field, as well as databases that track wildlife trafficking in real-time.New York University is working on an innovative web crawler that mines online web postings for animal and wildlife product sales. Stiles warns, however, that the crawler’s application may be limited since transactions involving live animals typically occur on social media platforms rather than websites. Social media has lately proven to be a prime way of connecting illegal great ape sellers with buyers, especially in the Middle East.In July 2015, the Wildlife Justice Commission (WJC) was quietly launched in The Hague. This non-profit seeks to “activate justice” by supporting national governments as they investigate and prosecute wildlife crime.Keeper and infant great ape at China’s Chimelong Safari Park. Photo courtesy of PEGASWhen dialogue with national governments fails, the WJC can hold hearings in The Hague in which independent, impartial experts review cases of wildlife crime. Unlike other judicial bodies, however, such as the International Courts of Justice, Commission hearings are not legally binding. They do, however, shine a light on wildlife crime and provide recommendations for actions to curb it.“CITES is merely an international treaty, so we must work on the country level,” explains Executive Director Olivia Swaak-Goldman. “Through collaborative investigations and public tribunals, we hope to put an end to wildlife crime. After all, time is running out.”The sobering reality: so long as there is public demand for boxing and dancing chimps, or photo ops available with orangutans in Asia, there will be poachers and traffickers willing to bear the legal risk of providing those animals, importers willing to forge documents to get great apes from abroad, and showmen willing to keep (and mistreat) them.If great apes are to be conserved, then the Asian public will need to come to the same conclusion as Americans — that these primates don’t belong on roller skates or in boxing rings; they belong in the wild. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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first_imgAnimals, Anti-poaching, Big Cats, Cats, China wildlife trade, Endangered Species, Featured, Hunting, Leopards, Mammals, National Parks, Poaching, Predators, Protected Areas, Saving Species From Extinction, Snares, Tigers, Top Predators, Wildlife, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Jeremy Hance An incredible image of a tiger snarling in 2005 in the park. Probably one of the last individuals to survive there. How it perished no one knows. Photo by: WCS-Laos.Citations:Gray, T.N.E., Hughes, A.C., Laurance, W.F. et al. The wildlife snaring crisis: an insidious and pervasive threat to biodiversity in Southeast Asia. Biodivers Conserv (2018) 27: 1031. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10531-017-1450-5Johnson, A., Goodrich, J., Hansel, T., Rasphone, A., Saypanya, S., Vongkhamheng, C., Venevongphet & Strindberg, S. 2016. To protect or neglect? Design, monitoring, and evaluation of a law enforcement strategy to recover small populations of wild tigers and their prey. Biological Conservation, 202: 99-109.Rasphone, A., Kéry, M., Kamler, J.F., Macdonald, D.W., Documenting the demise of tiger and leopard, and the status of other carnivores and prey, in Lao PDR’s most prized protected area: Nam et – Phou louey, Global Ecology and Conservation (2019), doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gecco.2019.e00766 . A sun bear, one of the park’s remaining large mammals. Photo: Akchousanh Rasphone, WildCRU, WCS-Laos. A new camera trap study finds that tigers vanished from Nam Et-Phou Louey National Protected Area by 2014, their last stand in Laos.Leopards were killed off 10 years prior, making these big cats also extinct in Laos.Scientists believe it’s most likely that the last tigers and leopards of Laos succumbed to snares, which are proliferating in astounding numbers across Southeast Asian protected areas.The Indochinese tiger now only survives in Thailand and Myanmar, and may be on the edge of extinction. The last tiger in Lao PDR likely died in terrible anguish. Its foot caught in a snare, the animal probably died of dehydration. Or maybe, in a desperate bid to free itself from a snare crafted from a simple and cheap motorbike cable, it tore off a leg and died from the blood loss. Perhaps the Indochinese tiger (Panthera tigris corbetti), a distinct subspecies, was able to free itself from the snare, only to have the wound fester and kill it in the end. Or, and this isn’t impossible either, the last tiger of Lao PDR (or Laos) was simply shot to death by poachers who then butchered its body and sold its parts in the illegal trafficking trade to feed a seemingly insatiable demand for tiger bits and bones for sham medicine or status symbols.However it died, it probably wasn’t peaceful.A new paper in Global Conservation and Ecology finds that the last tigers of Laos vanished shortly after 2013 from Nam Et-Phou Louey National Protected Area. And the scientists believe it was most likely a surge in snaring that did them in, despite large-scale investments in the park, relative to the region. With the loss of tigers in Laos’s largest protected area, the tiger is most likely extinct in Laos, as it probably is in both Cambodia and Vietnam. That’s an area significantly larger than Texas in Southeast Asia that’s now bereft of its proper top predator.One of the first tigers photographed during a baseline survey. This photo is from 2003 about ten years before tigers would vanish. Photo by: WCS-Laos.And the tiger isn’t the only victim: the researchers also believe Indochinese leopards (Panthera pardus delacouri) are extinct in Laos now, wiped out from Nam Et-Phou Louey and other protected areas by the same snaring crisis.This tragedy is simply another sign of industrial-scale “empty forest” syndrome across Southeast Asia, as poachers with guns and snares continue to wipe out animal populations, targeting anything the size of a mouse or sparrow and larger.In the early 2000s, conservationists saw Nam-Et Phou Louey National Protected Area as a major priority, given it still had populations of tiger, leopard and many other large mammals that had increasingly gone extinct across Southeast Asia. At the time, it was dubbed one of the most important tiger populations in the region.In 2003 and 2004, conservationists believed there were at least seven tigers in Nam-Et Phou Louey and maybe up to 23. New conservation strategies, including increased law enforcement and working with local communities, were jump started in 2005. But by 2013, researchers found only two tigers on camera trap. And no tiger has been seen since.“This represented a sharp decline and extirpation of tigers in Nam-Et Phou Louey in only 10 years,” says lead author Akchousanh Rasphone, with the Wildlife Research Conservation Unit, known as WildCRU, at the University of Oxford.“We’ve looked at various factors for the decline, such as prey numbers and amount of guns confiscated in the park, and the only factor that seems directly related to the tiger decline was the exponential increase in snares,” she added.Camera traps find no tigers or leopardsRasphone and her colleagues systematically surveyed the park from 2013 to 2017 with camera traps in what they describe as the largest endeavor of its kind ever conducted in Laos.Their survey found no leopards at all; the last one was recorded in 2004. And the last two tigers simply vanished after 2013, denoting they were most likely killed either by snare or gun.When asked if they could have missed tigers on the camera traps, Rasphone said, “If tigers are using an area, then typically they’re easily photographed in cameras set along trails.”An Indochinese leopard photographed in Nam Et-Phou Louey National Park. Poachers wiped leopards out of the park before tigers. This animal was photographed in 2003 and was probably one of the very last leopards in Laos. Photo by: WCS-Laos.Tigers are massive, easily distinguished from other animals, tend to use well-trodden paths, and cover huge areas of territory, making photographing them far easier than many other more cryptic species on camera.The only other place in Laos tigers were thought to maybe persist was Nakai-Nam Thuem National Biodiversity Conservation Area.“Recent camera trapping in Nakai-Nam Thuen suggests that tiger, leopard, clouded leopard, and golden cats have now been extirpated from this protected area,” said a conservationist who spoke on the condition of anonymity.So, tigers are very likely gone from Laos, just as they have recently been wiped out from Cambodia and Vietnam. Given all the attention and money for tigers, how did this happen?Again.What the #!*&*$ happened?Jessica Hartel, the director of the Kibale Snare Removal Program in Uganda, told me in 2015 that snares are “the landmines of the forest.”“Like landmines, snares do not discriminate, are virtually undetectable, and can cause irreversible permanent physical damage within a split second,” she said. “Like landmines, snares are unforgiving death traps that cause pain, suffering, and mutilation. Like landmines, snares are detonated automatically by way of pressure from the animals stepping into or through it.”And big cats like tigers and leopards are “particularly vulnerable to snaring,” says Jan Kamler, co-author of the recent study also with WildCRU — even if snares are mostly set for bushmeat animals, such as deer and wild pigs.“[Tigers and leopards] occur at relatively low densities to begin with (compared to prey species), and they have the widest ranging movements of all species,” Kamler wrote to me. “Consequently, even if snaring is stopped within a protected area, as long as snaring occurs along the boundary, then tiger and leopard populations may ultimately become extirpated.”With only a handful of tigers left to begin with, it only takes a few encounters with snares to kill off an entire population. Ditto for leopards.Hundreds of confiscated snares in Cambodia. These wire traps are decimating wildlife across Southeast Asia. They kill indiscriminately and cause incredible suffering to ensnared animals. Cheap and easy to make, snares are difficult for wildlife rangers to find and many parks have not adapted to this new threat. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler/ Mongabay.Kamler theorizes that the reason leopards vanished a decade before tigers is that the presence of tigers — the apex killer in the park and known to harry other predators — forced leopards into the park’s buffer area. Here they more quickly succumbed to snares and guns that hadn’t as completely infiltrated the core area.Research from last year in Biological Conservation found that wildlife rangers removed more than 200,000 snares from just five protected areas in Southeast Asia, including Nam-Et Phou Louey, over five years.But Thomas Gray, the paper’s lead author and the science director for the Wildlife Alliance, told me last year that he believed even the best-trained rangers would only find a third of the snares planted in protected areas — and rangers in Nam-Et Phou Louey were not among the best, according to Gray in 2018.“Snaring is very difficult to control because snares are cheaply made, and a single person can set hundreds and sometimes thousands of snares,” Rasphone said.Today, millions of snares likely blanket Southeast Asia’s protected areas, indiscriminately wiping out wildlife until there is little left to kill.‘Too little, too late’ Troy Hansel, the former Laos country director for the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), said funding and resources for Nam-Et Phou Louey came “too little too late … to secure the tiger population.”Headed by WCS Laos, conservation groups spent between $150,000 and $200,000 annually from 2009 to 2012, according to Rasphone. The money came from international donors such as the World Bank, USFWS, and the French Development Agency (AFD). While this may sound like a lot for a developing country, the money was meant to manage a national park more than half the size of Jamaica and covered in thick forest.Rasphone says the money definitely helped stop gun-toting poachers — gun confiscations increased with the rise of funding — but did not “stop the exponential increase in snaring.”Hunters caught on camera trap in Laos. Some hunting is allowed in the buffer zones of Nam Et-Phou Louey National Protected Area. But only for particular unprotected species and under certain regulations. Photo by: WCS-Laos.When conservation actions really took off in 2005, conservationists had the ambitious goal of increasing tiger number by 50 percent within ten years and eventually get to a point where the protected area contained 25 breeding females—turning this park into a “source site” for Indochinese tigers, according to a 2016 paper in Biological Conservation.Lead author of that research and also a former country director of WCS Laos, Arlyne Johnson, ,says the paper was intended to evaluate the program’s success or lack of it. It records how conservationists saw the sudden rise in snaring during that decade—and how it may have been a deliberate strategy by poachers to kill off the last tigers.“The increased snaring likely resulted from local hunters changing techniques to more effectively target tigers,” Johnson and her colleagues wrote. “Snares were not common until Vietnamese and Chinese traders from outside the area began providing local hunters with this gear.”While increased funding helped boost ungulate populations and curb hunters, the park needed to more than double the investment of funds even during peak funding in order to keep tigers safe, according to the study.That kind of money never happened (this is hardly unique to Laos: conservation the world over is underfunded, under-resourced, and under-prioritized).Johnson said that while snares definitely played a role in wiping out the park’s tigers and leopards, there were other problems: poachers were rarely arrested and convicted and, over time, funding declined.“It has been very difficult to get enough funding to adequately support patrol teams,” said Paul Eshoo, who’s worked both in ecotourism and conservation in Laos. “As donors are not willing to support day-to-day operations and patrol staff salaries directly … and instead prefer to put most of their funds into livelihood programs.”Even without tigers and leopards, Nam Et-Phou Louey National Park remains a hugely important protected area for rare and threatened species. This was the first ever photo of Owston’s palm civet, a species listed as endangered, in Laos. Photo by: WCS-Laos.Other issues may have been more structural. For example, Laos does not have any career rangers.According to Eshoo, patrols in Nam-Et Phou Louey were largely made up of a motley crew of government employees, volunteers, military, and villagers —but none of whom were career park rangers, a career which simply doesn’t exist in the country.“They are changed often, and require training by the project when they arrive,” he said. Lack of expertise, experience and high turnover certainly hurt the chances of saving the park’s tigers.“The management system in Nam Et-Phou Louey was and still remains one of the best in the country,” Eshoo added. “But, to protect a species like the tiger, which is highly threatened, requires A+ protection with a more professional and committed national parks system in the long-term.”Investment still matteredConservationists, and journalists, can get blinkered by their obsession with tigers, but, in fact, even though the investment was “too late, too late” for leopards and tigers, it’s likely had a major role in maintaining other animal populations in Laos’s largest protected area.Johnson said other species “definitely benefited” from tiger funding as her research in 2016 showed an increase in ungulates in the park. Meanwhile, many threatened Asian animals still inhabit the park, including dholes (Cuon alpinus), clouded leopards (Neofelis nebulosa), Asiatic black bears (Ursus thibetanus), sun bears (Helarctos malayanus), gaur (Bos gaurus), sambar deer (Rusa unicolor), Owston’s palm civet (Chrotogale owstoni), as well as several primate and otter species.Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) once roamed the northern portion of park, but disappeared around a decade ago, though Rasphone says there was a potential footprints were found in 2015. It may be that a herd of elephants is migrating between the park and Vietnam – but conservationists just don’t know at this point.The loss of leopards and tigers has restructured the park’s carnivore hierarchy to potentially benefit the next biggest carnivore: dholes.Wild dogs with a badass reputation, dholes are considered endangered on the IUCN Red List, and number fewer than tigers worldwide.“Dholes no longer have major competition for food and space, and their populations may benefit from that,” Kamler said, though he added grimly, “as long as snaring doesn’t eventually cause the extinction of this species as well.”A dhole in Nam Et-Phou Louey National Protected Area. The wild dog is now the top predator of the park. It may benefit from a lack of tigers and leopards, but it faces many of the same challenges for long-term survival. This species is rarer than tigers globally and listed as endangered. Photo by: WCS-Laos.As for the Indochinese tiger, Kamler says the conservation focus must now turn to Thailand and Myanmar.“If these last few populations are not protected with strong law enforcement, then the entire subspecies will go extinct.”Currently, the Indochinese tiger is listed as endangered on the IUCN Red List, but an update is overdue; that assessment was done in 2010. Today, it may very likely be critically endangered. In 2010, conservationists estimated 20 tigers in Cambodia (now extinct), 20 in Vietnam (also extinct), and 17 in Laos (alas, extinct). Thailand and Myanmar remain the only countries that likely house any semblance of a reproducing wild population. At the time, researchers believed there may be 352 Indochinese tigers left. If today it’s below 250, it would qualify for critically endangered status.“All protected areas in Southeast Asia should be especially vigilant towards the snaring crises in the region,” Kamler said, adding that the region needs “strong community engagement and education programs.”He also calls for continuous monitoring via camera trap so conservationists and staff on the ground can catch these declines quicker.Perhaps most vital, according to the anonymous source, is to increase the importance of conservation across the Laos government. They said that Nam-Et Phou Louey was never “seriously recognized” by the three provincial governments that overlapped with the national park, and the national government, due to the decentralization of protected areas, took little note.“Protected areas and species conservation are not a high priority for the government,” the source said. “National protected areas are not given the same level of authority or respect as other agencies. Protected area managers do not have even an official stamp and have lower authority than district authorities.”An impressive gaur is photographed in the darkness at Nam Et-Phou Louey National Protected Area. Listed as vulnerable, this species is a victim of poaching for Chinese traditional medicine as well. Photo by: WCS-Laos.The source called on groups like the World Bank, Asian Development Bank and USAID to “encourage” the Laos government to support conservation and make much-needed structural changes.“These species and habitats can bring wealth to the country if protected,” the source said.Hasan Rahman, a tiger expert with WCS in Bangladesh, however said a final component is essential for successful tiger conservation: “public support.”“No amount of money, arms, ammunition, forest patrol, and law enforcement can really save any species for long period of time without public support,” he said. “It’s not that we don’t need all those, but the public ownership is the key. Not only support from the people living surrounding landscape, but also from the people of the entire region, and even the world is needed to save the most of the ‘charismatic’ species.”Laos may have lost its tigers. But the potential for conservation there remains huge, as it does in Nam-Et Phou Louey National Protected Area.And it’s not impossible, with far greater protection efforts across the region, that one day tigers and leopards could find their way back to Laos — assuming we can save them from extinction in the first place.A photo of a tiger taken on the most recent survey, meaning this was one of the last tigers in Laos before it vanished. Photo by: Akchousanh Rasphone, WildCRU, and WCS-Laos. A rare image of two clouded leopards. These animals are now the biggest cats in the park. Photo by: Akchousanh Rasphone, WildCRU, WCS-Laos.last_img read more

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first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored More than half of the shrimp farms carved out of mangrove forests in Indonesia have been left idle or abandoned.The government plans to revive these aquaculture farms to both boost fisheries production and prevent the clearing of more mangroves.Fisheries experts have welcomed the plan to boost aquaculture, but say the government should focus on boosting yields from existing shrimp farms rather than expanding the number of operating farms.In addition to the deforestation of mangroves, shrimp farms have drawn criticism for degrading the quality of freshwater available for communities living in the vicinity of the ponds. KUTA, Indonesia — Indonesia plans to restore more than 300,000 hectares (741,300 acres) of idle shrimp-farming ponds to boost its fisheries and reduce deforestation of the country’s mangrove ecosystems, according to a top official.More than double that area, much of it in coastal regions rich in mangroves, have been cleared for shrimp farms, but only about 40% of the farms are in production, according to 2018 government data. “We must revitalize this area that’s abandoned or poorly managed … over the next five years,” Alan Koropitan, a senior expert in the office of the president’s chief of staff, told Mongabay on the sidelines of an event in Kuta, Bali, on Dec. 11.He said rebuilding shrimp farms on these idle lands could give a much-needed boost to the Indonesian fisheries sector. While Indonesia is a top global exporter of frozen seawater shrimps, the Southeast Asian country lags behind its neighbors in exports of freshwater shrimps and fresh, salted or smoked shrimps. Some of its top seafood exports include Asian tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) and whiteleg shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei).“But we don’t want to clear more land either [for shrimp farms] by clearing mangroves and such,” Alan said.Shrimp harvested from aquaculture farms in Indonesia. Image courtesy of the Indonesian Ministry of Maritime Affairs and Fisheries.Shrimp farming is a major driver of the deforestation of mangroves, a crucial habitat for coastal marine life, in Indonesia. In 1999, 350,000 ha (865,000 acres) of mangroves were cleared across the archipelago to make way for shrimp ponds — the highest rate of mangrove deforestation in the world, according to World Bank in 2003. Shrimp farming has also drawn criticism for degrading the quality of freshwater available for communities living in the vicinity of the ponds.Alan said President Joko Widodo had ordered the fisheries ministry to map out the idle or abandoned shrimp farms across the country that would be feasible for revival.Fisheries experts have welcomed the government’s intention of boosting Indonesia’s aquaculture sector, but say the way to do it is through intensification — getting greater yields from the same area of fish and shrimp ponds — rather than increasing the number of such ponds.“Expansion efforts would not fit with the current state of shrimp aquaculture in Indonesia,” said Susan Herawati, the general secretary of the People’s Coalition for Fisheries Justice, an NGO.She cited the revitalization of Bumi Dipasena, one of Indonesia’s main sites for shrimp fisheries, spanning 17,000 ha (42,000 acres) in Sumatra’s Lampung province.“Bumi Dipasena is the largest shrimp farm in Asia, maybe even in the world,” Susan said. “The fisheries ministry must be able to intensify the production of this site to fulfill demand.”She called for improving road infrastructure and ensuring access to reliable electricity and clean water, both to boost logistics for the Bumi Dipasena shrimp producers and to help the thousands of families living in the area.Shrimp farms in Bumi Dipasena, in Sumatra’s Lampung province. Image courtesy of Bumi Dipasena Village official website.Earlier this month, Indonesia’s fisheries minister, Edhy Prabowo promised to work with other government institutions to revive Bumi Dipasena. One of the main challenges is the limited capacity of the existing shrimp ponds and infrastructure to boost yields, the minister said.Reviving Bumi Dipasena would also require introducing community-based management and phasing out top-down corporate control of the farms, according to experts.Operational control of the shrimp farms there previously fell under Jakarta-listed aquaculture company PT Central Proteina Prima, working under a partnership scheme with small-scale farmers. At its peak in the 1990s, Bumi Dipasena was producing 200 metric tons of shrimp a day on average, and generating an estimated $3 million a year in export revenue. But the company was secretly slashing half of the bank loans meant for the farmers, leading to the decline of the entire operation.“If the restoration program indeed takes place, then the shrimp fisheries in Dipasena would reach its optimum operation and could re-emerge as a top shrimp producer like it used be,” said Dedi Adhuri, a researcher at the Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI).“Not only would the farmers benefit, but also the rest of the nation,” Dedi added.Some shrimp farmers continue to work at Bumi Dipasena, but profits are narrow.“We’ll keep on fighting, and we urge the government to play its role,” said Nafian Faiz, one of the farmers.Farmers harvest shrimp. Image courtesy of the Indonesian Ministry of Maritime Affairs and Fisheries.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Basten Gokkoncenter_img Coastal Ecosystems, Conservation, Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Policy, Fish, Governance, Green, Land Use Change, Mangroves, Wetlands last_img read more

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first_imgThe Social Cohesion Ministry in collaboration with the Region Five (Mahaica-Berbice) Regional Democratic Council on Wednesday, February 28, commissioned a recreational ground in the Paradise community.Regional Community Enhancement Officer, Dolston Huston said the ground, which was officially commissioned by Social Cohesion Minister with responsibility for Culture, Youth and Sport, Dr George Norton, will expand the sporting fraternity ofSocial Cohesion Minister with responsibility for Culture, Youth and Sport, Dr George Norton and children of Paradise cutting the ribbon for the opening of the groundthe Mahaica-Berbice region beyond their dreams.The ground was fenced to the tune of $7 million and works commenced on November 22, 2017. Its completion was slightly delayed due to adverse weather conditions. “Not only does the community have a fenced recreational facility now, but 85 per cent of the labour force during the rehabilitation was from the community, even the blocks were bought in the very community,” Huston explained.“The project is a dream come through for many,” Chairman of the Neighbourhood Democratic Council (NDC) Emile Wilson highlighted and expressed profound gratitude on behalf of the residents.last_img read more

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first_imgA new residential subdivision is expected to bring beauty and new home features to Fort St. John.The subdivision – located in the city’s west end – will be more than 30 hectares in size, consisting of approximately 250 homes, along with a man-made lake, walking trails and park.- Advertisement -The lake and park will take up slightly more than a hectare of the subdivision and homes will be constructed surrounding the area.The majority of the subdivision will be single family dwellings and around 10 per cent of the homes will be multi-family residences, such as duplexes.One new feature the homes will include is walk-out basements something that has never been done in this city, says Ron Brar, project manager for Peace Holdings, the land developer.The land has already been cleared in anticipation of the development and Brar says the installation of all underground utilities is expected to be completed within the next week. He adds that the City is supposed to start paving 108 St. in October.Advertisement There is also potential for a commercial area to be situated next to the subdivision, which could accommodate a gas station, grocery store, or even a school.Peace Holdings and Peace Enterprises are the two corporations working in conjunction to develop the land and build the houses in the area.The first lots facing 108 St. will be available for purchase at some point this fall, says Brar, adding that Peace Enterprises will begin construction on six homes over the winter.The development of the land is expected to be completed within five years and the houses should all be completed within the next ten years.Advertisementlast_img read more

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first_img– Advertisement -Hedges recognizes Lynnette Cordonier and the many others that have a passion for making the annual event a success. This year $9,150.00 was raised for the Fort St. John Hospital Foundation. Since 2012 a grand total of $46,167.00 has been raised by this annual event going to support the hospital. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – For the past eight years Unforgettable Memories Foto Source has been hosting annual photos with Santa Claus and all proceeds going to the Fort St. John Hospital Foundation. Niki Hedges, Executive Director for the Fort St. John Hospital Foundation expressed thanks to the Christmas theme decorators and the bakers of the gingerbread cookies, she then included, and of course, Mr. & Mrs. Santa who also made special Christmas party appearances and donated the proceeds to the Foundation. last_img read more

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first_imgLIFESTYLE: Less is more when it comes to make-up in the summer.A dewy look can easily turn to an oil-slick look as make-up melts and eyeliner slides across the face as the day wears on.FIVE essential products to avoid this happening include: 1. Primer- this is applied after moisturiser and before foundation. A primer gives a good base for foundation and helps to maintain a lasting good.It also helps to give longer foundation coverage.This Stay Flawless product is advertised as an über-long-lasting primer but at €35.50, it is quite expensive. Garnier 5 Second Perfect Blur Primer 30mlI would avoid this if you are prone to an oily complexion as it can give a ‘too shiny’ look. It’s currently on offer at Cara Pharmacy at €12.79.This Rimmel Product is a good option for oily-skins. Priced at €8.25, it eliminates shine and smooths the skin.2. Set foundation with translucent powder. This also helps to maintain coverage. Try and use one with a high SPF. Sometimes changing to use a powder make-up or foundation doesn’t have oil as an ingredient also helps to reduce shiny complexions.3. Use a waterproof eyeliner.4. Apply a waterproof mascara. 5. Lipstick can appear a little heavy in the summer, a pop of colour from a vibrant gloss stands out just as much.LIFESTYLE: STAY-PUT MAKE-UP IN THE SUMMER was last modified: July 24th, 2013 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:Donegal Daily LifestyleLIFESTYLE: STAY-PUT MAKE-UP IN THE SUMMERlast_img read more

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first_img Manchester City star Davild Silva plays in the snow 1 Richard Scudamore has responded to Sam Allardyce’s call for a winter break by revealing his belief it has “more prospects than I can remember”.He also said, however, that “something has to give” for one to be agreed, and that an agreement cannot be reached until the next Premier League broadcasting deal is discussed in late 2017 at the earliest.On Monday – Allardyce’s first day as England manager – the 61-year-old said a mid-season break “would help the Premier League and us at international level if we could achieve that”.FA chief executive Martin Glenn recognised that one could not be in place before the 2019/20 season. Premier League executive chairman Scudamore has added the organisation remains “open-minded” to it, but that there remain numerous hurdles to overcome.“There are more prospects for it than I can remember,” said the 56-year-old at the launch of Premier League 2, a competition that will succeed Under-21s football for the 24 teams involved.“The Football League and the FA, Martin Glenn particularly, wants to see it happen,” added Scudamore.“We are having discussions but it’s not easy due to the calendar of different competitions. If it can practically work we are up for listening to it. We are open-minded and keen if we can make it work. We have widened it out to the stakeholders with what is possible.“We all know what we have to do to create space and something has to give. It would have to be decided by (the) next TV market (agreement), which is sometime end of 2017, and start of 2018.”last_img read more

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first_imgA judge has told a Falcarragh man he needs to get straight ‘A’s in his probation report when he comes before him again or he could face jail.Manus Doohan, 19, of Ballina, appeared at Falcarragh District Court charged with a number of offences including assault and causing criminal damage.They included striking the owner of Josie’s Bar, Josie Gallagher, and also putting a gas cylinder through the window of a taxi-rank after asking local Gardai to arrest him. On another occasion, Doohan, the youngest of five boys, was found in a ditch by Gardai and claimed he had been the victim of a hit and run and was seriously injured.But when Garda traveled to Letterkenny General Hospital to check on him, they discovered he had not been injured at all.Solicitor Patsy Gallagher told the court that drink was the problem with his client but that he had been dry since last July and hadn’t gone out since.The court was told that Doohan was facing a total of 23 charges before the court.Judge Paul Kelly said a number of those charges related to offences which were committed on bail for other offences.“I heard all this in April 2011 and I decided he was a young man worthy of being given an opportunity to see how things go but within a month he is engaged in assault and public order matters.“You are building up a lot of trouble for yourelf and given numerous opportunities to adjust your behaviour but you seem determined to throw it back in our faces. You are on bail and it doesn’t seem to be changing,” said Judge Kelly.He adjourned the matter until April 17th but warned Doohan it was his final chance.“I am strongly considering a custodial sentence for the offence committed on bail. If his behaviour is good I might be persuaded to suspend it but depends on him getting straights A’s in his probation report and that he is doing something about alcohol,” warned the judge.* Comments on this article are closed as the case is ongoing.JUDGE TELLS FALCARRAGH MAN HE NEEDS STRAIGHT ‘A’s OR FACE JAIL was last modified: January 17th, 2013 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:assaultcourtcriminal damageFalcarraghJudge Paul KellyManus Doohanlast_img read more

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first_imgBurt GAA Club Notes Congratulations to the Burt U14 footballers who won the Inishowen A Final after a tough match against Malin on Friday night.The final score line was Burt 2-12 Malin 3-8 and all credit to the young players and coaches, they showed great character and skill to take the match by one point. It was 24 years since Burt last won the U14 title and only their second final in that span.Both teams showed tremendous effort and it all came down to an exciting finale. Sean McHugh and Shaun Murphy deserve praise for their hard work and energy shown to the team all year. The season’s not over yet, with the Northern Board league and championship to play. The team and panel was: Mark McElheinney, Conor Bradley, Tom Doherty, Craig Brogan, Shaun Gallagher, Kyle Long, Jonathan McDaid, Sean McHugh, Stephen McCafferty, Jordan Arbuckle, Mark Coyle, Ryan (Spiky) McLaughlin, Ryan Doherty (Goose), Tony Cregan, Calvin Gallagher, Matthew Doherty, Paul Gallagher, Kyle MCGrath, Aaron Doherty (Goose), John Paul Hegarty, Ciaran Bradley, Shane O Donnell, Keith Grant, Dermot Quinn.The U14 camógs travelled to Kilconieron for the Galway All-Ireland Féile, which took place at the weekend past. Unfortunately, Burt lost all three games to host club Kilconieron, St Colmans and Drumree. However only four of the girls are overage again next year, where Burt will vie for a sixth Féile in a row.Many thanks to Manus O Donnell, Dr Steele, Cathy Ann McKinney and everyone who helped with the children over the last few months and at the Féile. Many thanks also to Reddins Bus and driver Brian for helping transport the Camogie team.The VHI/GAA Summer Camps is on in Burt this Monday 4 July to Friday 8 July. It runs from 10am – 2.30pm each day. It costs €65 for each child, €50 for a second family member or additional child. Contact Johnny Downey (086 3066874) or any underage coach. It is open for any child under 13. Check with schools also. Johnny is accepting deposits and will discuss payments in person. Please let him know if your child is attending (for camp numbers). The senior hurlers got the championship off to a great start with a 3-12 to 2-8 win over Setanta up in The Cross last Wednesday evening. Burt got off to a poor start with two goals conceded in the opening quarter.Despite this, Burt felt they could overcome the 2-4 to 0-6 deficit at half-time and everybody stepped up in the second half to show the strength-in-depth the team has. The backline put in a powerful second half which greatly made it easier for the forwards to get scores. In the opening five minutes, Burt hit 1-2 and took the lead and they soldiered on in the last quarter with two goals killing off the Killygordon side.This Wednesday 29 June, Burt are home to MacCumhaills. The U12 Blue and Gold team are home to Urris this Tuesday evening. Johnny will be in contact with parents about times. U12/13/14 football training is on Saturday mornings at Hibernian Park from 10.30 -12 noon. Please remember to bring your water bottle for hygiene reasons.Anyone that has lotto cards or who sells lottos for the club, please remember to hand them into your coach at training. The U14 footballers defeated Gaoth Dobhair last Tuesday evening in Burt 5-4 to 2-9. They play MacCumhaills this Friday. The U8 Hurling and Football Academy is on Monday nights in Hibernian Park, Burt. Training starts from 6pm to 7.30pm. Any new players/members are welcome. Can parents please send lunch/drink with their child for the mid-session break. If anybody has any questions, please feel free to contact any of the coaches at anytime.The coaches and their numbers: Martin McGrath – 087 7431332; Rory Grant – 087 7763668; Benny Harrigan – 086 8670070; Johnny Downey – 086 3066874. Finally, the club and team managers extend a warm invitation for any parents that would like to help out the coaches at these sessions in any way. All help no matter how big or small is greatly appreciated! U10 hurling training is on Monday nights from 6-7.30. U10 football training is on Saturday afternoons from 12-1.15pm Fixtures for the first group of games for Senior, U16 and U12 hurley is up in the clubhouse for seniors and you can also view it on our online club calendar at: http://tiny.cc/mTtmC. All upcoming games for underage and senior teams are also available on the site. The U12 and U16 hurlers play Strabane this Thursday night. The U12s are away whilst the U16s are at home. Anybody who has Burt gear ordered should contact Liam McKinney (086 3558398) about collecting.A number of stock is also available from Liam for anybody looking for extra gear. Just a reminder to all members and local community that there is a charity clothes bank beside the Burt clubhouse. The ‘Cash for Clobber’ bank is a good way to get free of unwanted clothes and it benefits both the Club and the charity it goes to. There will be a fundraising concert with local artists and Comedy sketch DIY 2 by The Swan Players in aid of Beart GAA Club and local charities. It will take place in Burt hall on Wednesday 29th June 2011 at 8pm. Adult 5 euro and children 3 euro. Family concessions. Cast Father – Frank – Eddie Murphy; Mother – Majella – Catherine Carlin; Son – Mark – Ciaran Bradley; Son – Owen – Kevin Carlin; Neighbour – Pam – Maureen Boyle; Neighbours Grandson – Joseph – Denver Doherty. CLG Beart is having a fundraising dance in aid of the club and Evans school of dancing. @Jigs n Rigs’ will be held in the Halfway House on Friday 26 August. There will be a few professionals and a few amateurs ‘trying’ to irish dance.GAA: BURT CLUB GAA NOTES was last modified: June 27th, 2011 by gregShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:GAA: BURT CLUB GAA NOTESlast_img read more

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