first_imgImagine this scenario:Dad is divorced and has custody of his two young daughters.  Recently, he remarried, and last week he was deployed. His second wife and new stepmom receives a call.   The youngest daughter, who is 8 years old, has been injured at school.  The school nurse needs consent for medical treatment.  Oops!  Stepmom doesn’t know what to do, or what her legal rights are.Step FamilyFor stepparents, this is an altogether too common and sometimes frightening situation.  Deployment often means that the stepparent has to take on a new role as both the mom and the dad, and must assume new responsibilities and tasks with little or no preparation.  For stepfamilies, deployment can be particularly challenging because of the murkiness that often exists for who has legal authority.Did you know that in most cases, stepparents have no legal authority when it comes to making decisions or even getting information about their stepchildren’s education, benefits programs, medical treatment or health care?Dr. Francesca Adler-Baeder, Director of the Center for Children, Youth, and Families at Auburn, is the Stepfamily Association of America and oversees the activities of the National Stepfamily Resource Center, a division of Auburn University’s Center for Children, Youth, and Families.In this short video clip, Adler-Baeder offers suggestions for working with stepfamilies serving in the military and briefly introduces a new set of learning modules geared to stepfamilies (soon to be available through the National Stepfamily Resource Center).What tips would you give to Military Family Resource Providers?Yes, stepfamilies face many challenges.  But Adler-Baeder offers reassurance to those working with “complex families” like stepfamilies in which the custodial parents are deployed.  She says that military families are strong and resilient, that by definition military families are service-oriented, and that family members have a “similar service-heart.”See Adler-Baeder respond to the question, “What makes military families strong and resilient?” in this short interview at the 2011 National Council on Family Relations (NCFR) Conference<span style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” data-mce-type=”bookmark” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span> Here are some of the issues that stepfamilies about to be deployed need to discuss.  Those working with these complex families can facilitate these discussions and help both stepparents and custodial parents feel more secure and less stressed when the time comes to assume new roles and new responsibilities.Issues to discuss:How will the stepparent be able to facilitate contact between the child and the deployed parent?If the stepparent is married to a noncustodial parent, will the stepparent be allowed to have regular access to the child?If the stepparent is married to a custodial parent, what will happen if the noncustodial parent wants custody during the deployed parent’s absence?Will the deployment affect child support payments?Will the stepparent need to move the child to a different location, enroll the child in school, negotiate with the school about the stepchild’s special needs, enroll the child in benefit programs, consent to medical care, enroll the child in daycare, summer camps, sports activities or other special programs, or insure the child’s participation in religious training or programs?If the stepparent will need to travel abroad with the child, is the child’s passport in order and are there any special permissions that will be needed?Are there any pending legal actions involving the child?Are there financial arrangements that need to be made with regard to the child, involving matters such as tuition payments, health insurance payments, support, or property?last_img read more

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first_imgAmid protests over the alleged “desecration” of a temple in south Kashmir’s Anantnag district, the State government today said an investigation of the shrine’s complex has found all its properties “intact”. A team of district officials examined the Bhargashakha Bhagwati temple in the Mattan area after posts and pictures alleging its “desecration” were uploaded on social media.last_img

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first_imgKolkata: West Bengal Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee said on Friday that the state government had formed a separate department to bring about comprehensive development of various tribal communities in the state. The chief minister, on the occasion of International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples, listed her government’s work for the uplift of the tribals. “Today is… #AdivasiDibas. Our government has created the Tribal Development Department to bring about comprehensive development of various tribal communities in #Bangla,” Banerjee tweeted. Also Read – Bengal family worships Muslim girl as Goddess Durga in Kumari Puja The state government has set up development boards for the Lepcha, Tamang, Sherpa, Bhutia, Limboo and Adivasi tribal communities of the state. The state government offers old-age pension and social security schemes for the tribals besides publishing a Santhali dictionary for development of the language. It also publishes booklets in Bengali, Santhali and Hindi to disseminate information on various tribal development schemes. The state government had commenced a pilot project in 2014-15 for screening of tribals suffering from sickle cell disease.last_img read more

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first_imgCommunities in Schools (CIS), the national organization dedicated to empowering at-risk students to stay in school and on a path to a brighter future, is delighted to welcome NBA Hall of Famer Shaquille O’Neal as the newest member of its national board of directors.“Over all the years I’ve known Shaquille, he has always shown himself to be a man of integrity and principle for whom giving back to his community is a top priority,” says Communities In Schools National Board Chair Elaine Wynn. “We are privileged to have him among the volunteer leaders of Communities In Schools.”Shaquille O’Neal, former NBA basketball player and Hall of Fame inductee, is currently a sports analyst on the television program, Inside the NBA, and is considered one of the greatest players in NBA history. O’Neal’s athletic accomplishments include a 19-year NBA career, four NBA championships (three with the Los Angeles Lakers and one with the Miami Heat), and 15 All-Star game selections. He is one of only three players to win NBA MVP, All-Star game MVP, and NBA Finals MVP in the same year.Rivaling his athletic accomplishments are O’Neal’s off-court undertakings, which include success in acting, music, television and gaming. Inspired by positive childhood experiences at the Boys and Girls Club in Newark, NJ, O’Neal has a long career of partnering with youth organizations and giving back to his community.“Every kid, no matter where they’re from or how much money their parents make, deserves the opportunity to get a good education,” said O’Neal. “My education was critical to my success on and off the court. Being in school gave me self-discipline and showed me the importance of hard work. I always knew that when my playing days were over, nobody could take my education away from me.”“Even more than Shaquille’s extraordinary athletic career, it’s really his passion and dedication to ensuring young people opportunities for success that makes him such an incredible role model,” said Communities In Schools Founder Bill Milliken.The Communities In Schools National Board of Directors is comprised of passionate supporters of the CIS mission, and leaders in a variety of fields including finance, education, marketing, law, civil rights and more. Click here to see full list of the board of national directors.last_img read more

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first_imgBy Jorge Barrera APTN National NewsManitoba Keeewatinowi Okimakanak Grand Chief David Harper’s plan to classify sponsors for the upcoming Assembly of First Nation election event in Winnipeg by traditional clan designations has upset some chiefs in his organization.Chiefs gathered at the AFN’s annual general assembly in Halifax this week selected MKO to host the election for national chief in Winnipeg this coming December.The dismal state of MKO’s finances, however, has led MKO-member chiefs to question whether the organization had the financial ability to host such a large and important event. The organization has been warned the federal Aboriginal Affairs department could put it into co-management or third party management if it doesn’t get its books in order.Yet, despite this, Harper said during the AFN assembly MKO was “financially ready” to host the event.Harper refused requests from APTN National News for an interview.A spokesperson for MKO said the organization would be relying on the Manitoba government, Tourism Winnipeg and third-party sponsors to help pay the bills.In an effort to attract cash, MKO plans to award Bear, Eagle, Sturgeon and Wolf Clan designation to sponsors, according to a sponsorship package obtained by APTN National News. The sponsorship package was drawn up on the assumption the AFN election would be held on Sept. 30.APTN National News confirmed the sponsorship clan plan remains the same for the December event.The document shows that a sponsor who contributes $75,000 or more to the AFN election event will be classified as Bear Clan. An Eagle Clan designation will go to sponsors who contribute $50,000, a Sturgeon Clan designation will be bestowed on sponsors contributing $25,000 and the Wolf Clan goes to sponsors who put up $15,000.Bear, Eagle and Sturgeon Clan-level sponsors will get a chance to attend a private reception with the newly elected national chief, according to the document. All clan-designated sponsors will have a seat on the planning committee for the event.The use of traditional clan designation, however, has upset some MKO member chiefs.“Trying to utilize our sacred clan system for the purpose of this nature is not right. As Indigenous people, a clan system is very sacred to us and to use it as an economic development strategy is not something we should do,” said an MKO-member chief who requested anonymity. “That is not right using our sacred clan system.”Harper’s plan to sell sponsorships for a “spiritual services event” to coincide with the AFN election is also causing concern. Harper, who is a born-again Christian, has organized Gospel jamborees to coincide with MKO events and there is suspicion among some MKO chiefs that the organization’s money is used to support revival services.“There were certain things that were not budgeted for that the grand chief insisted would get funded,” said another MKO member chief. “There were certain revivals (Evangelical Christian services) that he would associate with the businesses we were doing. He has these Gospel jamboree that are usually loosely connected to events that MKO hosts and he would us MKO funds for this.”An official with MKO, who was not authorized to speak on behalf of the organization, said revival and “prayer services” are paid for by sponsorship dollars.Harper is facing increasing discontent from the MKO chiefs who voted him into the job. There is a move to oust the grand chief over allegations of financial mismanagement and suspect transactions with MKO dollars.MKO is facing major financial difficulties, according to documents obtained by APTN National News that showed the organization faced a $976, 025 accumulated deficit as of March 2013.MKO member chiefs say they have received little information about the current state of the organization’s finances. MKO.MKO is currently under a forensic investigation called for the executive council of chiefs. The results of the most recent phase of the forensic audit is expected to be tabled at MKO’s chiefs meeting next week in Norway House First Nation, Man.The forensic audit report will reveal that laptops and cell phones were tampered with before they were handed over to auditors conducting the investigation, according to a copy obtained by APTN National News.Harper is also facing allegations he tried to obstruct the forensic audit.jbarrera@aptn.ca@JorgeBarreralast_img read more

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first_imgRisk reduction for Alzheimer’s disease is now more critical than ever due to the continued lack of a cure or effective disease-slowing treatment,”Dr. Joshua S. Talboom, a Postdoctoral Fellow in TGen’s Neurogenomics Division, and a member of Dr. Huentelman’s lab Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jun 21 2019Results from a study of nearly 60,000 individuals suggest those at higher risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease due to family history may demonstrate changes in memory performance as early as their 20s.Researchers from the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), an affiliate of City of Hope, and the University of Arizona gathered the data through an online word-pair memory test called MindCrowd, one of the world’s largest scientific assessments of how healthy brains function.Published today in the scientific journal eLife, study data suggests that those with a family history of Alzheimer’s disease, and who are younger than 65, on average do not perform as well as their peers who do not have a family history of Alzheimer’s, the most common form of dementia.The study results suggest that the family history effect is particularly pronounced among men, as well as those with lower educational attainment, diabetes, and carriers of a common genetic change in APOE, a gene long associated with Alzheimer’s disease risk.While family history has previously been associated with the risk of Alzheimer’s, this is the first study of its kind, and in these numbers, that indicates this risk can be detected up to four decades before the typical age of onset. The study looked at 59,571 MindCrowd participants aged 18-85, and the effect of family history was shown across every age group, up until age 65.”In this study we show that family history is associated with reduced paired-associate learning performance as many as four decades before the typical onset of Alzheimer’s disease,” said Dr. Matt Huentelman, TGen Professor of Neurogenomics, and the study’s senior authorBecause there is no cure or proven way of slowing progressive memory-loss among those with Alzheimer’s, early indicators of the disease can help those at risk to focus on ways to help stave off dementia. Related StoriesGenetic contribution to distractibility helps explain procrastinationResearchers identify gene mutations linked to leukemia in children with Down’s syndromeStudy reveals link between inflammatory diet and colorectal cancer risk”This study supports recommendations underscoring the importance of living a healthy lifestyle and properly treating disease states such as diabetes,” said Dr. Talboom, the study’s lead author. “Our findings specifically highlight the positive effects of such interventions for those with a family history risk of Alzheimer’s, opening the door to the development of more targeted risk-reduction approaches to combat the disease.”In addition, this study underscores the utility of web-based participant recruitment to research studies like MindCrowd, facilitating large sample sizes in a cost- and time-effective fashion, said Dr. Lee Ryan, a University of Arizona Alzheimer’s researcher, who along with the UA’s Dr. Betty Glisky, helped Dr. Huentelman develop MindCrowd. Drs. Ryan and Glisky were contributing authors to the study.”It should be acknowledged that that web-based studies are not without concerns. However, we propose that the advantage of considerably larger sample sizes and enriched participant diversity in online research mostly diminishes the potential disadvantages,” Dr. Ryan said.The MindCrowd study began in 2013. By August 2018, it had nearly 60,000 qualified participants, whose performance is reflected in the study. Today, more than 115,000 people, aged 18-95 — from all 50 states and 150 nations around the world — have completed the MindCrowd assessment.MindCrowd cannot tell you if you have Alzheimer’s. What it does give researchers is a set of data baselines about how people not suffering from the disease perform at different ages; among men and women, among those with quick and slow physical responses, among those who smoke and those who don’t, and among many other demographic, lifestyle and health factors.Establishing these baselines will help researchers to more properly evaluate Alzheimer’s patients and usher in a new era of what the MindCrowd developers describe as Precision Aging.Alzheimer’s is a progressive neurological disorder that typically presents clinically as deficits in memory and thinking. It is estimated that more than 5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s, and that by 2050 that number will nearly triple to almost 14 million. Source:The Translational Genomics Research InstituteJournal reference:Talboom, J. et al. (2019) Family history of Alzheimer’s disease alters cognition and is modified by medical and genetic factors. eLife. doi.org/10.7554/eLife.46179last_img read more

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first_imgCredit: CC0 Public Domain The European Aviation Safety Agency said Tuesday that the new rules will come into force from July 2020, giving member countries and operators time to prepare. The rules will override any relevant existing national rules.EASA said the rules specify that new drones must be “individually identifiable,” allowing authorities to trace a particular drone if needed. They will also allow operators authorized in one EU country to fly their craft in others.EASA Executive Director Patrick Ky said that “common rules will help foster investment, innovation and growth in this promising sector.” Citation: EU publishes Europe-wide rules on drone operation (2019, June 11) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-06-eu-publishes-europe-wide-drone.html EU aviation agency proposing rules for drone operation Explore furthercenter_img © 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. The European Union has published EU-wide rules on drones to provide a clear framework for what is and isn’t allowed, improve safety and make it easier for drone users to operate their craft in another European country. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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first_imgNEW DELHI (Reuters) – U.S. President Donald Trump faced criticism for saying Pakistan’s arrest of the alleged mastermind of the 2008 attacks on Mumbai had come after a 10-year search, as the suspected militant had been living in plain view. U.S. President Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally in Greenville, North Carolina July 17, 2019. REUTERS/Kevin LamarquePakistani authorities on Wednesday arrested Hafiz Saeed, the founder of the Lashkar-e-Taiba militant group that is accused by India and the United States of carrying out the Mumbai attacks, on terrorism financing charges. More than 160 people were killed in the four-day militant attacks. Saeed is designated a terrorist by the United States and the United Nations. Trump, who is due to host Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan for talks at the White House next week, welcomed Saeed’s arrest and said it was the result of pressure from his administration on Pakistan to get tougher on militants. “After a ten year search, the so-called “mastermind” of the Mumbai Terror attacks has been arrested in Pakistan. Great pressure has been exerted over the last two years to find him!,” Trump tweeted. But Saeed has been in and out of Pakistan prisons for the last decade and even addressed public rallies. The U.S. House Foreign Affairs Committee countered Trump’s comments with a tweet of its listing the eight times Saeed had been arrested and freed by Pakistan authorities since 2001. “FYI Pakistan wasn’t searching for him for 10 years. He’s been living freely..” it said and suggested Trump hold the applause till Saeed is convicted by Pakistani authorities. Former Pakistan ambassador to the United States Husain Haqqani said Trump had been ill-advised about Saeed’s case. “Finding him was never an issue. He operated freely and was highly visible. He has been arrested and released many times over. @POTUS shd immediately fire whoever gave him the wrong information,” he said in a tweet, referring to Trump. Pakistan said Saeed was arrested while he was going to a court to seek pre-arrest bail. Saeed has denied any involvement and Pakistani authorities say they have not found any evidence against him either. India says Pakistan’s failure to act against the suspected militant is one of the reasons it won’t resume peace talks with the arch rival. Christian Fair, a South Asia specialist at Georgetown University, said Trump was also wrong to describe Saeed as the “so-called mastermind” of the Mumbai attacks. “@POTUS shows AGAIN that he’s a complete dumbass,” said Fair. Reporting by Sanjeev Miglani; Editing by Michael PerryOur Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.last_img read more

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first_img Originally published on Live Science. Something me and Amabella Klein have in common. #BigLittleLies pic.twitter.com/35Rx1aJUsf — Michael. (@yosoymichael) June 24, 2019 It turns out that anxiety, grief and despair about the state of the environment is nothing new. It even has a name: eco-anxiety. And according to psychologists, it’s incredibly common. [Hypersex to Hoarding: 7 New Psychological Disorders] AdvertisementClimate Change Is Triggering Eco-AnxietyWhen news about the environment becomes grim, you might be overcome by an urge to hide or collapse.Volume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Better Bug Sprays?01:33关闭选项Automated Captions – en-US facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65843-climate-change-anxiety-is-real.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0002:2102:21Your Recommended Playlist01:33Better Bug Sprays?01:08Why Do French Fries Taste So Bad When They’re Cold?04:24Sperm Whale Befriends Underwater Robot00:29Robot Jumps Like a Grasshopper, Rolls Like a Ball01:09Robots to the Rescue02:27Robotic Arms关闭  Amabella having a panic attack in a closet because of climate change is a MOOD #BigLittleLies — mackenzie (@macckkattacckk) June 24, 2019 Top 10 Controversial Psychiatric Disorders The Reality of Climate Change: 10 Myths Busted Me too, Amabella. Me. too. #biglittlelies pic.twitter.com/PZG9uqOQE3by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoGundry MD Total Restore SupplementU.S. Cardiologist: It’s Like a Pressure Wash for Your InsidesGundry MD Total Restore SupplementUndoFinance101What Are The Best States To Retire In?Finance101UndoNucificTop Dr. Reveals The 1 Nutrient Your Gut Must HaveNucificUndoEditorChoice.comSee What The World’s Largest Dog Looks LikeEditorChoice.comUndoKelley Blue Book2019 Lexus Vehicles Worth Buying for Their Resale ValueKelley Blue BookUndo — cole (@colesevn) June 24, 2019 According to a Yale survey conducted in December 2018, 70% of Americans are “worried” about climate change, 29% are “very worried” and 51% feel “helpless.” Despite these striking statistics, most people don’t realize how widespread eco-anxiety is, one psychologist told Live Science. “[Ecoanxiety] is often hidden somewhat under the surface,” Thomas Doherty, a clinical psychologist based in Portland, Oregon, told Live Science, “people aren’t taught how to talk about it.” Still, over the past decade, eco-anxiety has gained increasing recognition from scientists and non-scientists alike. It’s not listed in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, psychology’s list of official diagnoses. That’s partially because its symptoms are poorly defined, said David Austern, a clinical psychologist at NYU Langone Health. The American Psychological Association defines it as “a chronic fear of environmental doom.” Eco-anxiety can range from day-to-day worry about the fate of the world, to Amabella’s outright panic attack. Depending on whom you ask, it can even include the fear and panic attacks some natural disaster victims experience after the fact, Austern said. Its symptoms are largely the same as any other kind of anxiety; its only distinguishing factor is its cause, Austern said. But that doesn’t mean that psychologists aren’t taking eco-anxiety seriously. In 2008, the American Psychological Association established a climate change task force. And in 2017, they published a 70-page report on the mental-health effects of climate change. This year, at their annual conference in Chicago, there will be four climate change related sessions. A term like eco-anxiety, though nebulous, is important to create recognition for a very real phenomenon, Austern said. It helps people express what they’re experiencing. Psychologists agree it’s important to open up a dialogue about the mental health effects of climate change. But they also agree that in most cases, eco-anxiety isn’t a bad thing. “It’s a rational reply to a really serious problem,” Maria Ojala, a psychologist at Örebro University in Sweden, told Live Science. That, she says, is why it could be dangerous to make it a clinical diagnosis. “We have to ask, Is it more pathological for someone to be so worried about climate change or is it actually more pathological that people are not more worried about it?” Austern said. Anxiety is precisely the emotion that’ll propel us to do something, he added. Conveniently, taking action Is also one of the most effective coping mechanisms for eco-anxiety, Ojala said. But anxiety is only good for sparking action up to a certain point, Doherty said. A tenet of psychology, the Yerkes-Dodson law, holds that up to a certain point, arousal — how alert or worried you feel — leads people take action and perform better. But overly high levels of anxiety can become paralyzing. For example, one study described cases in which fear of extreme weather approached the level of phobia. Depending on how anxious you are, that’s either incredibly convenient, or presents a catch-22 situation. In these cases, anxiety becomes counterproductive to climate action, Doherty said, And it’s important to seek help. Luckily, if you’re too anxious to take action, fostering a sense of connection with one’s environment and community can also help with symptoms. A recent study found that 2 hours per week in nature is enough to reap mental health benefits. Despite its prevalence, eco-anxiety still goes under-recognized. It shouldn’t be, Doherty said. “This ‘Big Little Lies’ episode clearly struck a chord with people,” Doherty said. And that’s a sign, he added, of how important a conversation this is to have. When news about the environment becomes grim, you might be overcome by an urge to hide or collapse. On last week’s episode of HBO drama “Big Little Lies,” 9-year-old Amabella did both. The character’s metallic boots were found sticking out of a classroom closet following a lesson on climate change, and the internet collectively nodded in recognition. Doomsday: 9 Real Ways Earth Could Endlast_img read more

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