first_imgJuly 9, 2018 Snowflake Council gives OK on $10 million budget By Diana Hutchison The Town of Snowflake held its regular monthly council meeting on July 3. Among the agenda items was the tentative budget for the 2018-2019 fiscal year. The budget total comes in atSubscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Adlast_img

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first_imgRichard Adhikari has been an ECT News Network reporter since 2008. His areas of focus include cybersecurity, mobile technologies, CRM, databases, software development, mainframe and mid-range computing, and application development. He has written and edited for numerous publications, including Information Week and Computerworld. He is the author of two books on client/server technology. Email Richard. Bixby is a contextual service, not just a voice assistant, and “even if the Voice component isn’t there yet, Bixby can still learn about you with Bixby Home and Bixby Vision,” Llamas noted. “There’s value in that, because Bixby has to build up a library of experiences in order to make the contextual connections.”Bixby “is very much a new wave of opportunity for Samsung,” observed Jeff Orr, a senior practice director at ABI Research.”It’s not a point solution — having a certain set of features and functionality for a particular audience at a particular price point,” he told TechNewsWorld.The concept underlying Bixby is to make intelligent machines learn and adapt to humans, instead of having humans learn how machines interact with the world, explained Samsung EVP InJong Rhee, when announcing the new service last month.With Bixby, Samsung “is positioned in the interaction layer which is used to engage with other services,” noted IHS Markit’s Schneeman.”If Samsung’s successful with its execution and broadens Bixby’s scope as announced, it’ll be an engagement tool for a broad range of devices, regardless of the operating system they run,” he added.”This concept of Bixby being able to interact with the environment around you just using your voice is a powerful thing that other brands haven’t even begun to articulate,” ABI’s Orr pointed out. “It’s very bold and a major undertaking.” Samsung on Wednesday said that Bixby Voice will not be operational when its Galaxy S8 and S8+ smartphones hit the market.Some Bixby features — Vision, Home and Reminder — will be active when the phones become available on April 21, Samsung said, but the Bixby Voice capability won’t show up until later this spring.The delay may be due to a weakness in Bixby’s English language chops, according to some reports. Its voice recognition in English apparently lags its Korean language capabilities substantially. That mismatch might be worrisome to Samsung, as it could cast its new artificial intelligence assistant in a negative light.It’s also possible that Samsung wants to round up more third-party apps to support Bixby Voice before it makes its debut. More Than a Voicecenter_img Whatever the reason underlying it, Samsung’s decision to delay the feature likely is prudent.”The S8 and S8+ are make-or-break products for Samsung to successfully rebound from BatteryGate,” said Cliff Raskind, a research director at Strategy Analytics.The S8 “offers a lot of industry firsts. Everything, including Bixby, has to be perfect on this rollout,” he told TechNewsWorld. “A launch date slip for Bixby would, in the final analysis, be more palatable than a sub-par experience.”Voice recognition requires an “immense orchestration” of software and services, said Ramon Llamas, a research manager at IDC.Bixby “is generation one, was built from the ground up by Samsung, and doesn’t extend beyond its walls,” he told TechNewsWorld. “I’m OK with their giving it a pass until it’s ready for prime time instead of ending up with egg on their face.”It’s important for Samsung to ensure that Bixby works correctly, noted Gerrit Schneemann, a senior analyst at IHS Markit.Samsung is “already behind, and a sloppy launch would have a negative effect,” he told TechNewsWorld, but “a delayed start — not so much.”However, “the longer Samsung delays in pushing out Bixby Voice, the more this will erode consumer confidence,” IDC’s Llamas cautioned. “The S8 runs on Android Nougat, which has Google Assistant built in as standard. Google Assistant does a lot of things very well.” Slow and Easy Wins the Racelast_img read more

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first_img Source:https://www.jhsph.edu/news/news-releases/2018/essential-oils-from-garlic-and-other-herbs-and-spices-kill-persister-lyme-disease-bacteria.html Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Dec 3 2018Oils from garlic and several other common herbs and medicinal plants show strong activity against the bacterium that causes Lyme disease, according to a study by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. These oils may be especially useful in alleviating Lyme symptoms that persist despite standard antibiotic treatment, the study also suggests.The study, published October 16 in the journal Antibiotics, included lab-dish tests of 35 essential oils–oils that are pressed from plants or their fruits and contain the plant’s main fragrance, or “essence.” The Bloomberg School researchers found that 10 of these, including oils from garlic cloves, myrrh trees, thyme leaves, cinnamon bark, allspice berries and cumin seeds, showed strong killing activity against dormant and slow-growing “persister” forms of the Lyme disease bacterium.”We found that these essential oils were even better at killing the ‘persister’ forms of Lyme bacteria than standard Lyme antibiotics,” says study senior author Ying Zhang, MD, PhD, professor in the Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology at the Bloomberg School.There are an estimated 300,000 new cases of Lyme disease each year in the United States. Standard treatment with doxycycline or an alternative antibiotic for a few weeks usually clears the infection and resolves symptoms. However, about 10 to 20 percent of patients report persistent symptoms including fatigue and joint pain–often termed “persistent Lyme infection” or “post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome” (PTLDS) that in some cases can last for months or years.The cause of this lingering syndrome isn’t known. But it is known that cultures of Lyme disease bacteria, Borrelia burgdorferi, can enter a so-called stationary phase in which many of the cells divide slowly or not at all. The slow-dividing or dormant cells are “persister” cells, which can form naturally under nutrient starvation or stress conditions, and are more resistant to antibiotics. Some researchers have sought other drugs or medicinal compounds that can kill persister Lyme bacteria in the hope that these compounds can be used to treat people with persistent Lyme symptoms.Related Stories’Scissors’ component of CRISPR/Cas9 sometimes gets stuckNew methods to recognize antimicrobial resistant bacteria and how they workNew research could help design algae that produces fuels and cleanup chemicalsZhang and his laboratory have been at the forefront of these efforts. In 2014, his lab screened FDA-approved drugs for activity against persister Lyme bacteria and found many candidates including daptomycin (used to treat MRSA) that had better activity than the current Lyme antibiotics. In 2015, they reported that a three-antibiotic combination–doxycycline, cefoperazone and daptomycin–reliably killed Lyme persister bacteria in lab dish tests. In a 2017 study they found that essential oils from oregano, cinnamon bark, clove buds, citronella and wintergreen killed stationary phase Lyme bacteria even more potently than daptomycin, the champion among tested pharmaceuticals.In the new study Zhang and his team extended their lab-dish testing to include 35 other essential oils, and found 10 that show significant killing activity against stationary phase Lyme bacteria cultures at concentrations of just one part per thousand. At this concentration, five of these oils, derived respectively from garlic bulbs, allspice berries, myrrh trees, spiked ginger lily blossoms and may change fruit successfully killed all stationary phase Lyme bacteria in their culture dishes in seven days, so no bacteria grew back in 21 days.Oils from thyme leaves, cumin seeds and amyris wood also performed well, as did cinnamaldehyde, the fragrant main ingredient of cinnamon bark oil.Lab-dish tests such as these represent an early stage of research, but Zhang and colleagues hope in the near future to continue their investigations of essential oils with tests in live animals, including tests in mouse models of persistent Lyme infection. If those tests go well and the effective doses seem safe, Zhang expects to organize initial tests in humans.”At this stage these essential oils look very promising as candidate treatments for persistent Lyme infection, but ultimately we need properly designed clinical trials,” he says.last_img read more

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first_img The biggest conflict among Republicans and Democrats on the drug issue centers on the GOP’s reluctance to give the government a role in directly negotiating prices. Adding to the pressure is the clear indication that the issue will be front and center in the 2020 campaign. Some states, such as California, are looking to find ways to bring down drug costs on their own. California Gov. Gavin Newsom, a Democrat, has proposed that the state have direct negotiations with drugmakers. Such efforts could mean cutting off consumers’ access to some drugs, if manufacturers don’t agree to a price the state likes, and that is a painful choice for officials and patients. When House committee assignments were released this week, women were appointed to lead many of the key panels that have a hand in health policy, including the chairman and top Republican on the Appropriations Committee and two Energy and Commerce subcommittees. The House Democratic Caucus now has more liberal members and fewer conservatives, so the party’s efforts to roll back restrictions on abortion are likely to be more robust. That could also trigger some big battles with Republicans through the legislative session. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) is putting a bill on the Senate floor that would make permanent the Hyde Amendment — which bars federal funding of abortions in nearly all circumstances. But it seems unlikely that bill could be passed by the Senate, where it needs 60 votes, and even some Republicans are believed to oppose it. Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Jan 17 2019 Related StoriesComputer-generated flu vaccine enters clinical trials in the USVirus killing protein could be the real antiviral hero finds studyCharacterizing and Isolating (Bio)macromolecular Structures using MALSPlus, for extra credit, the panelists recommend their favorite health policy stories of the week they think you should read too:Julie Rovner: Bloomberg News’ “This JPMorgan Health Conference Is So Packed Attendees Are Meeting in the Bathroom,” by Kristen V BrownJoanne Kenen: The New York Times’ “The Strange Marketplace for Diabetes Test Strips,” by Ted AlcornMargot Sanger-Katz: Kaiser Health News’ “Patients Turn To GoFundMe When Money And Hope Run Out,” by Mark ZdechlikAlice Ollstein: The Washington Post’s “Federal Officials Launch Audit of D.C. Government’s Opioid Grant Spending,” by Peter JamisonThis story was produced by Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent program of the Kaiser Family Foundation. This article was reprinted from khn.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent news service, is a program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan health care policy research organization unaffiliated with Kaiser Permanente. Many drugmakers have announced price increases with the start of the new year. The new Congress wants to do something about that. And even though both Republicans and Democrats want to address the politically potent issue of drug prices, it is unclear what they might be able to agree on.Battle lines are forming between the House and Senate on the matter of abortion. The House is led by abortion-rights supporters and, since the election, the Senate has become slightly more against abortion.And even though the majority of the Department of Health and Human Services remains unaffected by the partial government shutdown, the lapse of funding for other agencies is having spillover effects on health programs.This week’s panelists for KHN’s “What the Health?” are Julie Rovner of Kaiser Health News, Joanne Kenen of Politico, Margot Sanger-Katz of The New York Times and Alice Ollstein of Politico.Among the takeaways from this week’s podcast:last_img read more

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first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Feb 7 2019The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Cablivi (caplacizumab-yhdp) injection, the first therapy specifically indicated, in combination with plasma exchange and immunosuppressive therapy, for the treatment of adult patients with acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (aTTP), a rare and life-threatening disorder that causes blood clotting.”Patients with aTTP endure hours of treatment with daily plasma exchange, which requires being attached to a machine that takes blood out of the body and mixes it with donated plasma and then returns it to the body. Even after days or weeks of this treatment, as well as taking drugs that suppress the immune system, many patients will have a recurrence of aTTP,” said Richard Pazdur, M.D., director of the FDA’s Oncology Center of Excellence and acting director of the Office of Hematology and Oncology Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “Cablivi is the first targeted treatment that inhibits the formation of blood clots. It provides a new treatment option for patients that may reduce recurrences.”Patients with aTTP develop extensive blood clots in the small blood vessels throughout the body. These clots can cut off oxygen and blood supply to the major organs and cause strokes and heart attacks that may lead to brain damage or death. Patients can develop aTTP because of conditions such as cancer, HIV, pregnancy, lupus or infections, or after having surgery, bone marrow transplantation or chemotherapy.The efficacy of Cablivi was studied in a clinical trial of 145 patients who were randomized to receive either Cablivi or a placebo. Patients in both groups received the current standard of care of plasma exchange and immunosuppressive therapy. The results of the trial demonstrated that platelet counts improved faster among patients treated with Cablivi, compared to placebo. Treatment with Cablivi also resulted in a lower total number of patients with either aTTP-related death and recurrence of aTTP during the treatment period, or at least one treatment-emergent major thrombotic event (where blood clots form inside a blood vessel and may then break free to travel throughout the body).The proportion of patients with a recurrence of aTTP in the overall study period (the drug treatment period plus a 28-day follow-up period after discontinuation of drug treatment) was lower in the Cablivi group (13 percent) compared to the placebo group (38 percent), a finding that was statistically significant.Common side effects of Cablivi reported by patients in clinical trials were bleeding of the nose or gums and headache. The prescribing information for Cablivi includes a warning to advise health care providers and patients about the risk of severe bleeding.Health care providers are advised to monitor patients closely for bleeding when administering Cablivi to patients who currently take anticoagulants.The FDA granted this application Priority Review designation. Cablivi also received Orphan Drug designation, which provides incentives to assist and encourage the development of drugs for rare diseases.The FDA granted the approval of Cablivi to Ablynx. Source:https://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm630851.htmlast_img read more

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first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Mar 19 2019Milk can be lethal to babies with classic galactosemia, a rare genetic disorder that severely impairs the body’s ability to process a milk sugar known as galactose and is associated with a host of neurodevelopmental issues. However, the fate of children with Duarte galactosemia-;a milder, more common variant-;has been unclear. As a result, state-level recommendations on milk intake for children diagnosed with Duarte galactosemia have varied widely, from no limitations to banning all milk for the first year or more of a child’s development.A new study co-authored by a Washington State University researcher finally brings clarity to parents of children with Duarte galactosemia, their health care providers, and health officials. Published in a recent issue of the journal PEDIATRICS, the study found that children with Duarte galactosemia are at no greater risk of long-term developmental abnormalities than their unaffected siblings, regardless of their exposure to milk as infants.”Therefore, we don’t need to detect Duarte galactosemia, and we don’t need to restrict their milk intake,” said co-author Nancy Potter, a speech-language pathologist and a professor in the Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences at the WSU Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine.Potter, who collaborated on the study with a team of researchers from Emory University, said the findings provide peace of mind to parents of children with Duarte galactosemia that they can confidently feed their child as they would any other baby.”There has been great angst among parents of children with Duarte galactosemia,” Potter said. “They’re wanting to know, ‘Am I harming my baby by giving him or her milk?’ We know the value of breast milk to a baby-;is it worth restricting that? That’s the question we set out to answer.”She said the study findings also make a compelling argument for changes to newborn screening criteria for galactosemia that could provide significant cost savings while minimizing the high number of false positives associated with screening intended to detect Duarte galactosemia.While newborns are screened for galactosemia in all 50 U.S. states, screening protocols vary from state to state-;some only test for the extreme deficiencies of classic galactosemia, while others are designed to detect Duarte galactosemia as well. Newborn screening tests for galactosemia look at blood levels of an enzyme called galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT), which helps convert galactose into glucose that the body can use for energy. Children with GALT enzyme levels of 1 percent or less are considered to have classic galactosemia, which affects about one out of every 50,000 babies born in the U.S. Most babies with Duarte galactosemia-;which is 10 times more common-;have about 25 percent of the normal level of GALT activity.Related StoriesHealthy lifestyle lowers dementia risk despite genetic predispositionStudy: Causes of anorexia are likely metabolic and psychologicalDoes genetic testing affect psychosocial health?To determine long-term outcomes for children with Duarte galactosemia, the research team studied 350 children between the ages of 6 and 12 in 13 U.S. states-;206 children were case patients with Duarte galactosemia; the remaining 144 were unaffected siblings who served as controls.The researchers surveyed parents about each child’s level of dairy consumption as an infant, finding that 40 percent had consumed a substantial amount of dairy, whereas 60 percent had not. They also tested all children for a wide range of outcome measures representing five developmental domains: cognitive development, physical development, speech/language and hearing, motor development, and socioemotional development. Testers were blinded to the status of their subjects, meaning they did not know whether children being tested were case patients or controls. Thorough analysis of the study data showed that there were no significant differences in outcomes between case patients and controls.In a commentary published alongside the study, Shawn McCandless-;a professor of pediatrics and genetics at the University of Colorado Denver and the president of the Society for Inherited Metabolic Disorders-;said, “The field has been waiting 50 years for this study, since newborn screening (NBS) for galactosemia began. This work can be used to impact clinical care and NBS program planning. It can also be used to teach us important lessons about the public funding of research into clinical outcomes and the importance of data-driven clinical decision-making.”Potter said their study is the largest ever conducted in children with Duarte galactosemia and has contributed to clearing up conflicting findings from two earlier, smaller studies. Source:https://wsu.edu/last_img read more

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first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Mar 22 2019UT Southwestern researchers have identified two proteins that act as gatekeepers to dampen a potentially life-threatening immune response to chronic infection.The proteins – the transcription factors SIX1 and SIX2 – activate cellular pathways required for fetal development and later switch to a new role in which they repress these pathways in adult immune system cells. The findings are published today in Nature.”This work provides insight into the molecular components required to limit tissue damage associated with uncontrolled inflammation, such as in septic shock, and reveals how cancer cells may suppress the innate immune system during tumor genesis,” said Dr. Neal Alto, Professor of Microbiology at UT Southwestern and corresponding author of the study.Transcription factors are proteins that bind to special regions of DNA to turn genes on (activate them) or off (repress them). “One of the surprising findings was that a transcription activator that is essential for the development of tissues and organs has been repurposed as a transcriptional repressor in the immune system. While transcription factors can be used differently in various stages of life, a switch from a transcriptional activator in the fetus to a suppressor in adult immune cells is infrequent,” said Dr. Alto, who holds the Lorraine Sulkin Schein Endowed Distinguished Professorship in Microbial Pathogenesis. Dr. Alto is also a UT Southwestern Presidential Scholar and a Rita C. and William P. Clements, Jr. Scholar in Medical Research.He added that the work provides a new pathway for controlling inflammation, which could be important for developing new drugs. It also might explain how cancer cells develop chemotherapy resistance.The researchers found that the two proteins showed inhibitory activities when bound to genes involved in inflammation. Specifically, SIX1 and SIX2 appeared to dampen the body’s immune response to prevent damage associated with a potentially life-threatening condition called a cytokine storm, which can occur in chronic inflammatory conditions. “A cytokine storm can occur when the body’s immune cells and activators (cytokines) show an overresponse to a health threat such as the flu,” he explained.Related StoriesComplement system shown to remove dead cells in retinitis pigmentosa, contradicting previous researchFibrinogen a key player in health and disease, says new studyChronic inflammation removes motivation by reducing dopamine in the brainAn experiment with transgenic mice found that expression of SIX1 in adulthood conferred near-complete recovery following exposure to a toxin released by gram-negative bacteria that can set off a cytokine storm. The two SIX proteins seem to dampen the response of the so-called noncanonical NF-κB pathway, a signaling cascade that is instrumental in the development of the lymph organs, the maturation of the immune system’s antibody-producing B cells, and the development of bone cells. The same pathway is involved in the body’s immune defense in adulthood.The studies, which initially focused on bacteria and viruses, also shed light on mechanisms of cancer cell resistance to drug treatment, Dr. Alto said.In one series of experiments, the team found that cancer cells derived from patients with treatment-resistant non-small cell lung cancer expressed high levels of the SIX1 and SIX2 proteins. The scientists used the CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing technology to remove the genes that produce those two proteins, making the cancer cells dramatically more sensitive to a promising drug class called SMAC mimetics.”In summary, we have established that SIX family transcription factors function as immunological gatekeepers, regulating the activity of inflammatory genes in response to noncanonical NF-κB pathway activation,” he said. “These findings indicate that disruption of this pathway could have important consequences for the pathogenesis of human disease, including cancer.” Source:https://www.utsouthwestern.edu/newsroom/articles/year-2019/reducing-inflammation.htmllast_img read more

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first_imgRisk reduction for Alzheimer’s disease is now more critical than ever due to the continued lack of a cure or effective disease-slowing treatment,”Dr. Joshua S. Talboom, a Postdoctoral Fellow in TGen’s Neurogenomics Division, and a member of Dr. Huentelman’s lab Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jun 21 2019Results from a study of nearly 60,000 individuals suggest those at higher risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease due to family history may demonstrate changes in memory performance as early as their 20s.Researchers from the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), an affiliate of City of Hope, and the University of Arizona gathered the data through an online word-pair memory test called MindCrowd, one of the world’s largest scientific assessments of how healthy brains function.Published today in the scientific journal eLife, study data suggests that those with a family history of Alzheimer’s disease, and who are younger than 65, on average do not perform as well as their peers who do not have a family history of Alzheimer’s, the most common form of dementia.The study results suggest that the family history effect is particularly pronounced among men, as well as those with lower educational attainment, diabetes, and carriers of a common genetic change in APOE, a gene long associated with Alzheimer’s disease risk.While family history has previously been associated with the risk of Alzheimer’s, this is the first study of its kind, and in these numbers, that indicates this risk can be detected up to four decades before the typical age of onset. The study looked at 59,571 MindCrowd participants aged 18-85, and the effect of family history was shown across every age group, up until age 65.”In this study we show that family history is associated with reduced paired-associate learning performance as many as four decades before the typical onset of Alzheimer’s disease,” said Dr. Matt Huentelman, TGen Professor of Neurogenomics, and the study’s senior authorBecause there is no cure or proven way of slowing progressive memory-loss among those with Alzheimer’s, early indicators of the disease can help those at risk to focus on ways to help stave off dementia. Related StoriesGenetic contribution to distractibility helps explain procrastinationResearchers identify gene mutations linked to leukemia in children with Down’s syndromeStudy reveals link between inflammatory diet and colorectal cancer risk”This study supports recommendations underscoring the importance of living a healthy lifestyle and properly treating disease states such as diabetes,” said Dr. Talboom, the study’s lead author. “Our findings specifically highlight the positive effects of such interventions for those with a family history risk of Alzheimer’s, opening the door to the development of more targeted risk-reduction approaches to combat the disease.”In addition, this study underscores the utility of web-based participant recruitment to research studies like MindCrowd, facilitating large sample sizes in a cost- and time-effective fashion, said Dr. Lee Ryan, a University of Arizona Alzheimer’s researcher, who along with the UA’s Dr. Betty Glisky, helped Dr. Huentelman develop MindCrowd. Drs. Ryan and Glisky were contributing authors to the study.”It should be acknowledged that that web-based studies are not without concerns. However, we propose that the advantage of considerably larger sample sizes and enriched participant diversity in online research mostly diminishes the potential disadvantages,” Dr. Ryan said.The MindCrowd study began in 2013. By August 2018, it had nearly 60,000 qualified participants, whose performance is reflected in the study. Today, more than 115,000 people, aged 18-95 — from all 50 states and 150 nations around the world — have completed the MindCrowd assessment.MindCrowd cannot tell you if you have Alzheimer’s. What it does give researchers is a set of data baselines about how people not suffering from the disease perform at different ages; among men and women, among those with quick and slow physical responses, among those who smoke and those who don’t, and among many other demographic, lifestyle and health factors.Establishing these baselines will help researchers to more properly evaluate Alzheimer’s patients and usher in a new era of what the MindCrowd developers describe as Precision Aging.Alzheimer’s is a progressive neurological disorder that typically presents clinically as deficits in memory and thinking. It is estimated that more than 5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s, and that by 2050 that number will nearly triple to almost 14 million. Source:The Translational Genomics Research InstituteJournal reference:Talboom, J. et al. (2019) Family history of Alzheimer’s disease alters cognition and is modified by medical and genetic factors. eLife. doi.org/10.7554/eLife.46179last_img read more

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The recall will affect 1.7-litre models of the KitchenAid brand manufactured between January 2013 and June 2017 and sold in Europe, the Middle East and Africa, it said in a statement.The group decided to tke action following complaints from customers that handles were breaking off, exposing users to the risk of being burned by boiling water. “We voluntarily take action to keep our consumers safe by asking for the products to be returned to Whirlpool in exchange for a new one at no cost to the consumer,” it explained.The US multinational was recently criticised by British MPs for its “woeful” response to problems identified in some of the tumble dryers produced by its Hotpoint, Creda and Indesit brands which are a fire risk.A Whirlpool-made fridge freezer was also found to be the source of a fire in a London tower block last year which left 71 people dead. US appliance giant Whirlpool announced Tuesday it was recalling 310,000 kettles worldwide that are potentially dangerous because of faulty handles. HP recalls computer batteries over fire risk US appliance giant Whirlpool has recalled 310,000 kettles worldwide that are potentially dangerous because of faulty handles Citation: Whirlpool recalls 310,000 kettles over safety fears (2018, February 20) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-02-whirlpool-recalls-kettles-safety.html © 2018 AFP Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. read more

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Aramco is contemplating listing on a domestic stock exchange said reports on March 19, 2018 Saudi Arabia plans to sell shares of Saudi Aramco on a local exchange and may scuttle entirely an earlier plan for an overseas listing, The Wall Street Journal reported Monday. Saudi Arabia plans to build futuristic city for innovators This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Aramco had previously discussed an initial public offering in the latter half of 2018 and had been eyeing a listing on New York or another international exchange.However, the oil giant is now contemplating listing on a domestic stock exchange, viewing the legal risks of listing in New York as considerable, said The Journal, which cited unnamed officials as well as some public comments from top Saudi officials.The report also said the earliest a listing could take place would be April 2019.The report comes as Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman prepares to meet Tuesday with President Donald Trump, who has publicly lobbied for a US Aramco listing.The Aramco IPO had previously been seen as potentially raising $100 billion, but higher oil prices have helped mitigate the need for additional funds, The Journal said.The IPO forms the cornerstone of the petro-state’s reform program to wean the economy off its reliance on oil revenues.Until 2014, oil income made up more than 90 percent of public revenues in Saudi Arabia.But following a protracted global oil slump, the kingdom is seeking to diversify its economy and privatize some state assets alongside new measures such as a value-added tax. Citation: Aramco eyes local IPO, may spike overseas listing: report (2018, March 20) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-03-aramco-eyes-local-ipo-spike.html Explore further © 2018 AFP read more

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first_img Explore further Bloomberg News said the tiny chips were place in gadgets made for Amazon and Apple, and possibly for other companies and government agencies.The article comes as China-US relations are strained by a long-running trade war, claims of intellectual property theft by Beijing and an accusation China is trying to sway upcoming elections.The chip story “plays heavily into the view that the Sino-US trade stoush is not just about Trump’s infatuation with the size of the US-China bilateral trade balance”, said Ray Attrill, head of foreign exchange strategy at the National Australia Bank. “But is a much more geopolitical affair as well as being related to China’s desire to dominate the technology sphere. It means that an early resolution of Sino-US trade issued is not a realistic prospect.”The sell-off comes as tech firms around the world struggle on profit-taking following a healthy rally in recent years, while chip makers are also being hurt by falling demand.In morning Hong Kong trade PC maker Lenovo tanked more than 17 percent, while mainland-based telecoms equipment maker ZTE plunged 11.4 percent.AAC Technologies a Hong Kong firm listed in the city, sank almost two percent, while in Taipei HTC sank 3.6 percent, Realtek was almost seven percent off and Delta Electronics retreated 4.5 percent.”Electronics produced in China may be viewed unsafe due to this news, and tech shares are falling in general because of that,” said Ray K W Kwok, an analyst at CGS-CIMB Securities Hong Kong.With around a third of its revenue coming from North America, Lenovo could be in particular trouble.And ZTE was already struggling to recover its losses for the year after collapsing 40 percent in June in response to a Washington decision to ban US companies from selling crucial hardware and software components to it for seven years. While the ban was eventually lifted after it agreed to pay a huge fine, its share price remains subdued.”The hack report has nothing to do with Lenovo, but since Lenovo sells PCs and servers there, some investors may have concerns on a sentiment level,” Dennis Guan, a senior analyst at eFusion Capital. “It’s just too hard to predict how things will develop.”The report added to already tense relations between the world’s top two economies as they slug out a trade war that has seen them impose tariffs on hundreds of billions worth of goods.Vice President Mike Pence added to the uncertainty by accusing Beijing of military aggression, commercial theft and rising human rights violations, while saying it was bent on interfering in upcoming US elections.”There can be no doubt—China is meddling in America’s democracy,” he warned. Citation: Lenovo shares pummelled in Hong Kong after microchip report (2018, October 5) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-10-lenovo-pummelled-hong-kong-microchip.html China’s Lenovo led a sharp tech sell-off in Asia on Friday after a report said Beijing had used microchips inserted in US computer goods as part of a drive to steal technology secrets. China’s ZTE dives 39% at resumption of trading in Hong Kongcenter_img © 2018 AFP This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. The plunge in Lenovo and ZTE’s shares comes as tech firms around the world suffer losses following recent strong gainslast_img read more

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first_imgCredit: CC0 Public Domain The European Aviation Safety Agency said Tuesday that the new rules will come into force from July 2020, giving member countries and operators time to prepare. The rules will override any relevant existing national rules.EASA said the rules specify that new drones must be “individually identifiable,” allowing authorities to trace a particular drone if needed. They will also allow operators authorized in one EU country to fly their craft in others.EASA Executive Director Patrick Ky said that “common rules will help foster investment, innovation and growth in this promising sector.” Citation: EU publishes Europe-wide rules on drone operation (2019, June 11) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-06-eu-publishes-europe-wide-drone.html EU aviation agency proposing rules for drone operation Explore furthercenter_img © 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. The European Union has published EU-wide rules on drones to provide a clear framework for what is and isn’t allowed, improve safety and make it easier for drone users to operate their craft in another European country. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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first_imgNEW DELHI (Reuters) – U.S. President Donald Trump faced criticism for saying Pakistan’s arrest of the alleged mastermind of the 2008 attacks on Mumbai had come after a 10-year search, as the suspected militant had been living in plain view. U.S. President Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally in Greenville, North Carolina July 17, 2019. REUTERS/Kevin LamarquePakistani authorities on Wednesday arrested Hafiz Saeed, the founder of the Lashkar-e-Taiba militant group that is accused by India and the United States of carrying out the Mumbai attacks, on terrorism financing charges. More than 160 people were killed in the four-day militant attacks. Saeed is designated a terrorist by the United States and the United Nations. Trump, who is due to host Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan for talks at the White House next week, welcomed Saeed’s arrest and said it was the result of pressure from his administration on Pakistan to get tougher on militants. “After a ten year search, the so-called “mastermind” of the Mumbai Terror attacks has been arrested in Pakistan. Great pressure has been exerted over the last two years to find him!,” Trump tweeted. But Saeed has been in and out of Pakistan prisons for the last decade and even addressed public rallies. The U.S. House Foreign Affairs Committee countered Trump’s comments with a tweet of its listing the eight times Saeed had been arrested and freed by Pakistan authorities since 2001. “FYI Pakistan wasn’t searching for him for 10 years. He’s been living freely..” it said and suggested Trump hold the applause till Saeed is convicted by Pakistani authorities. Former Pakistan ambassador to the United States Husain Haqqani said Trump had been ill-advised about Saeed’s case. “Finding him was never an issue. He operated freely and was highly visible. He has been arrested and released many times over. @POTUS shd immediately fire whoever gave him the wrong information,” he said in a tweet, referring to Trump. Pakistan said Saeed was arrested while he was going to a court to seek pre-arrest bail. Saeed has denied any involvement and Pakistani authorities say they have not found any evidence against him either. India says Pakistan’s failure to act against the suspected militant is one of the reasons it won’t resume peace talks with the arch rival. Christian Fair, a South Asia specialist at Georgetown University, said Trump was also wrong to describe Saeed as the “so-called mastermind” of the Mumbai attacks. “@POTUS shows AGAIN that he’s a complete dumbass,” said Fair. Reporting by Sanjeev Miglani; Editing by Michael PerryOur Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.last_img read more

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first_img Read the WHO’s answers to frequently asked questions about GMOs. Why GMOs are good Many scientific organizations and industry groups agree that the fear-mongering that runs through discussions of GMO foods is more emotional than factual. “Indeed, the science is quite clear: crop improvement by the modern molecular techniques of biotechnology is safe,” the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) said in a 2012 statement. “The World Health Organization, the American Medical Association, the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, the British Royal Society, and every other respected organization that has examined the evidence has come to the same conclusion: Consuming foods containing ingredients derived from GM (genetically modified) crops is no riskier than consuming the same foods containing ingredients from crop plants modified by conventional plant improvement techniques,” according to the AAAS. Others point to the benefits of sturdier crops with higher yields. “GM crops can improve yields for farmers, reduce draws on natural resources and fossil fuels and provide nutritional benefits,” according to a statement on the website for Monsanto, the world’s largest manufacturer of GMOs. Monsanto and other agriculture companies have a financial stake in the research and messaging surrounding GM foods and have the resources to fund research that reinforces their narrative. However, although there are plenty of scientific data that demonstrates the safety, efficacy and resilience of GM crops, genetic modification remains a comparatively new scientific field. GMO labeling debate The argument over the development and marketing of GMO foods has become a political hot potato in recent years. In November 2015, the FDA issued a ruling that only requires additional labeling of foods derived from genetically engineered sources if there is a material difference — such as a different nutritional profile — between the GMO product and its non-GMO equivalent. The agency also approved AquaAdvantage Salmon, a salmon designed to grow faster than non-GMO salmon. According to Monsanto, “there is no scientific justification for special labeling of foods that contain GM ingredients. We support these positions and the FDA’s approach.” According to GMO Answers, an industry group comprised of Monsanto, DuPont, Dow AgroSciences, Bayer, BASF, CropScience and Syngenta, GMO agricultural products are “by far the most regulated and tested product in agricultural history.” Additionally, their website states that “many independent scientists and organizations around the world — such as the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, World Health Organization, American Medical Association and the American Association for the Advancement of Science — have looked at thousands of scientific studies and concluded that GM food crops do not pose more risks to people, animals or the environment than any other foods.” The political issue that GMOs have become is almost as conductive as the scientific debate. However, after much discussion among various lawmakers across the U.S., the National Bioengineered Food Disclosure Standard (NBFDS) was passed into law at the beginning of 2019. According to the NBFDS current federal statutes, starting in 2020, all food must bear a BE (bioengineered) label if it contains more than 5% bioengineered material. States are free to impose their own labeling requirements as well, though it seems that most jurisdictions are waiting for federal laws to be implemented before working on new legislation. One thing is for certain: the scientific and political discussions surrounding GMO foods aren’t going away any time soon. Additional resources: See how Americans are narrowly divided on their thoughts about GMO safety according to a recent Pew Research Center report. This article was updated on July 8, 2019 by Live Science Contributor Mark Davis. by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 minute and see why everyone is addictedVikings: Free Online GameUndoGundry MD SupplementsTop Cardiologist: This One Thing Will Properly Flush Out Your BowelsGundry MD SupplementsUndoHealthCentral.com7 Sneaky Signs of Lung CancerHealthCentral.comUndoYahoo SearchYou’ve Never Seen Luxury Like This On A Cruise Ship. Search Luxury Mediterranean CruisesYahoo SearchUndoArticles VallyDad Cuts Daughter’s Hair Off For Getting Birthday Highlights, Then Mom Does The UnthinkableArticles VallyUndocenter_img Learn more about the genetics behind GM foods, from the University of Utah. A genetically modified organism, or GMO, is an organism that has had its DNA altered or modified in some way through genetic engineering. In most cases, GMOs have been altered with DNA from another organism, be it a bacterium, plant, virus or animal; these organisms are sometimes referred to as “transgenic” organisms. Genetics from a spider that helps the arachnid produce silk, for example, could be inserted into the DNA of an ordinary goat. It sounds far-fetched, but that is the exact process used to breed goats that produce silk proteins in their goat milk, Science Nation reported. Their milk is then harvested, and the silk protein is then isolated to make a lightweight, ultrastrong silk material with a wide range of industrial and medical uses.Advertisement The dizzying range of GMO categories is enough to boggle the mind. CRISPR, a novel genome editing tool, has allowed geneticists to breed GMO pigs that glow in the dark by inserting jellyfish bioluminescence genetic code into pig DNA. CRISPR is opening doors to genetic modifications the likes of which were unimaginable just a decade ago. These are more comparatively wild examples, but GMOs are already very common in the farming industry. The most common genetic modifications are designed to create higher yield crops, more consistent products, and resist pests, pesticides and fertilizer. Genetically modified food According to the National Library of Medicine (part of the National Center for Biotechnology Information, or NCBI), genetically engineered, or GM, foods are those that have had foreign genes from other plants or animals inserted into their genetic codes. This has resulted in foods that are consistently flavored, as well as resistant to disease and drought. However, the NCBI also maintains a list of potential risks associated with GM foods, including genetic alterations that can cause environmental harm. Specifically, it’s possible that modified organisms could be inbred with natural organisms, leading to the possible extinction of the original organism. For instance, the banana tree is propagated entirely through cloning methods. The bananas themselves are sterile. By far, the biggest use of GMO technology is in large-scale agricultural crops. At least 90% of the soy, cotton, canola, corn and sugar beets sold in the United States have been genetically engineered. The adoption of herbicide-resistant corn, which had been slower in previous years, has accelerated, reaching 89% of U.S. corn acreage in 2014 and 2015, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. One of the biggest draws for widespread adoption of GMO crops is pest resistance. According to the World Health Organization, one of the most widely used methods for incorporating pest resistance into plants is through Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) genetics, a bacterium that produces proteins that repel insects. GMO crops that are modified with the Bt gene have a proven resistance to insect pests, thus reducing the need for wide-scale spraying of synthetic pesticides. Are GMOs safe? Anti-GMO activists argue that GMOs can cause environmental damage and health problems for consumers. One such anti-GMO organization is the Center for Food Safety, which calls the genetic engineering of plants and animals potentially “one of the greatest and most intractable environmental challenges of the 21st century.” “Genetically modified foods have been linked to toxic and allergic reactions, sickness, sterile and dead livestock, and damage to virtually every organ studied in lab animals,” according to the Institute for Responsible Technology, a group of anti-GMO activists. “Most developed nations do not consider GMOs to be safe,” according to the Non-GMO Project. “In more than 60 countries around the world, including Australia, Japan and all of the countries in the European Union, there are significant restrictions or outright bans on the production and sale of GMOs.” As You Sow is a nonprofit environmental watchdog focusing its research on how corporate actions affect our environment, including food production. According to Christy Spees, a program manager with As You Sow, GMO foods are dangerous “because the modifications are centered around resistance to toxic substances, such as pesticides and certain fertilizers. When dangerous chemicals are applied, plants use them to grow, and the food itself can be detrimental to our health.” Designer Plants Boost Crop Yields | VideoVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Better Bug Sprays?01:33关闭选项Automated Captions – en-US facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/40895-gmo-facts.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0001:0301:03Your Recommended Playlist01:33Better Bug Sprays?01:08Why Do French Fries Taste So Bad When They’re Cold?04:24Sperm Whale Befriends Underwater Robot00:29Robot Jumps Like a Grasshopper, Rolls Like a Ball00:29Video – Giggly Robot02:31Surgical Robotics关闭 last_img read more

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first_img Originally published on Live Science. Something me and Amabella Klein have in common. #BigLittleLies pic.twitter.com/35Rx1aJUsf — Michael. (@yosoymichael) June 24, 2019 It turns out that anxiety, grief and despair about the state of the environment is nothing new. It even has a name: eco-anxiety. And according to psychologists, it’s incredibly common. [Hypersex to Hoarding: 7 New Psychological Disorders] AdvertisementClimate Change Is Triggering Eco-AnxietyWhen news about the environment becomes grim, you might be overcome by an urge to hide or collapse.Volume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Better Bug Sprays?01:33关闭选项Automated Captions – en-US facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65843-climate-change-anxiety-is-real.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0002:2102:21Your Recommended Playlist01:33Better Bug Sprays?01:08Why Do French Fries Taste So Bad When They’re Cold?04:24Sperm Whale Befriends Underwater Robot00:29Robot Jumps Like a Grasshopper, Rolls Like a Ball01:09Robots to the Rescue02:27Robotic Arms关闭  Amabella having a panic attack in a closet because of climate change is a MOOD #BigLittleLies — mackenzie (@macckkattacckk) June 24, 2019 Top 10 Controversial Psychiatric Disorders The Reality of Climate Change: 10 Myths Busted Me too, Amabella. Me. too. #biglittlelies pic.twitter.com/PZG9uqOQE3by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoGundry MD Total Restore SupplementU.S. Cardiologist: It’s Like a Pressure Wash for Your InsidesGundry MD Total Restore SupplementUndoFinance101What Are The Best States To Retire In?Finance101UndoNucificTop Dr. Reveals The 1 Nutrient Your Gut Must HaveNucificUndoEditorChoice.comSee What The World’s Largest Dog Looks LikeEditorChoice.comUndoKelley Blue Book2019 Lexus Vehicles Worth Buying for Their Resale ValueKelley Blue BookUndo — cole (@colesevn) June 24, 2019 According to a Yale survey conducted in December 2018, 70% of Americans are “worried” about climate change, 29% are “very worried” and 51% feel “helpless.” Despite these striking statistics, most people don’t realize how widespread eco-anxiety is, one psychologist told Live Science. “[Ecoanxiety] is often hidden somewhat under the surface,” Thomas Doherty, a clinical psychologist based in Portland, Oregon, told Live Science, “people aren’t taught how to talk about it.” Still, over the past decade, eco-anxiety has gained increasing recognition from scientists and non-scientists alike. It’s not listed in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, psychology’s list of official diagnoses. That’s partially because its symptoms are poorly defined, said David Austern, a clinical psychologist at NYU Langone Health. The American Psychological Association defines it as “a chronic fear of environmental doom.” Eco-anxiety can range from day-to-day worry about the fate of the world, to Amabella’s outright panic attack. Depending on whom you ask, it can even include the fear and panic attacks some natural disaster victims experience after the fact, Austern said. Its symptoms are largely the same as any other kind of anxiety; its only distinguishing factor is its cause, Austern said. But that doesn’t mean that psychologists aren’t taking eco-anxiety seriously. In 2008, the American Psychological Association established a climate change task force. And in 2017, they published a 70-page report on the mental-health effects of climate change. This year, at their annual conference in Chicago, there will be four climate change related sessions. A term like eco-anxiety, though nebulous, is important to create recognition for a very real phenomenon, Austern said. It helps people express what they’re experiencing. Psychologists agree it’s important to open up a dialogue about the mental health effects of climate change. But they also agree that in most cases, eco-anxiety isn’t a bad thing. “It’s a rational reply to a really serious problem,” Maria Ojala, a psychologist at Örebro University in Sweden, told Live Science. That, she says, is why it could be dangerous to make it a clinical diagnosis. “We have to ask, Is it more pathological for someone to be so worried about climate change or is it actually more pathological that people are not more worried about it?” Austern said. Anxiety is precisely the emotion that’ll propel us to do something, he added. Conveniently, taking action Is also one of the most effective coping mechanisms for eco-anxiety, Ojala said. But anxiety is only good for sparking action up to a certain point, Doherty said. A tenet of psychology, the Yerkes-Dodson law, holds that up to a certain point, arousal — how alert or worried you feel — leads people take action and perform better. But overly high levels of anxiety can become paralyzing. For example, one study described cases in which fear of extreme weather approached the level of phobia. Depending on how anxious you are, that’s either incredibly convenient, or presents a catch-22 situation. In these cases, anxiety becomes counterproductive to climate action, Doherty said, And it’s important to seek help. Luckily, if you’re too anxious to take action, fostering a sense of connection with one’s environment and community can also help with symptoms. A recent study found that 2 hours per week in nature is enough to reap mental health benefits. Despite its prevalence, eco-anxiety still goes under-recognized. It shouldn’t be, Doherty said. “This ‘Big Little Lies’ episode clearly struck a chord with people,” Doherty said. And that’s a sign, he added, of how important a conversation this is to have. When news about the environment becomes grim, you might be overcome by an urge to hide or collapse. On last week’s episode of HBO drama “Big Little Lies,” 9-year-old Amabella did both. The character’s metallic boots were found sticking out of a classroom closet following a lesson on climate change, and the internet collectively nodded in recognition. Doomsday: 9 Real Ways Earth Could Endlast_img read more

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first_img COMMENT SHARE SHARE EMAIL To attract more medical tourists to Kerala, CII is organising the seventh edition of Kerala Health Tourism (KHT 2019) on July 3 and 4 in Kochi. The summit will deliberate on the theme “Kerala an emerging global hotspot for medical value traveller”. Delegates from nine countries – Bangladesh, Oman, Africa, Jeddah, Cambodia, Iraq, Maldives, Yemen, Uzbekistan – will participate in the summit. Quoting a recent study, the organisers said India has nearly 18 per cent of the global medical tourism market. The country’s medical tourism industry is estimated to be worth $9 billion, and could account for 20 per cent of the global market by 2020. NITI Aayog identified it as a major source of foreign exchange earnings for India. Although Kerala is the leading State in India for tourism, tourists travelling to the State for medical needs isminimal. A rare combination of advanced facilities, skilled doctors, and low cost of treatment are the advantages Kerala possesses but unfortunately the State is not able to attract the medical tourists to the fullest of its potential. Published on June 25, 2019 SHARE COMMENTSlast_img read more

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first_img Nation 07 Jul 2019 Safety drills suggested for Pasir Gudang Related News He said on overall, air quality monitoring conducted by the Department of Environment (DOE) last week found the condition has improved and air readings were normal. – Bernama Johor , Disaster Operation Control Centre , Pasir Gudang , Air pollution , Closed {{category}} {{time}} {{title}} Nation 07 Jul 2019 Health Ministry to issue statement on death of woman in Pasir Gudangcenter_img Tags / Keywords: Related News JOHOR BARU (Bernama): The Disaster Operation Control Centre (PKTK), which was opened in Pasir Gudang, following breathing difficulties and vomiting experienced by students here due to suspected air pollution since June 20, has closed at noon on Friday (July 11).State Health, Culture and Heritage Committee chairman Mohd Khuzzan Abu Bakar said the closure of the control centre at Level 4, Aqabah Tower, was carried out following an improved situation in Pasir Gudang.”However, the Pasir Gudang Municipal Council (MPPG) has been directed by the Johor Baru District Officer to set up an Emergency Assistance Unit which would be activated immediately to address the situation if there is a recurrence,” he said in a statement here Friday night.Mohd Khuzzan said as at 4pm, there were no new cases reported. Nation 23 Jun 2019 Breathing difficulties: Another Pasir Gudang school affectedlast_img read more

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first_imgDelhi HC imposes Rs 50,000 cost on woman for filing false sexual harassment pleaThe court said there was no merit in the woman’s petition in which she has challenged the 2012 order of the internal complaint committee (ICC).advertisement Next Press Trust of India New DelhiJuly 12, 2019UPDATED: July 12, 2019 23:22 IST There is no merit in this writ petition which is dismissed with cost of Rs 50,000 to be deposited by the petitioner: Justice JR | File photo from PTIHIGHLIGHTSCourt said the organisation, where woman was working, is at liberty to initiate appropriate action against herThe woman in her complaint had alleged sexual harassment by her senior in 2011The high court said it was of the view that the woman’s complaint appeared to be falseIn a one of its kind order, the Delhi High Court has imposed a cost of Rs 50,000 on a woman for filing a false complaint of sexual harassment against her senior official and dismissed her plea challenging the benefit of doubt given to him.The court said there was no merit in the woman’s petition in which she has challenged the 2012 order of the internal complaint committee (ICC) and sought that direction that the retirement benefits of the man be withheld.”There is no merit in this writ petition which is dismissed with cost of Rs 50,000 to be deposited by the petitioner [woman] with the Delhi High Court Advocates Welfare Trust within four weeks,” Justice JR Midha said.The court said the organisation, where the woman was working, is at liberty to initiate appropriate action against her for “filing a false compliant” against the man in accordance with law.In her petition, the woman had also sought direction to the organisation to initiate independent departmental enquiry against the man and to also prosecute him.The woman in her complaint had alleged sexual harassment by her senior in 2011. She had alleged that the man had misbehaved and made sexual advances towards her.To examine the complaint, an ICC was constituted where the man had denied the allegation and claimed that the complaint was the result of a grudge against him due to certain official work disposed by him in her absence.The committee had observed that the exact content of communication of the incident could not be established and gave benefit of doubt to the man.It had recommended relocating both the woman and the man from their present posting.The high court, after going through the record of the inquiry proceedings, said it was of the view that the woman’s complaint appeared to be false.It said the woman had claimed that the incident took place in the presence of the staff and other members but during the inquiry proceedings, she could not give the name of any person present at that time.”The petitioner has not mentioned the alleged comments of respondent No 3 [man] in the complaint on the ground of modesty. The petitioner did not even disclose the alleged comments before the committee. No reason or justification was been given by the petitioner for not disclosing the same before the committee. The entire complaint of the petitioner appears to be false and has been filed with some ulterior motive,” the court said.Also Read | Delhi High Court turns down plea to declare marital rape as ground for divorceAlso Read | Delhi: Men rally against criminalisation of marital rape, share tales of spousal abuseAlso Watch | Why marital rape can’t be criminalised?For the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byMohak Gupta Tags :Follow Delhi High CourtFollow sexual harassementlast_img read more

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first_imgJammu and Kashmir: IED module busted in Shopian, 2 arrestedPolice claimed to have recovered incriminating materials.advertisement Next Asian News International ShopianJuly 13, 2019UPDATED: July 13, 2019 18:54 IST A case under relevant sections of law has been registered. (File Photo)Jammu and Kashmir Police busted an Improvised Explosive Device (IED) module in Shopian on Saturday and arrested two persons in connection with the case.Police claimed to have recovered incriminating materials.A case under relevant sections of law has been registered.Further investigation is underway.ALSO READ | Jammu and Kashmir: Couple injured in Pakistani firing along LoC in RajouriALSO WATCH | Pakistan violates ceasefire along LoC in J&K’s PoonchFor the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted bySnigdha Choudhurylast_img read more

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