first_imgNielsen-owned Gracenote has launched a new Mobile Video Analytics solution designed to offer insights into the quality and performance of popular mobile video streaming apps.The solution is targeted at mobile operators, TV operators, streaming services and hardware manufacturers, allowing them to understand how mobile app performance impacts user behaviour and attitudes.The offering will also provide engagement metrics so that users can understand how, when and where viewers tune-in  – including information such as average viewing time, network access and speed.“Nielsen has been at the forefront of measuring television and digital video content for decades and the new Gracenote Mobile Video Analytics solution extends our market-leadership position in the mobile streaming space,” said Mike Greenawald, senior vice-president, connectivity for Gracenote.“In a hotly-contested marketplace for subscribers, it is critical to understand the factors that drive engagement and retention. Gracenote Mobile Video Analytics identifies the key video performance factors that enable our customers to gain a competitive edge and make more informed business decisions.”last_img read more

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first_imgRather quietly, there’s yet another revolution in computer technology going on – one that may bring about the kind of global democratization that enthusiasts have been predicting for so long. It’s the incredible shrinking computer. There are those who envision the day when every schoolchild on the planet will have one, creating a flood of new, youthful interest in programming.During our lifetimes, many of us have watched the computer evolve from a big, clunky mainframe, with its spinning tape reels and instructions arriving via punch cards, to a compact unit (which most people forget was originally called a microcomputer) that fit neatly on every desktop, to a battery-run laptop that you can take anywhere, and on down through various, ever-smaller devices like tablets and smartphones that share some but not all characteristics with computers.The next logical step would be a full-featured computer, with real power and programmability, that is super-cheap and fits in the palm of your hand. A sub-microcomputer, if you will. That step has been taken.The big splash in this area was made in early 2012 with the commercial debut of the British-based Raspberry Pi, which will come in two models, A and B, selling for US $25 and $35, respectively. Model B is the only one available at the moment, with Model A scheduled to begin shipping in the first quarter of this year.The Raspberry PiBoth versions come with a Broadcom BCM2835 system on a chip (SoC), which includes an ARM1176JZF-S 700 MHz processor (which can be souped-up to 1 GHz without impairing the lifetime of the machine), a VideoCore IV GPU, and 256 megabytes of RAM that was later upgraded to 512MB. There is no hard disk nor solid-state drive; the computer uses an SD card for booting and long-term storage. Both have audio and HDMI video outputs.The Model B has two USB ports and a 10/100 Ethernet controller. Model A has a single USB port and lacks the built-in Ethernet controller, but it can connect to a network through a user-supplied USB Ethernet or Wi-Fi adapter.Fedora Linux is the free, open-source operating system that’s used by default in the Raspberry Pi. But after users reported bugs in Fedora, Raspbian, a Debian-based OS optimized for the Raspberry Pi hardware, was released in July 2012 and is the current recommended system.That’s a pretty impressive lineup of features for something so small and inexpensive – and the initial demand reflected that. Interest ran so high in the first days that it stalled the sites of the shops selling the computers. Moreover, that demand has proven durable. Premier Farnell, one of the two authorized manufacturers of the product (RS Components is the other), announced in January that it has sold more than a half-million units. RS Components, which took 100,000 pre-orders on day one, is apparently selling them equally briskly, so it’s likely that there are now a million of the devices out there.Such a number is mind-blowing to chip architect Eben Upton, co-creator of the little PC. “We honestly did think we would sell about 1,000, maybe 10,000 in our wildest dreams,” he says. “We thought we would make a small number and give them out to people who might want to come and read computer science at Cambridge.”Those 10,000 Upton thought he’d sell all told? Gone in the first couple of hours.While the Raspberry Pi Foundation – a charitable body initially funded by loans from Upton and five other trustees – was established with the intent to “educate and encourage a new generation of computer scientists and to invigorate computing in the UK and beyond,” it was no time at all before DIYers everywhere began devising all sorts of other applications. Among other things, it’s been used: to stream 1080p video; as a home-automation controller; to run photo/video picture frames around the house; to operate a video camera on a quadcopter UAV; and to maintain proper temperature levels in a beer-brewing operation. One ingenious person wrote on Reddit that his is functioning as a “kitchen computer. With a barcode scanner close to the trash can, so we can add items to the grocery list when something runs out.” And a project called FishPi aims to use the tiny PC to guide an unmanned boat across the Atlantic.For the more technically minded, anyone who really wants to dive into programming will find online a free Cambridge University course that teaches how to develop your very own Raspberry Pi OS.There’s also an app store. The Raspberry Pi website announced in December that it was launching “the Pi Store to make it easier for developers of all ages to share their games, applications, tools and tutorials with the rest of the community.” Twenty-three free titles were made available as part of the store’s introductory inventory, including LibreOffice, Asterisk, Freeciv, OpenTTD, and Iridium Rising.That community is a growing part of the Raspberry Pi’s appeal. People are developing fanzines around the platform. Raspberry Jams – meetups of owners and enthusiasts, who gather to share stories, swap ideas, and generally work out what to do with their new devices – sprang up almost immediately in Britain. The idea then quickly spread to much of Europe, along with the US, Canada, Australia, and Singapore.Raspberry Pi’s low cost is bound to bring out any number of philanthropists and other buyers willing to give them away. For starters, Google – OK, undoubtedly sniffing profit somewhere down the road – just announced that it is donating 15,000 of the computers to schools in the UK.Naturally, anything that has had the kind of success that Raspberry Pi has is bound to spawn a host of competitive products. So it’s hardly a shocker that the sub-microcomputer market has exploded.Last summer brought the Oval Elephant. It costs $72 and comes with Android 4.0, but can run Linaro Linux as well.A microSD card slot supports up to 64GB, and a full HDMI port enables direct connections to a TV or monitor. The device is powered via a mini-USB port, and it also features built-in MIC and an external port for MIC audio.A single-core 1.5GHz AllWinner A10 Cortex A8 ARM processor runs the device; 1GB of DDR3 high-capacity memory is included, as is WiFi connectivity, a MALI400 graphics processing chip, and 1080p HDMI video output, with support for 2160p.Next up was the Mini X, retailing for $79, powered by the same AllWinner A10 processor.It can reportedly run a variety of Linux distributions, including Ubuntu, Fedora, and Puppy Linux. With support for both Android 2.3 and 4.0, the Mini X features 512MB of DDR RAM, 4GB of Nand Flash, a microSD slot, an HDMI port, and WiFi 802.11b/g/n with an external antenna. It plugs into a TV, where you can then run apps to your heart’s content; a remote is included.Then in September we saw the introduction of two new entrants into the under-$100 space.Cubieboard, created by a Chinese team, was birthed through crowdfunding on the Indiegogo.com site. Aptly promoted as a “Raspberry Pi on steroids,” the Cubieboard sells for just $49 and offers a 1 GHz ARM processor, Mali 400 graphics, a gigabyte of RAM and 4 gigs of flash memory. It can run Android, Ubuntu, and a variety of other Linux distributions. It has Ethernet, HDMI, and USB ports, as well as a built-in SATA port that lets it power a hard drive all on its own.At about the same time as Cubieboard appeared, South African distributor Reno Botes introduced the MK802, which sells for $74.It’s very similar to the Cubieboard, except that its processor is a dual-core ARM A9. In addition, it runs Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich and includes access to the Google Play Store, which makes downloading apps simple.Finally, in November, Bulgaria-based Olimex trotted out the A13-OLinuXino, selling for $57. It comes with an Allwinner A13 Cortex A8 processor running at 1GHz, along with a 3D Mali400 GPU and 512 MB of RAM. Four USB hosts are built-in – with one dedicated to WiFi – as is an SD card connector, VGA video output, audio output, five keys for Android navigation, and a UEXT connector for modules such as Zigbee or Bluetooth. Also available is an optional low-cost 7-inch LCD with touchscreen. Android 4.0 is included, but it’s also possible to run Debian and other Linux distributions, Olimex says.As you can see, while Raspberry Pi remains the price leader, those wanting a bit more computer are able to select among a number of entrants available for a bit more money.So what’s the takeaway from all this?It just might be that manufacturers of these microdevices are sowing the seeds for the next crop of young hackers (who will increasingly come from the developing world, as all of its nascent talents are released). Traditional PCs may soon be regarded like the mainframes of old, and vast networks of tiny, interconnected devices like this could be the next big leap forward.Super-cheap chips, ubiquitous wireless, small form factors, open sourcing, and a large and creative community all are coming together to support the ongoing computer revolution, which never stands still.Bits & BytesWhat’s Next in Wearable Computers? (San Francisco Chronicle)It just might be the SmartWatch. Google is actively exploring the idea of making one, Apple has been rumored to be doing the same, and a company called Pebble – which smashed crowdfunding records on Kickstarter by pulling in $10M – is about to ship its version. Some observers think the device could eventually replace the smartphone, finally landing us in Dick Tracy territory three-quarters of a century after the comic-strip detective started talking to his wrist.Same Old, Same Old for RIM (Globe and Mail)Research in Motion has appointed Alicia Keys to be its new global creative director. Oh, and it also released the Blackberry 10 to a wealth of rave reviews. Neither apparently impressed investors, who pounded the company’s stock price, knocking it back 20% in a day and a half.Surface Off to a Rocky Start (Computerworld)Microsoft’s Windows RT Surface tablet is off to an exceedingly poor start, with sales of at most 750,000 and very high rates of return, according to Rhoda Alexander, an analyst at iSuppli. Alexander attributes the return rate to the steep learning curve of the Win 8 OS, and she notes that there is a “distinct lack of interest” among hardware makers – including Acer and Samsung – to build RT-based devices.Hike the Grand Canyon from Home (PCMag)If you’ve always wanted to hike the Grand Canyon but lack the physical or financial means, Google announced today that it has added more than 9,500 panoramic images of the canyon to its Maps service. The interactive images cover more than 75 miles of trails and surrounding roads.last_img read more

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first_img I’m happy to report that I don’t have many stories for you today. The standout feature for the first week of deliveries against the July silver contract indicates that JPMorgan has taken roughly 90% of the metal offered for delivery, or a total of 1,637 contracts out of a cumulative total of 1,828 delivered so far. In turn, of the silver contracts stopped or accepted by JPMorgan, 90% (1,479 contracts) were for JPMorgan’s own house or proprietary trading account. In other words, JPMorgan took delivery of roughly 7.4 million ounces of silver in the COMEX warehouses for their own benefit and risk. – Silver analyst Ted Butler…06 July 2013 Ted wrote the above paragraph on Saturday in his weekly review for paying subscribers…and as I pointed out in both Monday and Tuesday’s Daily Delivery Report from the CME, JPMorgan Chase has stopped another 350 Comex silver contracts on top of that…or 1.75 million ounces.  Adding that to Ted’s number, you come up with over nine million ounces of silver they’ve taken delivery of in their in-house [proprietary] trading account in the first six trading days of July…and that, dear reader, is a lot…and that’s just what we can see.  Without doubt, they own much more [in one form or another] that we can’t see. There’s not much to discuss about yesterday’s price action, except for the fact that all four precious metals followed the same price path…and in a free market, that’s just not possible. All I’m waiting for now is the end game…and how it plays out…and over how short a time period.  It’s only the start date that remains uncertain…and I’m sure that JPMorgan Chase, when they do let the precious metals rip to the upside, won’t be warning anyone in advance.  You’ll know it’s happening when you look at the price action…and as Ted Butler has been telling me for about fifteen years now…you won’t need to ask “is this it?”…as it will be self-evident. All four precious metals got sold down a bit in Far East trading on their Wednesday, but have recovered somewhat now that London is trading.  Volume’s are already pretty heavy, but mostly of the high-frequency trading variety…and the dollar index is down about 35 basis points.  And as I hit the ‘send’ button at 5:01 a.m. EDT…gold is up a few dollars…and silver is down a dime or so.  Platinum and palladium are both trading unchanged from yesterday’s close in New York. I’m off to bed.  See you here tomorrow. The dollar index closed on Monday at 84.20 in New York…and rallied up to 84.36 by 9:30 a.m. in Hong Kong trading. From that interim high, it rolled over and hit its low of the day at 84.10 just a few minutes or so before London opened.  From there the index rallied over 30 basis points going into the London p.m. gold fix…and then shot up another 30 or so basis points…hitting its high tick [84.73] at 11:30 a.m. in New York. From there it sold off a handful of basis points into the close. The index closed at 84.64…up 44 basis points from Monday.   There was obviously no correlation with the precious metal prices yesterday…especially when you observe the price action in the 3-hour time span between noon BST in London…and the London p.m. gold fix.   The gold stocks peaked at the London p.m. gold fix…and it was all down hill until 2:15 p.m. EDT…when shares recovered a bit on the back of a tiny rally in the gold price that materialized at that point in time. The HUI finished up 1.02%.   The silver stocks did better…with the exception of Coeur d’Alene and Hecla for some reason…and Nick Laird’s Intraday Silver Sentiment Index closed up 2.13%.   (Click to enlarge)   The CME’s Daily Delivery Report showed that zero gold and 181 silver contracts were posted for delivery within the Comex-approved depositories on Thursday. Once again the two largest short/issuers were Canada’s Bank of Nova Scotia…and JPMorgan Chase out of its client account…with 96 and 70 contracts respectively.  Of course JPMorgan was the largest long/stopper again…picking up 170 contracts…virtually all of them for its in-house [proprietary] trading account.  I wonder if JPM’s clients realize just how badly they’re getting their faces ripped off by the company that they do business with?  It’s appalling…but all in a day’s work at that firm…and other Wall Street brokerage houses as well, I would suspect. The link to yesterday’s Issuers and Stoppers Report is here. Another day…and another withdrawal from GLD.  This time it was 231,907 troy ounces.  Since July 1st…six business days ago in the U.S…not including today, which is Wednesday…about 918,000 ounces of gold have been withdrawn from GLD. And as of 10:28 p.m. EDT yesterday evening, there were no reported changes in SLV. While on the subject of SLV, I note that Joshua Gibbons, the Guru of the SLV Silver Bar List, updated his website again yesterday…this time for the close of SLV business on July 3rd…and here are his comments: “Analysis of the 03 July bar list…and comparison to the previous week’s list…772,282.5 oz. were added (all to Brinks London)…144,670.0 oz. were removed (all from Brinks London)…and no bars had a serial number change. The bars added were from: Russian State Refineries (0.5M oz.), KGHM (0.3M oz.), and Henan Yuguang (0.0M oz.). The bars removed were from: Solar Applied Materials (0.1Moz). The bar list shows 144,058.8 oz. less than iShares reports. This is likely the result of a monthly withdrawal, but it is odd that it did not show up on the iShares page.”  The link to Joshua’s website is here. There was no sales report from the U.S. Mint yesterday. All I’m waiting for now is the end game…and how it plays out…and over how short a time period. I shan’t bother giving a blow-by-blow description of the price action in each precious metal for the trading day on Planet Earth on Tuesday, as all four followed precisely the same pattern…a rally in Far East trading with the highs coming shortly before 2:00 p.m. Hong Kong time…a decline until noon in London…rallies into the 3:00 p.m. BST London p.m. gold fix [10:00 a.m. EDT in New York]…and then all were sold down, before more or less trading sideways into the 5:15 p.m. EDT electronic close in New York, although both gold a silver both rallied a bit into the electronic close.   It was just another free-market trading day in gold, silver, platinum and palladium yesterday.   I shall dispense with the New York lows and highs for gold and silver, as they are irrelevant.   Gold closed the Tuesday trading session at $1,250.70 spot…up $13.40 on the day.  Silver finished the Tuesday trading session at $19.26 spot…up 19 cents on the day. Gold’s net volume was higher than yesterday by about 36,000 contracts…around 139,000 contracts in total.  Silver’s gross volume was 36,000 contract…about 15 percent higher than on Monday.     Sponsor Advertisement Opt Out! Tired of being saddled with higher taxes to help pay for the government’s reckless spending? Make sure your money and assets have diplomatic immunity from a government hell-bent on bankrupting the nation – and everyone in it. Find out how to take advantage of this strategy before the government outlaws it too (they’re already working on it). Over at the Comex-approved depositories on Monday, they didn’t report receiving any silver…and shipped a smallish 47,390.470 troy ounces out the door.  The link to that activity is here.  In gold, these same depositories reported receiving 55,870 troy ounces…and shipped out 151,545 troy ounces for parts unknown. The link to that action is here.last_img read more

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first_img[dropcap]S[/dropcap]imply a desperate defeat for Man City at Turf Moor last night and Manuel Pellegrini is coming under further pressure as their title hopes fade into the distance.Chelsea can turn the screw even further on Man City with a win over Southampton leaving them eight points clear AND a game in hand.It could be a tight battle, both sides are good defensively and it will be interesting to see how Chelsea bounce back from their Champions League exit this week. It was a lengthy game which may well have left it’s mark fatigue wise.With the exception of John Obi Mikel (knee injury), Jose Mourinho has a fully fit squad to choose from.Jay Rodriguez and Emmanuel Mayuka are still absent through injury for Southampton who could get right back into the pitch for a Champions League spot if securing all three points here.The stats are very much against them however as Chelsea have lost only one of their last 11 Premier League games against Southampton (W6, D4).Chelsea v SouthamptonPremier League1.30pm SKYHEAD TO HEAD(Maximum 10 matches)Dec 2014 Premier Southampton 1-1 ChelseaJan 2014 Premier Southampton 0-3 ChelseaDec 2013 Premier Chelsea 3-1 SouthamptonMar 2013 Premier Southampton 2-1 ChelseaJan 2013 Premier Chelsea 2-2 SouthamptonJan 2013 FA Cup Southampton 1-5 ChelseaApr 2005 Premiership Southampton 1-3 ChelseaAug 2004 Premiership Chelsea 2-1 SouthamptonMay 2004 Premiership Chelsea 4-0 SouthamptonNov 2003 Premiership Southampton 0-1 ChelseaChelsea to be winning and half time is around 6/4 on Star Sports which looks the call.RECOMMENDED BETS (scale of 1-50 points)BACK CHELSEA/CHELSEA on the HT/FT market for 6 points at around 6/4 with Star SportsRETURN SINCE START OF WORLD CUP: PROFIT 93.92 POINTSWhat’s your view? CALL STAR SPORTS 08000 521 321last_img read more

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first_imgStart Up Your Day March 31, 2016 Image credit: Monica Dipres Looking for the latest headlines in small business, innovation and tech? Our Start Up Your Day recaps are posted every morning to keep you current.No headset required. Microsoft began shipping HoloLens kits yesterday. In addition to the $3,000 device, the company announced an emulator will be available enabling developers to try out holographic apps, according to VentureBeat.“Lite-ing” up. Whoopi Goldberg is launching a marijuana startup just for the ladies to, relieve period pains. A power play. The American Civil Liberties Union released a map of all the places the FBI is taking Apple and, in some cases, even Google, to court in an effort to unlock suspects’ phones. According to Engadget, the ACLU has uncovered 63 cases so far.Taking a different tone. Google introduced a new voice for its search app. Sounding more subtle and neutral, it’s designed to seem more human with more intonation changes, like a higher-pitched inquisitive tone.An unlikely adviser. A 1990 letter from Harper Lee was auctioned off Wednesday. In it, the famed author discusses the Trump Taj Mahal in Atlantic City. She doesn’t hold back. A fresh start. Burrito-maker Chipotle Mexican Grill likely has a burger chain concept in the works. It filed trademark paperwork for the name “Better Burger,” according to the Wall Street Journal.   Add to Queue Lindsay Friedman Download Our iOS App Staff writer. Frequently covers franchise news and food trends. Next Article Chipotle Could Be Opening a Burger Chain — Start Up Your Day Roundup 2 min read –shares Free Green Entrepreneur App Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Keep up with the latest trends and news in the cannabis industry with our free articles and videos, plus subscribe to the digital edition of Green Entrepreneur magazine.last_img read more

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first_img Image credit: Reuters | Robert Galbraith 1 min read This story originally appeared on Reuters Learn from renowned serial entrepreneur David Meltzer how to find your frequency in order to stand out from your competitors and build a brand that is authentic, lasting and impactful. Fireside Chat | July 25: Three Surprising Ways to Build Your Brand Next Article Reuters Salesforcecenter_img August 2, 2016 Enroll Now for $5 Cloud-based software maker Salesforce.com Inc. said on Monday it agreed to acquire document-editing startup Quip for about $582 million.Salesforce has an existing investment in Quip, whose word-processing platform is designed to be used by teams to edit documents or spreadsheets on mobile devices, wearables and desktops.Quip will be a wholly owned subsidiary of Salesforce once the deal closes.Quip Chief Executive Bret Taylor, former chief technology officer of Facebook Inc., was appointed to Twitter Inc.’s board last month.(Reporting by Anya George Tharakan in Bengaluru; Editing by Savio D’Souza) Add to Queue Salesforce to Buy Document-Editing Startup for Millions –shareslast_img read more

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first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Mar 19 2019Milk can be lethal to babies with classic galactosemia, a rare genetic disorder that severely impairs the body’s ability to process a milk sugar known as galactose and is associated with a host of neurodevelopmental issues. However, the fate of children with Duarte galactosemia-;a milder, more common variant-;has been unclear. As a result, state-level recommendations on milk intake for children diagnosed with Duarte galactosemia have varied widely, from no limitations to banning all milk for the first year or more of a child’s development.A new study co-authored by a Washington State University researcher finally brings clarity to parents of children with Duarte galactosemia, their health care providers, and health officials. Published in a recent issue of the journal PEDIATRICS, the study found that children with Duarte galactosemia are at no greater risk of long-term developmental abnormalities than their unaffected siblings, regardless of their exposure to milk as infants.”Therefore, we don’t need to detect Duarte galactosemia, and we don’t need to restrict their milk intake,” said co-author Nancy Potter, a speech-language pathologist and a professor in the Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences at the WSU Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine.Potter, who collaborated on the study with a team of researchers from Emory University, said the findings provide peace of mind to parents of children with Duarte galactosemia that they can confidently feed their child as they would any other baby.”There has been great angst among parents of children with Duarte galactosemia,” Potter said. “They’re wanting to know, ‘Am I harming my baby by giving him or her milk?’ We know the value of breast milk to a baby-;is it worth restricting that? That’s the question we set out to answer.”She said the study findings also make a compelling argument for changes to newborn screening criteria for galactosemia that could provide significant cost savings while minimizing the high number of false positives associated with screening intended to detect Duarte galactosemia.While newborns are screened for galactosemia in all 50 U.S. states, screening protocols vary from state to state-;some only test for the extreme deficiencies of classic galactosemia, while others are designed to detect Duarte galactosemia as well. Newborn screening tests for galactosemia look at blood levels of an enzyme called galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT), which helps convert galactose into glucose that the body can use for energy. Children with GALT enzyme levels of 1 percent or less are considered to have classic galactosemia, which affects about one out of every 50,000 babies born in the U.S. Most babies with Duarte galactosemia-;which is 10 times more common-;have about 25 percent of the normal level of GALT activity.Related StoriesHealthy lifestyle lowers dementia risk despite genetic predispositionStudy: Causes of anorexia are likely metabolic and psychologicalDoes genetic testing affect psychosocial health?To determine long-term outcomes for children with Duarte galactosemia, the research team studied 350 children between the ages of 6 and 12 in 13 U.S. states-;206 children were case patients with Duarte galactosemia; the remaining 144 were unaffected siblings who served as controls.The researchers surveyed parents about each child’s level of dairy consumption as an infant, finding that 40 percent had consumed a substantial amount of dairy, whereas 60 percent had not. They also tested all children for a wide range of outcome measures representing five developmental domains: cognitive development, physical development, speech/language and hearing, motor development, and socioemotional development. Testers were blinded to the status of their subjects, meaning they did not know whether children being tested were case patients or controls. Thorough analysis of the study data showed that there were no significant differences in outcomes between case patients and controls.In a commentary published alongside the study, Shawn McCandless-;a professor of pediatrics and genetics at the University of Colorado Denver and the president of the Society for Inherited Metabolic Disorders-;said, “The field has been waiting 50 years for this study, since newborn screening (NBS) for galactosemia began. This work can be used to impact clinical care and NBS program planning. It can also be used to teach us important lessons about the public funding of research into clinical outcomes and the importance of data-driven clinical decision-making.”Potter said their study is the largest ever conducted in children with Duarte galactosemia and has contributed to clearing up conflicting findings from two earlier, smaller studies. Source:https://wsu.edu/last_img read more

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first_imgCredit: CC0 Public Domain The European Aviation Safety Agency said Tuesday that the new rules will come into force from July 2020, giving member countries and operators time to prepare. The rules will override any relevant existing national rules.EASA said the rules specify that new drones must be “individually identifiable,” allowing authorities to trace a particular drone if needed. They will also allow operators authorized in one EU country to fly their craft in others.EASA Executive Director Patrick Ky said that “common rules will help foster investment, innovation and growth in this promising sector.” Citation: EU publishes Europe-wide rules on drone operation (2019, June 11) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-06-eu-publishes-europe-wide-drone.html EU aviation agency proposing rules for drone operation Explore furthercenter_img © 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. The European Union has published EU-wide rules on drones to provide a clear framework for what is and isn’t allowed, improve safety and make it easier for drone users to operate their craft in another European country. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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first_img COMMENT SHARE SHARE EMAIL To attract more medical tourists to Kerala, CII is organising the seventh edition of Kerala Health Tourism (KHT 2019) on July 3 and 4 in Kochi. The summit will deliberate on the theme “Kerala an emerging global hotspot for medical value traveller”. Delegates from nine countries – Bangladesh, Oman, Africa, Jeddah, Cambodia, Iraq, Maldives, Yemen, Uzbekistan – will participate in the summit. Quoting a recent study, the organisers said India has nearly 18 per cent of the global medical tourism market. The country’s medical tourism industry is estimated to be worth $9 billion, and could account for 20 per cent of the global market by 2020. NITI Aayog identified it as a major source of foreign exchange earnings for India. Although Kerala is the leading State in India for tourism, tourists travelling to the State for medical needs isminimal. A rare combination of advanced facilities, skilled doctors, and low cost of treatment are the advantages Kerala possesses but unfortunately the State is not able to attract the medical tourists to the fullest of its potential. Published on June 25, 2019 SHARE COMMENTSlast_img read more

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first_imgDelhi HC imposes Rs 50,000 cost on woman for filing false sexual harassment pleaThe court said there was no merit in the woman’s petition in which she has challenged the 2012 order of the internal complaint committee (ICC).advertisement Next Press Trust of India New DelhiJuly 12, 2019UPDATED: July 12, 2019 23:22 IST There is no merit in this writ petition which is dismissed with cost of Rs 50,000 to be deposited by the petitioner: Justice JR | File photo from PTIHIGHLIGHTSCourt said the organisation, where woman was working, is at liberty to initiate appropriate action against herThe woman in her complaint had alleged sexual harassment by her senior in 2011The high court said it was of the view that the woman’s complaint appeared to be falseIn a one of its kind order, the Delhi High Court has imposed a cost of Rs 50,000 on a woman for filing a false complaint of sexual harassment against her senior official and dismissed her plea challenging the benefit of doubt given to him.The court said there was no merit in the woman’s petition in which she has challenged the 2012 order of the internal complaint committee (ICC) and sought that direction that the retirement benefits of the man be withheld.”There is no merit in this writ petition which is dismissed with cost of Rs 50,000 to be deposited by the petitioner [woman] with the Delhi High Court Advocates Welfare Trust within four weeks,” Justice JR Midha said.The court said the organisation, where the woman was working, is at liberty to initiate appropriate action against her for “filing a false compliant” against the man in accordance with law.In her petition, the woman had also sought direction to the organisation to initiate independent departmental enquiry against the man and to also prosecute him.The woman in her complaint had alleged sexual harassment by her senior in 2011. She had alleged that the man had misbehaved and made sexual advances towards her.To examine the complaint, an ICC was constituted where the man had denied the allegation and claimed that the complaint was the result of a grudge against him due to certain official work disposed by him in her absence.The committee had observed that the exact content of communication of the incident could not be established and gave benefit of doubt to the man.It had recommended relocating both the woman and the man from their present posting.The high court, after going through the record of the inquiry proceedings, said it was of the view that the woman’s complaint appeared to be false.It said the woman had claimed that the incident took place in the presence of the staff and other members but during the inquiry proceedings, she could not give the name of any person present at that time.”The petitioner has not mentioned the alleged comments of respondent No 3 [man] in the complaint on the ground of modesty. The petitioner did not even disclose the alleged comments before the committee. No reason or justification was been given by the petitioner for not disclosing the same before the committee. The entire complaint of the petitioner appears to be false and has been filed with some ulterior motive,” the court said.Also Read | Delhi High Court turns down plea to declare marital rape as ground for divorceAlso Read | Delhi: Men rally against criminalisation of marital rape, share tales of spousal abuseAlso Watch | Why marital rape can’t be criminalised?For the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byMohak Gupta Tags :Follow Delhi High CourtFollow sexual harassementlast_img read more

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